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Just Posted: Samsung Galaxy NX Hands-on

By dpreview staff on Jun 20, 2013 at 19:57 GMT
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Just posted: Our Hands-on with the Samsung Galaxy NX. We were given the chance to play with Samsung's latest phone/camera hybrid - the Android-powered Galaxy NX. It combines a 20MP DSLR-style mirrorless camera body with the vast touchscreen and connectivity of a smartphone, giving a high-IQ camera with 3G, 4G LTE and Wi-Fi connectivity as well as GPS and GLONASS-compatible positioning. What's it like to use, though? Read our Hands-on article to find out.

Click here to read the DPReview Hands-on with the Galaxy NX

Click here to read the DPReview Connect Hands-on with the Galaxy NX

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Comments

Total comments: 114
Timmbits
By Timmbits (10 months ago)

is this a hoax?

or did they actually do this?

with lots of revenues come lots of absurd product and marketing experiments LOL

2 upvotes
Simon Says
By Simon Says (10 months ago)

It used to be a phone with a camera on it, now the trend is the opposite? A camera that also come with a phone?
I bet you can play angry birds on it too.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

And what would be wrong with that? If you're going to lug around such a large device, I don't think it's such a terrible idea that it also be able to do other things besides shoot photos and video. Sure, there are some people who would prefer that their giant camera *only* takes photos, just like there are some people who would prefer that their phone *only* makes phone calls, but other people like to get more functionality out of their devices. If the hardware can do it, then let it do it. Besides, I think we should stop thinking of cameras as only being cameras, or phones as only being phones. The reality is that these devices are basically small, powerful computers with considerable processing power packed into them that can come in various shapes and sizes.

4 upvotes
N13L5
By N13L5 (10 months ago)

Certainly, if I'm carrying a bulky camera, it would be nice if I don't have to also carry a phone and an ebook reader and a compass etc.

So this is the right concept. With enough iterations, it will be a formidable tricorder.

Even if there maybe problems with current implementation, like some here suggest - size, balance concerns etc, its still the right concept.

For photography, everything seems to hinge on sensors. As soon as we learn to shrink them without loosing the full capability of an APC sized sensor, we can use smaller glass and all the other issues of form, balance and weight go away.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

N13L5:

Okay but this is an excellent APSC sensor--and right now smaller sensors cause image quality headaches.

Then the startup time problems with Android remain, and no keeping the camera in sleepmode for days at time is not an option. To save batteries for future use cameras are shut off after a few hours of sleepmode, and then they must restart in something like 2 seconds, if needed.

Also the photo sorting and assignment for upload software on the current SamsungDroid camera, GC110, is not great. So if the NXdroid has the same problems and one is serious about image quality and mobility one is going to have to carry a laptop in addition to this decently fast Android computer.

Possibly something like Adobe Bridge will become available for Android, but it would need to integrate seamlessly into the playback menu included with the Android cameras. It would not simply be additional photo organization software for the camera folder on an Android tablet.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

And still GearCrap double signins get enforced.

0 upvotes
Houseqatz
By Houseqatz (10 months ago)

Who here has actually handled this camera? by that i mean, actually touched it, with their own hands, and seen it with their own eyes? NOT one of the other similar, non android, NX bodies, but this one.. the Galaxy NX.

how does it handle? balance, weight distribution, any thoughts on the lack of physical buttons, or the touch screen? how is the eye cup, and evf, does the eye cup provide adequate isolation?

Only the physical features of the camera itself. no comparisons. i'm not interested in the gc110, or the zoom, or any other android cameras.. JUST the Galaxy NX

thanks,

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

Good enough point, but people are going to speculate, myself included, and reasonable speculation is based upon other Samsung Android 4 devices--eg the GC110 and the Galaxy S4 smart phone.

See with the NX system, it's already known to be a very good sensor with some excellent native lenses.

0 upvotes
Houseqatz
By Houseqatz (9 months ago)

i understand what you're getting at, but we don't how/if the software has been optimized for the chipset in the body. since this is a new body, larger than the previous NX offerings, i'm curious how it handles, balances, etc.

i'm assuming that the image quality will be consistent with prior NX output, same with the lenses. so those aren't as much of a concern as the ergonomics of operation, or simply holding it in operation. i've read the concern of no physical buttons, and while i see that as problematic, the idea of gestures is very promising, as a few android users have highlighted.

i guess i should be more clear with my question.

how does it handle? balance, weight distribution, any thoughts on the lack of physical buttons, or the touch screen? how is the eye cup, and evf, does the eye cup provide adequate isolation?

Only the physical features of the camera itself. no comparisons. i'm not interested in the gc110, or the zoom, or any other android cameras. JUST the Galaxy NX

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (9 months ago)

Houseqatz:

All right but we can only wait and see if there's some real magic to this new interface. (It's a pretty sure bet that Android will take at least 25 seconds to start up from being fully off.)

The bigger problem to my mind, is what this means for the NX30? Or other future NX cameras. And this camera announcement doesn't inspire me to buy more NX lenses.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (6 months ago)

Houseqatz:

All right I tried it, and the Samsung Galaxy NX has all the predicted problems, slow to start from fully off, silly touch screen, not bad menus, just a dumb idea.

