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Photographer revisits images of Vietnam War

By dpreview staff on Mar 29, 2013 at 00:56 GMT
Captain William N. Parish HHC and a group of young soldiers near Cu Chi. Parish was a very popular officer in the 2/12. Other names and details about photo unknown. Photograph by Charles Haughey.

Only months after being drafted into the Vietnam War as a rifleman in 1967, photography enthusiast Charlie Haughey was given the task by his commanding officer of photographing his unit for Army and US publications. The directive was clear, 'You are not a combat photographer. This is a morale operation. If I see pictures of my guys in papers, doing their jobs with honor, then you can do what you like in Vietnam.'

The 'tunnel rat' was the soldier that volunteered to, at very high risk, enter Viet Cong tunnel networks and search them for hostile forces, weapons, and contraband. The tunnels would afterword be destroyed with explosives. Name, date, and location unknown. Photograph by Charles Haughey.

What Haughey did was capture some very poignant wartime images that put a human face on the costs of war. After his tour, Haughey returned home with almost 2,000 negatives which then sat in boxes untouched for 45 years. In 2012, after agreeing to have these negatives scanned, Haughey began the emotionally taxing process of viewing and captioning these images of his unit members, many of whose fate he remains unaware of.

Under the pseudonym Chieu Hoi (bestowed upon him during the war by his US Army 25th Infantry Division members) Haughey is making these images available on his Flickr, Facebook and Tumblr feeds. A selection of 28 digital prints will be shown in an exhibit at the ADX gallery in Portland, Oregon that opens on April 5. You can read more about Haughey's story and see a larger sampling of the image collection at The Boston Globe.

Staff Sergeant Edgar D. Bledsoe, of Olive Branch, Ill., cradles a critically ill Vietnamese infant. The child was brought to Fire Support Base Pershing. This image, with this caption, was originally published in Vol. 3 No. 53 of Tropic Lightning News, December 30, 1968. Photograph by Charles Haughey.

Comments

Total comments: 89
wootpile
By wootpile (11 months ago)

Excellent wartime stuff. BTW - also tells a huge story about what people used to look like. Not a gram of too much fat on those troops!

0 upvotes
Carl Silverman
By Carl Silverman (Apr 9, 2013)

Agreed. But how do we measure or compare suffering? All suffering is
bad and that gives respect to the victims, yes? Whose pain is worse? Ask the
victims.

1 upvote
invinci
By invinci (Apr 8, 2013)

GOOD pictures but nothing compare to those photographers who shot the effect of "Agent Orange".
Search it and see some of the shocking photos in the history of mankind.

0 upvotes
Carl Silverman
By Carl Silverman (Apr 5, 2013)

All these comments prove at least one thing; the power of a photograph to
influence, inform, inspire us. For that we can all be grateful, yes? We can
all do our photographs as witnesses to our lives, yes? Todays snapshot is
tomorrows history lesson!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Carl Silverman
By Carl Silverman (Apr 4, 2013)

Try looking at WERNER BISCHOF's World War 2 photos. They look like they were
shot yesterday. Timely and timeless at the same time. Sad. He lost his life in a
auto accident while in PERU. Sad.

0 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Apr 3, 2013)

Due to the appalling bokeh in one of those shots; it just has to be a sony/minolta. :)

0 upvotes
Carl Silverman
By Carl Silverman (Apr 3, 2013)

By the way, war journalists volunteer for that job....they could be doing weddings instead. That takes courage. The service of all the draftees was
courageous too, they had no choice. They could have been doing something
better with their lives, but again they had no choice.

0 upvotes
Carl Silverman
By Carl Silverman (Apr 1, 2013)

All wars are bad, but we need journalists to document them for future generations. Without a record of history, we're more likely to repeat our mistakes.
Artists just react to the society around them. Without wars, they would obviously
choose other subjects, yes? I like Werner Bischoff's photos of germany after
WW2.

