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Canon announces EOS 70D mid-range SLR with 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF'

By dpreview staff on Jul 2, 2013 at 04:00 GMT
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Canon has announced the EOS 70D, a mid-range SLR for enthusiast photographers. Its headline feature is a brand-new 20.2MP 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF' sensor which splits every single pixel into two photodiodes for on-chip phase detection, promising vastly improved autofocus performance in live view and movie mode. It also gains the 19-point AF module from the EOS 7D for viewfinder shooting, touchscreen control via its fully articulated 3" LCD, and built-in Wi-Fi for image sharing and remote camera control from your smartphone or tablet.

The 70D be available at the end of August for £1079.99 / $1199 / €1099 body only, £1199.99 / $1349 / €1249 with the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens, and £1399.99 / $1549 / €1499 with the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens. 

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Press Release:

Unleash your potential with the powerful and versatile Canon EOS 70D 

London, UK, 2 July 2013 – Canon today unveils an outstanding new addition to its world-famous EOS series – the EOS 70D. Designed for aspiring enthusiast photographers, the EOS 70D is the ideal camera for anyone looking to take their photography to the next level. It combines completely new, world-first Canon imaging technology with powerful, creative and wireless sharing features – delivering a responsive, all-purpose camera ideal for capturing the moment with stunning images and Full HD video.

Capture the moment with stills and Full HD movies

The EOS 70D features a new 20.2 MP APS-C CMOS sensor, designed and manufactured by Canon. It’s the first Digital SLR in the world to feature ground-breaking Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology, which delivers smooth and accurate autofocus (AF) when shooting Full HD movies and fast AF acquisition when shooting in Live View mode. Paired with the 14-bit DIGIC 5+ processor and 19-point all cross-type AF System, the EOS 70D captures incredible, full resolution images at up to 7 frames per second, with up to 65 JPEG or 16 RAW images in a single burst*. Additionally, a native ISO range of ISO 100-12800 enables photographers to shoot in lower light conditions and use faster shutter speeds whilst retaining high image quality.

“I was incredibly impressed with how many new technologies the EOS 70D packs into one body, and how versatile it is,” said Brutus Östling, Canon Ambassador. “The EOS 70D is the perfect camera for anyone that wants to develop their photography skills. Not only is it suited to shooting people, landscapes and action easily and in outstanding quality, but also filming subjects in Full HD with focus speeds I never thought would be possible. The camera proved itself in the most challenging of circumstances, and had a range of new-generation technologies to comfortably solve any test I threw at it – especially with the new Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology. It really takes DSLR shooting and filmmaking to a whole new level.”

Canon’s new Dual Pixel CMOS AF provides swift AF performance when shooting in Live View mode and smooth accurate focus for Full HD movies. It makes it easy for users to take their next step with movies, enabling them to keep moving subjects in sharp focus and create professional-looking pull-focus effects. The technology utilises advanced CMOS architecture, allowing two photodiodes to be mounted within each pixel, both of which can be read independently to achieve autofocus, or together for image capture, with maximum image quality at all times.

An advanced AF system for stills includes 19 cross-type AF points spread across the frame, providing high speed, accurate AF – ideal for tracking sports and wildlife subjects as they move within the frame. The AF system is customisable, allowing photographers to adapt to the subject they’re shooting. AF points can be used individually, together in small groups, or as a wide active area for more unpredictable subjects. A dedicated AF area selection button, positioned conveniently next to the shutter release, enables quick switching between modes, without having to take the camera away from the eye.

Expertly designed for professional control

The EOS 70D’s powerful specification is packed into an expertly-engineered body that’s designed for comfort and swift operation. The Intelligent Viewfinder, with 98 per cent frame coverage and 0.95x magnification, allows photographers to comfortably frame their images and visualise settings via the electronic overlay. Conveniently-placed controls provide instant access to the most frequently used settings, such as ISO, AF mode selection and metering, so users can quickly change settings and concentrate on capturing the moment.

A 7.7cm (3.0”) Vari-angle Clear View LCD II Touch screen with a sharp 1,040k dot resolution is ideal for video shooting, or composing images from unusual and creative angles. The screen is a capacitive type, which supports a series of multi-touch gestures including swiping and pinch-zooming – perfect for navigating menus, amending settings or flicking through images.

Clever connectivity for easy control and instant sharing

The EOS 70D is the latest EOS model to feature integrated Wi-Fi, providing the freedom to remotely control the camera, as well as share images. Using Wi-Fi connectivity, users can connect to the EOS Remote app and control a wide range of image settings, including ISO and exposure, as well as focus and release the shutter. Photographers can also remotely use Live View mode, as well as review and rate their images.

Instant creativity unleashed

The EOS 70D features a host of creative modes to make capturing unique images easy. In-camera HDR removes the challenges of shooting in tricky, high contrast situations, merging three exposures into one that captures more detail in both the shadow and highlight areas. With multiple-exposure mode, photographers can shoot and combine up to nine exposures into a single image, or use a range of Creative Filters to instantly change the style and look of their shot.

Experimenting with creative off-camera flash is easy, thanks to the Integrated Speedlite transmitter, which provides in-camera control of multiple Canon Speedlite EX flash units.

Creative Full HD Movies

Alongside beautiful stills, the EOS 70D allows photographers to create high quality movies with ease. Full HD (1920 x 1080p) resolution video can be captured with a choice of selectable frame rates, including 30, 25 or 24fps, and 60 and 50fps at 720p, and a range of compression options for post-editing and sharing. Thanks to new Dual Pixel CMOS AF, Movie Servo AF mode tracks subjects as they move, or even as shots are recomposed, ensuring they’re always in focus. Alternatively, users can select different focus areas over 80 per cent of the frame** simply by tapping the touch-screen, even when recording – ensuring that movies stay sharp and clear if a subject moves or the user changes the composition of a shot.

Videographers can also enjoy stereo sound using the internal microphone, or enhance audio with the in-built external microphone input terminal. Full control over settings such as aperture and ISO is also possible within manual mode, giving users greater freedom as their skills develop.

EOS 70D – key features:

  • 20.2 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor and DIGIC 5+
  • 19 point cross-type AF System and 7 fps shooting
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
  • Instant sharing and remote control with Wi-Fi
  • ISO 12800 (H:25600)
  • Vari-angle 7.7cm ClearView II LCD touch screen
  • Intelligent viewfinder
  • Full-HD movies

*UHS-I card required for maximum burst duration

**Dual Pixel CMOS AF is possible over 80 per cent of the width and height of the Live View frame

Canon EOS 70D specifications

Price
MSRP£1079.99 / $1199 / €1099 body only. £1199.99 / $1340 / €1249 with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM. £1399.99 $1549 / €1499 with EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
Body type
Body typeMid-size SLR
Sensor
Max resolution5472 x 3648
Other resolutions3468x2432, 2736x1824, 1920x1280, 720x480, 4864x3648, 3248x2432, 2432x1824, 1696x1280, 640x480,5472x3072, 3468x2048, 2736x1536, 1920x1080, 720x408, 3648x3648, 2432x2432, 1824x1824, 1280x1280, 480x480
Image ratio w:h1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels20 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors21 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (22.5 x 15 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorDigic 5+
Color spacesRGB, Adobe RGB
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800 (25600 with boost)
White balance presets6
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal
File format
  • JPEG: Fine, Normal.
  • RAW: RAW, M-RAW, S-RAW (14bit)
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampIntermittent firing of built-in flash
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points19
Lens mountCanon EF/EF-S
Focal length multiplier1.6×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFully articulated
Screen size3
Screen dots1,040,000
Touch screenYes
Screen typeClear View II TFT color LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage98%
Viewfinder magnification0.95×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/8000 sec
Scene modes
  • Portrait, Landscape, Close-up, Sports, Night Portrait, Handheld Night Scene, HDR Backlight Control
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range12.00 m
External flashYes (Built-in flash works as wireless commander)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-eye
Flash X sync speed1/250 sec
Drive modes
  • Single, Continuous L, Continuous H, Self timer (2s+remote, 10s +remote), Silent single shooting, Silent continuous shooting
Continuous drive7 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec, remote)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Partial
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±3 (2, 3, 5, 7 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (3 frames in either blue/amber or magenta/green axis)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25, 23.976 fps), 1280 x 720 (59.94, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (59.94, 50 fps)
FormatH.264
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (HDMI mini)
WirelessBuilt-In
Remote controlYes (RS-60E3 cable release, RC-6 wireless remote, or using smartphone over Wi-Fi)
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes (Water and Dust resistant)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion LP-E6 rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)920
Weight (inc. batteries)755 g (1.66 lb / 26.63 oz)
Dimensions139 x 104 x 79 mm (5.47 x 4.11 x 3.09)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingYes (by USB cable and PC)
GPSOptional

Additional images

567
I own it
238
I want it
40
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 272
12
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

about the baseline of the dual-pixel CMOS AF.

like the traditional phase detect AF found in SLRs, the baseline is the diameter of lens aperture at most. but unlike the traditional PDAF, dual-pixel CMOS AF works throughout the sensor and can use actual aperture size instead of fixed/limited/prepositioned one as found in SLRs. this means that we can have longer baselines at f/1.4 (or the max micro-lenses can see) and shorter baselines at f/11. thus the design is more flexible and efficient.

currently it looks the performance is limited by readout speed and processing power (and Canon's marketing strategy). I don't know if Canon will make a break-through in readout soon but expect shorter battery life for new cameras with powerful processors.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

I'd like to see in DPReview but the performences look like

(1) works at low light at almost -3EV, because the imaging sensor receives 2.5 times of light (+1.3 stops) than the AF sensor on an SLR. can be improved further with higher performance sensors.

