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Sigma announces super-fast 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Art for APS-C DSLRs

By dpreview staff on Apr 18, 2013 at 05:00 GMT
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Sigma has announced the 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Art lens for APS-C DSLRs - the world's first constant F1.8 zoom. The lens covers a 27-52.5mm equivalent range, and will be available in Canon, Nikon and Sigma mounts. As yet there is no announcement of a recommended price. The lens will offer the depth-of-field equivalent of a constant F2.7 on full-frame, and allow the use of lower ISO settings in low light, which may under-cut the need for some photographers to change formats.

We're impressed to see a manufacturer creating a high-end lens for APS-C at a time when the big DSLR manufacturers are trying to tempt users across to full-frame bodies and the additional lenses that such a move can require. At a time when APS-C cameras (and their sensors) are so good, and continue to make up such a large proportion of DSLR sales, it makes sense to offer high-quality lenses to support them.

Jump to:


Press Release: 

Sigma Corporation announces world's first F1.8 constant aperture zoom lens

RONKONKOMA, NY, Apr. 18, 2013 — Sigma Corporation of America (www.sigmaphoto.com), a leading researcher, developer, manufacturer and service provider for some of the world's most impressive lines of lenses, cameras and flashes, today announced the Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Art lens, the market’s first zoom lens to achieve a maximum aperture F1.8 throughout the entire zoom range.

This revolutionary, wide aperture, standard zoom lens is created for DSLR cameras with APS-C size sensors, which translates to a focal range of 27-52.5mm on a 35mm camera. With a minimum focusing distance of 11 inches, and a maximum magnification ratio of 1:4.3, the 18-35mm is ideal for landscapes, portraits, still-life, studio, close-up and casual photography.

"Exceptionally fast apertures were previously unavailable in zoom lenses, so photographers turned to several prime lenses in a session to get bright images at various focal lengths. We're incredibly excited to be the first manufacturer to bring the F1.8 standard zoom to the market and to provide photographers with a new level of creativity and convenience, with the outstanding image quality at the core of the new Sigma Global Vision," said Mark Amir-Hamzeh, president of Sigma Corporation of America.

Amir-Hamzeh added that because developing a large aperture wide angle zoom lens can prove to be technologically and optically challenging, often resulting in various distortions, aberrations and field curvature, Sigma has tapped into its long history as a lens pioneer to overcome those issues in this new generation lens.

"Our experience with the wide angle designs of our 12-24mm F4.5-5.6 II DG HSM and our 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM, and our research and development in our Aizu factory have prepared us for this technological advancement,” he said. “Our wide, glass-molded aspherical lens and the incorporation of Special Low Dispersion (SLD) glass have optimized power distribution of the optical elements and compensated for various aberrations, as well as curvature of field at the widest angle. We’re extremely proud of this achievement."

The 18-35mm is the latest addition to the company’s company’s Art line of lenses, designed under the new Global Vision. The Global Vision lenses have a sleek new design with the manufacturing year stamped on the barrel, and are categorized by use into one of three groups: Art, Contemporary and Sports. The Art category delivers high-level artistic expression through sophisticated and abundant expressive power.

The new 18-35mm lens incorporates Sigma’s improved AF/MF switch and the use of Thermally Stable Composite (TSC) compound material, which has a high affinity to metal parts, consistently performs well at extreme temperatures, and reduces the size and weight of the lens. It is also compatible with Sigma’s new USB Dock, which will be available in coming months, enabling photographers to update lens firmware and adjust focus parameters from their computers.

Convenient handling is achieved with internal focusing and zooming, which prevents changes to the size of the lens. Additionally, the front part of the lens does not rotate, so special filters like circular polarizers can be used.

The 18-35mm lens’ Super Multi-Layer Coating reduces flare and ghosting and provides sharp and high contrast images, even in backlit conditions. The petal-type hood that is supplied with the lens will provide extra protection from flare and ghosting. Sigma’s Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM) ensures a silent, high-speed AF function and the optimized auto focus algorithm results in smooth focusing and full-time manual focusing capability. Lastly, the nine-blade, rounded diaphragm creates an attractive, round bokeh at large-aperture settings.

Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM specifications

Principal specifications
Lens typeZoom lens
Max Format sizeAPS-C / DX
Focal length18–35 mm
Image stabilisationNo
Lens mountCanon EF, Nikon F (DX), Pentax KAF, Sony Alpha, Sigma SA
Aperture
Maximum apertureF1.8
Minimum apertureF16.0
Number of diaphragm blades9
Aperture notesRounded diaphragm
Optics
Elements17
Groups12
Special elements / coatings5 SLD glass elements, 4 glassmold aspherical elements
Focus
Minimum focus0.28 m (11.02)
Maximum magnification0.23×
AutofocusYes
Motor typeRing-type ultrasonic
Full time manualYes
Focus methodInternal
Distance scaleYes
DoF scaleNo
Physical
Weight810 g (1.79 lb)
Diameter78 mm (3.07)
Length121 mm (4.76)
Zoom methodRotary (internal)
Filter thread72 mm
Hood suppliedYes
Hood product codeLH780-03
184
I own it
439
I want it
20
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 724
1234
tazmac
By tazmac (Apr 18, 2013)

Well done Sigma!

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

NOW can we please have night scenes properly framed?

1 upvote
ebrembo
By ebrembo (Apr 18, 2013)

Bravo SIGMA!!!!!