0 upvotes
wkay
By wkay (Mar 31, 2013)

I spent a lot of time in SE Asia (especially Malaysia) in the early 80's and the universal sentiment was that if the US had not been involved in Vietnam, then SE Asia would be communist today, as communist terrorists operated freely on the Thailand borders and would have the support to enter other countries. And anyone that thinks communism is good, needs to talk to anyone in South Vietnam post 1975, what real hell is.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Mar 31, 2013)

Pure horse-dookey.

The U.S. lost, Vietnam became communist, the domino theory was false.

Or is your contention that "communist terrorists" who "operated freely" on the borders would have been a stronger influence on the region than an entire state, strongly militarized, which had just won a war and become communist, i.e., Vietnam?

Maybe this "universal sentiment" you speak of was universal to your world, a few wild-eyed washed up U.S. diplomats and operatives, or something along those lines.

Give me a break.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Apr 1, 2013)

Well... Cambodia and Laos did become communist. Cambodia was later "saved" by communist Vietnam and all the three Indochina countries are now kind of hybrid communist/capitalist and rather corrupt. Not as corrupt as Thailand though.

As for hell vs. real hell, more than 2 million people died in Vietnam during the war, a war that USA kept nurturing. Several hundred thousand children were born with defects because of the use of Agent Orange. There are still areas in Vietnam where food can't be grown because of the dioxin in the earth.

I think I would prefer to be alive in a communist regime rather than dead in a capitalist one.

6 upvotes
robenroute
By robenroute (Apr 1, 2013)

1. Communist does not equal hell;
2. What capitalism has brought us is debatable, at least.

2 upvotes
Stan LS
By Stan LS (Apr 2, 2013)

bobbarber,

"domino theory was false" - you do realize that US kept (and still has) military bases in South Korea and Japan for a reason, right?

robenroute,

I was born and spent a part of my childhood in the USSR. So, I am just going to sigh and shake my head at both of your points.

1 upvote
No Sideshow
By No Sideshow (Mar 31, 2013)

I served two tours there as part of the AATT, 1967/8 and 69/70. Of course we all wished that it had not happened, but the politics and fear of the cold war drove a different tune than today.
Its good to see these images and it communicates the reality of war, and its the only way sometimes to shock people so that another Vietnam doesn't happen again.
You're right though with one thing. It was not a war in that your Congress did not issue a declaration of war with Vietnam. Neither did they for the $3 trillion adventure in Iraq and Afghanistan. US political leaders have hidden behind dubious resolutions from the worlds greatest debating society, the UN, as an excuse to again pretend they are the worlds policemen.

9 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Mar 31, 2013)

"Its good to see these images and it communicates the reality of war, ..."

Bollocks! This is the reality of war:
http://www.kingsacademy.com/mhodges/03_The-World-since-1900/11_The-Bewildering-60s/pictures/LFE-306_My-Lai-massacre.jpg

1 upvote
austin design
By austin design (Mar 31, 2013)

This and nothing else, zakk9? Take a pill and chill: things are usually neither this nor that, but this AND that -- and all sorts of stuff in between.

Surely there's something more current about which you can get your knickers in a twist.

5 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Mar 31, 2013)

Would you see the German soldiers from WWII the same way, as tough guys just doing their jobs? Those who transported Jews to the concetration camps? They were also just obeying orders.

Every time the theme of American soldiers in Vietnam come up, they are heroes. Even now, 40 years later, attempts like this are made to make things look "nice". "There's a tough world out there, but we coped, although some of us succumbed." Sorry to say: The fact that some Americans died too doesn't make their task more honerable, not then and not now.

William Calley, the only soldier who was convicted for the My Lai massacre where hundreds of innocent Vietnamese civilians were cold bloodedly murdered, got three and a half years in "house arrest". What a joke.

There was nothing honorable about the Vietnam war. Killing people because they have a different political view isn't comme il faut now and it wasn't then, cold war or not. Most civilised nations have understood that many decades ago.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Stan LS
By Stan LS (Mar 31, 2013)

What a horrible analogy. The genocide against the Jews was part of the Nazi official policy. Mai Lai - wasn't. What about those who tortured and killed US pow's and their allies? You think they were tried and punished? No, they were made into national heroes.

