Previous news story    Next news story

Transcend releases 64GB microSDXC UHS-I memory card

By dpreview staff on Mar 28, 2013 at 16:57 GMT

Transcend has released a 64GB microSDXC Ultra-High Speed Class 1 (UHS-I) memory card. The card offers data transfer speeds of up to 45MB/s (300x), and an ability to store more than 10,000 hi-res JPEG images (6MB file size) or 16 hours of 1080p HD videos. It also includes a free copy of the company's RecoveRx software to recover deleted or lost files. The memory card is available for $109. There is currently no information about its European price and availability.


Press Release:

Transcend Unveils New 64GB microSDXC UHS-I Memory Card

March 28, 2013: Transcend Information, Inc., a worldwide leader in storage and multimedia products, today announced the introduction of the 64GB microSDXC Ultra-High Speed Class 1 (UHS-I) memory card. With enough space to carry an entire collection of personal media files, the new 64GB microSDXC card also features high-speed transfer rates of up to 45MB/s (300x); perfect for users aiming to get the best performance results from their mobile device.

Featuring capacities ranging from 8GB to an enormous 64GB, Transcend's Premium Series microSDHC/SDXC UHS-I memory card lineup allows smartphone, tablet, and other portable device users to significantly expand their multimedia storage space. The new 64GB microSDXC card, for instance, can store more than 10,000 high-resolution jpeg images (12 megapixel camera, 6MB file size), a full 16 hours of 1080p High-Definition footage (1920x1080 9Mbps H.264 AVC compression), or over 1,200 media-rich mobile apps (50MB file size).

In addition to large capacity, mobile users consider fast performance to be an equally important factor when choosing the best memory upgrade solution. Equipped with the next-generation UHS-I interface, the 64GB microSDXC UHS-I card offers data transfer speeds of up to 45MB/s (300x) – especially noticeable when running memory-intensive mobile apps and capturing high-quality video. With its impressive combination of high-speed performance and vast storage capacity, the 64GB microSDXC UHS-I memory card will undoubtedly satisfy mobile users for a very long time.

For added value, each Transcend UHS-I memory card includes a free download of Transcend’s own RecoveRx™ software – an extraordinarily effective tool for bringing back accidentally deleted or lost files. Transcend’s new 64GB microSDXC UHS-I card is now available for a suggested price of US$109 and carries Transcend’s renowned Lifetime Warranty.

Comments

Total comments: 39
Brazen31
By Brazen31 (4 months ago)

I purchased 4/32GB SDHC (10) UHS-1 cards and 2/64GB SDXC (10) UHS-1 cards with the adapters for $133 on Friday 11/29/13. I think that's a great deal. I realize without for-profit corporations we would be in serious financial ruin; I just wish we didn't have to wait around all year for one day to get a bargain. Can anyone relate?!

0 upvotes
skysi
By skysi (Apr 23, 2013)

LOL! Talk about being late for the train that has left the station long time ago. I can get the same class SanDisk card for $55

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 29, 2013)

Just last week, my 83 year old grandma had a very old computer die and wanted me to see if I could get her journals off of it. I pulled out the old standard HDD and she says, "wow, all my files are on that tiny thing!". Made me chuckle at the irony seeing this new fast 64GB microSD card that surely would have blown her mind. :)

0 upvotes
stevens37y
By stevens37y (Mar 30, 2013)

You need to teach her to make backups on some indipendent media. HDDs may also die:)

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 31, 2013)

She has some on 3.5" floppies, but I didn't have anything around that could read those!

1 upvote
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Mar 29, 2013)

The Sandisk version has been around for a couple years and has sold for $35 at times. This is a common capacity and the price isn't groundbreaking.

This is a non-news item.

3 upvotes
stevens37y
By stevens37y (Mar 29, 2013)

64GB is pretty common already even for microSDXC.
E.g. : Samsung MB-MGCGBEU Class 10 microSDXC Pro 64GB (UHS-1, Grad 1) is only 50-60 EUR; read: 70MB/s, write: up to 20MB/s.

3 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Mar 29, 2013)

These high capacity cards probably only exist for video needs.

Who the heck would put 10,000 photos on a card?

It would take me a year to shoot that many photos, and even a few months for most heavy users. That's an awful lot of post processing work for one night!

0 upvotes
DaNPrS
By DaNPrS (Mar 29, 2013)

These are great for expanding memory on a mobile device like tablets and phones.

4 upvotes
Essai
By Essai (Mar 29, 2013)

I have Sandisks Ultra 64GB in my phone and my tablet.

