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Lenovo announces ThinkVision LT3053p covering 99% of AdobeRGB gamut

By dpreview staff on Apr 1, 2013 at 19:34 GMT

Lenovo Japan has announced the ThinkVision LT3053p Wide, a 30" WQXGA (2560 x 1600) resolution AH-IPS LCD monitor designed for color-critical applications like photo editing. The latest flagship model promises 99% coverage of the AdobeRGB color space and 100% of sRGB. It includes features such as Picture In Picture (PIP) allowing input from multiple devices and an adjustable stand for ergonomic viewing. The monitor will start shipping from April 11, 2013 at a retail price of $1599 in the US. There is currently no information about the European price and availability.

 The latest flagship ThinkVision LT3053p Wide promises 99% coverage of the AdobeRGB color space

Comments

Total comments: 58
jaygeephoto
By jaygeephoto (Apr 3, 2013)

You get what you pay for in so far as monitors. LaCie makes a decent product but their biggest one is only 25 or 26. I've been using a 21 LaCie for a number of years and it's been quite good. I'd like a bigger display especially when working in Photoshop.

0 upvotes
needforspeed009
By needforspeed009 (Apr 3, 2013)

I don't get why this is so expensive. I have a dell precision m4600 with an RGBLED IPS display that has 100% coverage of aRGB and the entire computer cost around 1500. Granted my display is only 1080p and 15.6 inches but still, why is it so expensive?

0 upvotes
jtan163
By jtan163 (Apr 3, 2013)

Can your laptop do picture in picture and picture by picture?
I could see those as being a useful feature for people who work in media production.
And yeah the extra real estate would be nice too.
And of course like most moderate to high end monitors these days this thing has mor ports than my laptop.

Which again might be quite useful in a production environment.

I 've no idea how good a quality this monitor is, but assuming the quality is OK the announced price doesn't seem all that high - as an RRP/MSRP.

1 upvote
camerosity
By camerosity (Apr 3, 2013)

NOM NOM NOM NOM NOM NOM NOM NOM.

0 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Apr 2, 2013)

Monitors are a very delicate matter. Each human has different viewing patterns and color sensibility. Therefore, buying on lab test results online might result in the wrong personal choice.
A top of the line Eizo is on my wish list. But, I delayed this since for long, and frequently bought a good new camera or lens instead.

I would never buy a Lenovo monitor. I don’t like their recent mobile computer quality. I suffered from the flimsy materials and overheating of a high-end (most expensive) model. Why should I trust them? High end monitors are not Lenovo’s core competence. May be I am preoccupied, but Lenovo from China is no more the classic Lenovo quality from the former IBM guidance. I stay with other brands.

1 upvote
Matthias Hutter
By Matthias Hutter (Apr 2, 2013)

does this have sRGB emulation mode?

0 upvotes
Paul Guba
By Paul Guba (Apr 2, 2013)

This is good news. More competitors means lower prices for everyone. Lenovo certainly has deep pockets and can put some of that into a new segment for them.

0 upvotes
Rick Knepper
By Rick Knepper (Apr 2, 2013)

I see no reason to consider this monitor until the price settles into street. B&H has the NEC PA301w for $1849 without SV, a $450 discount from the price on the NEC website. NEC had a refurbed model for $1500 a few months ago. I'd say $1100 or $1200 would be just right for taking a chance on Lenovo.

Actually, when I saw the news headline, I nearly broke my mouse finger trying to pull up the article. Associating Lenovo with laptops, but not familiar with their nomenclature for Model numbers, I thought for a second this was about a laptop.

0 upvotes
Mr Punch
By Mr Punch (Apr 2, 2013)

Be very wary of buying kit like this from manufacturers who don't have a track record of producing 'pro' monitors.

I bought a Samsung XL20 - something that looked like a good deal, very much like this - a few years ago. When I made the jump from XP to Vista and upgraded the rest of my hardware, I found I was locked out of the hardware calibration because Samsung never updated the drivers or calibration utility.

I know they're expensive, but NEC and Eizo monitors are hard to beat.

2 upvotes
Hugo First
By Hugo First (Apr 2, 2013)

wish what you say about eizo was true: i have one of their lower-end CD displays, and it didn't -- and won't -- get updated win8 drivers, so i can't use colornavigator -- just the old CE version. bummer...

0 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (Apr 2, 2013)

What is it that makes this more expensive to build than a good 60" plasma or LED TV?