(2) 5 times faster than EOS M (before the upgrade?), limited by readout speed (assume 1/10s for full readout, up to 1/60s for partial=video) and processing power.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (9 months ago)

"Photographers can also remotely use Live View mode, as well as review and rate their images."

Well, the way I read this... you can only watch remotely what you shoot in LiveView while taking stills, not video. Otherwise they would not have specified that PHOTOGRAPHERS can use LiveView instead of everyone, including those shooting video clips, right?

Amazed still that as far as Canon goes, the maximum frame rate in 1080p is still only at a lamentable 30fps mximum refresh rate, whereas others have been delivering 1080p60 enabled digital cameras for years. This practice on the part of Canon is getting to be rather numbing, really. No idea what the video recording bitrate is, either.

Too bad about cheapening this 70D by having a 3-inch touchscreen on it. The OVF will not work at all in video mode, and then if you want to use a simple LCD VF so you do not have to hold the camera away from your body and squint at the screen, you cannot use the touchscreen feature, either. Ouch!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (9 months ago)

The 70D's price of $1,200 is for the body only, or slightly more with one of the kit lenses. So, its price is right where the Nikon D7100 is parked at. Not much of a "price competition" here from Canikon, as usual, and let's not forget that you can get a Canikon DSLR in any beautiful color -- as long as it is black.

Still, there is always hoping....

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

"Too bad about cheapening this 70D by having a 3-inch touchscreen on it."

Time to join the 21st century. Everything is going touchscreen. The next flagship pro EOS body will probably have touchscreen too. In the very near future, people will instead be saying: "Too bad about cheapening product XYZ by having a non-interactive 3-inch non-touch dumb-screen. How primitive!" You live in a backwards world if you think *adding* touchscreen capability means *cheapening* a product.

"The OVF will not work at all in video mode"

Which is how it is with every OVF.

"and then if you want to use a simple LCD VF so you do not have to hold the camera away from your body and squint at the screen, you cannot use the touchscreen feature, either."

First of all, there is no EVF for the 70D. Secondly, if you're using *any* kind of eye-level viewfinder (EVF or OVF), then you would not be needing to use the touchscreen anyways.

Want some cheese with your whine? LOL.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

T3, Frank's primary hobby is complaining about cameras he never wants to buy. One problem with photography sites is the fact that a large number of photographers are grumpy old men, and if they don't have an aperture ring on their lens then the world has gone straight to hell in a handbasket. Since many are still trying to figure out this internets machine a touchscreen seems like a barrier to efficiency rather than something to be embraced. I think a more interactive control system is the precursor to a menu system that is much more customizable and dynamic. Why not have completely configurable quick settings screens where I can move settings around, add a button for any custom function setting I want, and swipe from tab to tab more quickly than the control wheel or joystick would allow for? Also, half the time people talk about how they hate video and half the time how useless 30fps is...makes you think Canon (or anyone else) can't win unless they include every feature for free.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Charrick
By Charrick (9 months ago)

T3 is spot on.

I wonder why people complain about touchscreens. Unless it takes up the whole back (which is only the case with one or just a few cameras) and you like physical buttons, you still have the choice to use the touchscreen or the physical buttons. The touchscreen only gives you more features...and in almost every case, you can also turn it off if you want. Is going into the menu and turning off the touchscreen such a huge hassle?

0 upvotes
frankje
By frankje (9 months ago)

It seems to me that a major drawback of this system is that it will only work in one direction. It wil focus on vertical lines, not on horizontal lines.
I think therefore that Canon has to re-design this sensor so that it can focus in both horizontal and vertical direction.

2 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (9 months ago)

I have written a little blog article where I explain why I think the multi pixel AF technology (MPAF) will eventually transform the industry. Not the 70D as it won't beat phase detect autofocus. But eventually, MPAF will blow PDAF out of the water.

Also, I found the original patents in the Japanese web (which btw discussed the 70D 4 days before launch ...). Seems like the lauch of the Fujifilm Hybrid AF on 2010, July 21 made Canon realize that reading half a pixel rather than masking half a pixel may be a great idea. It took them exactly 12 working days to rush their patent to filing. If my assumption holds true.

Here is the article:
-> http://falklumo.blogspot.de/2013/07/comment-why-new-dual-pixel-af-will.html

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

Nikon and Fujifilm have only partial control of their sensors while Canon, Sony, and Panasonic have full control from scratch.

I suspect the reason Canon came to the idea first was because their micro-lens technology is not as good as Sony. they might have been thinking of such a configuration for a long time.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (9 months ago)

"Not the 70D as it won't beat phase detect autofocus."

But the MPAF is phase detect autofocus, although it's done differently. It remains to be seen if the 70D is faster or more accurate in live view, or when it uses the separate PDAF sensor.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (9 months ago)

No idea how fast the AF in still shooting and particularly in video recordings really is, maybe as fast or even faster as what the Nikon 1-series V2 is capable of? All camera makers are routinely claiming "world's fastest AF" these days, so who is to decide what the truth is? It's probably not worth paying much never mind to these recurring "fast AF" product announcements, really.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

high speed parallel readout and processing are the key points on the sensor/camera side.

there may not be a leap forward in immediate performance, but the road is paved and we can see very high performance straight into to the future, maybe through a sequence of Canon/Bubka style improvements.

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (9 months ago)

Ok. Two comments:

1. This should have a native single-shot, single-lens, stereo capture. Does it?

2. The central 80% restriction is probably due to the lenses -- most lenses have internal vignetting that crops anglular views pretty significantly. (The darker corners are darker because some rays are clipped entirely.)

This is all about OOF PSFs, which I've discussed all over the place....

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

"1. This should have a native single-shot, single-lens, stereo capture. Does it?"

Why, because there are two diodes at each pixel position? Well, you probably won't get much "stereo" from split diodes sitting so close together-- literally sitting next to one another! While dual diodes at each pixel is effective for AF, it would be useless for "stereo capture". Even if you shot an image with just the right diode, and then the left diode, and switched back and forth between both images, there would be no shift in perspective, which is necessary for "stereo capture." You're literally talking about sub-pixel level separation or perspective shift.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

hope Magic Lantern will be able to readout the whole 40.3M and output to the SD card. a stereo image generated from 0.8 x 0.8 of that (12.9M x 2) will be good enough as it comes for free through all the Canon, Nikon, and third party lenses.

more interesting is that there will be quad-pixel sensors soon that we will be able to rotate a stereo image (while tracking the holder's eyes with a camera).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

P.S., think this great "dual-ray" sensor carelessly killed Lytro, too, the real value of which is 3D, not refocusing.

0.8 x 0.8 of a Canon APS-C sensor is about the same size (area) as a 4/3".

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (9 months ago)

The stereo separation is plenty. Take a look at:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Use-Your-Camera-To-Capture-3D-Anaglyphs/
A more detailed explanation of how this stereo capture works is my talk:
http://research.microsoft.com/apps/video/dl.aspx?id=156493

0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (9 months ago)

One quick clarification: the dual sensels separate views by taking different acceptance angles using the microlens. This will give rise to some flaws, as the shape of the virtual aperture is actually different (mirrored) for left and right sensels. I don't think this is a killer, although my anaglyph capture trick doesn't suffer this defect.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

there may be very serious crosstalk between the dual-pixels
making post processing more difficult (still readily feasible).
btw, the AF can work at low light of almost -3EV.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

@ProfHankD - your linked anaglyph 3D example apparently shows that the dual diode separation is NOT "plenty" for stereo separation, since the stereo baseline used in the lens modification in that link is 29.0mm (1.1 in). A stereo baseline of 29mm is a *bit* more than two diodes sitting adjacent to one another underneath a single microlens that measures just a few microns!

