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Canon unveils EOS 100D/Rebel SL1 world's smallest and lightest APS-C DSLR

By dpreview staff on Mar 21, 2013 at 05:00 GMT

Canon has announced the EOS 100D/Rebel SL1, the world's smallest, lightest DSLR. It shares the 18MP resolution, DIGIC 5 processor, 3" touchscreen and 1080p30 video capability of the mirrorless EOS M. The camera does introduce much wider scene coverage of Canon's Hybrid AF system and shoots at up to 4 fps. The 100D has a recommended price of $799.99/£799 with the co-announced EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM kit lens.

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Press Release:

CANON U.S.A. ANNOUNCES WORLD’S SMALLEST AND LIGHTEST DSLR CAMERA

MELVILLE, N.Y., March 21, 2013MELVILLE, N.Y., March 21, 2013 – Continuing the quest to deliver superb product innovations, Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the world’s smallest and lightest DSLR* camera: the EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR Camera. It features a newly developed 18.0- megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor and high-performance DIGIC 5 Image Processor for exceptional image quality and speed. With its combination of lightweight size, ease of use and outstanding image quality, the EOS Rebel SL1 is perfect for users looking for the ideal camera to bring sightseeing on vacation or to capture the everyday

'The EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR Camera represents a new era in DSLR versatility: ultra-portable, full- featured DSLR cameras,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A. “The EOS Rebel SL1 combines the high speed, high image quality and expanded shooting range of a DSLR camera, with the easy and fun usability of a point-and-shoot camera.'

Advanced Image Quality in a Compact Body

Illustration comparing relative size of EOS M, SL1 and T4i

As the world's smallest and lightest DSLR, the new camera body is 4.6" (w) x 3.57" (h) x 2.74" (d), and weighs only 14.36 oz.** In comparison, the EOS Rebel SL1 is approximately 25 percent smaller and 28 percent lighter than the EOS Rebel T4i digital camera.

The EOS Rebel SL1 features an 18 megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor that performs exceptionally well in both bright and dimly lit shooting environments with an ISO range of 100-12800 (expandable to H: 25600) for photos and ISO-6400 (expandable to H: 12800) for video. Canon’s DIGIC 5 Image Processor technology allows for exceptional image quality and shooting speed up to four frames per second (fps).

The camera includes a new nine-point center cross-type autofocus (AF) system to help achieve fast, sharp focus. The new AF system also includes a new Hybrid CMOS AF II sensor, which provides a wider focus area when shooting photos or video in Live View mode, and a continuous AF speed that’s increased from previous EOS models.

To help capture video with ease, the EOS Rebel SL1 features Canon's Movie Servo AF, which provides continuous AF tracking of moving subjects. When shooting video with one of Canon’s new STM lenses, such as the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM (available in the standard lens kit), Movie Servo AF takes advantage of the lens’ stepping motor for smooth and quiet continuous AF. The camera is capable of Full HD shooting in a number of recording sizes and frame rates, and enables easy manual control of exposure, focus and Live View features. The combination of Canon’s new Hybrid CMOS AF system II and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens is ideal for shooting video helping to ensure only the sounds of the scene are recorded.

Allowing for clear and easy viewing even in bright environments, the Touch Screen three inch Clear View LCD monitor II provides a rich and expansive display as well as providing intuitive touch panel operation. Two finger touch gestures (multi-touch) can be easily used for zooming or changing images, accessing menu and quick control settings, and activating focus point and shutter release while shooting

Creativity at your Fingertips
The EOS Rebel SL1 encourages users to explore their creative side with a wide array of features for convenience and simple shooting. The EOS Rebel SL1 is equipped with Scene Intelligent Auto Mode, an advanced function that detects faces, colors, brightness, movement, contrast, distance and other factors and automatically adjusts and selects the exposure method needed. The results are photos with a wide dynamic range, ideal for users without advanced photography knowledge or experience.

Users can also access advanced imaging features like the new Effect Shot mode, which automatically creates two different shots, one with a selected creative filter and one without. In addition, Creative Filters and Background Blur Simulation can now be displayed in real time during Live View shooting. Editing photos is also a snap with the Rebel SL1’s in-camera editing and cropping functionality. This feature allows users to view and crop the image using the camera’s LCD touch screen and save the edited version as a separate file.

For those who would like to take beautiful photos with ease, the EOS Rebel SL1 offers a variety of scene modes to explore. New special scene modes include Kids, Food and Candlelight, giving users advanced presets to help ensure the best possible photos even under difficult shooting conditions.

Pricing and Availability

The new EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR Camera is scheduled to be available in April for an estimated retail price of $649.99 for the body alone or $799.99 bundled with the new EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM kit lens.

For more information about the EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR Camera, and a full list of product specifications, visit www.usa.canon.com/eos.

* Among digital SLR cameras which use APS-C size equivalent sensors. As of March 1, 2013.
** Weight specifications are for camera body only; does not include battery or memory card