0 upvotes
seanny
By seanny (Apr 2, 2013)

Economies of scale. This is a niche product for professionals. Also, HDTVs are 1080p sRGB and not 1600p Adobe RGB.

4 upvotes
uniball
By uniball (Apr 2, 2013)

And a far higher pitch. Like comparing making Ford's to Ferrari's.

0 upvotes
MiTaka
By MiTaka (Apr 2, 2013)

No internal LUT adjustment is sad, and really this should be standart feature for monitors like that. With open drivers, Dell do You hear the last part!

1 upvote
Photog74
By Photog74 (Apr 2, 2013)

Dell's U2413 and U2713H monitors at least feature 14-bit internal LUTs, although hardware calibration is only possible with an X-rite i1DisplayPro - and curiouslíy their 30ˇUltraSharp 3014 doesn't have an internal LUT.

0 upvotes
MiTaka
By MiTaka (Apr 2, 2013)

Dell 3014 has internal LUT adjustments, but only with the mentioned i1, that's why I complain about open drivers. One should be able to achieve that with most of the widely available devices.

1 upvote
tomlianza
By tomlianza (Apr 2, 2013)

The i1DisplayPro is a very reasonably priced professional quality calibrator. As far as the Open Source drivers you request, it is important to remember that these lut commands are complex and not part of any standard. This results in service calls that the manufacturer of the display cannot answer. Also, it is not just the lut commands, but the device interface. These systems all use USB because of the massive problems with DDC/ci drivers on most Windows Graphic cards.

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Apr 2, 2013)

I wouldn't use anything thats natively wide gamut unless you can drive it with 10bit but that tech still hasn't really broken into the market yet.

0 upvotes
Baracus
By Baracus (Apr 2, 2013)

LED backlit and IPS.... I've been waiting for Dell's to update their 30 inch dinosaur with these features. Dell's and HP's 30 inchers are still florescent backlit and they don't age well from the examples I've seen.

0 upvotes
MiTaka
By MiTaka (Apr 2, 2013)

Seems You didn't see dell's latest offerings.

1 upvote
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Apr 2, 2013)

I have had two Dell's U3011 for years now. 30" 2560x1600 Over 100% sRGB and 100% Adobe RGB

0 upvotes
HopeSpringsEternal
By HopeSpringsEternal (Apr 2, 2013)

Despite the large gamut support, I'm not impressed with the pricing. By now these companies should be selling 4K 30-36" large gamut monitors for $2,000 or less given the large profits they have made these last ten years selling practically the same old 30" monitors.

More than twelve years ago, IBM was selling a much higher resolution 22" monitor.

Where is the innovation for larger , hires computer displays??!

6 upvotes
migus
By migus (Apr 2, 2013)

Agreed: The hires display field has stagnated for 15+ yrs. My colleagues have developed the IBM 22" 4K LCD in the mid'90s. Had sub-niche markets (science, medical), despite cards and PCs that could drive it...

The main market and its opinion leaders (reviewers, pundits, analysts) were not interested or educated enough. Ditto w/ OLED.

Now: I have some of the best 30" Eizo/HP/Dell screens, some exceed 115% AdobeRGB (e.g., ZR30w) . Too non-uniform, jagged (at 50+ i appreciate over 300dpi @ 0.5m), shallow blacks (IPS gray), big, and too bright (by necessity).

I'm looking forth to 4k aRGB AMOLEDs of 22-24", ideal size for having 2-3 displays (my Lenovo w530 can drive 5), also in portrait mode. itch

1 upvote
Steven Noyes
By Steven Noyes (Apr 8, 2013)

@ migus

Agree but leave the OLED for now. I have yet to see any OLED (put what ever letters you want in front of OLED) screen that is usable from a color perspective. Calling OLED gaudy is being nice.

0 upvotes
liquidsquid
By liquidsquid (Apr 2, 2013)

Great price for a monitor with these specs and size. Too bad this is just a hobby!

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Apr 1, 2013)

April fools!

Way too cheap for such a monitor.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Poweruser
By Poweruser (Apr 1, 2013)

Still not sure where the point is with wide-gamut screens?

95%+ of users cant see any difference because their devices run SRGB at best (often times uncalibrated), think of tablets, phones, all Macs, etc.

Also, you cant "print" Adobe RGB.

3 upvotes
tar4heel2
By tar4heel2 (Apr 1, 2013)

Usually when printing, but there's a garbage-in-garbage-out concept here as well. I want to see it all. When you do your post with the most possible image information, the final result will always look better when converted down to sRGB or JPG for printing.