I'm not going to hold my breath for the day when Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS produces amazing 3D. I'm not going to count on it at all.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

@T3, effectively you are arguing that the AF won't work. 3D may still work for a while after the AF fails (because AF got no long exposure).

the baseline should be the diameter of the lens aperture at most, the diameter at f/11 is 2.7mm using a standard 30mm prime (acturally f-number tells the story here).

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

in my own post
> more difficult (still readily feasible).
actually I'm not sure because the 40.3MP image may rot very fast that we get equal numbers from the dual-pixel near the end of readout. a solution may be that we readout a smaller portion from the center (like 50% x 50% = 5MP x 2).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (9 months ago)

The stereo baseline is a function of the lens aperture, not spacing of sensel pairs. Basically, one gets the left half of the aperture and the other fets the right (which is why the aperture shape is mirrored). The baseline is essentially the distance between the center of mass of the left and right sides of th aperture -- something less than 1/2 the diameter of the aperture (less than f# * focallength/2). A simple filter mask can increase this to nearly f# * focallenght).

0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (9 months ago)

Oops. I typed that last part on my phone too quickly using an airport wireless connection between flights... the f# * focallength formulas should be focallength/f#.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

@ProfHankD, I see you are very experienced with CHDK. look forward to seeing your 3D images from 70D.

0 upvotes
Alphoid
By Alphoid (9 months ago)

Called it a few months ago: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51552736

Comment edited 35 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (9 months ago)

I called it a few years ago, LOL

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

the next step may be quad-pixel CMOS, like an 80D with 80.80MP on chip and 20.20MP as output, a dream sensor for those who want higher SNR at lower resolution.

looking forward to a 640MP sensor with 160MP resolution. this is about the end of the age of discovery from where we will start to explore the space.

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

I expected this and removal of AA filter would happen somewhere between 60MP to 160MP but they come too early.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (9 months ago)

@ yabokkie: You may want to get down to Earth for a bit, no? :~))

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

we are going to have mass market 8K TVs from 2020, which got 33.2MP. does down to Earth mean that photos should be displayed on your TV like mosaic paints?

160MP is a comfort number for a still to be displayed on an 8K TV and "crystally" sharp, while giving some room for processing. 160MP is also the resolution that a person with vision 2.0 won't see the pixel at 100 deg angle of view.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (9 months ago)

Dear DPREVIEW,

Could you please kindly mount a Sigma 18-35 f1.8 on a Canon 70D and let us know how is AF speed/accuracy?

Thank you

1 upvote
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (9 months ago)

FINALLY!!! I was starting to think that Canon had developed an allergy to innovation. Now they just need to retire the 1990 body design.

1 upvote
cgarrard
By cgarrard (9 months ago)

Yep because it's obvious Canon doesn't sell enough cameras. :) Retire what works, that's the new CEO mentality that drives companies into the dumpster.

C

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

Why, so they can switch to an odd-ball, gimmicky, low-selling design like the Pentax K-01? Nothing wrong with continually using and refining a tried and true design.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (9 months ago)

These ever so boooooring Canikon bodies painted in ALL FUNERAL BLACK look older than the ancestors of my great-great-great granddad.

Kudos to PENTAX for making cameras enjoyable to look at. The Canikons DSLRs are anything but.

0 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (9 months ago)

Wow, finally a new APS-C sensor from Canon! Congratulations from a Nikon user (no irony intended)!

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (9 months ago)

Good show, good spirit. Wish there were more of that!

0 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (9 months ago)

This tech begs for some new mirrorless camera.
New EOS-M coming soon?
If they did this with an APS-C sized sensor for a 'mere' DSLR, maybe we can expect some 135 format sensor with this tech inside an RX-1 type mirrorless camera too.

0 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (9 months ago)

Yes, I would think an EOS M2 is in the offing as the price of the sadly flawed M1 has dropped by nearly half.

Should be a goody if they have listened to the justified criticisms. I'll have one for sure....

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (9 months ago)

We now know what Canon has been working on these past few years while continuing to warm up the 18 MP design. They are always in the top for number of patents filed.

0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

This is what they do
http://www.canon.com/news/2013/mar04e.html

It is more better on low light.
and I hope also good on still images too

0 upvotes
BJL
By BJL (9 months ago)

@utomo99: that is a roughly 2MP (1920x1080) video sensor; its photosites are excellent in low light by the simple strategy of being huge, and few in number.

Those same 19micron pixels would give 0.9MP in Canon's 22.5x15mm "EF-S" format. So no, not if interest for DSLR still images.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

@utomo99,

"In addition, the sensor's pixels and readout circuitry employ new technologies that reduce noise, which tends to increase as pixel size increases."

this "in addition" is the real technical achievement behind the low resolution sensor. it's a less problem for 20MP, 40MP, or 80MP sensors, but still whenever we want higher image quality, doubling the pixel count is the most straight forward solution.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

how do we know there are not 16 photodiodes inside each of 19 micron pixel? a simple straight-forward solution.

0 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (9 months ago)

welcome back to the game, canon.

4 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (9 months ago)

Except they are now and have been the top dog in camera sales, so where did they go?!

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

Yes, Canon. After falling out of the number one spot for exactly zero of the last decade or two or three, it's nice to hear you're making cameras again.

3 upvotes
Prestidigitator
By Prestidigitator (9 months ago)

Haha, new boyz got 0wnz0red. :P

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (9 months ago)

Canon can afford to leave the game, have a scotch, come back and checkmate an opponent. Unlike all the other competitors. But they are always winning, even though it seems like they aren't. Why someone would think that though....

C

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

Yeah, Kodak used to be the biggest too.

I would not say they are back in the game until the tests show they fixed their DR and improved their high ISO. And it is not given yet. The sensor would allow them to really enter mirrorless game though, but we will see what they have done with their image quality problems.

0 upvotes
DSHAPK
By DSHAPK (9 months ago)

Yep they were. Nikon also used to own the film market.

0 upvotes
Charrick
By Charrick (9 months ago)

New Boyz is right. Canon is coming "back into the game". Canons were losing their edge. Their sensors were old and reused, and there was nothing new from them that others hadn't done before. Of course, sales will continue because people think Canon is the best, even if it's slipping.

It's sort of like the United States. It's still far and away the most powerful nation on earth. However, it has been slipping recently, so if it were rejuvenated, we could rightly say "Welcome back" to America.

0 upvotes
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (9 months ago)

Finally, a dual pixel sensor!! Looks like the MP war is over. This brings back fond memories of 4 bit computer graphics. I can't wait to see what this beast can capture with 2 pixels.

4 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

Maybe other manufacturer will start thinking about 4/ quad pixel sensor ? 4 pixel sensor may give better result, because dual pixel is not same on horizontal and vertical size, quad pixel give same size so it may give better result. what do yu think ?

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
1 upvote
BartyLobethal
By BartyLobethal (9 months ago)

Where will it all end? 8 pixels? 16? Madness!

2 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (9 months ago)

MP war is far from over. With current tech alone, manufacturer would be able to make 100+ mp APS-C sensor. The problem is the processing. Moore's law will take care of that one.

1 upvote
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

How about using ARM processor ? I believe cheap ARM processor more power than what needed by most cameras. But need to tweak it so it optimize it to handle photos and videos

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"How about using ARM processor ? I believe cheap ARM processor more power than what needed by most cameras. "

You don't know what are you talking about. Fujitsu Milbeaut (what you may know under the names "Nikon EXPEED", "Pentax PRIME", "Sigma Ture" and "Leica MAESTRO") uses 2 ARM cores for control, but actual processing is done by much MUCH faster specialized image processing cores. Similar thing with "Canon DIGIC" (oops, TI OMAP).

2 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

Thanks for the Info.
BTW TI OMAP also ARM.
I think most cameras using OMAP 4 45nm, instead of OMAP 5 28nm.
CMIIW

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

general purpose processors are very low efficient in image processing, why we need GPUs beside CPUs (instead of having more CPUs).