On a positive note: Photographyblog reviewed the image quality as excellent, I'd expected that. And a nice unexpected surprise: the raw buffering problems are gone. Very good EVF.

Finally stupid; it uses microsd cards.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (10 months ago)

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz....

0 upvotes
nofumble
By nofumble (10 months ago)

why don't just design a lens mount for the Galaxy S4.

1 upvote
vv50
By vv50 (10 months ago)

yes, why doesn't Samsung just jeopardize their existing lens mount and compete against themselves.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

@vv50 - designing a lens mount for a Galaxy S4 would only bolster their existing lens mount, not compete against it. It would just be another Samsung-mount camera made by Samsung. I don't think Samsung is worried about cannibalizing their own products...and rightly so. As Apple have proven quite successfully, you should never be afraid to cannibalize your own business. The iPhone cannibalized iPod sales, the iPad cannibalized Macbook sales, the iPad Mini cannibalized iPad sales, etc. Conversely, look at the fate of Kodak, which didn't want to cannibalize their film business with digital. They are now dead. As Steve Jobs famously said, "“If you don't cannibalize yourself, someone else will."

3 upvotes
vv50
By vv50 (10 months ago)

you're contradicting yourself. do you believe designing a new lens mount would only bolster their existing lens mount, or do you believe that designing a new lens mount would cannibalize your own business, ergo compete against it?

0 upvotes
BJL
By BJL (10 months ago)

A better solution would be normal cameras controls plus WiFi or bluetooth connection to the phone that most NX camera users will be carrying anyway.

This instead seems like a toaster-fridge: a camera with the size and bulk of a DSLR, but with all the DLR controls replaced by a phone's touch so that the controls that you most often want to adjust while using the EVF cannot be, because they rely on looking at the touch screen.

1 upvote
flipmac
By flipmac (10 months ago)

Agree... the EVF will be awkward to use since there are essentially no physical controls.

Also, a full Android OS is overkill and will just wast the battery.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

I don't think there are as many "eye glued to the viewfinder" shooters out there as you seem to think there are. The reality is that people take their eye away from the viewfinder all the time. I'm a lifelong DSLR shooter, and I used to think I hardly ever took my eye from the viewfinder when shooting, but upon further observation I realized my eye moves from the DSLR's viewfinder all the time, glancing down to the rear LCD, or to the top LCD, or to look at buttons, or whatever.

Plus, you have to remember that NX system has the iFn button which allows you to use the lens's manual focus ring to make various camera adjustments, which is pretty cool. Is it really that hard to use the lens's focus ring to make camera adjustments while your eye is using the EVF? Sounds like it would be pretty easy to me.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

But I don’t have a problem with touch screens and I never heard anyone objecting to the touch interface on the iPhone–perhaps someone said: “Gee writing a page long email would be kind of hard with this, but the rest is cool.)

Physical buttons can be run without looking at them and that’s how people will use cameras best and fastest for years to come–looking at the scene being shot is much more important than looking at the screen. This is why touch screen only controls aren’t the way to go. With current screen tech, I think touch screen only cameras can only work with screens the size of a big iPad–irony we’d be back at large plate photography, possibly with a hood.

CAD or video editing software–all easier with a keyboard and mouse. In fact there are very specialized mice and keyboards for such programs.

continues:

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

T3:

The iFn button isn’t on all Samsung lenses, eg the extraordinary 30mm F2.0, also the adjustment of the function one has chosen with the iFn button is done with a second or third button/wheel. So you’re not real familiar with the NX system. Doesn’t solve using other nonSamsung lenses either.

I don’t know what kind of cameras you use, but this NXdroid is not an iPhone, it’s like a DLSR and one has to be able to quickly and effortlessly change settings while shooting and while still looking at the scene through the EVF. (Perhaps in the future, the gear will be released that can change the surface of the touch screen into physical buttons.)

Irony, the new Samsung Android tablet has 3 buttons at the base of the screen, in addition to things like volume control.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

T3:

I checked my iFN lens, one I don't particularly use, yes the manual focus ring also works as a controller. Also to change the iFN function selected one uses a second wheel. On my camera, there are 4 wheels if one counts the focus ring, and the PASM dial. And all can be moved without looking at them.

So if the lens has iFN, and one isn't focusing manually at that instant, you've got a button/ring combination you can run blind, good. Still better would be a few more buttons. See point about the extra buttons on the new small Samsung Android tablet.

0 upvotes
AngryCorgi
By AngryCorgi (10 months ago)

There's Samsung...pushing the envelope of ridiculous integration.

3 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (10 months ago)

I'm glad Sammy is doing it. Somebody got to try doing it, and they are best positioned.

Now, as the first thing, Sammy needs to send a batch of free Galaxy NXs to Adobe and other camera software companies, and let them develop apps for it - and see what would come out of it.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

You realize that there are already a couple Samsung Android 4 cameras?

And no they don't work well. Android+touch screen only is not a good camera control interface--this is obvious. (No Galaxy tablets and phones are not cameras, they'd PDAs with cameras.)