" Killing people because they have a different political view" - yet ironically no mention is made about what happened to the south Vietnamese after US pulled out. Any idea? Doesn't get much play does it?

6 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Mar 31, 2013)

I have little or no sympathy with the communists, but with regards to how they treated those who cooperated with the Americans: Of cause they were seen as traitors. Any American helping a foreign power attacking the USA would be treated as a traitor too, and honestly, I doubt many doing that would survive for long if caught.

From a North Vietnamese point of view, they were under attack by a foreign power, and it's difficult to disagree with that. As for the question if massacres were a part of official American policy, many American soldiers who were there have claimed that this was the case. What is clear is that My Lai wasn't an isolated incidence, although it was was of unprecedented size, and it was uncovered, although attempts were done to cover it up.

3 upvotes
austin design
By austin design (Apr 1, 2013)

zakk9, your failure of reasoning -- and it is an utter failure -- is to simplistically equate My Lai with the Vietnam war; try to keep your focus. While there are many reasons to dislike both, they aren't interchangeable.

And "many Americans" have NOT claimed that My Lai was a function of policy (certainly not a representative portion of them who have legitimate insight into the matter). That's simply ridiculous. It's as though you enjoy believing anti-American diatribe to the point where you don't even bother vetting it.

Besides, coming out against My Lai is kind of like coming out against cancer or murder: you're not going to find many proponents of either. Translation: your invective here, now 45 years after the fact, is rather pointless.

2 upvotes
Stan LS
By Stan LS (Apr 2, 2013)

Here's an interesting bit about the French involvement in Vietnam:

" Of the 12,000 French prisoners taken by the Viet Minh, only 3,000 survived."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War#Exit_of_the_French.2C_1950.E2.80.931954

Did anybody stand trial for that one? Did this fact even get much of publicity?

0 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Mar 31, 2013)

Thousands of photos have already been published of this fiasco of a war. Why show more shots from what was little more than a giant killing spree, organised by a gang of misguided politicians and generals? At least a couple of million innocent Vietnamese and other Southeast Asians were killed during the the event and the three involved countries are still suffering from the results of the bombings and the killings.

One photo is called "Charlie Haughey poses with a group of Vietnamese school children." How many Vietnamese school children were killed by American bombs during the Vietnam War? Nobody probably knows. I guess a smiling American soldier with the kids looks nicer than tiny corpses mutilated by bombs and napalm.

3 upvotes
Michael H
By Michael H (Mar 31, 2013)

Why not try some arguments, instead of a bucket full of anti American diatribe.

4 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Mar 31, 2013)

America didn't participate in that war, no?

0 upvotes
austin design
By austin design (Mar 31, 2013)

zakk9, I don't think Michael H contends the US wasn't involved; duh.

And do you know how many "innocent Americans" died in the Vietnam war? The failures of that war -- as those of ANY war -- aren't limited to one nation or another.

Newsflash: the human race isn't perfect...get over it.

1 upvote
zakk9
By zakk9 (Mar 31, 2013)

The responsibility for the Vietnam War is very easy to place. If the Americans hadn't been there, it would have been very short, no Americans and much fewer Vietnamese would have been killed, and the outcome would have been the same; a communistic Vietnam. It was the Americans who travelled to the other side of the globe to fight, not the Vietnamese.

3 upvotes
chevysales
By chevysales (Mar 31, 2013)

right because you can read the future you know this....

0 upvotes
Stan LS
By Stan LS (Mar 31, 2013)

And if Americans didn't fight the war in Korea and both South/North were both ruled by the Kims... Would that amount to more or less deaths? (How many died in the communist induced famine?)

