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Seawater-damaged Nikon lens fixed by boiling at Taiwan service center

By dpreview staff on Mar 18, 2013 at 00:47 GMT

A service center in Taiwan has repaired a seawater-damaged Nikon 17-35mm f/2.8D IF-ED lens by boiling it. According to a post by Nikon Rumors, after investigating the damage, staff established that the AF motor of the lens needed to be replaced and some internal parts were 'rusted' due to salt water damage. To remove this 'rust', they boiled them in water. The lens was apparently fixed in three days.

Despite being called the 'Nikon Repair Center' this company appears not to be an ahem... official Nikon... repair center, and we certainly wouldn't recommend taking the 'boiling in chemically-infused water' approach to cleaning your own jammed-up lenses. How would you feel if a service center took this approach to fixing your gear? Let us know in the comments. 

 (via Nikon Rumors)

A camera service center in Taiwan repaired a Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8 lens that was dropped in the sea by boiling corroded parts in a chemical/water solution. 

Comments

Total comments: 103
12
Glenn
By Glenn (Mar 19, 2013)

this isn't anything new. they didn't do this with electrical components. and in Taiwan they learn quickly how to clean metal parts. stuff just rusts sitting in the humid air there so it's always on your mind.

3 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Mar 19, 2013)

Still better than dead lens.

6 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Mar 19, 2013)

A new recipe for cooking lenses? The aim is to work properly, whatever the recipe, and if this works, it helps to break some myths.

2 upvotes
JaFO
By JaFO (Mar 19, 2013)

Sounds like a job for Myth Busters ...

too bad it doesn't feature explosions ;)

0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (Mar 19, 2013)

They didn't just throw the lens in boiling water. They boiled some of the parts in a chemical cleaning bath using water-soluble chemicals. Not really all that new an idea, neither is it all that scary; dissolving the sea salt deposits is pretty much the only way to get rid of them... and I hope they changed the bath & rinsed the parts well to remove all traces of the salt.

6 upvotes
BravoEcoNovember
By BravoEcoNovember (Mar 19, 2013)

...sounds like a surface passivation to me. It`s not "boiled in water". And some other parts required replacement as well, we can discover after reading the note. This kind of affirmative in an empty title is silly, and I suspect just another way to generate crap in the web.

2 upvotes
wakaba
By wakaba (Mar 19, 2013)

Insert "I boiled my D600 to clean the dust" comment here.

And then microwaved my D600 to dryiness.

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (Mar 19, 2013)

I don't quite get the criticism which is lurking in the article.

I am pretty sure this inofficial repair center rescued an otherwise irrepairable lens. And in quite a creative manner too. Kudos to the guys and to make it public.

6 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 19, 2013)

think the difference between official and non-official repairs is the official ones give out as little information as possible. "don't tell the customer" is a good rule for many businesses and it's especially true for cameras.

1 upvote
just Tony
By just Tony (Mar 19, 2013)

This is apparently what comes from Nikon cutting off the parts supply to the independent shops.

3 upvotes
Barry Stewart
By Barry Stewart (Mar 19, 2013)

Hey, does Apple own Nikon?

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 19, 2013)

an "officlal" repair shop would not have been allowed such creativity. they would have to replace the lens.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 19, 2013)

maybe a dishwasher instead of a Chinese medicine jar.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
forsakenbliss
By forsakenbliss (Mar 19, 2013)

this saved it from becoming a paper weight, why not.
anyway they didn't boil the whole lens. just the barrel part & it was not pure water, chemical added to remove rust.

4 upvotes
dgeugene1
By dgeugene1 (Mar 19, 2013)

Whatever works.

1 upvote
mrgooch2008
By mrgooch2008 (Mar 19, 2013)

Rust cannot be removed by water. It will return.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Mar 19, 2013)

I can say that the Nikon Service Center in the US would never do this. I wonder if I can buy a gray market item just to send my equipment to taiwan for service...

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 19, 2013)

In US perhaps not, but US seem to be the only market in the world where Nikon got unscratched opinion.
TBH I wouldn't be surprised seeing that being done in Central Europe or Middle East knowing how "amazing" Nikon repair centers are out there.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
VidJa
By VidJa (Mar 19, 2013)

Don't forget the non-existing service by Nikon in the EU when you 'god forbid' ever purchased a Nikon lens outside of Europe and then took it with you when moving back into the EU.

0 upvotes
JaFO
By JaFO (Mar 19, 2013)

Just because it is an "official" service centre that doesn't mean they won't take non-approved methods to fix your stuff.

Heck, just consider the fact that Canon(I think) used (high-tech) tape to fix a light leak in one of their latest DSLRs.

Never mind that news reports in media tend to omit the actual details, because it makes it sound more dangerous/stupid/retarded/etc than it actually was.

0 upvotes
camerosity
By camerosity (Mar 19, 2013)

Good thinking. I am sure that now, around the world, service centers will be trying this on the boxes of rusted lenses they have in the back of the shop...watch out eBay buyers...

0 upvotes
Total comments: 103
12