Say you shoot 200 raws, well you're going to want to sort through them before processing and sending over a network. So move them to a small laptop (possibly with NCF, likely simply by plugging the flash card into the laptop) sort, pick say 30 you like, maybe process to tiff or jpeg, maybe not, then send. All of that is much easier with the big screen of an actual laptop, or big tablet+mouse.

Remember people buying this camera for its wifi connectivity aren't going to simply want to upload 1 or 2 low resolution jpegs to FBbook. (Then there's the fact that marking photos for upload on the GC110 is not straight forward.)

0 upvotes
Eric Hensel
By Eric Hensel (10 months ago)

maybe you carry a laptop everywhere...with this the rest of us don't have to.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

Eric Hensel:

It’s still not a good control interface for shooting photos.

Then having to step out of the camera go into folders and select files (I’d guess possibly raw which you can’t preview in the camera folder, so you have remember exact file numbers) and then mark those files for upload via say DropBox is an unnecessarily complex process to send files. (Yep, that convoluted.) Possibly this will be fixed in future iterations. But that’s how things run on the GC110, and it’s unlikely to be radically different on the NXdroid.

So the paragraph immediately above is a huge reason to carry a small laptop.

Then another big reason to carry a small laptop: It’s a real pain to sort through say 200 raws and pick 30 of those raws, or even jpegs, for upload on a 5 inch screen. (Compounding this problem is that Samsung is using Android to organize the photo files, not separate organization software.)

continues:

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

Eric:

Get it? Uploading 2 or 3 jpegs from this the GC110, very likely also the NXdroid, is already unnecessarily convoluted, and doing actual uploads of any significant amount of one’s work is a real pain. (Unless upload speeds increase dramatically in the next 6 months, and suddenly uploading 6GB of data becomes a 10 minute process.)

Right now most people aren't going to want to upload all of the raws from a nearly full 16GB SD card, normal people would pick through the files and upload those, and over about 5 files that's still best done on a machine with real organization software and a much bigger screen.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

I just played with the other Samsung Android camera, the GC110, the OS is a disaster, no reason to think it will be better with this variation.

And no, it's not easy to find the photos and upload them, and with that camera, it's only jpegs. In fact though wifi was on I never did figure out the upload function.

5 upvotes
IZO100
By IZO100 (10 months ago)

You are probably too old for this camera or you are an iSheep.

I tried and found all I was looking for without even searching.

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

IZO100:

Gee, I looked for "mark photo for upload", and it's not clearly attached to the image files, unlike almost all organization software. . (Maybe this fail will be fixed with the new NX variation.)

Then, the other much more important reason this camera is a fail. No buttons, touch screen only controls, that's not how to do it

If I can ask what were you looking for? Jpeg only? GooglePlay link? Crapware? Having to look at the control screen to run the camera functions, instead of simply remembering which button does what, so you can keep you mind focused on shooting pictures? Well, those be all there for you to find.

I have no problem with a camera that can connect to a network, I have a problem with the execution of the GC110. And this NX isn't radically different.

3 upvotes
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

@HowaboutRAW - "Then, the other much more important reason this camera is a fail. No buttons, touch screen only controls, that's not how to do it."

That's what people said about the iPhone and iPad. "What? No physical keyboard!?! Touch screen only!?! That's not how to do it!"

Of course, these complaints mainly came from the older generation. The younger generation is much more adaptable, and took to touchscreens like fish to water. So the Galaxy NX has buttons on its touchscreen. Big deal. Millions of people touch "buttons" on their smart phones every day. Time to join the 21 century. Also keep in mind that the Galaxy NX does have a top mode dial, and uses the dedicated iFn button which allows control of various camera settings by turning the lens's manual focus ring. So the reality is that it gives you the best of both worlds: manual dials or rings to turn, as well as on-screen virtual buttons interface. Like I said, time to join the 21st century.

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

T3-

Reposted I know, I really wish DPReview would solve the signin mess.

But I don’t have a problem with touch screens and I never heard anyone objecting to the touch interface on the iPhone–perhaps someone said: “Gee writing a page long email would be kind of hard with this, but the rest is cool.)

Physical buttons can be run without looking at them and that’s how people will use cameras best and fastest for years to come–looking at the scene being shot is much more important than looking at the screen. This is why touch screen only controls aren’t the way to go. With current screen tech, I think touch screen only cameras can only work with screens the size of a big iPad–irony we’d be back at large plate photography, possibly with a hood.

CAD or video editing software–all easier with a keyboard and mouse. In fact there are very specialized mice and keyboards for such programs.

continues:

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

T3:

The iFn button isn’t on all Samsung lenses, eg the extraordinary 30mm F2.0, also the adjustment of the function one has chosen with the iFn button is done with a second or third button/wheel. So you’re not real familiar with the NX system. Doesn’t solve using other nonSamsung lenses either.

I don’t know what kind of cameras you use, but this NXdroid is not an iPhone, it’s like a DLSR and one has to be able to quickly and effortlessly change settings while shooting and while still looking at the scene through the EVF. (Perhaps in the future, the gear will be released that can change the surface of the touch screen into physical buttons.)