Canon Rebel SL1 / EOS100D specifications

Price
MSRP$799.99/£799 with 18-55mm STM
Body type
Body typeCompact SLR
Body materialAluminium alloy and polycarbonate resin with carbon and glass fiber
Sensor
Max resolution5184 x 3456
Other resolutions5184 x 2912, 4608 x 3456,3456 x 3456, 3456 x 2304, 3456 x 1944, 3072 x 2304, 2592 x 1728, 2592 x 1456, 2304 x 1728, 2304 x 2304, 1920 x 1280, 1920 x 1080, 1728 x 1728, 1696 x 1280, 1280 x 1280, 720 x 480, 720 x 400, 640 x 480, 480 x 480
Image ratio w:h1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels18 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors19 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (22.3 x 14.9 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorDigic 5
Color spacesRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter arrayRGB Color Filter Array
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800 (25600 with boost)
White balance presets6
Custom white balanceYes (1)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • JPEG: Fine, Normal (Exif 2.3 compliant)
  • Design rule for Camera File system (2.0),
  • RAW: 14bit RAW
  • Digital Print Order Format [DPOF] Version 1.1 compliant
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampby built-in flash
Manual focusYes
Lens mountCanon EF/EF-S
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3
Screen dots1,040,000
Touch screenYes
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentamirror)
Viewfinder coverage95%
Viewfinder magnification0.87×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program AE
  • Shutter priority AE
  • Aperture priority AE
  • Manual (Stills and Movie)
  • Scene Intelligent Auto (Stills and Movie)
  • No Flash
  • Creative Auto
  • Portrait
  • Landscape
  • Close-up
  • Sports
  • SCN
Scene modes
  • Kids
  • Food
  • Candlelight
  • Night Portrait
  • Handheld Night Scene
  • HDR Backlight Control
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range9.40 m
External flashYes (via Hot-shoe)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-eye
Flash X sync speed1/200 sec
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self timer (2s, 10s+remote, 10s + continuous shots 2-10)
Continuous drive4 fps
Self-timerYes (2s, 10s+remote, 10s + continuous shots 2-10))
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Partial
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±2 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (3 frames in either blue/amber or magenta/green axis)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (30, 25 fps)
FormatH.264, Motion JPEG
MicrophoneMono
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (HDMI mini)
WirelessEye-Fi Connected
Remote controlYes (RC-6)
Physical
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion LP-E12 rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)380
Weight (inc. batteries)407 g (0.90 lb / 14.36 oz)
Dimensions117 x 91 x 69 mm (4.61 x 3.58 x 2.72)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
GPSOptional
GPS notesvia GPE2

Additional images

232
I own it
87
I want it
35
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 250
12
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 26, 2013)

As someone who has used canon from when i started learning photography on my own years until last year when i purchased the omd i must say that my fanboyism has died and common sense taken place, if i were to return to dslrs i would pick up a nikon despite the lenses costing more in my country and being much harder to resell as in my country 70% of the market is canon 15-20% nikon and then sony and pentax share the left overs. (including m/43s in these numbers)

0 upvotes
AndrewG NY
By AndrewG NY (Mar 25, 2013)

Pentax has made DSLR bodies arguably smaller than this in the past -- though not lighter. I believe there are a few Pentax bodies that were shorter and narrower than this but Pentax bodies are usually slightly thicker and heavier due to the in-body sensor-based SR...and some of those small Pentax bodies were designed to take much bulkier AA batteries. (and unlike the small Oly bodies, the Pentax models actually housed a sensor slightly larger than this Canon).

Part of this Canon's diet was to allow reduced battery life by dropping the relatively big DSLR battery and shrink the handgrip that would have housed it. I imagine it will still handle OK with the relatively compact and light kit lenses it's likely to be used with most.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Scott Greiff
By Scott Greiff (Mar 25, 2013)

The Rebel wasn't "rebel" enough, I guess.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 25, 2013)

100D rebels at only one direction,
and it rebels quite extreme at that direction.

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (Mar 24, 2013)

I like the idea, but not from Canon.

The sensor is terrible, a lousy 1.6x crop and there are no EF-S primes for this thing.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Mar 25, 2013)

A "lousy 1.6x crop"...yeah, they'll NEVER succeed in the DSLR world with a lousy 1.6x crop! LOL. Yeah right.

4 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 27, 2013)

The sensor isn't terrible, it's just not class leading. Practically, its very decent. Yes it could be better, but a camera isn't judged by all solely by the sensor alone.

2 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 25, 2013)

Bah full frame and medium format is useless trash,, large format is the only good sensor that should be made (notice the sarcasm and how i am pointing at how ignorant your comment was and yes i am talking down to you for a good reason)

1 upvote
mischivo
By mischivo (Mar 24, 2013)

Great. DSLRs have been too big compared to their film-era ancestors. Now if they could do this with a full-frame body...

2 upvotes
petepictures
By petepictures (Mar 24, 2013)

That's quite a but overstatement. Olympus had smaller bodies for years.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Mar 24, 2013)

The title clearly says, "smallest and lightest APS-C DSLR"...yes, APS-C. The Olympus bodies clearly did not use APS-C sensors. They used much smaller 4/3 sensors.

3 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (Mar 24, 2013)

Canon also doesn't use a proper APS-C sensor. The Canon is 1.6x crop, Olympus is 1.9x crop. Big deal.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Mar 24, 2013)

I use Canon APS-C, and Oly m4/3. It's a big deal. I still prefer APS-C over m4/3. APS-C still gives you better DOF control and better background blur.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 25, 2013)

> APS-C still gives you better DOF control and better background blur.

that's not really because of a larger sensor.
it's larger aperture lenses that gives you
- better SNR (let in more light at a certain shutter speed),
- better DOF and blur control, and
- better resolution (diffraction-limited).

it's not the smaller sensor that let 4/3" down.
it's because they lack large aperture lenses.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Mar 25, 2013)

@yabokkie - I use both APS-C and m4/3. With the same aperture, same focus distance, and same framing, my APS-C cameras give better DOF control than my m4/3. Why is this so? Because an m4/3 sensor (which has a 2X multiplier) inherently has to use a shorter focal length to get the same framing as an APS-C camera (which has a 1.6x or 1.5x multiplier). Since focal length effects DOF, you get less DOF control with m4/3. So it really DOES come back to the size of the sensor. Yes, you can try to use lenses with larger apertures and longer focal lengths to get around this issue, but that of course means larger lenses, higher weight, and greater expense.

2 upvotes
stevens37y
By stevens37y (Mar 27, 2013)

>>I use both APS-C and m4/3. With the same aperture, same focus distance, and same framing, my APS-C cameras give better DOF control than my m4/3. <<
This is obvious.
Use bigger aperture with the m43 for the same DOF.

0 upvotes
leomartinez
By leomartinez (Mar 31, 2013)

4/3 vs APS-C deep of field.

There are three factors that affect the Deep Of Field:

1 - Aperture of the lens or f number.
2 - Focal Length of the lens (mm). The FL modify the angle of the light that enter trough the lens: Short length (mm) = wider light angle = more DOF.
Longer length (mm) = narrow light angle = less DOF.
3 - Distance between camera (C), subject (S) and background (B). With more distance between C and S the DOF will be greater and vice versa. (Distance represented here by the dashes)
Example 1: C---------S---B= more DOF.
Example 2: C---S---------B= less DOF.

to be continue...