Cheap (was 50$ on amazon a few months ago), fast(200X), huge capacity, water proof, temperature proof, shock proof and x-ray proof.

My MP3 collection takes 24gig so 64GB was a minimum for me.

2 upvotes
MtnBikerCalif
By MtnBikerCalif (Mar 29, 2013)

Take a three-month long trip shooting RAW even without video and you'll use more than 64GB. But one or two cards is less hassle than many small cards. Backups required though. The chance of misplacing a card when you change it in the field on a trip in a foreign country may be as likely as a corrupt card—no way to know and depends on your habits and luck.

I've taken 7000 pictures (digital) on a single trip. I've lost two rolls of film in the past (before digital).

The post processing is simpler with fewer cards to juggle. And I've juggled maybe ten of them on my last big trip three years ago. I welcome the larger cards. My camera uses SD, but I doubt it will be long before micro SD is common in mid-size and smaller cameras.

My wife welcomes the large micro SD for her GoPro.

Comment edited 53 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Forgottenbutnotgone
By Forgottenbutnotgone (Mar 30, 2013)

I have close to 60,000 on my 32gb card, some dating back to 1999. Most any time I export from Lightroom, I export a duplicate batch in 800x600. I then transfer the folder to my cell phone. I'm able to send photos to friends, family or clients any time. I've sold countless prints as a result of sending someone a photo from my cell phone. With all the music and video that I have on the same card, I'm down to less than a gig left so I'll be purchasing a 64 gig card soon. I have an Android phone and the app, QuicPic, which is excellent for displaying, organizing and sending photos. I also have some very good editing programs as well. You'd be surprised at the handiness and usefulness.

0 upvotes
idbar
By idbar (Mar 28, 2013)

I thought Samsung and Sandisk had already products out there. What's new about the Trascend product?

3 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Mar 28, 2013)

Probably the price. Samsung and Sandisk have high profit rates/markups.

2 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Mar 29, 2013)

@redfox88: Samsung and Sandisk command high prices on premium products is because they are the once manufacturing flash chips(atleast Samsung does) and they are the once to do binning of the chips.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Mar 29, 2013)

...actually, I've seen the Sandisk cards as low as $35. Unless this is cheaper than that, no, there isn't a story here.

Transcend makes a good products and of the 20 of their cards I own, when one failed, they replaced it. From someone who likes Transcend, I have to say...this ain't news.

Now 127gb...that'd be news!

0 upvotes
poligame
By poligame (Mar 28, 2013)

This are good news.If you know the price for europeans please PM.
Thanks for the information.

0 upvotes
DaytonR
By DaytonR (Mar 28, 2013)

Interesting news , this card makes a very discrete cost effective back-up storage solution !

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Mar 28, 2013)

Flash memory is NOT anything to be used as backup storage. Plus at $110 for 64 GB, that is not very economic compared to 1 TB external drives that are now back down in the $80 range.

2 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (Mar 29, 2013)

@RedFox88
Please, read carefully DaytonR's comment.
If one looks for a cheap AND "very discrete" back-up solution, DaytonR is right.
A 1 TB HDD is not discrete...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
The Squire
By The Squire (Apr 2, 2013)

Flash is fine for back-up on the road. Why not? Far less prone to damage than lugging a mechanical USB drive around. Just dont bother paying for a Class 10 card. You don't need a fast card for back-up, just a big reliable one (or two). Look at SanDisk products: £39 get you a 32GB, U-I Class 10 to put in the camera; £24 for Class 2 to backup your files to.

0 upvotes
AV Janus
By AV Janus (Mar 28, 2013)

so this is $100 for a card that claims "up to 45 MB/s" whereas it is really more closer to 10-20MB/s...
Probably way less cause you need a good reader, software in your phone, could supporting adapter.

When will they (SD consortium) finally do something useful like a true and dependable minimum speed rating that all must adhere.
They just keep inventing names, and new designations and manufacturers play aroun those rules on semantics, cheating the less educated consumer.

8 upvotes
Steve69
By Steve69 (Mar 28, 2013)

based on your post this product might not be dedicated to educated customer like yourself. they won't cry if you choose not to get one.

6 upvotes
atlien991
By atlien991 (Mar 29, 2013)

This!

But really, only professionals will care about this comment. Casual users, music, tablets and the like, don't need the advertised speed specs and simply like to see the numbers on the package (New!, Improved!).