6 months ago i thought of sigma as a company with many products that were not of good quallity. The releace of the 1.4/35 showed my that they clearlly changed their goals, today i simply congratullate them.

I hope other companies made also such interesting anouncements.

edit: PS: the lack of an a-mount edition let me down a bit

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (Apr 18, 2013)

It will be interesting to compare this to the 16-35L with metabones speed boost adapter.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Apr 18, 2013)

I sometimes feel like I've said this thousand times - the Metabones Speed Booster doesn't work on SLRs.

8 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Apr 18, 2013)

Lets give this guy the benefit of the doubt and say he's got a NEX or something similar and is assuming they will release this new Sigma lens on a mirrorless one day?

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

You can always adapt the lens to mirrorless, there are even adapters with AF support. So if you are going this way, you can choose either a glassless adapter for the 18-35, or the Metabones for 16-35 (or better 24-70/2.8), and these solutions really do compete.

0 upvotes
ceaiu
By ceaiu (Apr 18, 2013)

But what do you say about the way Sigma handled this release?
Now you have a rumor with most comments saying it’s a fake… couple of hours later it’s official… and then some even have pictures (not samples though) with the preproduction model.
Who was expecting that release?
I though their next ‘Art’ would be a 24mm f/1.4 or a 135mm f/2 based on a 2 YO rumor.

3 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Apr 18, 2013)

I would love to see them continue with this trend and release a 67-135 f1.8 APS-C super fast tele zoom. I assume it would weigh 2 lbs and cost ~$1,500. I wounder if that would sell?

0 upvotes
ceaiu
By ceaiu (Apr 18, 2013)

A 70-135mm would need OS also. I wonder if it's doable with an f/1.8. I doubt it.
If priced right I'd like to see a 35-70mm f1.8 with OS instead.

0 upvotes
Kokeen4231
By Kokeen4231 (Apr 18, 2013)

Wow! Its been a long time since any of these lenses interest me. On the spec sheet it looks great. Hopefully it can really deliver.

7 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

So far, with my 35mm and 17-70mm (both new gen), they did deliver!

0 upvotes
gustavditter
By gustavditter (Apr 18, 2013)

Sigma is best with fast lenses , as 50 mm 1.4 super ! teles are better by Tamron, according my experience , with the Nikon D90 , D3200 and D7000 . Do you have experience withv Tamron ?

0 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

Nope. But I was pondering on their new 24-70mm with OS, I would expect a great center image when mounted to my crop D7100. Now this one is announced. I know, different ranges, but choices, choices...

0 upvotes
Spunjji
By Spunjji (Apr 18, 2013)

"The lens will offer the light-gathering and depth-of-field equivalent of a constant F2.7 on full-frame"

Aaaaaaaarrrgh who wrote this?! Wrong wrong wrong.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Apr 18, 2013)

looks good to me, at least in terms of DoF. Light gathering of f/2.7 is obviously bollocks.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Tim F 101
By Tim F 101 (Apr 18, 2013)

BUT what is its equivalence to a 4x5 view camera? To the Hubble telescope? This report is woefully inadequate.

2 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Apr 18, 2013)

It's correct. What's the damn issue? The lens at f1.8 gathers photons over an APS-C area at the same total photon count of FF f2.7.

2 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Apr 18, 2013)

The depth of field equivalent of F2.7 is (hopefully) completely non-controversial.

In terms of light gathering, the F1.8 zoom projects a greater intensity of light, of course, due to its larger aperture, but onto a smaller sensor area. The net affect is that the overall quantity of light being captured is that same as using an F2.7 lens on full frame.

8 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Apr 18, 2013)

Andy,

What you are saying is correct. However, people who don't understand that will think that it means that this is actually an F2.8 lens on APS-C systems.

The statement just wasn't fully qualified. It is all in the definition of light gathering which most people don't know the true definition of.

2 upvotes
OldScotch
By OldScotch (Apr 18, 2013)

"The net affect is that the overall quantity of light being captured is that same as using an F2.7 lens on full frame."

That's technically correct, but that's already factored in when we're talking about apertures - they are a rato measurement after all. The statement is rather misleading.

0 upvotes
FoolyCooly
By FoolyCooly (Apr 18, 2013)

No one really cares about "full frame equivalents". It's just another over-hyped term seen in equipment talk forums and review sites.

1 upvote
Tim F 101
By Tim F 101 (Apr 18, 2013)

The capture parameters (f/stop and shutter speed at constant ISO) are f/1.8. The DOF is what you would get if you took a ff picture at f/1.8 and then cropped it to about .62 of its area. That looks like f/2.7 if you print it at the same size as a ff pic and compare them side-by-side.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
BJL
By BJL (Apr 18, 2013)

I am fine with this equivalence talk if it also included "ISO speed equivalence". My edit:
"The lens will offer the light-gathering and depth-of-field equivalent of a constant F2.7 on full-frame _used at about twice the ISO speed in order to get the same shutter speed_".

0 upvotes
sadwitch
By sadwitch (Apr 18, 2013)

Oh finally Olympus F2 zooms have been dethroned...

This lens can be really be call the one and only now.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

They are 3x though.

0 upvotes
sadwitch
By sadwitch (Apr 18, 2013)

I bet this lens will reignite another feverish round of APSC and FF equivalence mudslinging.

m4/3 vs FF will take a backseat now.

2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Apr 18, 2013)

Story from 5-6 years ago repeats. When ppl doubt 4/3 sensor format has any sense to exist.

