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Researchers in Tokyo develop high-speed subject tracking system

By dpreview staff on Jul 16, 2013 at 18:58 GMT

Engineers at Tokyo University's Ishikawa Oku Laboratory have come up with new technology to track extremely fast motion. Their new system - which uses 'Saccade Mirrors' for pitch and tilt, a 'pupil shift system', and very fast image processing - is able to keep even the quickest subject in the center of the frame at all times.

According to engineers, the initial application for this system could be to capture video at sporting events, and they expect this system to be market-ready in about two years.  Check out the video below to see this intriguing new system in action.

 
Via: Colossal, Source: DigInfo TV

Comments

Total comments: 17
rfsIII
By rfsIII (9 months ago)

Nice...but if they really want to get the tech down, they need to work on it until it can track a litter of shiba inu puppies, or, the hardest target of all, bridesmaids.

0 upvotes
SiriusDoggy
By SiriusDoggy (9 months ago)

Serious astrophotographers have known about this tech for years. In the astronomy community it's called adaptive optics and works almost exactly the same. https://www.sbig.com/products/adaptive-optics/ao-8t/

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (9 months ago)

Thanks for the link. But ...
1. The SBIG product is an optical image stabilizer, not adaptive optics (AO aspherically deformes a mirrors surface in real time), in an attempt to correct for wavefront errors. SBIG abuses the term AO here...
-> http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Adaptive_optics_system_full.svg/1000px-Adaptive_optics_system_full.svg.png
2. The SBIG product works at 10Hz rather than 1000Hz.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
SiriusDoggy
By SiriusDoggy (8 months ago)

Maybe you should look up the definition of Adaptive Optics. Whether the mirror is being deformed or there is a tip-tilt mirror in use and whatever the frequency happens to be, it's still considered Adaptive Optics.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adaptive_optics

0 upvotes
Alton (TN)
By Alton (TN) (9 months ago)

I would like to have it when taking humming bird shots when they are going back and forth when feeding.

0 upvotes
dark goob
By dark goob (9 months ago)

Put a high power laser on that and you have something truly scary lol

0 upvotes
Dan Tong
By Dan Tong (9 months ago)

Extremely smart idea, and it works, too!

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (9 months ago)

FYI

The work is from 2011. The same institute, in 2009, demoed a fast contrast detect AF (CDAF) system:
-> http://www.k2.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/mvf/FocusingVision/index-e.html
A video where CDAF tracks an object in real time is here:
-> http://www.k2.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/mvf/FocusingVision/FV_FocusTracking.wmv
(AF time is 16ms).
Just a brute force approach, but nice to see anyway.

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (9 months ago)

FYI

Here is additional genuine information:
-> http://www.mechatronic.me/69-projection-mapping-system-lumipen

It includes a complete description of the optics of their so-called pupil-shift system:
http://www.mechatronic.me/images/a/13/06/Lumipen_Saccade_Mirror.jpg
It is composed of three lenses. The article links to the research papers too:
-> http://www.k2.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/members/okumura/pdf/okumura_icra11.pdf (engl., with illustrations)

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (9 months ago)

MILC's need not apply!

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

The system captures and processes an image every 1/1000 second. DSLRs need not apply, a mirror flapping at 1000Hz would destroy your ears if not destroy itself earlier.
For comparison, tracking system of Panasonic GH3 (a MILC if you don't know) operates at 240Hz. New Oly cameras too if I remember correctly.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JoKing
By JoKing (9 months ago)

I wonder if the system blows up if someone throws another ping-pong ball into the mix? :)

1 upvote
falconeyes
By falconeyes (9 months ago)

it might loose track, or switch tracking between balls when their trajectories overlap. That's all.

Tracking is the hard part in this demo. Needs computing power and a lot of light. And in this case, a simplified task where the target stands out (a white football against green grass may do as well). A similiar situation to tracking a PlayStation Move controller.

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (9 months ago)

3 ideas, clever combined. Nice result!

2 upvotes
NM Scout
By NM Scout (9 months ago)

That is most impressive!

2 upvotes
Johnsonj
By Johnsonj (9 months ago)

Very cool. I want one!

1 upvote
harry
By harry (9 months ago)

Wow!

1 upvote
Total comments: 17