1 upvote
Zeb Andrews
By Zeb Andrews (Mar 31, 2013)

zakk9, I can appreciate your opinion on the matter, but allow me to suggest just appreciating the images for what they are, please don't hijack this post and turn it into your soapbox. I mean that politely. Charlie has stated through all this that his intent in sharing the images is to honor the men in them, men who worked hard at doing a nasty job, men who but for a couple twists or turns of fate could easily have been you or I. These aren't meant as a statement on history, politics, war or any of that. And there is honor in those men doing the best they could in a horrible situation, even if there isn't much other honor often found in war in general.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
jdc562
By jdc562 (Mar 31, 2013)

Zakk9, You miss the profound meaning those photos have acquired by what is now established truth. Your comments belong to photos of Nixon, Westmoreland, and other perpetrators of the war. Nearly all the people shown in Haughey's photos did not freely choose to be in that conflict and were lied to by morally corrupt American and South Vietnamese politicians. This was the time of the draft: the U.S. grunt soldiers were forced to serve. The children could not flee. They all endured a time of profound stress, being maimed, scarred, tortured, and killed. The very facts you state underline the horrible irony in Haughey's photos of smiling people--for an incongruous moment.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
austin design
By austin design (Apr 1, 2013)

zakk9 wrote:
"At least a couple of million innocent Vietnamese and other Southeast Asians were killed during the (Vietnam conflict)..."

Then I wrote:
"do you know how many 'innocent Americans' died in (that conflict)?"

Then zakk9 wrote:
"The responsibility for the Vietnam War is very easy to place. If the Americans hadn't been there..."

Here you go again, conflating the US government with Americans. Are you really suggesting that American soldiers who were drafted into Vietnam service against their will were somehow responsible for their own deaths in that conflict?!

Here in the US, I don't know of any Americans who are always in agreement with every single thing their government does (but maybe you're in agreement with everything your government does, like the Thammasat Massacre?). Then again, I understand this sort of distinction gets in the way of your simplistic blather.

1 upvote
austin design
By austin design (Apr 1, 2013)

In the interest of clarity: 1) the US government does NOT = Americans; and 2) generally NO one defends the Vietnam conflict -- neither Americans nor even those in US government during that time -- so you, zakk9, are beating a dead horse...instead of discussing photography.

1 upvote
contadorfan
By contadorfan (Mar 30, 2013)

" I wonder if humanity will ever learn that war is never worth starting and causes loss we will never recover."

Abolition of slavery? Stopping the Nazis? Some things are worth fighting for. I sure as hell wouldn't want to live under a dictatorship. I like my life in a democracy very much.

2 upvotes
thefatefullightining
By thefatefullightining (Mar 30, 2013)

I am a warrior who made Spec Four twice. Some of you will know what that means but suffice to say, "...once in, never out...", ["E" Co Heavy Weapons&Recon, 1Bn/52nd Inf, 198th Inf Bde, Americal Inf Div, RVN, Class of '68].

I view current events from that persepctive and I understand a few things. One, that there will always be SOBs, and I pray to God there will always be warriors who stand in the doorway and say, "No, not here." And Two, the best of our politicians, Red or Blue, would not make a pimple on the a** of a good warrior. The sacrifices, gains and losses of the battlefield are thrown to the wind by men and women back in the air conditioning who have no idea what we ask these young people to do.

Like the bumper sticker that says, "I hope to become the man my Labrador thinks I am", I pray that our politicians can have the drive, morality and sacrifice displayed daily in the worst places this earth holds by our young men and women in uniform.

Out.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Ivar Dahl Larsen
By Ivar Dahl Larsen (Mar 30, 2013)

Great photographs under circumstances most People of today cannot apprehend. Let's never forget and may it never happen again.

2 upvotes
jedinstvo
By jedinstvo (Mar 30, 2013)

Let it never happen again? It's happening right now! It never stopped happening. We're about to get into it in Korea again and Israel has plans for us to invade Iran. There's no escape!

6 upvotes
austin design
By austin design (Mar 31, 2013)

By "it", I think Ivar means an avoidable, non-defensive war with high civilian casualties. Even the last war in Iraq, sadly fabricated as it was, doesn't fit this definition.

1 upvote
Stan LS
By Stan LS (Mar 31, 2013)

" Israel has plans for us to invade Iran. " - ah, yes. Good ol' europeans... Some things never change, do they?

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
misolo
By misolo (Mar 31, 2013)

"ah, yes. Good ol' europeans... Some things never change, do they?" -- You do realize you are quoting an American? An abundant supply of pompous fools, that's what never changes.