And don;t forget to get the highest quality video card you can afford.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
DPNick
By DPNick (Apr 1, 2013)

Why can't you print AdobeRGB?
I thought there are many printers that have enough range.

1 upvote
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Apr 2, 2013)

If something is unimportant to 95% of users, does that mean it's unimportant? If so, then by your reasoning we need to throw out all our professional gear right this second, if 95% of people do not appreciate why our images are better.

Also, have you ever actually compared gamut plots of today's printers? I have an Epson 3880 which has significant color ranges clearly exceeding sRGB, and a few color ranges even exceed parts of Adobe RGB (because gamuts are not just a size, but a shape). While I understand the limitations of CMYK and the Web, I am not interested in lowering my creative expectations to the lowest common denominator when the equipment for exceeding it is so readily available at affordable prices.

10 upvotes
Hugowolf
By Hugowolf (Apr 2, 2013)

You may not be able to print all of AdobeRGB, but neither can you display all that you can print. It has been years since high end pigment inkjet have been able to produce colours outside AdobeRGB.

0 upvotes
Matthias Hutter
By Matthias Hutter (Apr 2, 2013)

"Also, you cant "print" Adobe RGB."
wrong. If you print yourself from lightroom you can print the 'full' colors of the photo.

1 upvote
Scott Eaton
By Scott Eaton (Apr 2, 2013)

No, you're wrong. If you really think a matte based print made from pigment ink and displayed under typical room lighting exceeds the gamut range of a backlit monitor you're stoned. In order to truly exceed the color range of sRGB a print needs to be on reflective or coated media and displayed under a light source as bright if not brighter than open sunlight. Reflective media like ink-jet prints are calibrated with densitometers, and these densitometers have very intense light sources built in. In order to reproduce the color range that you see in those fancy 3-D color maps your room light needs to match the spectral range and intensity of the calibration tool that's reading the print, and it's not practical. This is why 95% of the print industry is still sRGB an those 5% mucking around with other color spaces aren't producing anything additional in a print we can see. AdobeRGB is otherwise nothing more than an abstract when it comes to printing.

0 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Apr 2, 2013)

Not so. Commercial lithography isn't going anyway anytime soon, and converting sRGB files to cmyk is a sad and utter disappointment.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 1, 2013)

All the recent news stories are much appreciated, but do you think we'll ever get any Sample Images from all the recent cameras like the Olympus XZ-10, Nikon P330, Pentax MX-1 and Coolpix A?

These cameras have been available for weeks, and it seems like all of the camera review sites are on a collective hiatus from camera samples. So if DPR staff has time, a few snaps would go a long way toward helping people get an idea of what these new models can do. Cough, cough, p330, cough.

2 upvotes
robmanueb
By robmanueb (Apr 1, 2013)

I think they're doing some more phone camera reviews first... Followed by same stories about security cameras and camera bags.

5 upvotes
massimogori
By massimogori (Apr 2, 2013)

I am afraid I disagree, Marike. Accurate Colour calibration and wide colour gamut do matter to photography and it is good Dpreview realized this. However, I am agreeing on your general point, the fact that Dpreview lost the focus on cameras. Problem is the fact the the vast majority of the other news refer to somenthing that has little to do with the original scope of this website: who cares about printing images from facebook to a mug?; who is going to boy a "gyro stabilized 4K video" camera?; who is going to need the help of "picfari"when taking pictures during holydais?...

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Apr 1, 2013)

Its slightly less than 100 PPI. Quite normal for this kind of monitor.

But, what do you think about the future devices? Is not 200 PPI a more reasonable resolution very soon?

2 upvotes
steve_hoge
By steve_hoge (Apr 1, 2013)

"Reasonable" if you have the eyesight of a teenager. But unless future desktop OS's included graphics drivers that can accomodate doubled resolution you'd be zooming in the view on every application.

1 upvote
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Apr 1, 2013)

At normal viewing distances 100ppi is more than enough. I notice that around here everyone seems to zoom an image to 800% to complain about their gear. I think that any difference one will see at 200ppi as opposed to 100ppi will come from attempts by the display manufacturer to enhance apparent sharpness in their quest to sell a higher res monitor.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Apr 1, 2013)

Yeah, you have to have support from the OS - or you have to rewrite all applications. But - eyesight of a teenager? Nope - I think even we oldies can benefit from more resolution. It will look better and the original needs to be downscaled less.