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

Here's irony for you. People always talk about Nikon putting so many more AF points on their cameras and act like it's the only way to do it. Canon gives people several million PDAF sensors and the same people come out of the woodwork talking about what a stupid feature it is and that it's only good for videographers. Funny.

6 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (9 months ago)

Yeah, kinda funny if you think about it.

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (9 months ago)

And yet, Canon own.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

Nikon got only 5 AF points (Nikon F5) when Canon debut their 45-point high density AF sensor (Canon EOS-3) near 15 years ago.

0 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (9 months ago)

My initial take: If this 70D will definitely show an improvement at the sensor level, then good news - as it looks a bit intentionally "crippled", maybe ultimately there is a 7D II on the drawing board. If yes, then my prediction is: THAT camera will be AWESOME (and pricey). Cheers! :)

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (9 months ago)

I'm in stitches. The first time a major player adopts a lightfield sensor (multiple photodiodes behind one microlens), it's not to achieve some pie-in-the-sky dream of a "focus-free" cameras, or the "solution to a non-problem" gimmick of "refocusing" images on a web site.

Nope, it's to improve focusing (more accuracy, greater AF area coverage) for plain-old, flat images that you can't "refocus".

I can picture the next steps: 4 photodiodes behind each microlens, for better performance on either horizontal or vertical detail, then 9 to cover a wider range of apertures and take the coverage up to 100% of the frame.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Photato
By Photato (9 months ago)

Not the first time. Fujifilm used 2 photodiodes per micro lense with their first generation SR sensors. http://www.dcresource.com/images/news/superccd_sr.gif
Although it was made for HDR capture rather than AutoFocus.
I have a mild concern about this new Canon sensor losing light collection efficiency, diodes are now smaller, but binned. Notice how Canon did not say anything about this new sensor sensitivity in their marketing material.

3 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (9 months ago)

the diodes are smaller when used for AF, but both diodes will be used to gather light when capturing image, so practically the same with regular single diode

0 upvotes
Photato
By Photato (9 months ago)

@DanCee. The gap between the diodes is not and wont be infinitesimal small so this new sensor with dual diodes will always have less sensitive area when compared to the standard one diode sensors. Canon strategy could be of selling APS-C on megapixels and wiz bang features and reserving image quality for the full frame market. See how they skipped the 7D replacement, a model that was much older than the 60D.
The 70D looks excellent on paper but may lack in the IQ department by the current standards.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (9 months ago)

By Photato: "The gap between the diodes is not and wont be infinitesimal small so this new sensor with dual diodes will always have less sensitive area when compared to the standard one diode sensors."
A 5-10% reduction in sensitive area translates to about 1/10th of a stop reduction in sensitivity. Unless they reconfigure microlenses to compensate, in which case it will translate to zero reduction in sensitivity.
On the other hand, this construction could translate into a lot of leeway in highlight DR - if a highlight is not in perfect focus, it is unlikely to overwhelm both subsensors.
I don't think IQ will be a problem.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

@Photato & BorisK1,

we can allow some crosstalk between the dual-diodes as long as we have enough SNR for AF. the pair of diodes can crosstalk freely during exposure/readout without affecting the image quality. so there doesn't have to be a traditional wall seperating the diode pair.

there could be one well with two drains, or four drains, with a single drain able to readout all the charges to make a dream sensor (only I feel sorry it comes at so low resolution at 20.2M).

> I don't think IQ will be a problem.

IQ is not a problem. it's an added bonus.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (9 months ago)

"two photodiodes to be mounted within each pixel, both of which can be read independently to achieve autofocus, or together for image capture"

Why not independently for image capture then? It would be 40 Mpix...

0 upvotes
PredatorsPrey
By PredatorsPrey (9 months ago)

No it wouldn't be 40Mpix because these pixels would be for the same color channel and the pixels will have smaller pixels in the width than height (or inverted), so the images will look stretched. Because they're for the same color channel, there must be a lot more interpolation therefore the image becomes softer so it would be better if you simply upscale the photo (works great if the lens is sharp enough which also is needed for 40mpix).

2 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

Why, are you shooting for billboards? And how powerful is your computer to process those huge RAW files?

This comes from Luminous Landscapes:

"A 40 MP DSLR would generate approximately a 60 MB raw file, might well out-resolve all existing zoom lenses in the corners, leaving full utility only with a few primes, and would almost certainly be so sensitive to camera shake that it only achieved its full resolution on a sturdy tripod (even a 24 MP DSLR is almost tripod-dedicated, the hand holding speed on the D3x seems to be around 1/250 second). Furthermore, the print size to actually see all the detail it was capable of would be somewhere around 30x45 inches. A 44-inch printer is an ugly piece of furniture approximately the size of an upright piano, and a 30x45 inch print requires oversize mat board and a very large wall space."

For the overwhelming percentage of shooters in the world, 40mp is overkill and unnecessary, and would mainly be an ego-boosting exercise in excess.

4 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

> Why not independently for image capture then?

don't worry we will go well beyond 40MP but it's still a good thing to have the low resolution of 20MP and the high image quality of 40MP.

0 upvotes
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (9 months ago)

@ T3 - It is ignorant to assume that nobody will ever want to crop an image. I crop virtually every picture I print to some degree. Often I want something in the middle third and failed to zoom in at the moment. So why not have extra pixel? Increasing your wildlife lens from a 300mm to a 600mm will cost you thousands. Increasing pixels can have the same effect for much less money and weight. Take your blinders off.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

@Vitruvius - We have 20mp today. I was shooting weddings with film, then switched to digital with the 6mp Canon 10D. Many of my colleagues had been shooting with the 4mp Canon 1D. 6mp, 8mp, 10mp, 12mp, 16mp...I've shot with all these sensors, and cropped with all of them, too. The notion that not even a 20mp sensor can handle cropping is flat-out crazy non-sense.

To put things into perspective for you, I've seen stunning bird photography shot by Arthur Morris using an 8mp Canon 1D MKII:

http://www.birdsasart.com/bn136.htm
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/bp/morris/document_view

Yes, 8mp, stunning photos, beautiful prints, lovely detail. Yet you have people here whining that 20mp just won't cut it, or doesn't leave much room for crop, and that they desperately need even more megapixels. Maybe its these people who need take their blinders off. Go out and shoot, and even crop! People have been producing beautiful photos with far lower megapixels for a long time now!

0 upvotes
rarufu
By rarufu (9 months ago)

Canon, i am afraid, that the times, when masses bought big and heavy DSLR stuff, are almost over.

I would not buy those again and people running arround in the city making silly photos of street cafes or of themselfes seem to be poor dinosaurs.

Second: Will those split phase detection pixels make photos better or worse from the quality aspect ?

Good luck anyway.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (9 months ago)

Well then, it's a good thing that the AF capability in this new sensor could put Canon right on top of the mirrorless heap, isn't it?

The split pixels won't harm any aspect of image quality (noise, dynamic range, etc) and they will result in more sharply focused images, so "better".

7 upvotes
Bamboojled
By Bamboojled (9 months ago)

This sensor technology seems very cool...
I am sure that it will focus very fast in live view.
If you have any doubts to the advantage of a system with this incorporated, pick up a Nikon 1 and see how blazing fast the focusing is in bright light.

0 upvotes
steelhead3
By steelhead3 (9 months ago)

Joe, not having read the whole...are the diodes in couplets the same size? If so, to squeeze the 40 million pixels for photo and AF onto apc size sensor means the pixel size probably is in the rx100 diameter.

0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

I wish canon put this tech on Canon S and G series. the competition become more in this premium market. Canon need something good to help winning the competition

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

"Canon, i am afraid, that the times, when masses bought big and heavy DSLR stuff, are almost over."

Which is why the dual pixel sensor is so important: it works for Canon's future mirrorless cameras.

I agree, mirrored DSLRs are going to increasingly become a niche product. My philosophy, now, is that the only time I carry my DSLRs is when I'm being *paid* to carry them. Otherwise, I'd much rather go with a lighter, more compact, less obtrusive and less obvious mirrorless system. Frankly, I think amateurs "unning arround in the city" (or wherever else) with big DSLR system cameras and lenses look rather dorky now. Like someone carrying around a thick, giant, chunky laptop in the age of ultrabooks and Macbook Airs.

1 upvote
justmeMN
By justmeMN (9 months ago)

"the times, when masses bought big and heavy DSLR stuff, are almost over."

Which means a bright future for the compact, light, Canon SL1 / 100D DSLR.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (9 months ago)

Good to see major innovation in sensor tech!