0 upvotes
luigibozi
By luigibozi (Mar 30, 2013)

without those guys, no Jimi Hendrix and John Lennon and others...

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Mar 30, 2013)

Good point. Without the U.S. having lost a war in Vietnam, John Lennon and Jimi Hendrix would never have made music. I see the connection.

Oh wait, maybe your point was that we would have been overrun by commies from Vietnam, domino theory? Um, were you alive back then, or is this something your Uncle Ted told you around the dinner table?

See, we lost, and nothing happened. Most people would reevaluate their thought process at that point...

No, I'm wrong. Sorry. Most people don't reevaluate their thoughts when they're wrong. Some people even repeat or allude to the same idiotic claptrap 50 years later. I wonder if that has anything to do with the state of the world currently?

5 upvotes
timccr
By timccr (Mar 30, 2013)

Some people do re-evaluate thoughts. In the latest round of military adventures for example no critiscism is allowed and all journalists are strictly controlled. When looking back at Vietnam it is important to be aware of the history, which is still coming out. The recent revelations about LBJ's knowledge of Nixon keeping the war going is a case in point. It looks more and more as though people like Lennon and Hendrix told the truth while governments lied to a man. I think it is important to keep this in mind when looking at these shots.

3 upvotes
jedinstvo
By jedinstvo (Mar 30, 2013)

All journalists are strictly controlled? That's hardly the case.

0 upvotes
sik_photos
By sik_photos (Mar 29, 2013)

These are strong images (see Globe link), nearly each one tells its own detailed short story within the larger context of history. What does it say, that they were taken without the "advantage" of multiple focus points, thru lens metering, image stabilization, weather sealing and other modern niceties?

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Mar 30, 2013)

Well, a lot of people forgot that subject is more important tan anything else in the photo. Hence the pollution of the Internet with all the pointless head-and-shoulders, flowers, insects...

1 upvote
Lcky
By Lcky (Mar 29, 2013)

In the 32nd Image in the Boston.com article, Charlie Haughey has a minolta with a wrapped tele, any ideas why he would wrap the lens like that?

0 upvotes
Tlipp
By Tlipp (Mar 29, 2013)

That is called "field expedience" or how to repair something in the field.

0 upvotes
alpha90290
By alpha90290 (Mar 30, 2013)

The lens is not weather seal. It is normal for people to wrap the lens to protect it from dust and rain water. (dry and wet season)

0 upvotes
Zeb Andrews
By Zeb Andrews (Mar 30, 2013)

It was his lens cap, made from a beer can wrapped up. He's told us that story a couple of times now when the image comes up in various edits.

0 upvotes
joelfoto
By joelfoto (Mar 29, 2013)

Great images. Good work, Mr. Haughey.

0 upvotes
threed123
By threed123 (Mar 29, 2013)

Spent a year there as a USAF officer ground controller. Took lot of pics with my Nikormat. Have great memories living in a hootch. It was either join the Airforce or get drafted after college, and in those days they were drafting marines as well-life expectancy was 30 days--no thanks. All us guys were just trying to stay alive and get back home. And today, I put my digital camera into a nice camera bag that I bought about 5 years ago at the local camera store--and inside was a tag: Made in Vietnam--so all is good lol. And the island, Hon Tre off Nha Trang mainland, I spent most of my time on is now one of the best resorts in Vietnam. Google it and look at the images--cracks me up.

Make sure your sons and daughters take a good pocketable camera over to North Korea--it will be their next stop, and possibly they can get a nice shot of a mushroom cloud. Sorry to be cynical, but the world continues to be both a dangerous and beautiful place.

11 upvotes
Tlipp
By Tlipp (Mar 29, 2013)

WELCOME HOME SIR!