0 upvotes
leomartinez
By leomartinez (Mar 31, 2013)

the continuation:

The factors 2 and 3 determine the field of view (the viewed area pictured within the picture frame) and both are inevitably related to sensor size. That is why that, at the same distance between C and S, the cameras with bigger sensor will use longer lenses (less DOF) to cover the same pictured area than the cameras with smaller sensors. And, with the same given focal length of the lens (mm), the cameras with bigger sensors should be closer to the subject (less DOF) in order to achieve the same pictured area by a camera with a smaller sensor.

The key factor here is the viewed area pictured within the picture frame. With that in mind it is possible to understand why the people say that the bigger the sensor, the shallow the Deep Of Field, even though is not the sensor size itself but the relation between the focal length and the distance between the camera, the subject and the background, which are the factors that determine the field of view.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
leomartinez
By leomartinez (Mar 31, 2013)

Hay tres factores que afectan la profundidad de campo:

1 - Apertura de la lente o número f.
2 - Longitud focal de la lente (mm). la longitud focal modifica el ángulo en el que la luz que entra através de la lente:
Longitud (mm) corta = ángulo de luz más amplio = más DOF.
 Mayor longitud (mm) = ángulo de luz estrecho = menos DOF.
3 - Distancia entre la cámara (C), sujeto (S) y el fondo (B). A mayor la distancia entre C y S el DOF será mayor y vice versa.(La distancia es representada aquí por los guiones)
Ejemplo 1: C --------- S --- B = más DOF.
Ejemplo 2: C --- S --------- B = menos DOF.

0 upvotes
leomartinez
By leomartinez (Mar 31, 2013)

Los factores 2 y 3 determinan el campo de visión (el área visualizada representada dentro del marco de la imagen) y ambos están inevitablemente relacionados con el tamaño del sensor. Es por eso que a una misma distancia entre C y S, las cámaras con sensor grande, usarán lentes más largos (menos DOF) para cubrir la misma área representada en una fotografía por cámaras con sensores más pequeños. Y, a la misma longitud focal dada de la lente (mm), las cámaras con sensores más grandes deberán estar más cerca (menos DOF) del sujeto con el fin de representar en la fotografía la misma área que una cámara con sensor más pequeño.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
leomartinez
By leomartinez (Mar 31, 2013)

La clave aquí es el área representada dentro de la fotografía, con eso en mente es posible entender porque se dice que las cámaras con sensor más grande ofrecen una profundidad de campo más reducida, aun cuando no es exactamente el sensor en sí mismo, sino la relación que existe entre la longitud focal y la distancia entre la cámara, el sujeto y el fondo, es decir, los factores que determinan el campo de visión fotografiado.

0 upvotes
DaNPrS
By DaNPrS (Mar 23, 2013)

I don't see the market for this.

2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

- Potential mirrorless owners who need more lenses
- Travel camera for photographers who need or want TTL OVF
- Secondary camera for Canon user (eg. for travel photography - you'll take only one set of lenses instead of two - one for mirrorless and one for the DSLR)
- Soccer mums / casual shooters
- Basically: all of the OM-D and GH-3 buyers (both are in the size of 100D, only offer less lenses (but smaller), while Canon got more, and still offers quite a few of good focal lengths in tiny lenses (eg. 50mm prime or pancakes (note here that not only Canon manufactures pancake lens with EOS bayonet), and on top of that: got better AF system).

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Mar 24, 2013)

Then you clearly don't have very good vision. LOL.

There are millions and millions of people who are still buying DSLRs every single day, and quite a lot of them want something just a bit smaller than what is currently available, but don't quite feel comfortable with going with one of the mirrorless systems because they still want the potential upgrade path of Canon's DSLR system. Plus, there is an enormous pool of existing Canon DSLR users who would want this camera is a second or third body.

3 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (Mar 24, 2013)

People upgrading from point-and-shoot always look at size first.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 26, 2013)

I thought that they look for the image quality first.

1 upvote
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 27, 2013)

You may not see the market for this, but the #1 camera manufacturer clearly does. I'll place a bet that Canon knows what it's doing.

0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Mar 23, 2013)

Finally a canon step in the right direction: Compete in size and IQ! Though i'm partial to mirrorless for portability and FF dSLR for IQ, there's a niche for small dSLR...

Just think a 1-lb dSLR w/ pancake and 1500shots/charge and OVF (however arguable tunnel), and the usual benefits of a quiet sensor (not always running hot in LiveView mode) etc...

1 upvote
harold1968
By harold1968 (Mar 22, 2013)

great camera, and a good evolution of the APS-C dslr

3 upvotes
KrisVlad
By KrisVlad (Mar 22, 2013)

Oh look! Another 18MP camera... exactly what Canon needed.

They're going in the wrong direction if they want to compete with Nikon's lineup. The D3200 outperforms this little thing in every aspect, except you know, size.

0 upvotes
photoshutter
By photoshutter (Mar 22, 2013)

Nikon outperforms Leica too, on paper...

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Mar 24, 2013)

In this market segment, the size difference will count a lot more than pixel-peeping differences in sensor performance or whatever. There are plenty of people who just want a super compact Canon DSLR!

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 27, 2013)

Never underestimate how a camera handles or its size and weight. Feel and use are just as important to some photographers as sensor performance, sometimes more (I dare say always more).

C

0 upvotes
friedchicken
By friedchicken (Mar 22, 2013)

it seems like everything is epic fail if:

- it is something not exactly what he or her was hoping for

- it is something similar to what he or she already own

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
Woodlink
By Woodlink (Mar 22, 2013)

My old (and still functioning) Rebel XT dimensions:
127 x 94 x 64 mm

The specs of the NEW, SMALLEST DSLR ON THE PLANET!!! EOS Rebel SL1:
117 x 91 x 69 mm

Congrats Canon, you just made your new camera smaller by a few millimeters.

Sure the new one has a better sensor and has a fancier touchscreen...