Irony, the new Samsung Android tablet has 3 buttons at the base of the screen, in addition to things like volume control.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

T3:

I checked my iFN lens, one I don't particularly use, yes the manual focus ring also works as a controller. Also to change the iFN function selected one uses a second wheel. On my camera, there are 4 wheels if one counts the focus ring, and the PASM dial. And all can be moved without looking at them.

So if the lens has iFN, and one isn't focusing manually at that instant, you've got a button/ring combination you can run blind, good. Still better would be a few more buttons. See point about the extra buttons on the new small Samsung Android tablet.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

IZO100:

I looked at the GC110, yes marking single files for uploading is a bit easier than I thought, but still not really smooth.

Unless the NXdroid has radically better photo organization software than the playback menu of the GC110, the much bigger problem with the NXDroid is likely to be picking through say 150 raws quickly and selecting say 10 for upload.

(That's upload, not "share" to a posting site like FBook or Flickr. You see with this mobile computer, people are going to actually want to use it as a mobile networked computer and that's much more than "sharing" say 2 jpegs. Remember iPhones/Pads can't even store files that they can't immediately open, unlike Windows/Mac/Android machines.)

0 upvotes
tinternaut
By tinternaut (10 months ago)

For Samsung, this could be important. I think this could be an ideal second camera for journalists. Imagine capturing a critical moment and being able to get it to an editor immediately (well, immediately if in dual channel HSPA+ or LTE coverage :)).

0 upvotes
W Sanders
By W Sanders (10 months ago)

Unfortunately, your comment may be prescient, now that full time photojournalists are getting sacked and news gathering is being put in the hands of underpaid interns with cell phone cameras.

6 upvotes
PredatorsPrey
By PredatorsPrey (10 months ago)

I hope D-SLRs will stay free of Android or something similar.. and I don't understand why everyone needs instant sharing.

3 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (10 months ago)

Instant sharing is there just for the marketing.

The bigger thing is the ability to replace camera UI with something entirely different, potentially several different UIs suited to various photographic scenarios. Also, of course, the PP and editing. All the things which are impossible with the proprietary firmwares - but are possible with the open Android SDK. Worth mentioning, Adobe is already well presented in app stores.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

"Instant sharing" is the new zeitgeist of photography, and I think it's a heathy development. How many countless photos throughout the decades have been shot, only to be seen once, by a couple of people, never to be seen again? I think the true point of a photo is to capture a moment, then to be seen, shared, and accessible by many people. And "instant sharing" is the best, most effective way for that to happen, because the "I'll do it later" notion often ends up being "I'll do it never".

Frankly, "instant sharing" is a heck of a lot better than "I took a photo and its sitting on my memory card, and I haven't bothered to download it to my computer, but even if I did, it'd just sit on my hard drive and I'd forget about it."

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

And it’s likely to be difficult to instantly share 30 raws from this new camera, or even 30 jpegs.

You see with the other Samsung Android camera (GC110) selection/viewing of many files and execution of send/upload requires a convoluted process. And raws will likely just compound the problems in this new camera. (Yes, Samsung could have shipped some unannounced excellent organization software with the NXdroid.)

Also I really never liked looking at hundreds of shared photos back in the film days, we didn’t need to see every photo taken on vacation wherever. How about the 20 best. There’s a reason many photos never saw wide distribution–the reason is still valid today, even with wide distribution a convoluted upload away.

Do you understand how long it would take to upload say 10GB of photos from a camera? That’s not going to be some easy 20 minute process.

1 upvote
Marvol
By Marvol (10 months ago)

99.x% of all photos that are currently "instantly shared" would have been better off remaining on the memory card of the clueless/ignorant photographer.

I'd rather people have a little look to select actual *good* photos before sharing rather then the Twitstagram hysteria of "everybody must see what I'm having for breakfast"/"everybody must see this skewed and poorly framed shot of this tourist trap that a hundred thousand before me have already taken, better, but please like this photo because it has ME in it".

4 upvotes
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

@HowaboutRAW - "And it’s likely to be difficult to instantly share 30 raws from this new camera, or even 30 jpegs."

Clearly, you're not someone who has much experience with instant sharing of photos. In other words, you're a bit out of touch with how people actually do instant sharing of photos. No, people no NOT "instantly share 30 raws", or even "30 jpegs." Time to look around and see how people *actually* instantly share photos. They share a small handful, typically two or three at a time at most. It goes up to Facebook, Google+, Flickr, Instagram, etc as just a couple photos, not 30 RAWs or 30 JPEGs. And who the heck "shares" RAW photos?!? That's not what we mean by "instant sharing". If I take some photos from my nephew's graduation, I certainly don't upload them as RAW files for everyone to see! Should I also attach a message saying, "Hey, everybody, please process these RAW files for me so you can see them!"? LOL!

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

T3–

Missed my point: I wrote about “sharing 30 raws or jpegs”–I guess I should have made it clearer: “uploading 30 raws or jpegs” is likely going to be a pain from this camera. And people who use cameras like this most certainly go out and shoot 200 raws in a night. So one has to be able to pick through that 200 hundred and mark say 30 for upload. Get it? (Unless the one can upload say 8GB of data in 20 minutes.)