1 upvote
Infared
By Infared (Apr 18, 2013)

EXCITING!
..but I am a full-frame shooter :-(.
I have their new Art-Line 35mm which ROCKS...so I hope this lens reviews as well in IQ and price! The new Art Line is looking promising!
YOU GO SIGMA! ...bring the Camera Manufacturers to their knees! :-)

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
sadwitch
By sadwitch (Apr 18, 2013)

WOW i must say.... finally something ground breaking and could be a reason to stick to or buy into APSC format cameras again. Amazing its not crazy huge too like canon's and nikon's offering. Only 72mm filter thread and 0.8kg. This is something canon and nikon should've done to show their commitment to APSC cameras rather than relying on their legacy lenses.

5 upvotes
SunnyFlorida
By SunnyFlorida (Apr 18, 2013)

I Love you Sigma!

1 upvote
pancromat
By pancromat (Apr 18, 2013)

i'm referring to the press text here. i do understand the term: "depth-of-field equivalent of a constant F2.7 on full-frame". more (sometimes unwanted) depth of field because of the smaller sensor. but "light-gathering equivalent of a constant F2.7 on full-frame", that's new (or nonsense) for me. a f1.8 on FF does not "gather" more light then the same f1.8 on APS-C. if my meter tells me i need f5,6/ 1/30s @ 100ISO to get the right exposure, it is the same on every lens/camera-combination, from 8x10" via 4x5", 4,5x6cm, 35mm, APS-C, 4/3, 1" etc. or will you tell me that i have to step down if i change from an APS-C body to a FF body retaining the lens and the scene.

5 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Apr 18, 2013)

I think you have to allow for the size of the image circle. A smaller image circle with more intense light can gather the same amount of light as a larger image circle with less intense light. The number of photons gathered can be the same.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Dennis
By Dennis (Apr 18, 2013)

The exposure is the same because the light intensity is the same. Same intensity over larger area means more light gathered. Thats why an image shot with a larger sensor has less noise - more light means lower SNR.

5 upvotes
Thorbard
By Thorbard (Apr 18, 2013)

So its misleading (within the bounds of current understanding of "equivalent"), but not necessarily incorrect.

Still, interesting lens!

0 upvotes
Spunjji
By Spunjji (Apr 18, 2013)

It's still an f1.8 lens. The amount of actual photons gathered is utterly irrelevant to the end user, which is why "equivalency" is of no use whatsoever for anything other than estimating DoF.

2 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Apr 18, 2013)

It shouldn't be irrelevant. The number of photons are your data points. As long as cameras have variable ISO, variable sensitivity, than the total light from the lens is paramount. You can widen the light over a larger image area dropping it's intensity or focus it down into a smaller image area increasing it's intensity but the light is still the same and still contains the same information. It amounts to an ISO change corresponding to the image circle, nothing more.

0 upvotes
Antisthenes
By Antisthenes (Apr 18, 2013)

Spunjji wrote:
> The amount of actual photons gathered is utterly
> irrelevant to the end user

The number of photons gathered is only irrelevant to ignoramuses like you, who haven't grasped the implications of the size difference between a 24x36mm sensor and an APS-C sensor: at equal irradiance, the 24x36mm sensor will obviously gather more photons than the smaller sensor.

Or in simpler terms: which one do you think will generate more electrical energy when exposed to the same irradiance: a 1m x 1m solar panel, or a 1.5m x 1.5m solar panel ?

It's this larger number of photons gathered that translate into smoother tonal ranges and better SNR, which are parameters that are quite relevant for end-users considering image quality.

Thus, Sigma (who probably know a bit more about sensors and optics than you) are entirely relevant when they say that this F/1.8 APS-C lens has a light-gathering ability that is comparable to that of a F/2.7 lens on a 24x36mm sensor.

2 upvotes
crsantin
By crsantin (Apr 18, 2013)

No price range announced...why do I have the feeling this is going to be mega expensive? Terrific idea though, congrats Sigma for doing something different.

7 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

I hope this is the sign of things to come.

1 upvote
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

The end of the ages? ;-P

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

The end of f/5.6 zooms.

1 upvote
mpetersson
By mpetersson (Apr 18, 2013)

If it performs well, this could be huge. Pricing needs to be right though if they want to take a chunk out of Canikons lens sales...

2 upvotes
Thorbard
By Thorbard (Apr 18, 2013)

Sigma's pricing has always been good, at least in my part of the world. QC has always been what has let them down, particularly on the lower end stuff.

0 upvotes
King Penguin
By King Penguin (Apr 18, 2013)

Nice, but a few nice primes will be a lot smaller, easier to handle and also be sharper and cheaper......

1 upvote
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

True, but good luck to you carrying all that and switching between them on the go.

9 upvotes
Tap0
By Tap0 (Apr 18, 2013)

Good luck with carrying around a 810 gm lens.

0 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

Carried heavier. Did the job. Can't handle the weight? Oh yeah, only gurls can endure the bulk! ;-P

5 upvotes
JakeB
By JakeB (Apr 18, 2013)

I like your attitude, Nuk.

Gotta realize dpreview is largely frequented by old fellas with weak wrists, poor eyesight, and cheap monitors.

3 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

LOL! And apparently, dirty sensors, I mean with all that lens switching and stuff!

1 upvote
Low Battery
By Low Battery (Apr 18, 2013)

@Tap0 810g is about the same weight at a 24-70 f/2.8 lens.