6 upvotes
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (9 months ago)

This is as close to revolutionary as you can get. Canon just made M4/3 obsolete and I use a GH1.

5 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

the latest 4/3" sensor resolution (per mm) is still higher and should be able to get slightly more details of a remote and still subject.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (9 months ago)

The highest sensor resolution per mm is found in the cellphone sensors (10MB squeezed into 1/3" chip).

1 upvote
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (9 months ago)

I hate the image quality of my GH1. hate it. The only reason I have it is because of continuous focus in video and Canon just topped Pana. M4/3 is a transitional platform anyway, but Canon just killed it. :)

6 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

the m4/3" gangs do not have good technology (they have some, but not in general) and they don't have sound strategy. but they are the first to market, and they do have a good pie which they can only lose.

0 upvotes
vapentaxuser
By vapentaxuser (9 months ago)

No doubt in my mind it will be an excellent DSLR. I have to wonder though if this model is it for top-end APS-C Canon DSLRs (no 7d replacement).

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

there is no 15-85 kit for 70D yet. I'd like to grade 15-85 just above so-so but it's a kit lens reserved for 7D.

hope 7D2 will have 61-point AF, 100k pixel imaging AE, and faster frame rate to beat the hell out of D7100.

1 upvote
vapentaxuser
By vapentaxuser (9 months ago)

I was just basing my doubts on the fact that an interview with one of the top execs at Canon seemed to throw cold water on the idea that there will be anything beyond the 70D as far as high-end APS-C goes (at least in DSLR form).

0 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (9 months ago)

There will be 7Dmk2 for sure.. 70D specs is a lot improvement and closer to current 7D, but they can do more which will be saved for the upcoming 7Dmk2

0 upvotes
LensHood
By LensHood (9 months ago)

I just don't get it with these video capabilities. Editing video is seriously time consuming and most people I know really don't have time to do that. And besides the video it is so hard to find good music to go with it. Or is it just a sales argument for people and never use it once they have it? Maybe I'm oldfashioned, but from a hobby perspective shooting stills provides far more joy.
It justbreaks my heart all the innovation goes to video instead of optimising photo more.

Even hollywood can't guarantee success after a $100 mln investement in a two hour movie. Are there really that many video amateurs that prefer DSLR over a handycam that at least has decent autofocus?

1 upvote
KZMike
By KZMike (9 months ago)

LensH. . .

I like having video clips in my slideshows. . . not often with music. Easy to do

1 upvote
Juraj Lacko
By Juraj Lacko (9 months ago)

I don't think there is any competition IQ-wise between amateur handycams and apsc dslr. Now finally AF is catching up. Ergonomics will be still lacking, but one can't have it all.. yet

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (9 months ago)

"It justbreaks my heart all the innovation goes to video instead of optimising photo more."

Does better focus count as "optimising photo more"?

What Canon has done with this new sensor should result in main-sensor PDAF that surpasses SLR mirror based AF in both accuracy and frame coverage. It's hard to imagine something that will benefit photos more than that.

Except for better lenses, and this new AF system is perfectly suited to mirrorless cameras, which means lenses that approach closer to the sensor plane. Ever heard the phrase "the Leica look"?

5 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (9 months ago)

A lot of the entry level new wedding and social event (paid) videographers are going DSLR with rigs for audio and LED lights etc. Nice to have more choice in DSLR in smaller form factor to traditional professional camcorders and improved continuous AF in live view. The sensor in DSLR is vastly larger than the smaller consumer based (non-pro handheld) camcorders so less noise in low light. So yeah, lots of appeal for DSLR video users among semi-pros and enthusiasts. For hobbiests, one camera for both photo and quality hd video has appeal.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

Compact camera will not be able to beat DSLR for image quality.
DSLR will not be able to beat Professional Video cameras.
so do not worry about that

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

These days, a DSLR buyer is almost just as likely to be a video shooter as he is a photographer. And there are plenty of photographers who also enjoy the ability to shoot a bit of video, too.

As for the notion that "all the innovation goes to video instead of optimising photo more", I just don't buy that argument. We've enjoyed a faster progression of photo performance and quality than in any time in history...and yet, people still complain that it's still not enough! LOL. It's amazing how spoiled people are these days. If you can't get excellent image quality and performance from today's cameras, the problem is more likely with you, and not with the camera.

1 upvote
thomas2279f
By thomas2279f (9 months ago)

Looks good - reported fast AF via Live-view and video as you expect from a company that has camcorder presence. Also improved AF like 7d and Wi-fi (free), wished they built in GPS rather charging extra.

Looks like a good camera - hopefully the Sensor is improved - however still like the images I get from my Nikon's...

0 upvotes
Abhijith Kannankavil
By Abhijith Kannankavil (9 months ago)

next thing we'll hear about is canon unlocking some one shot hdr by just some firmware updates. Hope that happens. It's not impossible with this dual photodiode pixels.

Will that happen atleast with the next 7d?

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (9 months ago)

But the more you look at this, it makes the argument (like Sony) for a fixed mirror, i.e. the pellicle mirror solution. Either view should have equal capability and always be on.

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

The Sony solution may have been necessary at the time if you absolutely had to have live view all the time, but it is no longer necessary to take light away from the sensor to focus. Sony's solution made my soul hurt.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
fox-orian
By fox-orian (9 months ago)

If Sony uses a phase-detect sensor in its DSLR bodies, chances are it will just ditch the translucent mirror and call them mirrorless DSLR's. That would make the internal construction of Sony's cameras less complex -- not needing a phase sensor array at all. Just go straight to the sensor, then to the EVF, no matter if you're shooting photos or videos.

Either that, or they're going to develop the SLT tech further with beefier phase detect sensors that perform better than what Canon is using.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
vapentaxuser
By vapentaxuser (9 months ago)

I have heard Sony is done with making pellicle mirror cameras (the A58 being the last one) and the next Alpha mounts will be entirely mirrorless.

2 upvotes
Dennis
By Dennis (9 months ago)

Other way around. The SLT was always an interim fix, with PDAF-on-sensor the final destination. There's no reason Canon couldn't have done an EVF (like Sony has) instead of the OVF. That's what Sony is probably heading towards with their next iteration. That would have been simpler/cheaper for Canon as they've already implemented the LV bit and need to replace the OVF, mirror and primary PDAF array with the EVF.
Canon seems quite adverse to the EVF, though ... it would have made loads of sense in the G1X.

2 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (9 months ago)

Oh how I wish my G1X had an electronic viewfinder! The one big downside of that camera is never being quite sure what you'll get if you use the current viewfinder.

0 upvotes
Atlasman
By Atlasman (9 months ago)

With this technology, Canon will extend the life of DSLRs.

At the same time, it gives them more time to perfect a mirrorless solution.

I guess we can expect little from their EOS M line.

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (9 months ago)

With this technology, Canon can "perfect a mirrorless solution" easier than anybody else.

4 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (9 months ago)

Answer for people questioning EOS-M slow AF.

2 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

with this sensor Canon can add value to all their cameras, not only on DSLR. they must put this sensor on the premium compact cameras too. the competition on the premium camera need something good like this. otherwise many customer run to other brand

1 upvote
Njphoto1
By Njphoto1 (9 months ago)

The new sensor certainly has an impressive spec with the dual pixel Af and is an good advancement in technology. Thank you canon for trying to push the sensor tech once again after so many years; but has it come to late and is it enough to hold back the competition? Personally i would have preferred canon to focus on more dynamic range and colour depth as well as the new on chip Af. can't have everything though right...

Anyway, i have to disagree with this comment - "It really takes DSLR shooting and filmmaking to a whole new level." It does for canon but overall, not really when comparing it to other manufactures... take Sony for instance; back in 2010 Sony created a camera that has full time Af even in video mode with TMT (for their slr style cameras) and still is known for having the best LV performance even in their mirrorless range (their evf still needs working on but that's another story).

Shame to say it but canon you seem to be a couple of years behind everyone else. Give us something to really shout about!

9 upvotes
AkinaC
By AkinaC (9 months ago)

And no one complains Nikon's haven't change for years too?

1 upvote
KZMike
By KZMike (9 months ago)

I'm an old Nikon 'guy' and have just decided to go else where. Nothing since the 300s has been compelling from them at all. . . this hurts since I been on the Nikon wagon since the mid-1960s

5 upvotes
Dennis
By Dennis (9 months ago)

But despite Sony's lead, filmmakers are using Canon and not Sony DSLRs. So it does change filmmaking. (To the extent that filmmakers actually want to use AF ... that I can't answer).
It's one thing to introduce technology. Another to introduce technology and then sell it.
Another issue is that Canon has a much broader array of lenses that are more suitable for video.