You guys should win a design award or something. /s

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 22, 2013)

And video, and a higher frame rate, and a lot more customization options, fun JPEG modes, and and and

It's a lot more camera, there's no denying that. On size, I see your argument, it's pretty sound, but smallest is smallest.

Oly should re-introduce the E450 with the new 16mp sensor, LCD screen, and menu system. That would be a nice camera for 4/3 users. That and an E7. Minimal investment, 4/3 users are still chugging along.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Mar 24, 2013)

I think once you put the SL1 right next to your XT, or have it in your hands, the size difference will be more apparent. Just look at the Camera Size Comparison of the SL1 vs the Rebel XS:

http://camerasize.com/compare/#218,448

0 upvotes
klavrack
By klavrack (Mar 22, 2013)

Cool! Now if they would add in-body stabilization, 6fps, focus peaking, metal frame, a great low-light sensor and weather resistance, then cut the price by $180, they'd have a Pentax K30. To admit it, though, AF during video and touch screen might be nice advantages over the Pentax, and I'm sure there are others I'm overlooking. The dimensions are slightly smaller and it is several ounces lighter, though the kit lens is heavier. Hope it does well and gets newbies into the hobby.

3 upvotes
SantaFeBill
By SantaFeBill (Mar 22, 2013)

The kit lens already looks huge compared to the body. Wonder what a 500 would look like?

0 upvotes
Joel Pimenta
By Joel Pimenta (Mar 22, 2013)

Canon EOS 100D is the perfect body to match with my 100-400L...

2 upvotes
Zigadiboom
By Zigadiboom (Mar 21, 2013)

Nikon D5000 - 12mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 72
Nikon D5100 - 16mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 80
Nikon D3200 - 24mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 82
Nikon D5200 - 24mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 84

Canon 550d - 18mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 66
Canon 600d - 18mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 65
Canon 650d - 18mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 62
Canon 100d/700d - 18mp - DXO Mark sensor score: 6?

Nikon sensors over time have continously been improving in dynamic range, color depth and high ISO even as the megapixels have been increasing. Canon on the other hand have been relatively stagnant in its sensor innovation and in its inexcsuable that in four iterations at such a competitive segment of the market that it cannot come up with anything better. I'm a Canon man if owning a G1X and a SX260HS counts. However if I'm going to upgrade to an entry/mid tier DSLR based on curent offerings I really cannot see why I would choose Canon over Nikon other than maybe lens selection and shooting video.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
10 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Mar 22, 2013)

Show me a real world example where the 650d turns in demonstrably worse result than the 550d and we'll talk.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

He won't. He is one of these "numbers" guys. ;)

2 upvotes
coody
By coody (Mar 21, 2013)

Unfortunately, it is not stereo; otherwise, its price and size is competitive. Probably Canon leave that feature on purpose for its upgrade.

0 upvotes
///M
By ///M (Mar 21, 2013)

note to Canon, make the lenses smaller!

1 upvote
Andrew Booth
By Andrew Booth (Mar 21, 2013)

Agreed. The 40mm f2.8 is a cool little lens (I just bought it). If Canon could make a 21mm or 24mm pancake to partner it, then I'd look seriously at selling my m43 gear and getting the 100D!

3 upvotes
klavrack
By klavrack (Mar 22, 2013)

Andrew--I think you're looking for a Pentax K30 with some Limited primes, unless you're avoiding the little guys.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 22, 2013)

it's near physically impossible to make lens smaller (going to mirrorless can help a lot but that's another mount). basically smaller lens, smaller aperture, means lower image quality.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

Smaller aperture DOES NOT mean lower image quality! Check Pentax pancakes - they are usually around f/2.8 and offer excellent image quality, often beating crap out of Canon or Nikon f/1.4 or f/1.8 glass.
And the lenses can get smaller - Pentax got whole bunch of them. If Canon follows similar scheme - it might be an amazing competition to the m4/3 (especially for larger size bodies).

0 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (Mar 24, 2013)

Canon will never commit to EF-S glass.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 25, 2013)

@ Plastek,

I still keep some Pentax junks with little resale value and I know those beautiful metal ones well. they are not too bad but not so good either.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 26, 2013)

well, if you keep the old metal junks than no wonder you have such a low opinion about them :)

0 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 21, 2013)

Im Reminded of Tommy Boy the movie "Fat man in a little coat"

4 upvotes
G G
By G G (Mar 21, 2013)

Little fat with big lens... Who said Sony NEX looked strange?

0 upvotes
Greynerd
By Greynerd (Mar 21, 2013)

People are confusing the meaning of smaller with small. It is still a big lump but not as big as the other big lumps.

3 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 21, 2013)

I think it is unfair to "lump" in this camera.

2 upvotes
Cailean Gallimore
By Cailean Gallimore (Mar 21, 2013)

I was wondering what that drip, drip, dripping sound was, and I found out that it was the Canon/Nikon innovation timeline...

2 upvotes
Nectar D Or
By Nectar D Or (Mar 21, 2013)

Everything is already invented.
Go take pictures.

4 upvotes
David Naylor
By David Naylor (Mar 21, 2013)

Go take pictures yourself. You're obviously lurking here just as much as everyone else.

1 upvote
fibonacci1618
By fibonacci1618 (Mar 21, 2013)

I welcome efforts by Canon, Nikon et el, in coming up with ever increasing choices for consumers.. it may not appeal to many, but it will appeal to many others, so yaay for consumer choice!

I believe this size format is intended to address consumers who are considering getting a m4/3 camera such as the Oly E-M5, but don't like the EOS-M offering. Being smaller will make it a much closer candidate to the mirrorless competition. I see this as one way in which Canon hopes to fight back against the m4/3 cams, as there are a lot of experienced photographers who increasingly want the benefits of smaller & lighter, and this might go some way to address those needs.

However, I'm not sure how much mileage can be gained as the reflex design and APS-C sensor still means that lenses are a *lot* bigger & heavier than the m4/3 alternatives. In the end, it will likely still not be a m4/3 stormer as the total weight of the SYSTEM including lenses cannot truly trump m4/3.

To each his/her own...

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Mar 21, 2013)

I can't say anything positive about this so I just won't say anything at all.

