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17 signs that you were alive before digital photography

By dpreview staff on Aug 2, 2013 at 07:00 GMT

Feeling old? Photoshelter has published a humorous list of 17 signs that you were around before digital photography became the norm. For those of us who were, the list is a nostalgic look at some tools and accessories that have fallen into disuse, as well as a reminder, possibly, that some things remain useful, even in the digital age. If you're too young to remember anything before digital, you should take a look at the list anyway.

You might learn something. 

Among the 17 items in Photoshelter's list is a bulk film loader.
There's a Photoshop icon based on this. Do you know what it is? 
Source: Photoshelter

Comments

Total comments: 149
12
Raymond Cho
By Raymond Cho (7 months ago)

I just developed my first roll of b/w last week. My first camera in 1999 was a Canon Rebel (film) or the EOS 3000. It is not hard at all .... having owned a 2003 dSLR and now the Nikon D600 I find that over time this is the new look we have now and woudl probably change again. Without going into plugins or the advanced techniques, digital cannot get a look to the old style b/w film. On my spreadsheet a kit cost $25US some chems last 6 months and some last 3 or 5 yrs but provided you use the cheaper powder developer, each 6 months it does 6 rolls and you do this for the 5yrs so you don't waste any chems. Per roll of film $2US to develop. I'll use digital for colorful snaps ie high ISO night cityscape portraiture, weddings, wildlife, sports etc ... but streets, real timeliness family shots, landscape i prefer film color or b/w...... Looking at developing my E6 now with home kits. Since I import fresh film and export for development to the USA. Roll of Velvia cost $35US here.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (7 months ago)

Still have my Watson bulk film loader. Still have the film canisters. Don't have any bulk film. Don't have any film cameras. Think I'll get rid of the loader. Thanks for reminding me.

Still have my Simmon-Omega D2-V enlarger, because no one want it. And a dozen Kindermann stainless-steel developing tanks and reels.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
David Hull
By David Hull (8 months ago)

I remember all of this stuff and owned quite a bit of it but I think it just means you are OLD :-(. Great trip down teh old "memory lane".

0 upvotes
DonM999
By DonM999 (8 months ago)

A Watson 200 bulk film loader, I presume. Not my favorite way to load because it dragged the film through the cassette felt an extra time encouraging scratches.

0 upvotes
RLPhotoAndImaging
By RLPhotoAndImaging (8 months ago)

I know what all are and have used nearly all of them, but that was looooooong ago.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
scooby0068
By scooby0068 (8 months ago)

OMG, I still have these things! I'm waiting for it to come back! lol In fact my 35 mm film loader still has Plus-X (125 ASA) in it!
There was a certain romance about photography with the old time approaches, certainly less instant, certainly much less inconvenient, but it had a charisma all it's own that is frequently lost in my download/upload, instant red eye fix world. I miss that more and more these days.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
RDMPhotos
By RDMPhotos (8 months ago)

OMG Plus-x still in it; that's great Film! Hop you have it stored in the Fridge then. Don't want it to GO bad.

0 upvotes
A Subset
By A Subset (7 months ago)

I rolled hundreds of feet of Plus-X and developed it all in Accufine. My favorite film/developer combination. I never could understand what people saw in Tri-X! How about waterbath development of 4x5 sheet film in trays? ;-)

- A.

0 upvotes
Sciagrafist
By Sciagrafist (8 months ago)

-Also, my "wet" darkroom has now been donated to a community college where the instructor won't let anyone go into digital until they have mastered film.

-I first developed my own film 60 years ago, still miss it, but would never go back from digital, although I still have some bricks of 120 Verichrome Pan, Tech Pan and Panatomic -X in my freezer, such great materials!

-A few other possibilities, focusing optics, aids...timers and density readers... analog thermometers...film washers (mine was a 32 oz. plastic pitcher with a hole at the top for a hose, and a hole at the bottom to drain), Photo Lab Index? (a darkroom Bible!), and on and on.