1 upvote
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Apr 18, 2013)

Unbelievable, with very practical focal lengths. I wonder why Canikon, doesn't have something similar. Is it due to size? This one is really huge yet if you're shooting indoors, this is the beast to get for our APSC camera especially for the Sigma mount. This might even have unheard of, image quality in an APSC zoom. I can't wait to hear the price and see the reviews.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

Canikon have FF to sell.

0 upvotes
jonny1976
By jonny1976 (Apr 18, 2013)

the best part is that people here still confuse aperture in terms of light entering the lens and bokeh...1,8 in apsc is a faster than 2,.8 in ff...POINT: then there is the qustion of shallow depth of field. 1,8 vs 2,8 will show the same shallow depth of field or similar, but when you shoot 1,8 in apsc is faster than 2,8 in ff.. is not that difficult to understand...a tamron 28-75 2,8 is not like this lens, it will show similar depth iof field but same speed with FF camera you will need an higher iso to match the faster aperture.

3 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 18, 2013)

If it's not that difficult to understand, why did you get it wrong?

The higher ISO is because you have...

less light.

This has been well understood by photographers for a century. It's why we shot so much with tri-x on the 4x5, while using a much lower speed film on the smaller formats, because a certain size "hole in space" lets in the same amount of light at the same coverage angle, whether it's a 50mm 1.4 on 35mm, an 80-100mm f2.8 on 6x6, a 180mm f5.6 on 4x5.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Apr 19, 2013)

i love the know it all tone when your completely wrong. Full frame offers superior iso performance because the total amount of light hitting the sensor is greater because it has more surface area

0 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

It's weird how people seem to have a narrow view of a fast wide. It's never been done in such a zoomable configuration.

Now think indoor events and weddings. Can you see it now?

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
16 upvotes
jonny1976
By jonny1976 (Apr 18, 2013)

it will be the perfect lens for this...incredible achievement..and they have many ace in their sleeve am sure.

3 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

I'm sure one of the bashers here will say "Nah, that's what them bright flashes are fer!"... ;-P

8 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Apr 18, 2013)

NKNK
Can I be in your fan club?

0 upvotes
bcalkins
By bcalkins (Apr 18, 2013)

Nice! Didn't think anyone would be saying 'I shot my zoom lens STOPPED DOWN at f/2' any time soon :) Sigma is bringing out some interesting stuff these days...

11 upvotes
RaZZ3R Death
By RaZZ3R Death (Apr 18, 2013)

Bravo Sigma, now please make for the other system, that Canon and Nikon pretends they don't exist, like Pentax and Sony, the ones who have IBIS.

16 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Apr 18, 2013)

If they make the mount for the M43rds it will be awesome with the 5 axis IBIS.

1 upvote
marcio_napoli
By marcio_napoli (Apr 18, 2013)

Just a couple of days ago, I suggested that a f1.8 zoom should exist in M4/3 format, and should be completely doable, given its smaller sensor size.

The replies I've got: "are you a lens designer??" and all sort of disbeliefs.

Last time I suggested in DPreview forums a f2.0 APS zoom, I got the same replies: "it would be impossible. Too bulky, weight tons, cost a house, etc".

I'm not a lens designer, but Sigma is, and Sigma just proved how wrong these forums experts are.

There it is, the f1.8 zoom.

As far as I see it, it doesn't weight a ton. Oh wait, 810 grams? A girl can hold it all day long.

Yes... we're seeing impossible things.

24 upvotes
stevens37y
By stevens37y (Apr 18, 2013)

>> 810 grams? A girl can hold it all day long.

try once

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Apr 18, 2013)

stevens37y - go to the gym or something. My girl doesn't have any problem with holding gear that's 1.5 kg, and she's rather fragile.

10 upvotes
Spunjji
By Spunjji (Apr 18, 2013)

810g really is quite heavy for an everyday lens... I think the point the M4/3 people are making is that it's odd to combine small and light cameras with something as large and heavy as this. I doubt you could shave much off the weight for an M4/3 version, if any at all.

That said, don't see any reason why it'd be *impossible* to make one.

0 upvotes
jacketpotato
By jacketpotato (Apr 18, 2013)

This on Fuji XE2 (with hybrid pahse dectect) would be a stunner.

0 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Apr 18, 2013)

@itsastickup

A bit too early to conclude. First of all this is a complete new lens design out of their top of the line product range. On paper the (9 blade rounded) lens design looks wonderful for many crop factor camera users who want to have a very fast zoom lens with pleasant soft boke.

Secondly it has no use to produce a lens for the top of the market if it has no good characteristics.

3 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Apr 18, 2013)

I made a counterpoint to the over-excited people here who are not familiar with Sigma zooms. Sure, they may do a good job but it remains to be seen and I'm not hopeful.

As it happens, rounded aperture blades are a bonus but good bokeh comes from the glass.

"Secondly it has no use to produce a lens for the top of the market if it has no good characteristics."

It hasn't stopped them before.

0 upvotes
razorfish
By razorfish (Apr 18, 2013)

W O W !

2 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Apr 18, 2013)

Sigma zoom bokeh tends to be harsh.

And the performance of their normal zooms is fairly poor.

I won't be making any changes to plans based on this announcement.

0 upvotes
straylightrun
By straylightrun (Apr 18, 2013)

Thank you for taking your time to share that with us.

12 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Apr 18, 2013)

Thankyou for your kind reply.