0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (9 months ago)

Every sales figure I see says Canon is dominant. They have been late to mirrorless, but they have produced both a MILC and a mini DSLR, and with this technology they could sweep up many of those with GAS with a single announcement. And remember, Canon's forte extends even more-so into lenses. That 40mm pancake they produced is stupidly good. It puts the vast majority of MILC lenses to shame yet lives in Canon's bargain basement. And Sigma's new 1.8 standard zoom breaths new life into APS-C.

Take the 100D size, the sigma zoom and the 40mm pancake, replace the mirror with a top quality EVF, and the competition won't know what hit them. All from a 'sleeping' giant.

1 upvote
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (9 months ago)

Maybe Canon can explain why in a camera of this class priced $1199 USD for body has only one SD card slot.
It would be more attractive to semi pros or sports/events users if it had backup file capability, like some of Nikons cameras (or the Canon 6D). Or is this considered advanced amateur camera or for more serious users? Do pros/semi pros want or prefer backup SD slots especially if the video is now getting better in movie servo AF mode?

The specs are impressive though, with its new AF system and sensor, and like the full articulating screen.

4 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

How much you are willing to pay more for another SDcard slot ? do you want 2, 3, or 5 ?
now SDcard are big enough. I think 1 is enough

3 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

Wifi everything to your smartphone and then put it right on the web. You'll have a backup and a remote backup. Or, if you have a network enabled hard drive at home you'll be able to instantly transmit everything back home rather than the cloud.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Vladik
By Vladik (9 months ago)

you're not going to backup everything to the web through the phone, via LTE, you will run out of data in no time, especially if you use raw. Having two SD Slots is really useful!

4 upvotes
FujicaST605
By FujicaST605 (9 months ago)

@utomo99 I'd be willing to pay $1199, and I did for a D7100 with dual card slots.

4 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

the latest fashion is pricing a camera high so that
the maker can half it later.

D7100 got an extral SD slot but an important part is missing,
the AA filter (which is a great cost saving).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (9 months ago)

Absolutely.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

Yab, that is absolute nonsense. Manufacturing costs more at the beginning. Volume production cost savings aren't seen until way later in a product's life cycle. The latest fashion is the same as the old fashion: economic principles cannot be circumvented by inventing a crystal ball that will allow someone to look into the future and set prices accordingly.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

I wasn't thinking LTE, I was thinking wifi back at the hotel...or Starbucks...or McDonald's....or everywhere else on the planet now. Sorry, I have unlimited data so it never occurs to me to consider that limitation, but wifi solves it. I've never had dual card slots and I've never had a card fail, so I'm spoiled I guess.

0 upvotes
Dimit
By Dimit (9 months ago)

And..I bet..in the fothcoming review the rating will be an 80 !! Copy paste this for a future comment if it's not.
Best regards to the dpr family,staff and fellow observators..

0 upvotes
brendon1000
By brendon1000 (9 months ago)

I am curious. Does this enhanced movie AF mode require STM lenses only or will they work with the regular Canon lenses ? Also is 3rd party lens compatibility compromised with this new tech I wonder.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (9 months ago)

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/canon-eos-70d/3

3 upvotes
brendon1000
By brendon1000 (9 months ago)

Oh neat ! Good to know. :)

0 upvotes
Dimit
By Dimit (9 months ago)

It is my feeling-or should I say certainty-that Canon ALWAYS gives less for more versus all other brands.Why? Because they consider-and probably it's more or less true-their products as being 10 to 30 % better than eqivalent products of Nikon,Sony and so on.This is applicable to dslrs solely.I can live with it.
When though it comes to milks,this is totally another area.As I believe that within 10-20 years time mirrored staff will be obsolete,something like dinausars-and they SHOULD be-Canon will follow up,probably last of all.Let's not forget that this firm is deeply conservative and radical innovations is the last card a firm plays knowing they own the highest sales percentage worlwide.
Regarding 70d; Astep forward for sure,emphasizing in af and video mostly,excellent stills quality as always,weight and dimentions still big enough,although minimization CAN be effected WITH THE SAME CONTROLS.
But then,one step at the time,one has to switch to the next model merely every 2 years,no?

2 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (9 months ago)

Canon plays it safe. Their cameras may be boring to DPR readers but they sell more cameras than anyone else. In the US, they offer rebates twice at year and they are substantial--and on desirable items. Backorders are minimal, making Canon a favorite with retailers. They make great lenses and their repair service is usually pretty painless.

So, no, they don't have 36 megapixels, they don't have enough dynamic range and they have too much noise. But for the vast majority of users Canon cameras are fine.

4 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (9 months ago)

@AbrasiveReducer: I completely agree with you (this is also true for Europe, maybe except France, where Nikon might have the lead in absolute DSLR sales) - this is the way a large corporation like Canon works. Cheers! :) P. S.: I own a 5D III and a 7D, not perfect but very good cameras, especially the 5D III (7D looks a bit older right now - and I am targeting solely its sensor here, the body is just fine)

1 upvote
oselimg
By oselimg (9 months ago)

If this camera doesn't bring my slippers, make me breakfast in the morning it's boring, yawn. What was Canon thinking for god's sake!!! I want 42 inch EVF which will work in absolute darkness. Puh!!! optical viewfinder. Boooriiinnnng. I don't want anything that will potentially leave me in a compromising position to justify myself amongst my gear head, techno-junkie local photography society friends. Why, why!!!

1 upvote
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (9 months ago)

New sensor in an ancient shell. Canon is playing hard. Are they trying to bury the competition?

0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

If this sensor yes, Canon will win the competition.
http://www.canon.com/news/2013/mar04e.html

Look like it is not that ones

0 upvotes
BJL
By BJL (9 months ago)

@utomo99 That link is to a 2MP (1920x1080 HD resolution or close to that) video sensor; hardly of interest for still picture cameras. The pixel count is not mentioned, but can be calculated from the fact that the pixel size is a huge 19 microns.

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (9 months ago)

Looks great. Also, glad I waited. Nice that WiFi isn't an add-on like Nikon. However, I do agree about not having 2 memory cards.

0 upvotes
FartIng
By FartIng (9 months ago)

Great - but only 1 mem card slots! :(

Nice specs, this is well worth upgrading to.

2 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (9 months ago)

just a thought.. this dual pixel, apart from helping AF in live/movie mode.. Canon might use this method to improve sensitivity/DR?? A 40MP sensor in disguise?? .. just curious about the IQ

0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (9 months ago)

In theory, they could implement an EXR type process where one pixel is given half the exposure to allow for more exposure range.

In practice, there may be many technicalities stopping it, such as available processing power. It only needs the dual pixel read during AF so the area can be restricted to just the active AF zones, or even 2 reads, one for left and one for right for its PD. But at capture, it would need all 40 million which could currently be beyond its processing limits.

2 upvotes
Dave Peters
By Dave Peters (9 months ago)

Each half of the pixel is already getting half the total exposure as it only gets light from half the lens. Its only the readout that changes. If the image is in focus then you should have half the charge in each of the pixel halves. So dynamic range would not be affected for an in focus image and reading out charge from both halves simultaneously just gives you back the same signal to noise that you would have had as a single pixel.

1 upvote
DanCee
By DanCee (9 months ago)

Najinsky, Dave..make sense guys. BTW I saw 70D sample at Canon.jp with ISO3200, looks clean! Quite promising I'd say. http://web.canon.jp/imaging/eosd/samples/eos70d/index.html

1 upvote
Branko Collin
By Branko Collin (9 months ago)

Maybe you could have an ISO 50 by reading out just one photosite (or by averaging the photosites). You could give a greater weight to one of a pair of photosites at the edge of a sensor to counter the effect of light hitting the microlenses at an extreme angle. There seem to be possibilities there.