8 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 21, 2013)

A failed attempt at introducing something to compete with an NX20 with a 30mm f2 on it (or a kit lens if you prefer).

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 21, 2013)

I doubt Canon even really remembers that the NX20 exists. Canon will sell more of these in a month than Samsung has sold NX bodies total since launch.

Not saying anything about the NX20 as a product, it just isn't even in the same league as Canon products in terms of sales.

3 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 22, 2013)

Samsung is nearly dead on NX, too bad too because they have a really nice product and lenses. I've seen you comment many times before on Samsung Timmbits, your beyond beating a dead horse now.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

NX?! Hahahaha, this system is still alive?!
From all of the photographic systems we've got you jump with NX. Come on. You really need to be desperate to buy Samsung gear. Perhaps Galaxy phone is "ok", but cameras? Seriously?

0 upvotes
Retzius
By Retzius (Mar 21, 2013)

Me thinks that this is made for the Chinese market (largest and fastest growing market). Small camera for tiny little female Chinese hands.

1 upvote
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Mar 22, 2013)

And the prize for most ignorant comment of the day goes to...

2 upvotes
migus
By migus (Mar 23, 2013)

Most of them 'tiny little female Chinese hands' might actually exceed in strength and endurance our expectations... still plenty of hard work there. Hence my respect.

0 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 25, 2013)

Yes because the average chinese person that gets paid more then ten times less than an american can afford a dslr... This will be a huge hit there *cough cough*

0 upvotes
marcio_napoli
By marcio_napoli (Mar 21, 2013)

Under the risk of showing extreme levels of ignorance about the subject, I really don´t get this small DSLR quest.

- If you wanna be discreet (for street photography or whatever), this won´t do. It´s all about the form factor, not size of things. If this ressembles a DSLR, you will still look like a Paparazzi, although one with small camera.

- if you wanna good IQ at a small package, there´re lots of choices already: Leica, EOS M, Coolpix A, a bunch of Sony Nex, Sigma DP, P&S, whatever.

- you mind about fewer grams, time to gain some muscle. A girl can hold a 1 kg camera all day long. Besides, whatever lens you use, it will weight more than the camera, so what´s the point of saving 90 grams on the body? As I said, time to enter a gym.

- all this little cameras do is present really bad ergonomics. I have a GH2, which is the best VIDEO camera I´ve ever had, but at the same time, the worst ergonomics of all time.

- if you wanna a toy, there´re better choices in the wild already

0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Mar 23, 2013)

Every gram counts. It's not muscle, but skeleton: neck, back, hip and knee joints and the cartilage therein. That's the damage accrued in time, as most pros and serious enthusiasts tell.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Mar 24, 2013)

Your comments show a lot of ignorance. I shoot with a 5D and 60D, but I would gladly add an SL1 as a more compact alternative to my current cameras. I can pretty much guarantee you that walking around with this tiny DSLR will be a lot less conspicuous and intimidating than walking around with any of my other DSLRs. And I don't think I'll have any problem with the ergonomics because I also shoot with an even tinier Olympus E-PM1 (often with a Canon EF lens mounted on it using an EF-to-m4/3 adapter)! Plus, there are times when even slight difference in weight can make a difference in overall comfort.

0 upvotes
Retzius
By Retzius (Mar 21, 2013)

I am really excited for this release!!!! I have been wishing for a camera that is even harder to hold on to compared to the competition!!!! So excited!!!

Yay!!! Go Canon!!!

6 upvotes
jaykumarr
By jaykumarr (Mar 21, 2013)

Can some experienced photog advise me please?

Compared to T5i, what are the DISadvantages this one has?

If attached with Sigma100-300 F4 or Canon 100-400 L , will the light weight cause harder handling than heavier T5i due to imbalance?

thanks
Jay ( out of focus)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 21, 2013)

if you hold a camera the way you are supposed to, right hand on the body and left hand under the lens, it shouldn't be an issue.

I would compare with an NX20 before making my final decision though.

3 upvotes
Drew Conway
By Drew Conway (Mar 21, 2013)

The disadvantages won't be in the quality of the pictures (because the sensor is the same), but most likely the ergonomics.

Some people will find the smaller size and placement of the buttons to be fine, others will not. It'll just depend on how it feels in your hands.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Mar 21, 2013)

4 fps vs 5 fps. Fixed screen. Much smaller battery (and shorter battery life).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 53 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Mar 22, 2013)

Yes. The bigger the lens, the bigger the camera should be to feel "right", balance properly, and handle well.

In the grand scheme of things the difference between this and the T5i is negligible by the time you are looking at something like the 100-400L. Both cameras are too small to handle well.

0 upvotes
Dames01
By Dames01 (Mar 21, 2013)

So this camera seems to have the two main things that people missed about the EOS-M: built in flash, OVF. Sure it is a bit more bulky, but not much if you consider the EOS-M with the EF adapter mounted.
The elephant in the room of course is the AF speed... If that is any better than the EOS-M, then in my opinion this will sell well amongst the people looking for a second Canon DSLR body.

2 upvotes
Michael Barkowski
By Michael Barkowski (Mar 21, 2013)

Heckle me all you want folks, I'm gonna say it anyway:

*Camera of the Year*

And yes, one of the biggest reasons is that it is a Canon.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 21, 2013)

Another all-plastic junker from Canon. Nothing surprising here any more, folks. Hey, Sony people won't lose any sleep over this one, he-he-he.

3 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 21, 2013)

ROTFL!
good one!
that's like saying a Smart is the car of the year because it's a Mercedes. wow, what blind logic.

1 upvote
meland
By meland (Mar 21, 2013)

Laugh all you like but Michael is absolutely right.

2 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Mar 21, 2013)

No, that's silly. By the end of the year there will be plenty of other Canon models to choose from if they want to give it to Canon. Maybe even something other than a shrunken retread.

1 upvote
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Mar 22, 2013)

Unless this horse has already bolted. Nice camera, attractive size, probably has Nikon a bit worried, but can it turn around the ever-dwindling sales of entry level dSLRs as people move to mirrorless? I'm not so sure.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

Richard - sales of DSLRs go up year to year ever since m4/3 was created, and it still went up in 2011, 2012, and by the prognosis: it'll go up in 2013.