1 upvote
philchan
By philchan (Apr 18, 2013)

f/2 for the range is commendable but f/1.8 is fantastic!!
Now let’s see how it performs – wide open!

8 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Apr 18, 2013)

Well, it won't match primes, that's obvious. BUT it's good enough for me if at f/2.8 it matches regular bright zooms.

0 upvotes
Dhabits
By Dhabits (Apr 18, 2013)

Sweet, Sigma really is on fire with their lenses. All of the new Art series lenses are sure to make the big brands think or at least it should.
As a Canon user i don't see any point going for an L lenses if Sigma provides an alternative that actually perform better than L glass and is roughly half the price. Weatherproofing is not that important to me and i honestly think that apart from real professionals not many people really need that.

Just look at the new 35mm F1.4 for FF and the 30mm f.1.4 for APS-C, Canon offers nothing close to the 30mm atm. You have the EF 35mm F2 IS but its almost double the price than the 30mm Sigma and i would expect the Sigma to be on par or even better than the Canon lens. Sigma just needs to release an ~24mm f1.4 ish and they're pretty much set.

3 upvotes
EXX
By EXX (Apr 18, 2013)

No Sony A-mount version? Bummer.

2 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Apr 18, 2013)

Not in the initial specs on Sigma's website, but that doesn't necessarily mean they won't ever make one.

5 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Apr 18, 2013)

According to some other sources they plan to release A-mount version later on. Kinda like they did with 35mm f/1.4. Initially it wasn't announced on A-mount but they did made it later on.

1 upvote
BlackZero
By BlackZero (Apr 18, 2013)

Thats a commendable innovation.

7 upvotes
Future user
By Future user (Apr 18, 2013)

Great. Now make a 8-16 f1.8 and 50-100 f1.8. I bet some FF users would sheet on their pants, LoL!

3 upvotes
ceaiu
By ceaiu (Apr 18, 2013)

Sigma released it's 8-16mm in 2010. I could see this redesigned for the new lineup with a constant f/4 instead of the f/4.5-5.6. Do you realy need that f/1.8 aperture with such a wide lense?

1 upvote
Future user
By Future user (Apr 18, 2013)

It would be very useful for handheld night landscapes, and indoors, wouldn't it?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
ceaiu
By ceaiu (Apr 18, 2013)

I thought landscape and architectural photographers use tripods and large ‘f’ values (to have everything in focus). I may be wrong…

2 upvotes
Future user
By Future user (Apr 18, 2013)

You aren't wrong, but that's just the limitations we've had with wide lenses until now. With f1.8 in the ultrawide range there would be still a large depth of field for landscape, and tripod could be avoided in lower light. Wouldn't it be great to leave tripods at home and use lower isos?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
ceaiu
By ceaiu (Apr 18, 2013)

The way technology progresses everything is possible, but with what cost?
Sigma’s current 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 is 700$. How much would one pay for a constant f/1.8 (OS also?) to leave the tripod at home?
I think DX gear should remain cheaper than the FX equivalent, otherwise what’s the point?
This new 18-35mm is nice (for me anyway) only if it’s bellow $1,200. One would need a trinity of similar 2x zooms (18-35mm + 35-70mm + 70-135mm) to cover what 24-70 & 70-200 f/2.8 covers.

0 upvotes
the Mtn Man
By the Mtn Man (Apr 18, 2013)

And just how much is this dude going to cost?

0 upvotes
Jablok
By Jablok (Apr 18, 2013)

I'm wondering if they could make it for FF as well...
Or at least fullframe 17-50 2.8

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Apr 18, 2013)

at first i was intriuged but the more i think about about it the more i dont get it. its is going to perform essentially like a 28mm-50mm f2.8 full frame lens. witch is kind of an odd focal range. Also taking aps-c lens to this extreme to get similar performance to full frame zoom lenses makes little sense because it going to make the camera bigger heavier and more expensive. witch puts it in a category of full frame. yeah i know it wont be as expensive as a full frame setup but it may be pretty darn close to as big and heavy. so what is the point really. Also this may mirror the relative low light quality of a fullframe zoom and the dof but full frame still offer an inherent increase overall image quality.

2 upvotes
ebsilon
By ebsilon (Apr 18, 2013)

tend to agree with you there. As great an achievement and f/1.8 zoom is in itself, anyone wanting this kind of specs would be better off with full frame and a 24-70mm f/2.8 zoom. Light gathering and DoF would be practically identical, as would size and weight and probably cost - with broader range as well. I think it demonstrates that the size and cost advantage of APS-C (for standard zooms) is valid only if you accept that you loose a stop in light gathering and DoF ability. What is intriguing though is what this could bode for in the future for APS-C mirrorless cameras.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
1 upvote
technotic
By technotic (Apr 18, 2013)

The light gathering is not practically identical. I thought F1.8 is F1.8 regardless of sensor size and hence is over 1 stop brighter than F2.8?

7 upvotes
ceaiu
By ceaiu (Apr 18, 2013)

Apparently Nikon’s execs think like you. Why give something ‘nice’ to DX when there is FX?
Good thing there is also Sigma, which released 3 DC lenses since reorganizing lineup.

2 upvotes
DStudio
By DStudio (Apr 18, 2013)

My Minolta light meter must be really messed up - it never asks me what size sensor or film I'm using!

7 upvotes
belard
By belard (Apr 18, 2013)

It just means those people who already have an APS-C as their main body can benefit from some of the advantages of a 24-70 f/2.8 on full frame without having to sell all their other small, compact lenses and getting new FF ones. This lens may turn out to be expensive, but not as expensive as a whole system change.

