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Eyeist serves up portfolio reviews digitally

By dpreview staff on Jun 21, 2013 at 23:47 GMT

Posting your images online for critique is a common practice in DPReview forums as well as on Flickr and other photo-sharing sites. But you usually have to go to a photo festival, or travel to have your portfolio reviewed by a professional curator, and finding the right one for your area of expertise can be a challenge. Allegra Wilde came up with the idea of taking photo curating online, and launched Eyeist.com, a service to connect photographers with creative professionals who can help them focus their selection for projects of many types, from books to websites to presentations. Click through for our review of Eyeist.com.

Eyeist.com offers photographers access to professional experts to whittle down and organize their portfolio for inclusion in books, websites, and other projects.

Comments

Total comments: 12
jmmgarza
By jmmgarza (10 months ago)

A person with only a shred of integrity and intelligence can critique. What a waste.

0 upvotes
Robert Schambach
By Robert Schambach (10 months ago)

I used to post my photos on photo.net where other users could critique my work and found it disheartening by the amount of hateful and thoughtless reviews, not doing that again.

2 upvotes
EduardoJB
By EduardoJB (10 months ago)

The critics have to be able to articulate clearly their comments and I find that most of them don't prepare for it by anticipating what they'll probably be seeing, and, most importantly, try to not repeat the same critiques. In the case of art photography, the market is what decides what's good or bad, and, frankly, too much of what we see, endorsed by curators, critics, historians, and gallery owner, is very bad. Too much of it is either shock value (forced, but pretty empty once the shock is gone) or cryptic (and very hard to understand, thus, not communicating). Contemporary art is exclusive: it pretends to force people to "understand". However, this shouldn't be necessary. Originality without integrity doesn't work, but that's what they teach. A one on one should take some time and the context of the work has to be known to be able to critique.

2 upvotes
EduardoJB
By EduardoJB (10 months ago)

I've been to portfolio reviews before, and I'm not sure if I would go again. The problem is not negative critiques (I, in fact, prefer them, if the person is intelligently communicating), because I'm an architect and have been a design professor, so I'm used to them, the problem is that the time allocated per person is too little. One cannot engage in a give-and-take, and most of the critics are used to saying the same things. Besides, photography in general has been experiencing a "blurring" of divisions between its genres, and the spectrum is wider every day.

2 upvotes
absentaneous
By absentaneous (10 months ago)

frankly, I've never really understood the point of paying someone to tell you what's their taste.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
panos_m
By panos_m (10 months ago)

Every serious collection of images has most probably pass through an intensive editing and organizing stage before being presented in a book, a website or an exhibition space. I have attended portfolio critique and organizing seminars and I was shocked about their not just usefulness but necessity. It is amazing what a experienced editor can do with a photographer's images by selecting a subset of them and by putting them in the "right" order.
The service provided by eyeist is something much needed IMO.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 40 seconds after posting
1 upvote
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

Oftentimes, it's really helpful to have an outside opinion or outside perspective on your work. A lot of photographers who "don't understand" the point of having someone else's input, feedback, taste, curation, etc. are, frankly, just missing out on the opportunity to grow beyond the echo chamber of their own mind. Sure, there are some people who think they don't need such external input, but I think even the best photographers and artists can benefit from it. Don't under-estimate the value of a good editor or curator to cull through your images.

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
absentaneous
By absentaneous (10 months ago)

this is art, not math. there is no 2+2=4 formula. there is no doing it right or doing it wrong. what these people do is simply tell you what they like, what is good for them, how things should work according to them etc. it might be useful for people who don't really know what they are doing so they need someone who would try to make sense of that. if you know what you are doing and if you know why you are doing what you are doing then you don't need someone to tell you you should do it in a different way even when you do it in a "wrong" way. that would be their work then not yours. in my opinion this is what kills art. because it is presumed that there is a good way and a bad way to do things. and then everyone or most of the people follow the same rules. it kills creativity.

1 upvote
groucher
By groucher (10 months ago)

You're right absentaneous. I've witnessed a FRPS assessment in which the examiner demonstrated how to 'improve' a set of landscapes. It soon became evident that all he was doing was applying the golden section and recommending that the whole of the image should be busy. Simplistic rule application such as this leads to boring conformist photography.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

In my experience, the people who think that they need outside opinions the least actually need it the most! Hahaha. Seriously, though, it's true. I've seen it so many times. It's not about "right" or "wrong", it's about getting outside your own head and getting someone else's input. People who feel secure in their own talent and secure with their own egos have no problem doing it. It's those insecure, overly defensive, "I-am-amazing-and-everything-I-do-is-faultless" types who have the biggest problem with this kind of external input and feedback. It gives these types of people a false sense of superiority, as if everyone else is inferior and "just applying a formula" or doing "simplistic rule application." Don't underestimate the value of having a second set of eyes to review your work. You are not infallible or beyond improvement. Even the best artists often do better when they have a collaborator or reviewer giving them feedback.

2 upvotes
jmmgarza
By jmmgarza (10 months ago)

A professional versus an idiots critique? Who is the critic? Good luck buster.

0 upvotes
fuego6
By fuego6 (10 months ago)

wHY?

1 upvote
Total comments: 12