1 upvote
Najinsky
By Najinsky (9 months ago)

@DavePeters

That doesn't 'sound' right. Each pixel is getting half the total exposure because it is half the size. The right/left feature is a technique during CDAF processing, not exposure. (but it equates to the same light gathering)

The way it works in EXR is one pixel (half of the dual pixel) is read early and doesn't receive the full exposure. This means you can increase the exposure, by say a stop, to capture more shadow detail, but at the risk of filling other pixels (blowing the highlights). But the companion pixel that was read early doesn't fill up and allows the highlight to be recovered. This is what combines to give the extra DR

In theory this deign could support something similar, but there may be some technical details that prevent it being done in this first generation sensor.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Dave Peters
By Dave Peters (9 months ago)

The only way phase detect AF will work is if each pixel half only receives light from one side of the lens so it must be masked and part of the exposure. By reading out the combined half pixels for the main image, you get the combination of both halves of the lens.

Since for in focus images you expect the same from both sides, there is no reason you could not use your increased dynamic range technique. Not sure what will happen in out of focus areas though - might be some strange effects.

Another interesting idea might be to readout the images separately and use some sort of mask over the front of the lens to obtain stereo pairs for 3D imaging.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (9 months ago)

Finally, Canon got back into the game.

15 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

People tend to forget that technological developments do take time. It's not as if they were sitting out the game until now. Things like this new Canon dual pixel sensor have been in development for years. It just took time for the technology to be finalized to the point that they could finally release it.

4 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

T3, people forget that Canon bought themselves some time with a class leading 18MP sensor that then got some tweaks like on-sensor PDAF and quite a few new lines that appealed to more specific groups....new mount, new STM lenses, new bodies, etc. The 7D probably got the firmware upgrade it got because Canon knew they wouldn't be releasing a 7DII without the newest sensor technology onboard, especially since the timing would make for many years of having a body on the market that would constantly be compared to whatever the 70D had. And in hindsight, Canon knew they weren't just playing with one ace up their sleeve, they had all four and once they hit the market with it they'd have everyone's attention. The sample image quality I've seen is very good, although I'd love to see what a good RAW converter can do. Videos posted here and there reveal AF that leads the industry. Now I just hope Canon will take advantage of touch screen tech to streamline their menu system.

1 upvote
fz750
By fz750 (9 months ago)

Which game..?

Don't see any "photographic" improvements, just stuff for video/liveview..?

Plus it seems extra features such as twin SD slots are even missing from this enthusiast model...

Underwhelmed..

4 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

Well, 2.2MP extra is a start. We'll see how good all those pixels are, but the test shots I've seen are really good. If you don't think having this on-sensor PDAF is a photographic advantage then you must shoot on a tripod at eye level and nothing else. There is a huge opportunity here for subject tracking and absolute spot on focus accuracy when shooting photographs. You have millions of focus points now instead of 19, so if you need to be precise with your focus the sky is now the limit. Not only that, focus at smaller apertures is possible which will make the teleconverter crowd thrilled not to mention low-light shooters. If they've made other improvements to the ISO performance, dynamic range, etc. then we'll have an even more stunning camera to work with.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (9 months ago)

"Don't see any "photographic" improvements,"

There is none so blind as he who simply refuses to see.

This sensor points the way to main sensor PDAF that's as sensitive as existing systems, but doesn't depend on two mirrors and a sensor block all being perfectly aligned to achieve acceptable accuracy. Mirror alignment was what screwed up both the Canon 1D III and Nikon D800 AF systems.

And it can cover 80% of the width and height of the frame, instead of 50% like APS DSLRs or 33% like FF DSLRs.

So, if you "Don't see any "photographic" improvements" in having the best focusing system ever, well...

7 upvotes
fz750
By fz750 (9 months ago)

Actually I never had any focussing issues, ever. So it's not really a big deal for me personally and I wonder what percentage of people did have focussing issues? I also don't think that the introduction of this new technology is done for stills, but for video which I couldn't personally care less about.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

Just like the 7D's new AF system, this system expands your options when it comes to locking focus. I'm not sure what the limitations are, but I'd imagine you'll be able to do better than spot AF if you have a very small area you want to focus on. You'll be able to touch the LCD anywhere and lock focus quickly. I think traditional PDAF will still be very useful, but in certain situaitons using the LCD could be a huge advantage. Imagine razor think DoF using a macro lens and being able to choose exactly where you want it to be rather than using manual focus. Plus, Liveview AF has always been more accurate than PDAF, but now Liveview AF will be much quicker and, therefore, much more useful. Sorry, but any improvement in AF equates to expanded possibilities in still shooting.

0 upvotes
Scorpius1
By Scorpius1 (9 months ago)

I am very curious to see if this sensor improves on the banding and pattern noise problems of previous sensor's..The only issue's preventing me from buying a canon body(still have most of my L glass..)

3 upvotes
ksgant
By ksgant (9 months ago)

Not sure, but beware of banding if jumping ship to Nikon as their 7100 suffers from banding issues in the shadow areas. I'd say just read up on it a little and not do what I did, get the camera and THEN only discover the issue popping up. Just something to be aware of. Not sure if the 70D will have the same issues because I don't know if it's the same sensor that the new Nikons use also.

2 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (9 months ago)

Nikon and Canon do not use the same sensors in DSLRs as Canon makes their own with unique features, the main point of this story.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ksgant
By ksgant (9 months ago)

That's what I figured NetMage, but you never know in this day and age as some use things from different manufacturers, such as Nikon using Sony sensors in some of their cameras.

Having read up more on the 70D, I can see now how new this sensor is.

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (9 months ago)

It couldn't have been the same sensor anyway, since Canon's APS-C sensors are slightly smaller (crop factor is 1.6x).

0 upvotes
Steen Bay
By Steen Bay (9 months ago)

Hmm.. why are the two photodiodes on every pixel read "together for image capture"? Wouldn't it be possible to get a higher resolution if they were read independently, also when shooting the image?

1 upvote
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

Who need more resolution ? Most people want better images instead of more resolution. The Mega pixel war is over few year ago

3 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (9 months ago)

More resolution always improves the image and lots more MPs to go.

2 upvotes
T3
By T3 (9 months ago)

When you're combining the two photodiodes for image capture, you're obviously also combining the light that both those photo diodes have captured. Two photodiodes for every (larger) pixel will obviously deliver more captured light than having just one photodiode for every (smaller) pixel. This obviously impacts light sensitivity and image noise. It's quite possible that using only one photodiode for every pixel may increase image resolution, but at the expense of much lowered light sensitivity and much increased image noise. Is that a good trade-off? Probably not, at least for most users.

2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (9 months ago)

You wouldn't be able to use the full 40mp resolution because for out of focus areas different pixels in a pair receive a slightly different image, which would create very strange image artifacts. Only when combined do the two pixel pairs show the same image as a single pixel would have.

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

What happened to DIGIC 6 ?
Why Canon did not use DIGIC 6 ?
is that correct that Digic 6 still not yet ready or have problems ?
I hope Canon Really working hard to finish it and put on Canon S 120

1 upvote
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (9 months ago)

DIGIC 6 mainly offers improved video recording for compact cameras, specifically including such things as dual IS (adding electronic corrections alongside the lens's optical IS). DIGIC 5+ is currently Canon's 'standard' processor for higher-end SLRs.

5 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

Thanks Andy, But I read it also good on low light photo, more detail

http://youtu.be/zcMoNL_pp8c

and I believe sooner or later more canon cameras will use the Digic 6 including the SLR

0 upvotes
wildbild
By wildbild (9 months ago)

Thank god it's not 24 mpixel! Defraction would have been noticable from f8 on..

1 upvote
sebastian huvenaars
By sebastian huvenaars (9 months ago)

Even better, a 1 mpx sensor will let you take picutures at f/32 without any visible defraction! ;)

Defraction is there, noticable or not.

I rather have the extra resolution until defraction shows up :)

11 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (9 months ago)

Being able to image diffraction at the pixel level is a more accurate picture - don't you want to capture what is really happening to the light as it comes through the lens?

Perhaps a more sophisticated exposure control than aperture adjustment needs to be next.

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

diffraction has nothing to do with pixel count because it's decided by angle of view and aperture size only.

diffraction or not, there is no more detail a low pixel count sensor can capture that a higher one cannot. low pixel count always means less detail.

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (9 months ago)

That isn't true, yab. A lower pixel camera with cleaner high ISOs will lose less detail at a higher ISO because detail isn't being crushed by noise. The 18MP sensor on the 1D X has so little noise at high ISO that is can produce more detail than a smaller sensor with more pixels. Of course, this is all assuming that the lens can keep up with the pixel density of the sensor in the first place.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (9 months ago)

LOL. There is only a 10% resolution difference between 20mp and 24mp. The diffraction difference is essentially invisible.

2 upvotes
Marvol
By Marvol (9 months ago)

If this AF system really - *REALLY* - works, the obvious question is: why still the 1970s mirrorbox at all?