12 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Apr 18, 2013)

It should still be considerably lighter and smaller than the equivalent fullframe.

1 upvote
ebsilon
By ebsilon (Apr 18, 2013)

Keep in mind that f/1.8 means that the aperture in actual mm's is focal length / 1.8. I think it's this measure that determines the total amount of light that reaches the sensor. So in terms of actual aperture opening for apsc we get A_apsc = 27.5/1.8 = 15.3mm for the Sigma zoom and A_ff = 50/2.8 = 17.8 mm for an equivalent 50mm f/2.8 full frame.
The Sigma zoom at 78x121mm and 810g is also not that much smaller than the comparable Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 at 83x133mm and 900 g.

0 upvotes
KalleAnka
By KalleAnka (Apr 18, 2013)

Light gathering per sensor area is identical for FF and APS. Thats where the f/1.8 is f/1.8 comes from.

However, the FF sensor has 2.6 times the area of the APS. This means that the TOTAL light gathering is 2.6 times better for FF than APS if they are both f/1.8.

f/1.8 on APS is equivalent to f/2.88 on FF, if you adjust for the focal length.

2 upvotes
maksa
By maksa (Apr 18, 2013)

Dear Mr. Yamaki! I think, Sigma is a great company and is on the way to a great success, but please don’t stop making decent affordable lenses. We don’t need a second Zeiss instead of old good Sigma, so please continue developing your Contemporary line. Particularly, we really need a replacement for both 70-300mm telezooms with better performance and possibly such full frame lenses as 24-120mm F3.5-5.6 and 28-200mm F4.5-5.6 with up-to-date specifications.

And thank you for such brilliants like new F1.4 primes, the 17-50mm, and many other great lenses.

7 upvotes
3dreal
By 3dreal (Apr 18, 2013)

f1.8 APSC=the same lightgathering like f2.7 on FF.
so comparing both formats at iso 100 and 1/30 apsc-lens at 2.7 shows darker image than ff-lens at 2.7? i dont get it. discussed here endlessly.
that would mean an external lightmeter must be recalibrated whe switching from FF to aps-c? very strange. fstops- no matter on which formats are all the same in relation to Evs.

0 upvotes
jgardia
By jgardia (Apr 18, 2013)

Hi,
The whole "equivalence" thing involves the focal length, the f number and the ISO.
So, this lens at 18mm, f1.8 and ISO 100 in a APS-C camera is "equivalent" to a 27mm f2.7 and ISO 225 in a 35mm camera.
Equivalent means that you are gathering the same number of photons in the whole picture, so same framing and DOF.
I hope this helps.

7 upvotes
Graham Lacdao
By Graham Lacdao (Apr 18, 2013)

f1.8 APSC=the same DOF like a f2.7 on FF
Light gathering of a f1.8 lens is always f1.8

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
22 upvotes
vscd
By vscd (Apr 18, 2013)

Thanks Graham. ...at least *ONE* without having halfbaked wisdom.

5 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Apr 18, 2013)

This is a common misconception on this forum. The light intensity conveyed by a particular lens at the sensor is identical whether FF or half frame but a half-frame lens has a smaller image circle - you don't get a darker image but you do get vignetting of the image.

f-number is defined as the ratio of the focal length to the diameter of the entrance pupil and is not related to sensor size.

If you put say the FF 50mm f1.8 on a half-frame camera, its equivalent focal length would be 75mm, its f-number would remain f1.8 and the camera would behave as if the lens were f1.8. If you have FF and half-frame cameras, this is easy to confirm.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 18, 2013)

can´t believe the cluelessness here.....

10 upvotes
Henrik Herranen
By Henrik Herranen (Apr 18, 2013)

Not strange at all.
1) An f/1.8 lens gets the same light intensity on all sensor sizes. This is obvious, because the same f/1.8 lens will be equally bright regardless of whether you put it in front of a crop or FF sensor.
2) So f/1.8 on FF gets the same light intensity as f/1.8 on e.g. 1.6x crop. So both FF and crop at ISO100 f/1.8 1/30s gives the same brightness image.
3) However, the FF sensor is 2.3 times larger than an 1.5x crop sensor, so it gathers 2.3 times the amount of total light with the same light intensity. It has a higher light gathering capacity.
4) If you use an FF camera with an f/2.7 lens, it will get 2.3 times lower light intensity, but because the sensor is 2.3 times bigger, it will get the same amount of light. Total amount of light is the final limiting noise limit factor given that sensor technology is otherwise equal.
5) Thus f/2.7 on FF has the same light gathering capacity as f/1.8 on 1.5x crop.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
9 upvotes
Dennis
By Dennis (Apr 18, 2013)

I can't believe that after all the debates over equivalence, there are still people who don't get it. Yes, your exposure is the same; of course the light meter doesn't need to be "recalibrated" ... but why do you think FF is known for being able to shoot cleanly at higher ISOs ? Why does APS-C give you cleaner images than a point & shot ? Because the larger sensor gathers more light. More light = better signal:noise ratio.
If that concept is too hard to understand then forget equivalence and just consider this:
f/1.8 on APS-C does not give you any capabilities that you don't have with f/2.8 on full frame. You don't get shallower DOF. And you don't get low light capability because the FF user can increase the ISO.
So it's a neat option, but FF users already have 24-70 in a lens that gives them the same capabilities.