0 upvotes
RDMPhotos
By RDMPhotos (8 months ago)

I wish someone would donate that to me. One Community college near me eliminated their wet lab. The other one, a little farther away (I go to) has just sold off its color wet-lab setup (an impressive one too, with 5 top of the line Durst enlargers w/ color analyzers. 4 would handle to [6x6]cm and 1 handles up to [5x7]in. Included in the sale was a 32 inch wide processor too.
Sad thing is, the auction was for a the Lot that needed to be removed from the room, one day before 5 PM. Buyer to dissemble as needed as it was all still in place. It sold for less than four hundred dollars. When the guy came to get everything , I happened to be there & asked if I could buy one enlarger. He just gave me his eBay name and told me to look for his postings, and he would be starting them at $600. The B&W lab is staying only because they actually offer a degree program in Photography and B&W I, II, & III remain.. Tho they have also canceled 4 film classes and replaced them with Digital classes.

0 upvotes
Sciagrafist
By Sciagrafist (8 months ago)

-Polaroid coaters were a great varnish good for many other uses...still have a bunch, they never dry out!
-My burning tool was always a black painted funnel used under the enlarging lens; dodging tool was a coat hanger with a piece of exposed, fixed sheet film cut to shape.
-Does anyone remember "Crone C" additive to reduce grain? And 2 solution Diafine to increase speed?

-

0 upvotes
Daniel Bliss
By Daniel Bliss (8 months ago)

Oh, yes, I was definitely around for all this. But I don't miss waiting for pictures to be developed; I don't miss going through a half box of paper to get the print I want; I don't miss emerging from the darkroom smelling of toxic waste. Simply going to film scanning and Photoshop in the late 1990s was liberating. I do miss some of the cameras; in general, they were smaller, lighter and more tactile than what we have now. And I also miss the excitement of the surprise of finding days after the fact that yes, you really did get that great photograph.

0 upvotes
dorff
By dorff (8 months ago)

Great images are still being made on film, and will continue to be for some time to come. Digital has replaced most of the Kodacolor 200 and commercial slides stuff, but in B/W and larger formats, film is quite healthy. I see on average better photography (both film and digital) from film shooters. More consideration, a more aware approach. Film is good for its own qualities, but also for the habits it cultivates. That is why it is still taught in schools and colleges. With MF/LF gear and darkroom equipment so cheap used, there's never been a better time to be shooting 120 or sheet film.

2 upvotes
MtOlympus
By MtOlympus (8 months ago)

Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

0 upvotes
Photojunky3
By Photojunky3 (8 months ago)

I miss the smell of Rodinal in the morning ! After a franctic night of printing I saw, in the cold light of day , that, yet again, i switched the stop with the fix. Can you blame me for the odd swig of Dektol ?! I use rodents now to do my bidding , much heathier !

1 upvote
photo_rb
By photo_rb (8 months ago)

Come on! A Nikon F4? Let's go back a bit. How many recall the Miranda Sensorex? Now that was a great entry level camera...or the Pentax Spotmatic?

2 upvotes
Tlipp
By Tlipp (8 months ago)

I still have my Miranda Sensorex.

0 upvotes
DMGross
By DMGross (8 months ago)

I still have my Miranda Sensorex and a Miranda DR. Just bought a brick of 120 BW to start using my Bronica S again. Even found the Nikkor SS tank in the basement to process the 120 film

0 upvotes
BurkPhoto
By BurkPhoto (8 months ago)

I used every single one of those things at one point or another. I still remember the awful smell of that Polaroid black-and-white print coater! I remember the smell of a fresh lamp turned on for the first time in a slide projector, too. Oh, and the smell of Tri-X film as I put a fresh 100-foot roll of it into my bulk loader.

I don't miss any of these 17 items, though. Film was a great development in the world of photography, but with all the excellent digital equipment around today, there is little reason to use it any more, unless you're taking an art class from a misguided school that persists in insisting you learn film photography (sigh...), or you just have to have a view camera for the swings and tilts.

0 upvotes
ArsHerold
By ArsHerold (8 months ago)

I miss the smells - or rather the ability to smell them (and other things) After to many nights in the toxic fumes in my darkroom i have lost most of my sense of smelling :-( I welcome the digital "dark"room !

0 upvotes
petegeoff
By petegeoff (8 months ago)

All this nonsense about how wonderful film is. I never missed it once after going digital. Best thing ever in photography. With weddings I had to wait to see if the pics were OK, or not! With digi I knew straight away if they were good, or not! Or any work. Ask any wedding photographer what they prefer to ,use. Retired for 9 years now so only
used digi for 3 years. Hobby only
now but no desire to use film. As for
young people using film, it's
something different. Once they start
taking photos for a living they'll use
digi. PS. Used some of those items. Regards from the UK.