I never disputed that uploading a couple of jpegs from this camera would be pretty easy. But with this NX camera people are still going to want to shoot raw, and then possibly convert a few to jpeg and “share” those few jpegs. (Not me, but someone.)

You really need to stop thinking that the only way people take photos is with an iPhone and that sharing means instant posting. No sharing means uploading to servers, which sometimes post jpegs for viewing by others. It’s kind of arrogant to assume that no one wants to simply upload data from a networked computer.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Frederick Lim
By Frederick Lim (10 months ago)

I decided to choose something else. Bye bye Samsung

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

Right, you have a point if Samsung isn't going to continue serious development of NX bodies, with buttons running the fast to startup menu system+OS.

Too bad many of the NX lenses are so good. And the sensors don't disappoint.

0 upvotes
Frederick Lim
By Frederick Lim (10 months ago)

I have a NX10 with 16mm, 30mm, 18-55mm lens. It is a really nice camera, the optics is so good. However I can't accept the NX series go this way. Fairwell.

0 upvotes
Frederick Lim
By Frederick Lim (10 months ago)

Why EVF modes always stick to fake SLR style?

0 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (10 months ago)

Not "always". Sony NEX 6 & 7 have in-built EVF and aren't shape as a dSLR. Nor the Fuji X-series.

1 upvote
Frederick Lim
By Frederick Lim (10 months ago)

Sorry my statement not clear.

I mean why Samsung's mirroless with EVF models always choose fake SLR style.

And the large screen + SLR's prism + big hand grip, this combination looks so ugly, not acceptable even it is a prototype. I can't imagine a camera like this would released.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (10 months ago)

@Frederick Lim - that "SLR style" is actually a result of decades of camera evolution. Various styles have been tried throughout the decades. But only the best "styles" continue to be used. As for the "DSLR style", that "style" puts the large screen in the best place, the prism in best place, and the big hand grip in the best place. Do you have a problem with putting things in the right place? Like I said, other styles have been tried throughout the years, but designers keep coming back to the "DSLR style" because it just works so well. If you can think of a better place to put the large screen, the viewfinder with integrated pop-up flash, and the big grip, then lets see it!

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (10 months ago)

T3 I disagree. SLR's are needed for the era before decent EVF's. The main feature for the SLR is it's accurate rendition of the lens's vision in the viewfinder. Without a decent EVF, you need the prism to effectively look through the lens which for a modern zoom lens is the most accurate and simplest way to see exactly what the sensor (film or chip) is going to see.

With an EVF, you can see exactly what the sensor sees without the flange distance from the prism, without the limited geometry of higher viewfinder, etc.

Generally for fixed lens film cameras, an SLR was not used for good reason. A rangefinder could be set up to match the field of view near perfectly and in general gives a much more pleasing perspective. There is an advantage too to seeing extra light from around the current lens's frame.

DSLR's needed to exist only in the era of crappy EVF's. As EVF's improve, the DSLR's prism will follow film out the door.

0 upvotes
Thatcannonguy
By Thatcannonguy (10 months ago)

Oh, if only i could make a phone call with my shoes, could drive to work in my fridge and cook on my bicycle... Where is all this going to ?

Oh, and don't forget; every picture taken and uploaded can be used by Google for advertisement without the 'owner's' consent.

Do you need to 'root' this thing too to get rid of Samesung's shell ?

0 upvotes
McCool69
By McCool69 (10 months ago)

>>> Oh, and don't forget; every picture taken and uploaded can be used by Google for advertisement without the 'owner's' consent.

Don't be ridiculous. Google has no more rights to use anything uploaded, shared or sent from this device than from any other device connected to the internet.

1 upvote
Thatcannonguy
By Thatcannonguy (10 months ago)

Ridiculous ? Read the news recently ?

Oh, Android was not stolen, and Google has a clean slate...

Sweet dreams.

1 upvote
IZO100
By IZO100 (10 months ago)

another pathetic ignorant iSheep...

2 upvotes
tabloid
By tabloid (10 months ago)

Questions: Can u make a phone call on it.

Can it send a uncompressed RAW file to somebody.

Can it send a high rez 1080 video to somebody.

Is the IS (image stabiliser) in the lens or the body.

If the camera can only send low rez JPG compressed pictures to somebody, will it still retain the original high rez images.

end

0 upvotes
ianp5a
By ianp5a (10 months ago)

If you have an email client, then you can send anything.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Android has excellent file transfer capabilities, also accessible via the API. In addition, you can write system services constantly monitoring for new / updated files in a given directory. (Android has excellent multitasking capabilities, unlike, say, the much more crippled iOS.)

That is, it's very easy to write an app that even automatically transfers / uploads any kind of a file (even RAW / videos) if the stock interface doesn't support it.

2 upvotes
Thatcannonguy
By Thatcannonguy (10 months ago)

Android is especially good in uploading your data to Russian Mobsters and is also great in downloading viruses and malware. Much better than the 'crippled' iOS !
Oh, don't bother to send a CC of your files to Google. That's done automatically too.