2 upvotes
jdc562
By jdc562 (Mar 29, 2013)

Haughey's photos put real faces on the Americans , Vietnamese, and others killed and injured in this war. More than 58,000 of these American soldiers were killed outright. The numbers include the MIAs. More than 303,000 Americans were wounded, not counting the profoundly psychologically wounded. According to the latest American analyses, this war killed approximately one million Vietnamese men, women, and children. Look at the people in Haughey's photos and extrapolate to all these numbers. Remember this war was not like WWI or WWII; the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War was tragically prolonged by presidential politics and political misrepresentations. And all those young American men you see in the photos? In those days, most did not freely choose to be in the military. Instead, they had to make a coerced choice of the draft, enlist, jail, or to become felons by fleeing the USA. And the million dead Vietnamese--what choice did they have?

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
jedinstvo
By jedinstvo (Mar 29, 2013)

I just bought a German book of photos taken on the Eastern front during WW2. The photos were found in an attic by people cleaning out the house after their father passed away. There's lots of history waiting to be discovered.

4 upvotes
AngshuArun
By AngshuArun (Mar 29, 2013)

Amazing, thanks..

1 upvote
encar
By encar (Mar 29, 2013)

Amazing - thanks for the link!

1 upvote
pixelized
By pixelized (Mar 29, 2013)

I went straight from the stirring images on the Globe site into 500px and there was a post of a modern day Vietnam street market scene from someone I follow. That was a slightly disorienting moment for me.

0 upvotes
tree11b
By tree11b (Mar 29, 2013)

Boy! Do those photo's bring back memories. Most of us who served then were not exactly thrilled to be there. We all lost very, very good friends. But we had a job to do. We tried to do the best we could and to survive. I don't think any one in the bush was pro-war.

8 upvotes
atlien991
By atlien991 (Mar 29, 2013)

Morale operations lol.

Let any other country try a 'morale operation' and they instantly becomes a propaganda state forever. Only in the USA does EVERYTHING have a double standard.

6 upvotes
jedinstvo
By jedinstvo (Mar 29, 2013)

You don't get around much, do you?

2 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Mar 29, 2013)

I don't think he's saying that other countries don't do this. I think he's saying that when they do, the U.S. calls it propaganda, which it is.

1 upvote
MPA1
By MPA1 (Mar 29, 2013)

But were his lenses sharp in the corners wide open?

22 upvotes
gdfthr73
By gdfthr73 (Mar 29, 2013)

HaHa. Thanks for the sarcasm. I hope your comment helps some on here realize how silly pixel peeping really is.

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
wayne131
By wayne131 (Mar 29, 2013)

Fantastic. Thank you DPREVIEW for the link :-)

7 upvotes
PunkRock
By PunkRock (Mar 29, 2013)

I am anti war but they are amazing amazing pics and really give a feel of what the drama and tension and just general all round days were like...excellent stuff.

0 upvotes
Ken Phillips
By Ken Phillips (Mar 29, 2013)

Oh, pretty much everyone is "anti-war", including all of the folks I worked with in the USAF.

5 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Mar 29, 2013)

Ken Phillips,

Not sure I agree with you. That's not the sentiment I pick up most forums.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Phixer323
By Phixer323 (Mar 29, 2013)

These stunning images are going force me to look back at mine from 68-69 (Chu Lai)! Like this photographer, my slides have been locked away for over forty years. I can't even imagine that they would even come close to these.

4 upvotes
beckmarc
By beckmarc (Mar 29, 2013)

Your images are part of history. It doesn't matter if you followed the rule of thirds etc. Photographs are a window into the past and need to be preserved

6 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Mar 29, 2013)

What I wonder about, is whether or not these images would have survived as digital images. There are some advantages to having a physical record of your images.

0 upvotes
dennishancock
By dennishancock (Mar 29, 2013)

Time to 'come out of the closet.'

1 upvote
alpha90290
By alpha90290 (Mar 29, 2013)

These photos gave me the urge to shoot film again :)

5 upvotes
huyzer
By huyzer (Mar 29, 2013)

Interesting.
I love the picture with the kitten.

0 upvotes
Felts
By Felts (Mar 29, 2013)

These photos (see Boston Globe article) are truly stunning! A very talented photojournalist at work...

2 upvotes
dennishancock
By dennishancock (Mar 29, 2013)

Great photos for Vietnam veterans to relive; great photos for Americans to ponder.

Another soldier's views at http://www.DennisHancock.com/vietnam a lot of people look at.

