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Did you miss it? Take a look at the Perseid meteor shower's peak

By dpreview staff on Aug 14, 2013 at 10:00 GMT

While some of us were sleeping this weekend, photographers around the northern hemisphere were capturing the Perseid meteor shower as it peaked. The annual shower continues through August 24th, but it reached its highest activity levels on August 11th and 12th as debris from a passing comet produced as many as 100 meteors per hour. This year's relatively dim waxing crescent moon meant more meteors were visible to eager stargazers, so there's no shortage of impressive photos of the event for those who want to relive it (or for some incentive to stay up past bedtime next year). 

Photo: Peter Greig.
Photo: AP Photo/Paul White.
Photo: Sergio Garcia Rill.

Head over to Business Insider to see more, and share your own photos of the meteor shower in a gallery.  

Comments

Total comments: 18
Mikey Mack
By Mikey Mack (8 months ago)

Managed to capture a few whilst shooting the Milky Way :)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeymack/sets/72157635090277552/

0 upvotes
rafneque
By rafneque (8 months ago)

My attempt: http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/2753727746/photos/2658353/makeawish

0 upvotes
Miwok
By Miwok (8 months ago)

On the first one, 11 meteorites at the same time? Photoshop? (no disrespect, it's just a question)

1 upvote
Urmas Tartes
By Urmas Tartes (8 months ago)

Composite image, he told in his blog:
"It is a composite of stacked images (or pieces of images). I chose the clearest background image to use for the starry sky then chose the best light painted foreground and layered it over my background. I then went through all of my images and gathered all the shots that contained a meteor, cut them out and layered them on top of my background image to demonstrate the radiant point to which the Perseid Meteors originate."

3 upvotes
Miwok
By Miwok (8 months ago)

Thank you!
Amazing and beautiful work. Kudos to him.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (8 months ago)

oh ok! and I thought it was merely because he left the shutter open a long time

0 upvotes
Five Piece
By Five Piece (8 months ago)

Very nice, I love it.

0 upvotes
jkoch2
By jkoch2 (8 months ago)

What ISO and shutter time would work? The few dim streaks my eyes ever see last under one second and occur only one or two times per minute. Urban light overwhelms all but the brighter stars. More might be visible atop a remote mountain, but still not be brilliant enough to produce sharp streaks. Easier to photograph lightning. Maybe Adobe could offer a "Perseid effect" to help me add streaks to my pictures. Or maybe pinstripe decals on my window would do the same thing, so I don't have to spend a night in some eery place.

0 upvotes
LoganVii
By LoganVii (8 months ago)

I had use ASA 800 and 20 secs exposure, but will recommend a higher ASA, I was going to try 2000 ASA last sunday, but if you look for my previous comment you'll see what happened.

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (8 months ago)

So what bothers you more, the coyote yips or the owl hoots?
What bothers me most is the mosquito's bzzzz inside my ear canal. The other two sounds are music to me.

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (8 months ago)

A majority of astrophotographers using DSLRs use Canon, and not all use the Canon-modified 20Da or 60Da. In fact, the bulk of Canon users send their old Rebels off to a third party to have the Canon far red/IR cut filter on the sensor replaced by a more permissive sensor that passes the deep red hydrogen emission band, allowing nebulae to be imaged better. The hackability of Canon is a plus, because people have written computer programs to integrate 'scope guidance and image capture (Backyard EOS and others). Also, some companies make specialized filters that clip into the lens mount of APS-C Canons.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (8 months ago)

OK, that is impressive information!
I use an NX20, and would never have considered a rebel, until you wrote this. thanks for the info. we should hear more about this kind of stuff... maybe a hacks section in the forums would be nice.

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (8 months ago)

Try 2015 Perseid meteor shower. 2014 Perseids will be obscured by a full moon all night.

0 upvotes
qianp2k
By qianp2k (8 months ago)

I am impressed by Peter Greig's photo (first one). Does he use Canon cameras? His photos are awesome.

1 upvote
M Jesper
By M Jesper (8 months ago)

You mean the Canon 60Da - astronomer edition ? Otherwise, brand isn't really relevant is it.

5 upvotes
LoganVii
By LoganVii (8 months ago)

Here in Panama rained from sunday night until tuesday afternoon, I wanted so much to see it... Well maybe next year.

0 upvotes
virtualkyr
By virtualkyr (8 months ago)

We had a lot of cloud cover where I live in the southern US,those 2 days and I went out to shoot in hopes of them breaking... no luck. Maybe next time! great pix thanks for sharing!

0 upvotes
RumpelHund
By RumpelHund (8 months ago)

Now that's kinda cool! Thanks for sharing!

2 upvotes
Total comments: 18