3 upvotes
tabloid
By tabloid (10 months ago)

Didn't understand any of that.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"Android is especially good in uploading your data to Russian Mobsters and is also great in downloading viruses and malware. "

No one forces you to install cracked apps with (possible) backdoors. If you only purchase well-tested stuff from the Play Store, you'll get no viruses.

"Much better than the 'crippled' iOS ! "

I bet you have never programmed either OS'es. I have - both, actually. (Have even written a UbiPix recorder for both.) Believe me: Android 4.x is FAR more powerful than even iOS7. MUCH more powerful APIs, much better everything. iOS cannot provide as much freedom as Android, not even when jailbroken.

BTW, are you an iOS fanboi? Your posts like this and the other one including "Oh, and don't forget; every picture taken and uploaded can be used by Google for advertisement without the 'owner's' consent." show you, while don't know Android at all, love spreading lies about it?

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"Didn't understand any of that."

Referring to Thatcannonguy? He's just trolling.

0 upvotes
Thatcannonguy
By Thatcannonguy (10 months ago)

Oh yes, so much more powerful. So powerful that Samesung needs to disguise their devices as something the size of a surfboard. Not to please the user, no... To create room behind that screen for the huge battery that is needed to come even close to the battery-life of an iPhone.

I am foremost a fan of decency and a sustainable society in which stealing is a very bad thing. No matter how powerful the stolen goods or how refined the sand that has been poured into your greedy eyes.

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"Oh yes, so much more powerful. So powerful that Samesung needs to disguise their devices as something the size of a surfboard. Not to please the user, no... To create room behind that screen for the huge battery that is needed to come even close to the battery-life of an iPhone."

Apples to oranges:

- 4" screen vs. 5" screen
- 1GB RAM vs. 2GB RAM
- true, windowed multitasking vs. a lame excuse (that of iOS)
- a much higher-resolution screen (not only significantly larger)
- tons of sensors, including "finger hovering

etc.

0 upvotes
Jostian
By Jostian (10 months ago)

luv Android but this thing looks plain ugly, not a great form factor at all, looks all plasticky and cheap like a typical bridgecam, Samsungs original NX cams looks great design wise but this just looks yuck!

2 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

I'm a huge Android fanboi

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

(that tapped reply too soon) ... But I don't see the point of implementing it on devices like this camera, particularly not if it comes at the expense of manual controls, battery life (idle or otherwise), etc.

I think Panasonic and even Samsung themselves have proven you can build in pretty slick wifi implementations that allow quick sharing to other mobile devices and remote control... Anything else Android might allow I'd rather just do elsewhere.

Maybe I'm just a stickler for purpose built devices, but I just don't see the great upside to this approach yet.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I think Panasonic and even Samsung themselves have proven you can build in pretty slick wifi implementations that allow quick sharing to other mobile devices and remote control... Anything else Android might allow I'd rather just do elsewhere."

Again, this isn't just about 3G / WiFi sharing but writing custom apps giving you FULL control of every recording / shooting parameter imaginable in a camera with great IQ and a good selection of high-quality lens, unlike every other open solutions before (Nikon's and Samsung's pathetic small-sensor Android cameras). This is what's so great about an open system.

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

I think the reality of writing those custom apps and the breadth of what you can really do falls far short from what you're dreaming of... Based on my experience developing apps for phone/tablets and the typical/hobbled source code release of OEM like Samsung.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I think the reality of writing those custom apps and the breadth of what you can really do falls far short from what you're dreaming of... Based on my experience developing apps for phone/tablets and the typical/hobbled source code release of OEM like Samsung."

Let's wait for more info on how open the API is. Nevertheless, if Samsung doesn't provide low-level access to, say, exposure / focus setting, you can still do a lot of stuff stock Android is capable of - for example, dynamic location recording along with videos. Currently, no other decent (read: large-sensor - I'm not speaking of the Pana ZS 20/30 or the Sony HX series, both sucking very bad in the IQ dept) camera can do this essential stuff.

1 upvote
bed bug
By bed bug (10 months ago)

I personally like the idea of apps for cameras which will open up a new world to the photographer. Much like Magic Lantern has been doing for some time.

Hail new technology!

3 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (10 months ago)

wasting a lot of computing power on Android interface, lengthy startup time. This one is power hungry. My camera can sits for weeks without charging, still has a lot juice left. You need to charge this baby everyday like your phone.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (10 months ago)

And you know all this since you have camera right next to you or what ?
How about not thrashing something nobody outside of Samsung labs and review sites actually has in their possesion yet ?

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (10 months ago)

It was mentioned in a review, I didn't make it up

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Prognathous
By Prognathous (10 months ago)

ATTN Samsung: If you're adding 3G/4G/LTE to a camera, make sure you do it to a camera that can actually replace a phone. This one can't make calls and is too big.

Many users want a more capable camera than what phones currently offer but don't want to go everywhere with two devices. To do it right, just take the 24-80/1.4-2.7 lens and 1/1.7" sensor from your EX2F camera and put it in the S4 or Note2 phones, then sell millions.

3 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (10 months ago)

but then how will Skynet be able to see, without a 4G connection?