It's pretty obvious that the DSLR form factor is, by and large, past its sell-by date. Give it five more years tops and the DSLR form factor will be considered old hat. And after another 5 it will be considered 'retro' again :p.

17 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (9 months ago)

What's made it obvious, the fact the DSLRs outsell mirrorless cameras by 3-to-1 or more?

Or that mirrorless vendors have cut production by 50% while DSLR vendors have increased production?

Some want to keep selling a fantasy of the demise of DSLRs, but it's not DSLR vendors who are having problems selling their cameras, it's mirrorless vendors who are in the red.

21 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (9 months ago)

Remember what they said about paper? Almost all pros still prefer the ultra realtime, 100% color accurate, near zero power consumption of the mirror OVF.

14 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (9 months ago)

It needn't be if it were modernized to bring in some "EVF-like" features. What about customizable head-up display or some of the things Fuji is doing. The OVF became like many other components in photography-the TLR, the Lecia RF, just slowed or stopped being developed. So, you are probably correct.

3 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (9 months ago)

For EVFs to completely replace OVFs the fallowing has to happen.

1. This new on sensor phase detection has to be just as fast and accurate as the dedicated phase detection af modules

2. The dynamic range of the EVFs need to be greatly increased. At least within half to maybe a stop of the sensor in the camera.

3. No noticeable difference in lag between an EVF and an OVF in all lighting conditions.

4. Either better battery capacities or much lower power consumption EVFs are needed.

5. Some improvement in EVF resolution is still needed.

1 upvote
Marvol
By Marvol (9 months ago)

marike: I'm sure people had arguments like yours when 35mm roll film was introduced "but medium format has better resolution". Then when AF was introduced "but manual is faster and more accurate". Then when digital was introduced "but film is much better". Yes. For NOW. If you plot a line through the points you will see the direction.

And that direction is, the split-light path phase detect AF - which together with an OVF - forces the DSLR form factor - is clearly on the way out, driven by live view and video demands and increased capabilities of EVFs.

Your argument will look just as dinosauric in a few years as those above.

5 upvotes
Marvol
By Marvol (9 months ago)

Nukunukoo: paper is not the discussion here.

First off, pros make up a tiny % of the market. As do the FF DSLRs which they buy.

Second, "pros" are notoriously conservative. They will only switch to EVFs once the EVF reaches a certain level of technical competence - which if the speed of all other digital developments is anything to go by, will be quite soon.

Heck, plenty of pros still prefer film, for crying out loud. It's only thanks to them that Kodak is still producing film. Oh, wait.

1 upvote
straylightrun
By straylightrun (9 months ago)

There is no doubt the mirror box will die, but the DSLR form factor will not. Camera manufacturers will just produce what we know as mirrorless cameras today, in bigger DSLR body form factors with the same current mounts.

3 upvotes
AlanG
By AlanG (9 months ago)

I think that for full frame cameras the SLR design is still useful. But just compare the view through the Canon APS DSLRs (non prism viewfinders) with the view via the Sony SLT systems. And I suspect Sony will have a better EVF on the market before long.

So all things are falling into place to where the EVF is good enough and with sensor based AF like this, Sony's semi transparent mirror will not be needed for Phase Detect AF. So a design such as that of the Nex 7 with this type of sensor may be very appealing and should ultimately be easier to manufacture. Consider how simple this will be once a mechanical shutter is not needed.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (9 months ago)

@Marvol

Mirrorless cameras have been trending on a downward trajectory for many months and 2012 was the worst year yet for MILC vendors. Sony A-mount SLT's failure to gain any market share at all is a clear sign from photographers that they prefer bright Pentaprism OVFs. If you want to speculate about some distant day far in the future when EVFs can match OVFs for usability have at it. But current trends do not at all back up your pipe dream theories. Not one bit.

Photographers are speaking loud and clear with their wallets as Canon and Nikon are pretty much the only two profitable companies in photography. All the rest, your theories about EVFs, crowbarred analogies to film's demise, etc, are currently only fantasy. The sales numbers don't back up your unfounded theories and predictions about mirrorless and the supposed death of DSLRs at all.

See here for a reality check:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51729502

2 upvotes
AlanG
By AlanG (9 months ago)

You do understand that the excitement about this sensor is for its ability to have fast AF in live view mode - thus not using the optical viewfinder which becomes useless for video.

2 upvotes
zkz5
By zkz5 (9 months ago)

Canon just poured a bunch of R&D into a focus mechanism that doesn't even work with the OVF.

While I hope there will always be cameras with good OVFs available, I think that's a pretty big point on the aforementioned chart.

1 upvote
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (9 months ago)

@Marvol. Heard that argument seven years ago. Not that I'm saying that OVF is forever, I'm saying your argument is too optimistic and I agree with Marike. The paper analogy is just that: an analogy, sorry if you didn't get that. DSLR sales are stil strong than ever. Even the Pentax K series sales surged...

1 upvote
dwalk
By dwalk (9 months ago)

This might be the replacement for my 50D. Hopefully the 70D has really good low light/ high iso performance in real life. While i love the magnesium body of the 50D, the lack of it in the 70D is not a deal breaker for me, esp as the 70D still has good ?? weather seals. What do you think? Is the lack of a magnesium body a deal breaker, meaning we wait for a 7D mkD, or is the feature set of the 70 a good enought reason to upgrade now?

2 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

Wait for the review first.
and Canon also did not put the Digic 6 which claimed to work good on low light.
who knows New cameras will be using Digic 6 soon

2 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (9 months ago)

if durability is the same then magnesium body isn't necessary....also it adds to weight as well. wedding photographers rather have a light-weight camear that we can hold in our hands all day. I personally don't even care about weather seals...

2 upvotes
mantra
By mantra (9 months ago)

hi
i can find the information
but is the body of magnesium?

0 upvotes
Frederik Paul
By Frederik Paul (9 months ago)

Could it be that Canon finally got their things straight? I'm curious about the noise performance.

3 upvotes
Barbu
By Barbu (9 months ago)

Take a look: http://web.canon.jp/imaging/eosd/samples/eos70d/index.html
The ISO3200 one looks impresively clean.
-
P.S.: can someone help me? How can I write a clickable link in DPR comments? :)

4 upvotes
oselimg
By oselimg (9 months ago)

click-copy-click paste. There you go... :-D just kidding

0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

By looking at the sample image look good. I hope more test prove it really good

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (9 months ago)

ISO3200 image has noise removal detail smearing, it's not "clean" at all. But it's JPG from pre-production unit likely.

0 upvotes
Abhijith Kannankavil
By Abhijith Kannankavil (9 months ago)

good. Dont know if it's great.

thinking about how the next 7d would be. Or wouldnt be there a 7D? :S
Just more custom modes and some weather sealing arent going to be enough to have the next 7d placed higher up than this one.

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (9 months ago)

The 7D just got older...

.

1 upvote
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (9 months ago)

So essentially you have the image photosite sensor size of a 40MP APS-C but with theoretically better LV AF. Let's see what the high ISO IQ images look like.

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (9 months ago)

No, read the tech again. It's not essentially 40mp.

By Andy Westlake (2 hours ago)

It's RGB with each pixel split into two photodiode with the same colour sensitivity. W doesn't come into it at all.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
6 upvotes
gpsgps
By gpsgps (9 months ago)

Now Canon, repair the G1X with the above features and I'll marry you for ever and ever happily after.

7 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (9 months ago)

I think it is not possible. in few years you will need to buy another cameras which is better and better.
manufacturer want to make money

2 upvotes
Tower
By Tower (9 months ago)

Decent image quality is an issue. AF is not that important! Also Canon should do some thing for studio photography.

0 upvotes
Juck
By Juck (9 months ago)

Huh? AF is important if you're shooting something that is moving,,, like,, oh,, I don't, know,,, birds, football players, your kids, cars.

1 upvote
rrccad
By rrccad (9 months ago)

it's not important for shooting brick walls and iso test charts.

1 upvote
Ragunaru
By Ragunaru (9 months ago)

Now, my question is (as irrelevant as it may seem), what do they mean by custom white balance? Is it Canon's typical setting the white balance with a photo of a sheet of paper. Or can one actually just set a custom white balance in Kelvin, like on Nikon?

0 upvotes
kikiriki
By kikiriki (9 months ago)

Nikon? You can set WB temperature in Kelvin on Canon for ages...

5 upvotes
Total comments: 272
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