0 upvotes
ABM Barry
By ABM Barry (8 months ago)

Looks like this tool has at least 3 uses.
1/ Dodging prints
2/ getting the film tongue/leader back out of the cassette when a power drive has wound it all the way in.
3/ Coffee stirrer
4/ Micro fly swat

I had to make one when using Kodak 2475 high speed recording film as the end caps were glued on for better light security!
Strange, .... I never saw light leak out?
Same as waterproof watches, I never saw water leak out of them as well?

Got me on the PS Icon too?

Baz Cheers

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
SomebodyFamous
By SomebodyFamous (8 months ago)

I never used a bulk loader. I used to measure so many widths of the changing bag :) It worked just as well. A friend had a board and he would clip the end of the film to the board and pull down to a nail and he'd know how many exposures were on the film.

1 upvote
Dan Wagner
By Dan Wagner (8 months ago)

I still use many of these. My film photo shots are much cooler than my digital ones and more satisfying too. See for your self danwagnerphotography.com These were shot with Rolleiflex and Tmax film and developed myself.

0 upvotes
nathantw
By nathantw (8 months ago)

I must not be as old as I thought because I have no idea what #11 is.

0 upvotes
Tlipp
By Tlipp (8 months ago)

It is a coating for polaroid prints.

1 upvote
Tlipp
By Tlipp (8 months ago)

It was a preservative for early polaroid BW prints.

3 upvotes
Joel Halbert
By Joel Halbert (8 months ago)

Very smelly as I remember.

1 upvote
DMGross
By DMGross (8 months ago)

I remember having to put the Polaroid film under your arm pit in winter to warm the film and keep moving the 60 second processing along. I still have a Polaroid SX-70 and an even older Polaroid that has fold-out bellows like the old Kodak plus it still has the original Wink light.

0 upvotes
Tom Goodman
By Tom Goodman (8 months ago)

And then there is the "B" setting on shutters.

0 upvotes
MrTaikitso
By MrTaikitso (8 months ago)

I didn't do my own developing, so some of those items don't mean anything to me, but what I have that my younger friends and relatives don't (and that my older relatives have a LOT more of), is (heavy!) boxes of photos developed in Boots, Snappy Snaps or WH Smith, and their accompanying strips of negatives. Oh, and a unwieldy pile of photo albums!

Every year or so I try to start scanning them in, but give up because it's such a hassle, so going to wait for a fully automated system that can scan multiple photos at once and automatically (accurately!), fix, crop, date stamp and tag (with names, places etc) each photo, before uploading them to the cloud at full resolution.

This can be done today, but the process is still too unreliable and reliant on human input. I think HP and Google will manage to pull this off at some point.

0 upvotes
Chuck O
By Chuck O (8 months ago)

Anyone want my Hope 32" print processor. You will need to bring a truck with a lift.

0 upvotes
averagjoe
By averagjoe (8 months ago)

I know, used or owned all of those at one time. And while I don't miss film photography, I do miss film cameras, and keep wishing for a digital camera with aperture control on the lens barrel, shutter speed control on top of the camera, and never mind fidgeting with a gazillion settings in multi-level menus to take a simple picture.

2 upvotes
Carl Fleming
By Carl Fleming (8 months ago)

Like the Fuji X - Pro or X-E1 you mean?

2 upvotes
JordanAT
By JordanAT (8 months ago)

I can't tell you how disappointed I was that Nikon took the aperture ring control off of their digital cameras. The least they could have done is put a control on the bottom of the body where your left hand fingers rest. *sigh*

2 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (8 months ago)

The manual lenses for newer cameras (from Samyang/Rokinon, Zeiss) have aperture rings though. Out of necessity if nothing else...

0 upvotes
showmeyourpics
By showmeyourpics (8 months ago)

I've been photographing for 50 years now (what?! I started when I was VERY young!). I recognize all these items and still own most of them. I remember with great fondness the nights in the darkroom developing/printing b&w and then Cibachrome. I also used to produce double-projector, fade in/out slide presentations with synchronized music and voice. I began playing with digital cameras in 2000 and converted completely in 2004. All the good memories and love for film are still there. I gave it up because, as a fine art photographer, the quality of my prints is my main priority. I have seen Canon comparison color prints of the same subject done state-of-the-art on film and in digital and the difference is significant in favor of digital (processing power and personal interpretation freedom are awesome). I also love the choice of lovely inkjet substrates including canvas which I can frame without glass (I still do all by myself from shooting to processing, printing and framing). Just me.