Get your numbers straight before talking BS.

Mirrorless sales on a large scale affect only advanced compacts with small sensors, not the DSLRs.

2 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 25, 2013)

Camera of the year? You have been sniffing to much of chemicals in the darkroom.

0 upvotes
klavrack
By klavrack (Mar 21, 2013)

It should sell well to folks that want DSLR capabilities w/o the weight. On the other hand, we Pentaxians would like to point out the K-30 as a great alternative. From our biased perspective, it's a much more capable camera w/o many relative weaknesses. Good for Canon, though, if it puts pressure on everyone else--competition benefits buyers of all brands.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 21, 2013)

I think this is aimed at the Rebel buyer (ie: first-time dslr buyer) who wants something small to bring on vacation.

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
jaykumarr
By jaykumarr (Mar 21, 2013)

Klavrack,
Sure Pentax is super good 'camera'. But lens? If pentax has fast focussing, not expensive lenses, esp tele-zoom I will buy them

0 upvotes
klavrack
By klavrack (Mar 21, 2013)

Jay--Not sure focusing would be better than on the k30. A side- by-side comparison of the 2 models' capabilities will be of interest. But if it does--again, good for both makes...that much more incentive for Pentax to improve.

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Mar 22, 2013)

What does "dSLR capabilities" mean to the entry-level crowd other than the optical viewfinder? You can do everything this does with a NEX-5, if so inclined.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

Richard - DSLR form-factor, DSLR lenses. NEX5 got... 13 AF lenses? And the most common focal lengths are either twice the price as these for Alpha, or unavailable at all. Sorry, but NEX is a joke for someone who wants to buy a DSLR. It's good if you plan to stick with pancake zoom and have too much money. Not at all in any other scenario. Especially if you are tight on budget.

1 upvote
Michael Barkowski
By Michael Barkowski (Mar 25, 2013)

klavrack, the K-30, (which is a semi-pro model like K20D or K10D), or even the K-r, is quite a bit heavier than the SL1 (Super-Light 1). So I'm not so sure about their "alternative" status. The K-r/K-x/K-m is obviously due for an update.

The SL1 is significant because it is a Canon, and all that goes with that, the lens/flash/accessory choices both 1st and 3rd party, the extensive repair/service network, refined interface and documentation, marketing/distribution/pricing/bundling, software compatibility, resale value...

The blogosphere might eventually wakeup from their love affair with new camera shapes, which isn't necessarily shared by the global consumer. The DSLR, a word that has not lost its charm, offline anyway, is not yet dead.

"He is not yet dead!
That's what the geezer said,
..."

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
fastlass
By fastlass (Mar 21, 2013)

As @Ermac said, a low end, basic dslr should be <$500 MSRP to compete. At this $500 price point you can prioritize IQ (dSLR), size (premium compact), a mix (mirrorless). The IQ-on-the-cheap crowd is not that big and they can get huge value if they bump their pricepoint closer to $1K.

0 upvotes
plasnu
By plasnu (Mar 21, 2013)

Hmm, a low end mirrorless camera with a cheap toy mirror and huge zoom lens.

This camera will be a good ignorance barometer.

7 upvotes
Woodlink
By Woodlink (Mar 21, 2013)

Lately, Canon has been saving on labor costs by not having to pay anyone to write their press releases.

Control C
Control V

Voilà

Same tired old 18 MP sensor, etc, etc, etc.

5 upvotes
highwave
By highwave (Mar 21, 2013)

I think this picture bellow tells the whole story that needs to be told:

http://3.static.img-dpreview.com/files/news/5148234552/Comparison1.jpg?v=2028

Basically it's not all about the height/width of these small cameras that matters the most. It's the depth. And as clearly seen in the picture above, this is just another fat SLR camera regardless of its height/width.

I mean, just look at the current Fujis. Those are chunky mirrorless cameras no smaller than a typical SLR in height/width. But with a prime they are still considered small laying flat saving space.

When you get something like a typical micro four thirds and slap on the magnificent 20mm f1.7, you can easily through it in your slingbag and it totally disappears. Even the relatively largish OM-D E-M5 can be slipped into cargo pants.

Now go and try doing stuff like that with this so called mirrorless competitor SLR.

No cake Canon. I was hoping for some spectacular creativity. This camera is just downright lame.

15 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Mar 22, 2013)

The value proposition is simple enough:

We'll give you an optical viewfinder, dSLR handling, and full compatibility with EF system lenses. You sacrifice to carry a little bit more bulk than a typical u43 system camera.

I agree with your basic point: long lenses are what makes cameras bulky, but that applies equally well to the OM-D with kit zoom, and the XE-1 with kit zoom, as it does to this Canon. If you are going to be running around with that kind of lens attached, the Canon is not at a huge disadvantage here.

2 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (Mar 22, 2013)

OMD is some of the largest m43 cams. Take and EPL5 and some primes and look at the difference.
Even with OMD...the OMD has a tiltablescreen, weathersealing, IBISand that kitlens is alrger, but it is has singifcantly more reach (24-100 compared to 27 to 90 mm) and is weahtersealed with macro function too.

With a zoom, the difference simply becomes a lot bigger not smaller. You can have an EPL5 or OMD with the 20mm Panny, 7-14 mm Panny, 45-150 Oly or Panny and the 14-42 kitlens. Put the OMD and 20mm in one pocket and the other in another. It is no problem at all. Try to do that with any DSLR and get a similar reach.
The 100-300 mm Pany weighs less than 1/3 of what a similar Canon/nikon lens weighs.

Also: the OMD/EPL5 has a better sensor, better dynamic range.

The canon will prolly sell well, because very few people approach this cam as we do over here. But for somone who wants a small, wellrounded cam with small and very good lenses there seem to be better choices on the market.

1 upvote
Michael Barkowski
By Michael Barkowski (Mar 26, 2013)

Put a zoom lens, large sensor, large rear standard aspect ratio LCD, flash, EVF, decent battery and grip either on or in the camera and you get almost the same size whether the camera has a mirror or not.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 21, 2013)

I like this announcement. I gave myself a couple of hours to think about it before I decided to have an opinion.