2 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Apr 1, 2013)

It would be welcome, especially for reading .pdf files and such. 2560x1600 sounds a lot, but spread out to 27 or 30" small lines of text becomes jagged and difficult to read.

"Retina" displays are coming, will surely come to desktop displays, but we're sadly still some ways off.

4 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (Apr 1, 2013)

For those who like (simple) math :
Human's eye resolution is one minute of arc, i.e. 1/60 degrees.
This is the performance of a normal, average, young adult.
I personally look at my computer screen at an average distance of 0,40 meter. Thus, in case I am this young adult, I can see a dot that is 0,40 X tang (1/60 degrees) X 1000 = 0.116 millimeters in size. As 1 inch = 25.4 millimeters, the "ideal" computer monitor resolution for me would be 25.4 / 0.116 DPI, roughly 220 DPI...

Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_acuity

8 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Apr 2, 2013)

Remember, trade color printing is done using 300dpi cells (with actual dots at 2400dpi, and black-and-white line art is thought to be jaggy-looking if printed below 1200dpi.

Just because monitors have been around 110-120dpi doesn't make that the gold standard. All it means is that digital is just now catching up to print. Why lower your standards to below what's been the norm for centuries?

1 upvote
wisep01
By wisep01 (Apr 2, 2013)

I concur. For too long, the high end consumer desktop market has stagnated at 2560 by 1600. We are beginnning to enter the 4k era. In a few years, I would like to have a computer monitor wth at least that resolution. Even today, the resolution of a 30" monitor is eclipsed by that of a 15" macbook.

1 upvote
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Apr 2, 2013)

220 PPI sounds about right.

Of course, today I have 100 PPI, and a quite good monitor. And it works just nicely. So ... I dont need 200 PPI. But, it would be nice.

0 upvotes
ML_Digital_nYc
By ML_Digital_nYc (Apr 1, 2013)

Hmm I'm leery. At the moment the 27" NEC is a steal for 900 at b&h. Tried and true.

6 upvotes
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (Apr 1, 2013)

Agree 100%. I've switched all my old gear for 27-inch NEC PA271W monitors with hood, and with the Spectravision II software that I bought as a download from the NEC website. Works like a charm with my X-Rite i1 Display Pro and X-Rite i1 Publish Pro 2 spectrophotometers.

2 upvotes
ML_Digital_nYc
By ML_Digital_nYc (Apr 1, 2013)

Yea they're a great bargain for what you get/pay. I'm a pro retoucher...so I need consistency over wide gamut.

0 upvotes
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Apr 2, 2013)

thanks ML digital for the heads up

Wonder if LENOVO does any market research
before coming out with their pricing ?

0 upvotes
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 1, 2013)

This just might replace my broken LaCie monitor that they will not repair (because of their horrible customer service and lack of an actual service plan.

Lenovo or Eizo monitors are what I'm considering at the moment.

1 upvote
tonywong
By tonywong (Apr 1, 2013)

Can't wait to see the reviews on this one...my Dell 3007s are really long in the tooth.

1 upvote
babola
By babola (Apr 1, 2013)

They are, because there are new 30" DELL IPS monitor models that superseded 3007, like the 3011 and 3014.

1 upvote
BJN
By BJN (Apr 1, 2013)

The question is how consistent the color and tonality are across the large display. I tried and returned a 30" Dell display that has wide gamut but that had very poor consistency across the display. You can't do accurate work if only a portion of your display is showing accurate colors.

I'm guessing that at $1600 that the hood and calibration package are extra.

1 upvote
DPNick
By DPNick (Apr 1, 2013)

Yeah, I returned the 30" NEC for the same reason. What's the point of wide gamut if the screen is beaming at me and driving me crazy with inconsistent colors? Went back to my Apple 30", it's sRGB but consistently so.

3 upvotes
OldDigiman
By OldDigiman (Apr 2, 2013)

Yeah, that's the real question. Both color and luminance are wretchedly incosistent on my 30" Dell. I'll wait to see what the real world has to say about this one before getting excited.

0 upvotes
jnk
By jnk (Apr 1, 2013)

The monitor will start shipping from April 11, 2013 at a retail price of $1599 in the US .... equal = 'awesome' ....!!!

99% coverage of the AdobeRGB color space and 100% of sRGB

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Apr 2, 2013)

100% of sRGB is nothing to get excited over.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 58