1 upvote
utomo99
By utomo99 (10 months ago)

I hope Samsung start considering to opensource the android and using it to other cameras too.
and hopefully many people will contribute and make it better

1 upvote
lol101
By lol101 (10 months ago)

I'm not an expert but I think they already released the source code for their cameras...

0 upvotes
tjobbe
By tjobbe (10 months ago)

no, that is for their open source TIZEN OS cameras ;) but code yet for Android

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (10 months ago)

And it was not the whole code, just the TIZEN part.

0 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (10 months ago)

Here is a solid Android app. I've downloaded and tested it on my Canon T3i using my Nexus 7 tablet.

This will give you an idea of what's possible and to come in this area of convergence.

http://dslrcontroller.com/

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (10 months ago)

"Hello, George! What's that clickety clack sound?"

"Hello, Henry, I'm in the middle of a photo shoot right right now... but, carry on!"

"Can I peek?"

.

3 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (10 months ago)

For keen photogs who are also heavy users of smartphone features, this is not bad. Beats carrying an E-PM2 and ALSO either a Macbook or Note 2. It has everything you need in your various portables - PDA and photo editing applications, games, email, e-reader, MP3/MP4 player, ... and a good camera.

Now let's hope Samsung gets its PDAF, IQ and operational features right.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (10 months ago)

"Beats carrying an E-PM2 and ALSO either a Macbook or Note 2"

In weight? Sure. In capabilities and convenience of editing photos? Not even close. Even carrying E-PM2 + Samsung S3 is going to be both lighter and more convenient (S3 could stay in you pocket, you don't to have to hold the weight until you need it).

0 upvotes
wootpile
By wootpile (10 months ago)

Where is the flipscreen? I hope they release a NX30 and keep the articulating screen on it, the one on NX20 rocks.

2 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (10 months ago)

+1

I'm definitely not buying a camera this size without an articulating screen.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Kuturgan
By Kuturgan (10 months ago)

It will be a total FAIL!

4 upvotes
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (10 months ago)

Just like your contribution to this discussion.
Open firmware in itself is an amazing feat AND blow to traditional camera manufacturers. It will allow for some awesome modifications from programmers who also happen to like photography.
It is sad to see how limited some peoples minds are.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
26 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

Absolutely agreed. This is why the Canon firmware was modded too - to add features that will be 1000 times easier to implement (and portable!) in Android. And a lot more - assuming, of course, the API is sufficiently open and powerful.

2 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (10 months ago)

Too bad hackers can't modify it to have some more buttons and an actually decent ergonomic design. But sure will do great email! Custom rom that's extra zippy, but the camera app crashes 3/4 times... not a big deal... It has Android which makes it awesomer!

2 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (10 months ago)

You are assuming that because an OS is open it is perfectly suited to any task. It isn't. The imaging in Android is woeful at best. Good luck with that!

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"You are assuming that because an OS is open it is perfectly suited to any task. It isn't. The imaging in Android is woeful at best. Good luck with that!"

It isn't worse than, say, in iOS.

1 upvote
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (10 months ago)

Lets wait and see how this works out. To say that an OS is "woeful" in imaging is little premature given that so far only pictures those OSes has had to deal with were coming from tiny, crappy imaging sensors that are found in cellphones.
This thing has a APS-C sized sensor and a rather good one too. No OS can do magic, if it's givven a tiny joke of a sensor and even bigger joke of a lens pictures WILL look like crap there no going around that.
This thing has a good sensor and proper lenses that cannot be compared to anything in any phone out there.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"Lets wait and see how this works out. To say that an OS is "woeful" in imaging is little premature given that so far only pictures those OSes has had to deal with were coming from tiny, crappy imaging sensors that are found in cellphones.
This thing has a APS-C sized sensor and a rather good one too. No OS can do magic, if it's givven a tiny joke of a sensor and even bigger joke of a lens pictures WILL look like crap there no going around that.
This thing has a good sensor and proper lenses that cannot be compared to anything in any phone out there."

Exactly. This is the very first real camera with an open, unrestricted OS. Not even the Nokia 808's Symbian comes close to Android's openness (Symbian was the precursor of Android, capability-wise. This means Symbian is far more powerful (supports a lot of stuff that the other doesn't) than Apple's iOS.)

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

This camera, provided the core camera API is open and allows access to every single function of the camera, can be a bomb. For example, it'll be, then, very easy to write apps like as follows:

- a dynamic location logger app for, say, UbiPix. (I've already written one for Android. Of course, up until now, it could only run on phones with pretty bad sensors.)

- a dream of movie makers: focus shift between two predefined points in a pre-programmed manner.

and so on.

All in all, I'm really looking forward to this camera. If it indeed has an entirely open API, I'll surely purchase one - and will release tons of apps for it. (As I've done for UbiPix on iOS and Android.)

8 upvotes
citrontokyo
By citrontokyo (10 months ago)

I think you meant to say "the bomb," not "a bomb". Being the bomb is a good thing, whereas being a bomb is a very bad thing. Your post seems to be leaning toward the former.

Personally I think it could go either way. If you have to carry around a phone separately, why would you want to double up on connection charges.

Also, enabling only small screen editing on highly capable camera like this one is a downer for many who really want to be doing that kind of thing on their laptop.