I like the idea of a well featured compact DSLR with a decent optical finder, and based on the specifications it seems Canon has nearly nailed this one.

My only concern is the use of Canons decent but aging 18mp sensor, it seems Canons semi-conductor facility isn't able to keep up with competition. Surely the sensor is decent, but it's lacking in DR and the CDAF off it doesn't seem capable enough to keep up with competition.

Comments continued in reply...

5 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 21, 2013)

Thing is with Canon, they are a package company. It's not about one or two headliner features with them, rather, they seem to be best at creating a well balanced and capable product overall- in short they are consistent.

This camera might entice me to buy one. I loved the Oly E420/450 based on its small size and feature set, but its finder/sensor/menu system left a lot to be desired. Compared to those record holders (smallest DSLR period...), the new SL1 addresses all the issues I had with the Oly I had, which was the E450.

In addition, it adds MUCH more functionality to it, and if the small 40mm pancake is added, it's a really small light combo to have around. Canon should make a couple more pancakes so there's a set of 3 to choose from.

Say a 17mm, 40mm, and 60mm f/2.8 set of pancakes.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Mar 22, 2013)

The problem, and Pentax does this too, is that the 40mm "pancake" lens is a uninteresting and unhelpful focal length on APS-C, and the mirror-box makes small, fast, wide angle lenses difficult to design.

There's another thing: mirrorless cameras are new, closed systems, electronic coupling. Lenses can be designed with the cameras's correction system in mind. A lot of optical flaws can be "mopped up" in this way so the max aperture can be pushed wider, where Nikon, Pentax, and Canon simply cannot because they must consider back compatibility to older cameras with no correction.

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 22, 2013)

Did you read the last line of my second comment? :) Seems we agree, but not everybody agrees a 40mm is uninteresting on APS-C, and that includes myself.

40mm on APS-C is much more interesting than the already very popular 50mm primes so many people use on APS-C.

C

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Michael Barkowski
By Michael Barkowski (Mar 26, 2013)

People complain whether the megapixel count stays the same or increases - it's amazing.

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 27, 2013)

I'm not complaining, there's a difference in pointing out the fact that Canon's sensors are testing below competitors at this level of camera, and complaining about the sensor. I have no issue with the sensor for my use, but it's something that users and prospective buyers are talking about a lot more. Canon knows they need to keep up in this area and improve, nothing to hide there. And I'm certainly not complaining.

Camera buyers are spoiled with options.

0 upvotes
eaa
By eaa (Mar 21, 2013)

It's not the worlds lightest DSLR.
Compared to the Olympus E-4xx series it is narrower all right, but deeper, and equally high. And heavier.

100D - 407g - 117 x 91 x 69

E-410 - 375g - 129.5 x 91 x 53
E-420 - 380g - 129.5 x 91 x 53
E-450 - 380g - 129.5 x 91 x 53

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 21, 2013)

EAA, Canon's claim CLEARLY states the smallest and lightest DSLR ... WITH... an APS-C sized sensor.

People have reading issues.

2 upvotes
eaa
By eaa (Mar 21, 2013)

@ cgarrard:
I haven't read Canon's statement...
I read this article, and the very first sentence atop THIS page states:
"Canon has announced the EOS 100D/Rebel SL1, the world's smallest, lightest DSLR." Full stop.
Reading issues, you said?

2 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 22, 2013)

The title of this article is: "Canon unveils EOS 100D/Rebel SL1 world's smallest and lightest APS-C DSLR". So you don't need to read what Canon said. But if you do:

There's an * next to the statement you quoted in the very first line of the press release. If you scroll down and read that note, it clearly points out the obvious. So, read again.

1 upvote
eaa
By eaa (Mar 22, 2013)

Yes, I can see that, but as said, I didn't read that part (Canon's). If you go further up, above the camera pic, the ingress of the DPR article still says:
"Canon has announced the EOS 100D/Rebel SL1, the world's smallest, lightest DSLR."
That's what I read, and that's what I commented on. And it's still wrong.
So, read once again.
(that said, we're both right here then ;)

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 23, 2013)

I did read that, I saw it right away, which is why I read more because I knew it's not the worlds smallest DSLR, the Oly E410,420,450 are. So I figured Canon had to include language somewhere in the press release that clarifies their claim, which they did. Therefore the horse is beaten enough :).

C

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Mar 21, 2013)

I always believe camera should be made ASAP (as-small-as-possible) so this should have been the 700D.

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 21, 2013)

there is the issue of ergonomics... not just compactness.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Rad Encarnacion
By Rad Encarnacion (Mar 22, 2013)

For this camera's market, I don't think ergonomics is that big of an issue.

After all, they're still shooting with iPhones.

0 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (Mar 21, 2013)

This will sell well.
It has good AF(ALL cross type),great touch screen(via the M), new sensor" new AF system also includes a new Hybrid CMOS AF II sensor", And alot of really good lenses.

Body only for a just announced camera is only $649. Not to bad.

Its build quality is most likely better VS the T4i due to it being more compact.

Looks like they lost alot of weight by loosing the DSLR battery. only 380 shots is mirrorless area.
Now if they could just make a pancake 30mm F1.8-F2 for crop, this camera would do really great.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Cheng Bao
By Cheng Bao (Mar 21, 2013)

"The camera includes a new nine-point center cross-type autofocus (AF) system"

you will be disappointed

1 upvote
misha
By misha (Mar 22, 2013)

I understand only one (center) AF point is cross-type, which is worse than the T4i.

0 upvotes
Ermac
By Ermac (Mar 21, 2013)

800 bucks??? c'mon bottom of the line DSLRs with APS-C sensors should be $199.99-299.99 by now... dang money grubbin' greedy camera makers!

Especially since Canon's own CEO said Full Frame was the future and basially these small sensor jobbies are a waste of money...

11 upvotes
thewhitehawk
By thewhitehawk (Mar 21, 2013)

Shouldn't they have showcased this camera with a pancake lens or something a bit smaller than the kit zoom?

This is why eastern companies sometimes appear so disconnected from their public.