1 upvote
faterikcartman
By faterikcartman (8 months ago)

I too still have a functioning dual projector set-up (unused for a looong time so maybe I should say "was functioning when last boxed up". Then again, I still have a dichro darkroom in boxes sans sinks and chemistry. I got started in the 70s and don't feel that old, but it looks like we're dinosaurs. I've held on to all my film gear for the most part and it is my wife who forced me into digital. While I am nostalgic, and some looks are inherent to film and tastes are subjective, I agree the quality of prints from my iPF8300 are superior. Anyway, I haven't logged in for a long time but your post really brought me back. Thanks
P.S., I must admit I missed #11 :(

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
MrScorpio
By MrScorpio (8 months ago)

Stupid article since it do not say what the displayed articles were for. More frustrating than informative IMO.

0 upvotes
showmeyourpics
By showmeyourpics (8 months ago)

Venomous dear Mr. Scorpio. BTW, it's "does", not "do", and you should never finish a sentence with a preposition.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Julio Sánchez
By Julio Sánchez (8 months ago)

Sorry but this article is nota por you. You are very young.

1 upvote
Julio Sánchez
By Julio Sánchez (8 months ago)

Sorry but this article is nota por you. You are very young.

0 upvotes
mandm
By mandm (8 months ago)

Dear showmeyourpics, please redo your reply to MrScorpio in proper Chinese, that’s not too much to ask from someone as intelligent as you want others to believe you are, now is it. It only takes a second to click on someone’s ID on this site, and had you known that, you would have noticed that MrScorpio lives in Shanghai; that’s in China.
The good news is that MrScorpio has been an active member on this site and has learned to ignore people like you, but how many other new members have you chased away by correcting their English.
Waiting for your reply in Chinese, Wu dialect please, but you knew that with MrScorpio living in Shanghai, right.
I’m also waiting for your reply to correct my English and Chinese.
ʑ̻iaja noŋ

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

mandm--

That "rule" about not ending sentences with a preposition is a made up one. It comes from people who couldn't let go of the rules of Latin grammar such as they are. And in Latin prepositions must come before nouns, while ironically sentence word order rules are not fixed.

So while showmeyourpics isn't helping you're quoting an invented rule of English grammar. Same basic idea can be applied to "split infinitives."

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

MrScopio:

Well the first item above is labeled. The second item is a dodging tool used to lower the exposure time of a limited area of photopaper under an enlarger. Most are hand made like the one above. Photoshop most certainly has a similar tool, but it doesn't actually reduce the number of photons hitting photopaper.

The split image focus screen (#8) is in fact something one can install in many DSLRs. Many times you can do it yourself. The Nikon D3 has that feature. Their absence from current DLSRs is not really a digital thing; it's an auto focus thing. All this means is that the author is a bit confused about the universal usefulness of AF. If you own a DSLR you can many times get this installed and do better faster manual focusing.

#9 is not particularly digital either. Though it suggests further developments in big telezooms.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Holger Drallmeyer
By Holger Drallmeyer (8 months ago)

I have a feeling more and more people get acquainted with these tools again. Film is making a comeback and I'm not surprised.

2 upvotes
sunhorse
By sunhorse (8 months ago)

Long ago got rid of my bulk film loader, changing bag, tank & reels, enlarger, etc. Did anyone else ever use a pipette for measuring liquid developers like Kodak HC-110? Love what that can do for Tri-X.

Still have my Pentax Auto 110 and a couple of lenses though

0 upvotes
SW Anderson
By SW Anderson (8 months ago)

That's a delightful blog post/article. Thanks for pointing it out.

0 upvotes
snegron2
By snegron2 (8 months ago)

I miss film. :(

0 upvotes
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (8 months ago)

Why miss what you can easily buy? We all deserve to be able to enjoy a balanced creative diet, if you want film to be a part of that diet, then by all means, partake my friend, partake:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Film/ci/9954/N/4294548525

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
LVPhoto1
By LVPhoto1 (8 months ago)

I opened my first studio in London era 1966, (I guess I’m old) and I’m still working…..On some of my jobs when I get asked what camera is that, I end up talking about something else and when I mention about when I used to shoot 4x5 film for my weddings, they become very interested about learning more, but I’m working and I don’t have the time to talk longer.
I think it was a privilege for me to have learned my trade from some of the great photographers…..some still living….some not.
Great article ;)-

0 upvotes
llamacide
By llamacide (8 months ago)

I never thought I'd say this but I miss color temp meters and filters.