2 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Apr 18, 2013)

Henrik Herranen and Dennis are right. I think the problem is that many people confuse exposure (as determined by a light meter) and total light-gathering ability (amount of light that hits the sensor as a whole, not per unit area).
F/1.8 on APS-C is indeed equivalent to F/1.8 on FF, if we talk about exposure, but not if we talk about DoF and total light-gathering (which determines signal-to-noise ratio). Then it's equivalent to F/2.7.

2 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Apr 18, 2013)

And to continue Revenant's point, the exposure also assumes identical ISO on both sensor sizes, which is silly. These cameras have variable ISO settings. If you want the exposure to be the same as well (between f2.7 ff and f1.8 APS-C) you just raise the ISO on the FF camera compared to the APS-C. Voala! Same exposure. Same light gathering. Same depth of field.

1 upvote
Spunjji
By Spunjji (Apr 18, 2013)

Dennis, not entirely true re: ISO. This part depends on the capabilities of the sensor. Not all FF sensors are capable of making use of all the light hitting them; some in turn use the surface area for smaller pixels which (combined with the heftier electronics required for readout) can actually lead to higher noise at high ISOs than some smaller sensors. If you do't believe me, look at what happens when you go to Medium Format.

Upshot: What you say is broadly true /for sensors with equivalent levels of technological development and equal pixel size/.

In reality, making generalisations like that doesn't really help much.

0 upvotes
Dennis
By Dennis (Apr 18, 2013)

Spunjii - yes, the noise you'll see in practice at varying ISOs will depend on the actual cameras used (not just the sensor sizes) but that's a two way street. You can find a FF and APS-C camera to compare where the SNR on the FF is even better than the sensor size would suggest.
The point is: APS-C aren't getting something better than FF users have with this lens (just as those f/2 zooms didn't give 4/3 users anything that APS-C or FF users didn't have). Just as an f/4 lens on medium format isn't "slow" and an f/1.8-f/2.8 zoom on a premium compact doesn't make it a DSLR slayer. Sensor size has to be considered when evaluating the capabilities that a lens with a certain max aperture gives you. Knowing that you can shoot a given scene at a specific settings is useless without knowing what DOF and noise you'll see at those settings and that depends on the sensor size (and, as you've pointed out, the sensor techonology, for noise).

0 upvotes
Thoughts
By Thoughts (Apr 18, 2013)

Perfect for wedding photography

3 upvotes
mediasorcerer
By mediasorcerer (Apr 18, 2013)

I'l have one.

Nothing wrong with having more choice.

5 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Apr 18, 2013)

Came out of nowhere, what a stunner!

9 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Apr 18, 2013)

Can you use it to take pictures?

0 upvotes
technotic
By technotic (Apr 18, 2013)

No, that'll come in version 2 or perhaps 3.

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 18, 2013)

I'm a full frame shooter and not jealous. I'm excited about this new lens... could be totally worth picking up a second crop body paired with this lens.

3 upvotes
vodanh1982
By vodanh1982 (Apr 18, 2013)

How about a 24-70 f/2.8 with a speed booster?

1 upvote
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Apr 18, 2013)

That won't work on SLRs

2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Apr 18, 2013)

Why would I buy high-end lens and than use overpriced piece of glass to lower the image quality? Pointless.

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Apr 18, 2013)

Looking at the specs I am sure this lens will retail for around 1200-1400$ mark and looking at the performance of recent Sigma releases(17-50 f/2.8, 8-16, 150mm OS, 35mm f/1.4) I have high expectations from this lens. At that price point it would be a must have lens for landscape shooters with APS-C cameras.

5 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 18, 2013)

and why would i need an expensive f1.8 lens as landscape shooter?

i want DOF to have everything sharp.

9 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

At hyperfocal, you have plenty of DoF. :)

2 upvotes
MAKfoto
By MAKfoto (Apr 18, 2013)

1.8 ... less in focus ,great for over creative nerds ,expensive and actually useless fast aperture for a wide zoom with latest cameras giving great results at high ISO's and increasing by the day ,another Merrill foveon fluff ,Sigma is desperate to prove that they also can do something better than Canon and Nikon ....thank goodness it is for APS-C ,whose shooters always complain about the high price lenses of FX.
All kit 18-55 lenses from Nikon,Canon and Fuji are sharp if one knows how to shoot.
Sure go get it you want it.
good luck!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
CeleryBeats
By CeleryBeats (Apr 18, 2013)

What are you whining about? Would you rather have a market without any new/exiting releases? A market where product releases are based around people like you? In that world sir, photography would be death by now.

Good luck with that!!

Other people will just enjoy new glass for creative nerdiness and enjoy photography!

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
23 upvotes
pictureAngst
By pictureAngst (Apr 18, 2013)

"less in focus, great for creative nerds"

You're absolutely right - us photographers should stick to our nice cat/car/seagull photos and resist going beyond our abilities with creative stuff like depth of field control and the like.

12 upvotes
MAKfoto
By MAKfoto (Apr 18, 2013)

Show me when you BUY it ,other than that most of you are big hat no cattle ;)

1 upvote
RichardBalonglong
By RichardBalonglong (Apr 18, 2013)

@ Mak: Arrogance is dangerous my friend...

5 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

"creative stuff like depth of field control"

:) :) :)
If you think that opening aperture has anything to do with creativity, you know nothing about creativity!

