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When Bad Weather Means Great Photography

By dpreview staff on Aug 19, 2013 at 09:00 GMT

Landscape photographer Carsten Krieger is no stranger to poor weather, but in this article he explains how you can get great shots even when the sun is hidden from view. His three-page article features several images taken in Ireland which should provide plenty of inspiration for those damp, rainy days that are just around the corner. Click the links below to read the full article. 

Comments

Total comments: 28
Klarno
By Klarno (2 months ago)

It's not so much that bad weather makes good photography--as it is that the bright, sunny weather that makes ordinary people want to go out and do things makes for BAD photography.

0 upvotes
dadada486
By dadada486 (2 months ago)

Totally agree, even though i'm wondering about the dangers of being so close to the sea in such weather, both to your camera and to yourself!

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
JOSEFQ8
By JOSEFQ8 (3 months ago)

for me bad weather condition is great chance to make unique photos specially the sky and condition came with new colors and styles also the place if you used to shoot at certain place you will find that place different, So bad weather not mean to close the drawer on the camera, just enjoy and get wet :)

0 upvotes
stan_pustylnik
By stan_pustylnik (4 months ago)

It is matter of "unusual". Doesn't matter if this is super macro that out-resolves human eye resolution, bad weather conditions when "normal person" sits at home, night photography that also out-resolves human eye's capabilities, stop action of bullet or broken glass, far land landscapes, well taken portrait.

Every time people say "Wow that is amazing photograph" - it is statement of personal discovery.

2 upvotes
watchingcrow
By watchingcrow (8 months ago)

Love that open sea shot of County Mayo I heard today that Mayo was one of the worst affected during the famine so folk would say something like "Mayo - oh dear". But anyway that shot is worth stealing. LOL.

0 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (8 months ago)

I'm a +1 on making sure you keep your gear dry, dry dry... Despite the YouTube videos of people hosing off their cameras with no ill effects, I managed to short out the internals of a D7000 in a very light mountain rain. Whether or not your camera drowns seems to be somewhat unpredictable.

2 upvotes
Bjorn_L
By Bjorn_L (8 months ago)

Were you using a sealed lens? Your d7000 has decent sealing but only when used with a sealed lens such as the Nikon 17-55 f/2.8 or 70-200 f/2.8
I have used my d700 (which may or may not be better sealed then your d7000) in a full-monsoon with a 70-200. I have also used a d300 with a Nikon 16-85vr (this lens has only token sealing compared to the 17-55) and the result was the lens started glitching and I had to dry it out on the mantle for a few days.

0 upvotes
calking
By calking (8 months ago)

Thanks Bjorn for mentioning that. Soooo many on here clamor for weather sealed bodies but completely forget or ignore the need for lenses with gaskets.

2 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (8 months ago)

Nope, had the good ol' 24-70 on it. Maybe the water hit it at just the right angle, maybe it was the temperature differential between cooler outside air and warmer camera interior sucking the water in; could have been the way the camera was hanging, could have been water from my thumb creating capillary action into the body when I actuated the bracketing button, I have no idea. But I've heard other people talk about how they killed their cameras in relatively minor downpours as well. The point being, water is a relentless enemy with all the power of physics on its side and you never know when it's going to get you.

1 upvote
Barry Pearson
By Barry Pearson (8 months ago)

My Pentax K-mount bodies and DA* lenses have been drenched many times over the last 4 years, without any problems. I've got photos I otherwise wouldn't have got. I've stopped worrying about them - I have more concern for myself! (One of the most famous YouTude videos on this topic featured Pentaxes being used in Afganistan. I have no knowledge of how other makes compare).

3 upvotes
Couscousdelight
By Couscousdelight (8 months ago)

The same for me, my 3 Y.O Pentax K5 stand proudly in pouring rain without any flaw.

0 upvotes
duro thedark
By duro thedark (4 months ago)

My Nikkor 17-55/2.8 (on d300 body) was caput (electronic), after I was in wet air (steam) of hot springs :-P...

Comment edited 53 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
HarryLally
By HarryLally (8 months ago)

Sorry to be pedantic, but Ireland is not Carsten Krieger's 'native' country, as suggested in your lead-in. He's German and only settled in Ireland a few years back.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (8 months ago)

No need to apologise - we welcome pedants here. (story corrected).

8 upvotes
HarryLally
By HarryLally (8 months ago)

Shouldn't all editors be pedants? As a qualified editor myself for over 35 years, I would have thought attention to detail was essential. Anyway, pleased to see you've now picked up the DPR line in put-down sarcasm. Quite a change from AP.

0 upvotes
groucher
By groucher (8 months ago)

These excellent photos and the superb 1940s American photos make me wonder whether DPReview is starting a campaign to rid the world of over-saturated, over-contrasty Photo$hopped cartoons. Having created my fair share of such photos, I hope so.

4 upvotes
Wye Photography
By Wye Photography (8 months ago)

I am with you there groucher. All this photoshopped fakery and obsession with computers and software will burn itself out at some point.

1 upvote
rfsIII
By rfsIII (8 months ago)

It always does—remember all the excitement over the Dave Hill effect? Whatever happened to that?

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (8 months ago)

Was he related to Benny Hill? Never heard of him. I think there is a division between photography that takes advantage of the ability to make a detailed and literal record vs. the digital art stuff you see in places like Photoshop User magazine ("Create the Matrix effect in just 59 steps").

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (8 months ago)

These photos make me appreciate the warm glowing embers of the fireplace in front of me...

There are enough storms in the urban jungle, thank you.

.

1 upvote
budi0251
By budi0251 (8 months ago)

i suppose, theoretically, ur magnesium electrically charged & active dslr body + metal tripod would be more attractive to the lightning; but i could be wrong

0 upvotes
3systermuser
By 3systermuser (8 months ago)

very true, but my camera or I do not want to go out on this kind of horrible rainy day, and I am very very scared of lightning.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ludwik123
By ludwik123 (8 months ago)

After a thunderstorm . colours are beautiful

0 upvotes
groucher
By groucher (8 months ago)

Yes it's very, very fright'ning.

1 upvote
tommy leong
By tommy leong (8 months ago)

absolutely agree.
But there are dangers associated with bad weather
such as lightning strikes...which happens a LOT here.

0 upvotes
groucher
By groucher (8 months ago)

Doesn't happen much in the UK - we just get wet.

0 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (8 months ago)

"Currently, about 30-60 people are struck by lightning each year in Britain of whom, on average, three may be killed. This compares with about 75 deaths in the much larger USA."

0 upvotes
Photopainter Andreu Murillo
By Photopainter Andreu Murillo (8 months ago)

Great Photo for a bad day, resembles one of mine in Menorca: http://www.andreumurillo.com/fotos_de_menorca_panoramica#h47c4f81e

1 upvote
Total comments: 28