0 upvotes
Jonne Ollakka
By Jonne Ollakka (8 months ago)

I bought a 4x5 in 2006 and converted a closet into a darkroom. I got tired of coming home with 300 raw files, unloading into the computer and then browsing through them.

3 upvotes
Cjar
By Cjar (8 months ago)

While this is humorous it could be a better article if it had captions and said what replaced it, and how the end result now compares with the previous effort.

Of course that would require some effort beyond a catch title and clip art.

We aren't all old-fogeys who had silver spoons in our mouths.

0 upvotes
ChazSelf
By ChazSelf (8 months ago)

Silver spoon? Bulk film loaders, dodging patterns and loading one's own sheet film holders, not to mention use of changing bags and cable releases, most definitely do not require a silver spoon.

Much of the rest works as commentary on the silliness of some low level photography of the past--110 film, flash cubes, etc.

It does seem like captions would have helped some younger readers, though.

2 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (8 months ago)

Some research wouldn't hurt the young.

0 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (8 months ago)

Some research wouldn't hurt the young.

0 upvotes
Tlipp
By Tlipp (8 months ago)

OMG! Still have some of that gear.
But happy to be alive in the age of DP.

1 upvote
FinDERP
By FinDERP (8 months ago)

Film is alive and well, even amongst the young!

I would say this, having just bought an enlarger....

3 upvotes
sfphotoarts
By sfphotoarts (8 months ago)

Especially among the young, it's become very hipster now to be vintage/retro with silver crystals.

0 upvotes
Holger Drallmeyer
By Holger Drallmeyer (8 months ago)

I wouldn't dismiss it as a hipster thing. You just can deny the fact that Film still has some advantages over digital. Yes, the gap is getting narrower but I have a feeling folks that shoot film enjoy their tools much more than the ones who have a auto creative setting on their camera.
People do stuff on their own again.

1 upvote
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (8 months ago)

Huh...I'm actually fairly young. I guess one thing I don't understand is that unlike music and other forms of arts, there seems to be this near-constant & insecure need to make fun of a great medium in which to arrive at a fine photograph. I have shot digital for 20 years now, great stuff. But it is not replacing my darkroom, my Hasselblad and my 4x5 as the price I get for those black and white prints goes up and up....with very few exceptions, I don't see digital output doing the same.

And to add to that, I have had a teenaged intern working with me over the Summer. She asked about film use, wants to try it because she is more than a little tired of doing everything in life on a computer. But yeah dpreview...where would digital be without all the web born hype?

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
carlos roncatti
By carlos roncatti (8 months ago)

Digital photography is awesome, but seeing a photography appears slowly out of nowhere (when being developed on chemicals) on a paper that was all white is simply amazing...

5 upvotes
victorian squid
By victorian squid (8 months ago)

Sadly (or happily) some of those very items are mere feet away from me in my camera closet. I've still got rolls of cartridge film I never developed. And, what else am I going to look at my slides on?

I used to own a firm with an E-6 processor, and Kodak was literally down the street for the fancy kodachrome stuff. We had light tables built in everywhere.

I bet I could still load a 4x5 pretty fast. A bicycle, not so much.

Now get off my lawn you darned kids!

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

Why would you not scan the slides? Takes time, skill and a good scanner, but then you can preserve them well too.

0 upvotes
victorian squid
By victorian squid (8 months ago)

I've considered going to Scan Cafe, but we're talking thousands of slides. It was free for me - like digital is now. So, I'd need to edit it down to stay on something resembling a budget.

I've also considered a good slide scanner and doing it myself. Speaking of old days I remember getting a Nikon slide scanner at our firm that was probably $20k. It wouldn't pass muster for a $50 epson these days.

I've got a large format Epson 10000XL that's calibrated - so a slide scanner would be a nice addition. Now, to find the time!

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (8 months ago)

Miss the smell of chemicals and hours locked in a bathroom to reveal and print in room, slow photography, and enjoyed.