1 upvote
InTheMist
By InTheMist (Mar 29, 2013)

Amazing images.

0 upvotes
Lmendy
By Lmendy (Mar 29, 2013)

Brings back memories. I bought my first SLR at the base PX, Camp Tien Shau, Danang, RVN in 1967. I have no idea what happened to all the photos, but none compared to these. He really captured the images of what it was like and you can almost feel what those grunts were feeling at the time.

11 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Mar 29, 2013)

I was in Alaska ( A Co, 5th Bat, 60th Inf, 172nd Brigade) from April 66 to April 68 and purchased my first SLR ( Canon Pellix QL) from a Pentax dealer in Hong Kong by mailorder in the summer of 66. Before that I had a Minolta 35mm rangefinder that I purchased from the base PX at Fort Ord California were Clint Eastwood was stationed in the 50's.

Back then they had a photography contest every two years between the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines and in the 12th Annual contest in 1967 I received 3rd place in the color action category were first place photo was awarded best of show and I had the highest award of any Army entries. My award was a silver bowl trophy and the winning photos were on display at the Pentagon in the main concourse. My photo was titled "Pure Hell" that was a drag racing photo of a AA/FA nitro fuel altered with the same name taken with my Canon Pellix at the February US Fuel & Gas Championship at Bakersfield California.

2 upvotes
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (Mar 29, 2013)

Everyone check out the Boston Globe article, nice big images. Amazing.

5 upvotes
John Koch
By John Koch (Mar 29, 2013)

Very interesting, until the Globe site forced one to state how much one ought to pay for "carbon footprint," without giving any consumption parameters. This ruins, unfortunately, the ability to see the pictures. The Globes owner is having some financial difficulties, but what good is there in forcing readers to impute prices for imprecise hypotheticals?

5 upvotes
AlpCns2
By AlpCns2 (Mar 29, 2013)

I suppose it is "progressive" to forcing readers to impute prices for imprecise hypotheticals.

0 upvotes
exRhodesian
By exRhodesian (Mar 29, 2013)

Superb - Black-&-White makes all the difference

0 upvotes
ArneK
By ArneK (Mar 29, 2013)

What camera did Mr. Haughey use i Vietnam? Leica? Other brands?

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Mar 29, 2013)

There is a picture of him holding a Minolta.

1 upvote
Dccps
By Dccps (Mar 29, 2013)

I believe that many of us that experienced the hell of war there are truly antiwar. Many of us (myself included) are antiwar mentally, emotionally and spiritually. Our actions in the middle east ultimately weakened us and I think in large part this is becasue we didn't learn the valuable lessons we should have learned over forty years ago. Yet when the monster from North Korea starts threatening us as he is, we must always be prepared to make these sacrifices yet again! I wonder if humanity will ever learn that war is never worth starting and causes loss we will never recover.

0 upvotes
zkz5
By zkz5 (Mar 30, 2013)

Disable Javascript in your browser. I did and could see all of the images without any garbage.

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Zeb Andrews
By Zeb Andrews (Mar 30, 2013)

It was a beer can that he wrapped up. A funny little story he has told us a couple of times. If you want the schematics ;-), I am sure Charlie would be happy to provide more info, you can e-mail him at info(at)chieu-hoi.com if you'd like.

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Zeb Andrews
By Zeb Andrews (Mar 30, 2013)

In terms of cameras, to the best of my memory at separate times he was using a Minolta (not sure of model), a Nikon F (til the back plate blew out of a helicopter), and a Yashicamat TLR in base (mostly for portraits).

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alfadoctor
By alfadoctor (Mar 30, 2013)

" I carried a camera and shot film"
I am so happy to see someone putting out their negatives to tell a story of what many of us did through a camera lens. So much of what we photographed is gone. Many of our negatives, slides and prints were confiscated when we left country, never to be seen again. Some of us are blessed to have our body of work for posterity. I have some negatives that haven't been out since 1969 and they need to be scanned and printed. I carried a Leica 3F, Nikon and a 6x7 roll film camera.

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Total comments: 89