In many respects, this camera's capabilities, fantastic though they may be, are mere overlaps with other devices that perform them better.

Then again, I may be misreading what people want, so it could really go either way.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

"I think you meant to say "the bomb," not "a bomb". Being the bomb is a good thing, whereas being a bomb is a very bad thing. Your post seems to be leaning toward the former."

Oops - sorry. (My mother tongue isn't English and I, generally, don't have the time to make absolutely certain I use all phrases like this always properly.)

"Personally I think it could go either way. If you have to carry around a phone separately, why would you want to double up on connection charges. "

The biggest advantage of camera systems like this is (when done properly) full, unlimited access to both shooting params (exposure, focus, shutter speed, ISO, video: bit- and framerate etc.) and the sensors.

For example, there are very few decent ILC's (mostly the, in low light, not-that-spectacular Sony SLT's) with GPS receivers. It's not only built in here, but you can even record your location dynamically while shooting a video with a simple-to-write app. No other ILC can do the same.

0 upvotes
citrontokyo
By citrontokyo (10 months ago)

No worries. English slang makes no sense much of the time.

GPS is useful, I agree.

0 upvotes
King Penguin
By King Penguin (10 months ago)

....er, to anyone other than an English person, that is......

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

Anybody know if one can upload raws over wifi with this camera? That would be a new feature, not one that would interest me, but I can see how it would be useful.

Samsung already had a good OS for the NX cameras.

How much crapware will be installed on this system?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (10 months ago)

If automatic RAW upload is not supported out of the box, it can surely be added as an add-on app. Given that Android programming is quite easy particularly if one already knows Java, I think there will be tons of apps for this camera.

Assuming the core camera API will be sufficiently powerful and open, of course. Currently, it isn't known whether this is the case.

0 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (10 months ago)

Dropbox would work just fine without an issue. Google Drive will work too

1 upvote
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (10 months ago)

I am sure it can be done. This is Android. Yes, standard Android!! I can see all sorts of possibilities and add-on new features/applications, DOF, effects, etc that can enhance the camera no end.

Android! Samsung is smart. Nokia is not. One goes up and up and the other .. (sigh).

Comment edited 60 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

Sergey Borachev+Menneisyys:

This Android thing is only smart if such application can be easily written and installed. Also this Android system needs to be faster, including faster to startup, than the current NX OS, then this Android system would need to be easier to use than the current NX menus.

So those last two are really unlikely, so no even if the first of the 3 requirements is met, raw uploads, Android is likely failure for this system.

1 upvote
wansai
By wansai (10 months ago)

edit: wrong post for some reason

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (10 months ago)

What do you mean easily written and installed? I have no doubt DropBox and Google drive will work without an issue. All you have to do is go to Google Play on the camera and install, but I am sure these two apps already come with factory installed.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

ET2--

I just played with the other Samsung Android camera, the GC110, the OS is a disaster, no reason to think it will be better with this variation.

And no, it's not easy to find the photos and upload them, and with that camera, it's only jpegs. In fact though wifi was on I never did figure out the upload function.

0 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (10 months ago)

If you are having trouble with installing Dropbox and Google drive on Android OS, then most likely it's you who doesn't know how to use the Android OS. The file system could be a bit confusing (Linux in general) for someone who is coming from Windows OS.

It's not that hard once you understand that Linux doesn't have drives (like C or D).

I have absolutely no doubt that Dropbox and Google drive would work on this camera to sync files

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

ET2:

Why would I have to use other software to do this? It should simply be included as part of the OS, particularly if that's the point of having a connected camera.

I'm not going to install DropBox to upload photos it's that simple. It's very likely DropBox is a excuse to spy on what I upload. (First the OS should just have the upload feature there to select from, the user would have to supply the server or email address.)

Anyhow the huge problem with the GC110 is the touch screen and nearly zero buttons. That failure detracts from taking pictures.

0 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (10 months ago)

HowaboutRAW, it's obvious now that you don't have a clue about how software and operating system works in general.

And given this short exchange, I am pretty sure you have never used Linux before. No wonder you were confused.

I will excuse myself with wasting more of my time

Comment edited 7 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

ET2:

I most certainly have owned a Samsung Android 4 tablet, and am plenty familiar with it.

I get it now one has to use external software to execute the upload, like DropBox, the big problem is that Samsung stupidly didn't include links for executing this software (DropBox or whatever) in it's playback menu. (And yes I still have privacy issues with DropBox, but that's not Samsung's problem.)

In all seriousness, it's pretty clear that you're not familiar with digital camera menus, or photo organization software.

I'll explain photo organization software for you. It lets you see the entire contents of your camera folder including raws, one can then export/send files from with direct control of the camera folder from the organization software. Get it? See photo, pick photo, mark to send/upload.

Anyhow the the huge problem that you're still ignoring with the GC110 is the lack of buttons.

Pretending to know what the problem is does your claim to knowledge no good.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (10 months ago)

ET2--

Okay I was somewhat wrong about the upload menu for the GC110, it's indeed less convoluted than I thought.

Now it could be easier, and because of uploading say 10 raws at a time the NXdroid needs to be even easier, and have real photo organization software involved.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 114