3 upvotes
CollBaxter
By CollBaxter (8 months ago)

Yep its was great. I do miss the darkroom. What my wife does not miss is the stink of chemicals , the rusted sinks and stuff and empty containers all over the place. The dark room was also one place you could hide for awhile. Turn the warning light on and have a bit of peace for a few hours. On the others side I don't miss my 35mm stuff at all , digital is much better. I do toy with the Idea of getting the medium format stuff out from the top of the cupboard. But then I think of the finding film , having it processed , arguing with the lab about the colour or scratched negatives and think hell no. Today the cell phone would ring and I would forget the film in the developer and land up wondering what might have been. Its really a pity that have become so spoon feed and lazy, actually pathetic.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JCS56
By JCS56 (8 months ago)

Good old days, here smells like vinegar..

0 upvotes
km25
By km25 (8 months ago)

Stop that.

0 upvotes
vroger1
By vroger1 (8 months ago)

Read the article and recognized 16 out of 17 (missed No. 15)- then when I looked at No. 16- I realized what No. 15 was used for. I guess we all used one or more of these items. I think I used some version of them all at one time or another.It was fun realizing that that I used an item just like that huge 250 shot (probably) Nikon back- but I used it with a pre-dated Practina. Still have the back- still have the camera. These days I get 8000 shots- from an SD card. Still amazes me.

0 upvotes
pbailey4
By pbailey4 (8 months ago)

The AGFA daylight developing tank - the best !

0 upvotes
vroger1
By vroger1 (8 months ago)

The late, great Bernard Hoffman- referred to it as a "Schmoo stick" I always think of that when I use PS. I call it "Schmooing". P.S. Bernard Hoffman was one of the great Print Makers and laboratory owners of the 60's and beyond.

0 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (8 months ago)

11 times yes :)

0 upvotes
rjjr
By rjjr (8 months ago)

Ahh....the bad old days.

;-)

I used a lot of that stuff but Canon instead of Nikon. I still use my F-1s, AE-1s and Canonet at times as well as Pentax and Mamiya 645s but I lost the disc camera. Still, my favorite picture is one I took with the Disc camera.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (8 months ago)

I still have my bulk loader, cassettes, film loading dark bag, and of course my beloved Paterson steel 35mm reels and tank.
I have used everything except for the Big White 600 or 800mm manual focus lens, the ultra-huge motorized film advance, and loading the 4x5 film cassettes pictured. (I did use various sizes of radiographic film in paper cassettes for research).

0 upvotes
mister_roboto
By mister_roboto (8 months ago)

I taught a photoshop intro class to college freshman, and one asked why the dodge tool was called dodge and why the icon looked like a black lollipop. I explained that it was a darkroom tool, but no one ever used a store bought tool- usually you just waved around a wadded up ball of tape on a unfolded paperclip or wire coat hanger to light up the print. They were totally lost by the explanation.

3 upvotes
felicity
By felicity (8 months ago)

Curious collection. Some are purely high end professional (Nikon camera), some are purely consumer (flash cubes), and some are darkroom related (vignetter). I loved developing film so I would have added the reel and tank.

1 upvote
jhinkey
By jhinkey (8 months ago)

I'm glad you only limited it to 17 items since I'm sure I would have know the next 17 more that you could have come up with and you didn't really go all that far back (I'm 49 years old).

I still have some film stuff left over, not because I'm collecting it, but rather I just haven't bothered to get rid of it yet.

My kids look at some of my old slides on a slide table and they can't understand how you make a big picture of them on a computer.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 months ago)

by scanning the slides into a tiff file, that's how you get a big picture on a computer. Encourage them to try, film scanning is tricky to do well, they'll learn something.

Yes, I assume you were making a joke about kids not being able to relate to images recorded on slides or negative film.

0 upvotes
BJN
By BJN (8 months ago)

Anyone that prints fine art inkjet prints should be familiar with the gloves. Just as today, very, very few people got to shoot with expensive tele lenses. A better example would be a cheap T-mount index aperture tele lens - extra points for knowing what a T-mount and an index aperture are. I've never seen a Nikon bulk film back in the flesh, but that helps put complaints about big, heavy camera gear in perspective. Not to mention many pros carrying a good size bag just for film.

And I had to walk five miles to the photofinisher, in the snow, uphill both ways...

1 upvote
vroger1
By vroger1 (8 months ago)

Well put...

0 upvotes
Total comments: 149
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