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Sigma blog posts tips for photographing 4th of July fireworks

By dpreview staff on Jul 3, 2013 at 19:31 GMT

Sigma has posted an informative article on its blog by photographer Jack Howard, sharing tips on how to photograph fireworks. The article comes just in time for the 4th of July celebrations in the USA, but is equally relevant to various festivals, year-wide, all over the world. Tips include obvious pointers like making sure you have a good, sturdy tripod, but also more detailed advice about how to set up your camera's exposure and focus modes, as well as how to trigger exposures. Click the links below to go straight to the article at blog.sigmaphoto.com.

And for those wondering how to shoot fireworks with a smartphone, be sure to check out our 5 tips for great fireworks photos with your smartphone over on connect.dpreview.com

Comments

Total comments: 10
dennishancock
By dennishancock (9 months ago)

Timely article and greatly appreciated!

One further question: what would be a recommended color temperature setting?

Thank you.

1 upvote
ngollan
By ngollan (9 months ago)

For outdoors, I keep the camera on its built-in daylight WB setting. That produces an initial colour rendition that I find easy to work with. If you find anything off, you can easily fix it in post and apply the setting to the entire filmstrip. IMO it produces a fairly "neutral" starting point.

As long as you shoot in raw, it doesn't matter though since you can just equalise the entire shoot in just a few steps, and with night shots it matters even less. I just found working from a daylight setting beneficial for my tastes, and it also captures changes in ambient light rather nicely.

1 upvote
Houseqatz
By Houseqatz (9 months ago)

if you're shooting jpeg, set your white balance ahead of time.

normally, i tend to favor the warmer side of things, but with fireworks, i find that i favor cooler white balance settings. i almost always shoot raw+jpeg, so i have options. if i shoot jpeg it so i can share without pp. I shoot raw in the event that i get one that i really like, but could be better served with a few touches.

0 upvotes
dennishancock
By dennishancock (9 months ago)

5260 K seemed to work out well.

1 upvote
Houseqatz
By Houseqatz (9 months ago)

xlnt, i was shooting 5200K last night =]

0 upvotes
silencer13
By silencer13 (9 months ago)

The 2nd link is not working

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (9 months ago)

(belatedly) fixed. Sorry about that.

0 upvotes
silencer13
By silencer13 (9 months ago)

Thanks, works perfectly now.
And thanks for this very timely article. Just in time for my trip to Japan and all the summer fireworks.

0 upvotes
Michael G2
By Michael G2 (9 months ago)

One very useful tip I read about is to shoot in B and then to have soft black cover to cover the lens (without touching it) to limit the exposure of the individual fireworks and then allowing the background exposure to continue after the firework has died. For my 24-105L lens I used a black neoprene cover for my 800/5.6 to control the exposure. I used this technique at the San Diego Big Bay Boom on July 4th with good success, a few examples on my blog
http://blog.catchlight.se/2013/07/july-4th-san-diego-big-bay-boom.html

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
LoganVii
By LoganVii (9 months ago)

First time I took fireworks, was too far away...

0 upvotes
Total comments: 10