0 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

You have no idea what you're talking about. DOF is not the only aspect of a fast lens... Here's a clue: "fast lens"... say it a few times and you'd probably get it. Now should you understand that part, say "fast and wide and zoomable" and youd probably learn something. If you are happy with your kit lens then good for you, good for you.

I own their new 35mm and 17-70mm and they are a whole new level past their last gens, past the Canikons in many cases. Now with that, there is quite a great deal of confidence with this upcoming one.

4 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

I wouldn't mind paying an extra hundred if they weatherproofed these lenses.

2 upvotes
MAKfoto
By MAKfoto (Apr 18, 2013)

you must be a rain shooter ,get a plastic cover for under $20 :)

2 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

True. But I couldn't find one with Hello Kitty prints!

23 upvotes
HozicEmir
By HozicEmir (Apr 18, 2013)

I will cry hard if this will not be available in K-mount.
Than will hate sigma til the end of time.

If this will be made in K-mount no mater optical quality I will buy one.

5 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Apr 18, 2013)

Ha ha! You gave me a laugh!

2 upvotes
Meuh
By Meuh (Apr 18, 2013)

It would be silly not to make this on the K mount, with pentax being one of the few DSLR makers these days without a FF offering it seems like the perfect place to sell it.

If I was on canon/nikon I would grab a 24-70 and FF to get similar DoF control, wider FoV control, but being a pentax shooter I don't have that option.

This lens on a k5iis would be a killer combo with the great dynamic range, sharp images and shake reduction.. its just a shame its not sealed silly sigma.

5 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Apr 18, 2013)

Meuh - demand for high-end glass in K-mount doesn't justify it.

1 upvote
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (Apr 18, 2013)

@Pat
Why should you laugh? Pentax produces some of the best APS-C around.
In fact, you should try one.

1 upvote
tornwald
By tornwald (Apr 18, 2013)

I hope Sigma wil offer an affordable alternative to the upcomming Zeiss 55 f1.4 Distagon lens. I think they will be able to match it in quality and offer autofocus at the same time. More full frame ART primes please Sigma :)

1 upvote
DStudio
By DStudio (Apr 18, 2013)

This would be good, but Sigma has never matched the quality of the Sony Zeiss lenses I've used, and I doubt they would here either.

In any case, although I wasn't a Sigma fan, the 8-16 I recently got has really impressed me, so I'll give this new one respect unless it proves otherwise.

0 upvotes
Hobbit13
By Hobbit13 (Apr 18, 2013)

The new Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM outperforms the Zeiss in most tests.

And Sigma already has an excellent 50mm F1.4, so I do not think they will release a 55mm prime.

7 upvotes
DStudio
By DStudio (Apr 18, 2013)

I seriously doubt the Sigma could beat most Zeiss lenses in the "this image looks beautiful" test. Likewise in comparison to most Leica lenses, as another poster suggested.

Sigma is the opposite of Zeiss and Leica - calling it the 'Art' line doesn't make it produce art.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
tornwald
By tornwald (Apr 18, 2013)

@DlStudio, The Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM does indeed outperform Zeiss, that is why I was hoping that Sigma would keep up this high quality and brings out more primes that can meet the high standards of new high megapixel sensors. The D800E and upcomming 50+ megapixel cams need ultra high quality lenzes. That is why Zeiss is comming up with the 55mm 1.4 Distagon, just to meet the extreme demands. At a very high price though. @Hobbit13: Although Sigma's 50mm f1.4 is very good, it is not in the same class as their new 35mm. So I do hope they will bring out new primes that can meet these very high standards.

1 upvote
Wilmark
By Wilmark (Apr 18, 2013)

Serious photographers hardly use crop bodies. Sigma announces lenses and take very long to deliver. 1.8 at that focal range is not really so critical - that range is of interest mainly to landscape photographers where smaller fstops are used typically. On the flip side SIgma seem to be taking advantage of an area that is completely neglected by canon and to a lesser extent by nikon. Maybe its in anticipation to the upcoming 7DII. Wonder how it would perform on a FF body - will it vignet?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

That range is actually perfect for indoor events such as weddings where you really don't want to use obtrusive flash and strobes. In fact it's a great indoor events lens. Exactly what I have been waiting for!

10 upvotes
BaldCol
By BaldCol (Apr 18, 2013)

"Serious photographers hardly use crop bodies"... bulls**t. I know many very serious photographers who use crop bodies.

17 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Apr 18, 2013)

Amen! ^^^

5 upvotes
DStudio
By DStudio (Apr 18, 2013)

It's good that you mentioned the 7D, because it's a perfect example of how serious photographers DO use crop bodies!

If this lens can truly deliver the performance it will be unbeatable in many situations where a zoom is needed.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 18, 2013)

you clown write this everywhere on teh net?

you know what wildlife photographer use.. APS-C.
so get a clue what your talking about!!

3 upvotes
Jared Earle
By Jared Earle (Apr 18, 2013)

Motorsports photographers use crop bodies all the time. We'd love a paddock/pit-lane lens on our 7Ds.

1 upvote
BlackZero
By BlackZero (Apr 18, 2013)

What are you upto? You have posted the same comment on Peta-Pixel also.

I suspect, you're a paid poster!

1 upvote
ekaton
By ekaton (Apr 18, 2013)

But: 810g without lens hood. 810G! Put that on a mirrorless aps-c body and .......

3 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Apr 18, 2013)

... watch it asplode.

2 upvotes
Total comments: 724
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