To professionals who have 15 cards already, the promise of speed means time saved which means money and thus it matters. Alas, the professional:enthusiast ratio is way too small for the industry to respond with a real standard.

Transcend is happy to cede the pro market to SanDisk while marketing fake pro products to casual users.

1 upvote
ianp5a
By ianp5a (Mar 28, 2013)

In my day, a micro SD card was the size of a LP record!

3 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Mar 28, 2013)

and a regular SD card had two volumes of 1000 pages of punch cards each!

1 upvote
Steve69
By Steve69 (Mar 28, 2013)

as i recall punch cards had storage capacity of less than 128bytes which means that you would need almost 8.5 million cards to store equivalent of 1 GB of data. this makes 536,870,912 cards to replicate storage capacity of this latest 64GB transcend card. not sure if it would fit in my living room.

2 upvotes
Alberto Tanikawa
By Alberto Tanikawa (Mar 28, 2013)

I just don't trust Transcend products. I tried an sd from them, it died on first use, and returning it for an exchange from Newegg would have cost nearly as much as the product itself. Never had such problem with Lexar, Sandisk, Kingston, Delkin, PNY, Hoodman, or even Kodak.

0 upvotes
ianp5a
By ianp5a (Mar 28, 2013)

I've had a few with no problems. Any mass produced item will have a small percentage of failures. It says "worldwide leader in storage" so I guess their percentage is no worse than others. Sorry to hear of your trouble. You are a victim of statistics. Try and transcend your situation.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Alberto Tanikawa
By Alberto Tanikawa (Mar 28, 2013)

I see what you there :p

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Mar 28, 2013)

You know, ANY product you use has the possibility to not work when it's brand new. That does not mean ALL products or units from the manufacturer are bad. I've used 2 Transcend CF cards for over 6 years now without a problem. The one memory card I had that went bad was a Kingston.

By your logic, if you had a new tire that happened to go flat within the first few months and it was made by Michellen, you'd call all Michellen products not worth buying, right?

2 upvotes
Alberto Tanikawa
By Alberto Tanikawa (Mar 29, 2013)

All the Lexar and Sandisk CFs I've purchased came with limited lifetime warranties, which I've never had to use. The Transcend SD had a single year (at the time) and it wasn't even worth the hassle of going through RMA, or contacting the manufacturer for that warranty. Bought two slightly more expensive Lexar SDs which worked right off the bat, and had limited lifetime warranty. Don't they test the memory before they ship? I still won't buy Transcend. It's my opinion and you're entitled to yours.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Matrox
By Matrox (Mar 29, 2013)

I have no problems with my 2 Transcend SD cards - 16GB and 8GB (Class 10). They work great. What's interesting, transfer rate is higher than Sandisk 16GB Nobile Ultra UHS-1 (microSD). I was really surprised that Sandisk doesn't provide higher data transfer. Maybe using SD-adapter was the cause.

0 upvotes
atlien991
By atlien991 (Mar 29, 2013)

LOL, everyone knows that Transcend is unreliable but let someone actually say it and out come the Transcend interns to earn their 8/hour defending the bosses' toy. Use Transcend if you don't mind losing what is on it.

1 upvote
Ed Ellks
By Ed Ellks (Apr 1, 2013)

Along with some others, I've used Transcend products for several years and only had one problem. I have about a dozen of their memory cards and other devices, mostly compact flash and SDHC.

I also had a problem with a Sandisk product, so every manufacturer will have an occasional issue.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Mar 28, 2013)

Unless my human memory fails, a 2" 1GB Memory stick cost $350 in 2003. The cost of flash memory, taking into account card size too, is only 5% of what it was. Setting aside size advantage, the cost per GB is now barely 1% of what it was in 2003.

The downside: too many osrtrich eggs in one dwarf-sized basket.

0 upvotes
Alberto Tanikawa
By Alberto Tanikawa (Mar 28, 2013)

I know what you mean, I bought a 320MB CF back in 1999 and it cost over $900! Back then 256MB was considered huge... :p

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
sh10453
By sh10453 (Mar 29, 2013)

You bring some 1990s memories! I bought a 5 1/4 inch, 500 MB (one half of a GB) hard disk monster back then (I think it was the largest available) for $500.

Later on, when I bought my 250 MB CF flash card, I was the envy of my colleagues. I don't remember how much the cost was, and I don't want to remember actually!
These high capacity tiny drives will make a lot of videographers happier.

1 upvote
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (Mar 28, 2013)

Aren't there tons of UHS-I 64 gb micro sd cards around?

0 upvotes
Total comments: 39