3 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 21, 2013)

...you can always go check out the NX20 with a 30mm f2, and not be disappointed! ;-)

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Mar 21, 2013)

Almost nobody would use anything BUT the kit 18-55 (maybe a similar kit from their old broken Rebel) on this thing. And what is out there to use commensurate to the size of the body - the useless 40/2.8?

1 upvote
Cane
By Cane (Mar 21, 2013)

It's funny to see cannon make a 'small' body but still make giant lenses.

5 upvotes
Woodlink
By Woodlink (Mar 21, 2013)

yea, I wonder where all the NEX haters are now?

This is basically the SAME thing

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

Half of them is p****** their pants.

And besides - Canon got few nice small primes :) Including one pancake. Issue are zoom lenses, as well as lack of interesting pancake lenses (eg. ~30mm one)

1 upvote
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (Mar 21, 2013)

I was hoping for a nice small M43 Canon with the ability to use all the M43 Lumix and Olympus lenses, and with a new sensor. I have Nikon, Olympus, and Lumix and would love to get into a nice compact Canon body but what a boring release this is.

5 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (Mar 21, 2013)

Why on earth would Canon make a body for Lumix and Olympus lenses? What do you like so much about Canon's bodies over Olympus and Panasonic that makes this desirable? Wouldn't your hopes be more realistically directed towards Olympus and Panasonic making the needed changes to their bodies to fix your perceived deficiencies?

4 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Mar 21, 2013)

I was hoping for a Ferrari shopping cart (oh, wait, there probably is one.) Canon already has the barest beginnings of a mirrorless system and has no reason to abandon it (yet). I would have loved to have seen other camera makers buy into Micro 4/3, but they've all decided to go their own ways. Just as they did with dslrs in years past.

Cooperation is not natural for these very competitive companies. Even Olympus and Panasonic have done things differently enough in their MFT bodies and lenses to discourage mixing and matching. Canon would have been even less likely to stay within the standard.

2 upvotes
MichelBB
By MichelBB (Mar 21, 2013)

What about the 80 percent of the world camera users who do not use ounces and inches ?

20 upvotes
Wally626
By Wally626 (Mar 21, 2013)

117 x 91 x 70 mm (to nearest mm) 407 grams. Smaller than the Sony A33, which is a tiny SLR. This for sure falls into the handle before buying camp.

2 upvotes
jtan163
By jtan163 (Mar 21, 2013)

The metric system is a UN conspiracy to take over the freedom loving people of the world!
The freemasons have 5 digit on both hands and if you add them up that makes 10, which is the number the metric system is based on!!!!!
:-)

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
xfoto
By xfoto (Mar 21, 2013)

Get with the times? :P

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (Mar 21, 2013)

Gee even counting in base 5 makes more sense than the Imperial System...

1 upvote
Cane
By Cane (Mar 21, 2013)

Does your country have a camera review website? Yeah, go find it.

1 upvote
plasnu
By plasnu (Mar 21, 2013)

Didn't you know that USA is defacto standard of the world?

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (Mar 21, 2013)

By the way what I said is absolutely true: by counting in base 5 you could count up to 25 with just two hands

Comment edited 11 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
DPReview Staff
By DPReview Staff (Mar 21, 2013)

Canon USA's press release only shows inch and ounce, but our specs beneath the release show both inch and metric. Camera review websites acknowledge the Internet, while most camera sales companies are by definition limited to their home country. For whatever reason, most Americans stick to the old system, even after 40 years of halfhearted government effort, hence Canon USA's omission of metric in the opening lines of the press release.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 21, 2013)

it's more like 99% of the planet. only US uses the olde English system. even England has got with the times a long time ago.

4 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Mar 21, 2013)

In theory and officially they're metric, but in practice many in the UK actually use a mix of old and new. People are still giving their weight in stones, and distances are not uncommonly measured in miles.

1 upvote
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (Mar 22, 2013)

It's just a social experiment to discover how quickly the 80% look for something to be offended by and start whining. You win.

1 upvote
Zerblatt
By Zerblatt (Mar 22, 2013)

I don't envy an US or UK engineer that have to convert units when calculating.
This could explain some products I have seen...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 23, 2013)

MarkInSF - only in the markets you can see old system. Shops, offices... everything uses metric system in UK. Basically an imperial system is used only there where you can find a lot of old grumpy people ;)

1 upvote
SteveNunez
By SteveNunez (Mar 21, 2013)

Great small form factor should be a hit at Best Buy where people will see it's diminutive size and be drawn to it- BIG problem is you'll still need those BIG and heavy lenses to shoot with it..........they should just join the m4/3 consortium and make their own micro 4/3 camera and release their own m4/3 lenses- then they'd really shake things up!!!

6 upvotes
dmanthree
By dmanthree (Mar 21, 2013)

Got to give Canon credit for introducing another camera that absolutely polarizes the user responses! While this isn't for me, I can see a market for it; people who want a small and light SLR who don't obsess about having the "best" sensor on the market. Canon's sensors are still quite good, even if Sony's are a notch better. And I'm betting that 99.99% of the buyers of this unit will never shoot anything but JPG and will never know the difference.

I'll stick with m4/3, thank you.

5 upvotes
Andreas Stuebs
By Andreas Stuebs (Mar 21, 2013)

Nice camera if only .... Yes if only Canon would have taken those photographers seriously who like a small no frills camera as a real tool. But no - again the typical tunnel vision dimly lit viewfinder (pentamirror!) - again only one control dial.
Canon you did again what you did with the M: you missed a chance.

2 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (Mar 21, 2013)

Why DIGIC 5 ? Why Not DIGIC 6 ?
Canon SX270 HS using DIGIC 6

3 upvotes
Dvlee
By Dvlee (Mar 21, 2013)

Because next year they can release an upgraded version so that everyone who bought this one can have a touch of buyers remorse. Its a new model so of course they have to hold back on features on the first one.

2 upvotes
Higuel
By Higuel (Mar 22, 2013)

the bastards! -_-

1 upvote
Eadfrith
By Eadfrith (Mar 21, 2013)

WOW at the UK Price !!

3 upvotes
Total comments: 250
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