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Rokinon gives May 2013 release date for T-S 24mm F3.5 lens

By dpreview staff on Mar 13, 2013 at 18:03 GMT

Rokinon has announced the T-S 24mm F3.5, a wideangle perspective control lens, for release in May 2013. Rokinon rebadges and distributes Samyang lenses for the US market, and this lens first appeared at Photokina 2012 as the Samyang T-S 24mm 1:3.5 ED AS UMC, but without a specific date for launch. The lens features manual focus and aperture setting, offers up to 12mm of shift and 8.5° of tilt, and is designed for full frame cameras. It'll initially be available in Canon, Nikon and Sony mounts, at an RRP of $1299.99.

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Press Release:

Elite Brands, Inc. Announces Rokinon’s Newest T-S 24mm F3.5

Rokinon is proud to announce the release of its 24mm F3.5 Tilt-Shift lens in May, 2013. The Rokinon T-S 24mm is a wide-angle, full-frame lens that has tilt shift movements, allowing its user to have advanced control over perspective and depth of field.  It will be available for Canon, Nikon and Sony Alpha mounts to start.

This lens was developed with extensive flexibility and a unique optical form, making it ideal for shooting architecture and landscapes. The T-S 24mm F3.5 lens allows up to a 12mm shift with a 8.5 degree tilt. Relative to the lens mount, this 24mm can be shifted up to 90 degrees, granting a broad tilt to meet the photographer's creative desires.

This manual focus 24mm lens features a fixed focal length with an aperture range of f/3.5-22. This lens is suitable primarily for full-frame cameras but will work just as well with an APS-C crop sensor.  Construction is solid, using 16 optical elements in 11 groups with 2 aspherical lenses.


Rokinon T-S 24mm 1:3.5 specifications

Principal specifications
Lens typePrime lens
Max Format size35mm FF
Focal length24 mm
Image stabilisationNo
Lens mountCanon EF, Nikon F (FX), Sony Alpha
Aperture
Maximum apertureF3.5
Minimum apertureF22.0
Aperture ringYes
Number of diaphragm blades8
Optics
Elements16
Groups11
Special elements / coatings2 aspheric elements
Focus
Minimum focus0.20 m (7.87)
AutofocusNo
Full time manualYes
Distance scaleYes
DoF scaleYes
Physical
Weight680 g (1.50 lb)
Diameter86 mm (3.39)
Length112 mm (4.41)
SealingNo
ColourBlack
Filter thread82 mm
Other
NotesUp to 12mm of shift and 8.5° of tilt
9
I own it
24
I want it
0
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 145
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Mar 18, 2013)

I wish these companies would change up the names a bit. SLR magic, Samyang, Rokinon, bower...come on...

I did like the overnight company named "Noktor" very good marketing. bought out by slr magic if I remember correctly.

2 upvotes
makofoto
By makofoto (Mar 17, 2013)

Backing up my point that folks use these to LIMIT depth of field these days:

http://fstoppers.com/my-new-favorite-lens-is-not-found-in-very-many-photographer-bags

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Alejandro del Pielago
By Alejandro del Pielago (Mar 17, 2013)

I like it !!!!

0 upvotes
Hex144
By Hex144 (Mar 16, 2013)

anyone noticed Rokinon is "No Nik(k)or" reversed?

7 upvotes
3systermuser
By 3systermuser (Mar 15, 2013)

I also want to see them come out with some kind of TSE for MFT , NEX ,X and NX.

0 upvotes
3systermuser
By 3systermuser (Mar 15, 2013)

how heavy is it ?
is this one any lighter and smaller than the Nikpn PCE24mmf3.5?

0 upvotes
technotic
By technotic (Mar 16, 2013)

It's in the specs above.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 16, 2013)

hope it will be better.

0 upvotes
makofoto
By makofoto (Mar 15, 2013)

too bad it's not faster since these lenses are mainly used for reducing wide angle depth of field these days

0 upvotes
Thomas Kachadurian
By Thomas Kachadurian (Mar 14, 2013)

Better be pretty amazing because it's way too close in price to the Canon 24 TS-E which pretty much defines amazing.

Tom

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 14, 2013)

there are something the new 24-70/2.8L2 cannot do but it can do most, better in some aspects, as TS-E.

0 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Mar 14, 2013)

To yabokkie..... I can see no sensible point in even comparing the two lenses. They have utterly different purposes.

3 upvotes
3systermuser
By 3systermuser (Mar 15, 2013)

I have the Rocknon 35mmf1.4 and 85mmf1.4 , to be honest the 35mmf1.4 is just as good as my ex Nikon AFS35mmf1.4G or the Zeiss one ,which I still have , but the 85mm was a crap and I replaced it with the Zeiss 85f1.4ZF2 +Nikon AFS85mmf1.8G.
So I am not really expecting anything too much but hope it will be a great lens.
Oh and Smyong should try a 17mm TSE for Nikon and Sony.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 16, 2013)

> I can see no sensible point

that's not my fault.

0 upvotes
3dreal
By 3dreal (Mar 14, 2013)

Crazy Nikon added electronics into their Shift/tilt? 24mm. It cannot be used in old mechanic cameras FMs. You will be very upset when you electronics will freeze in cold days.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 14, 2013)

Nikon got the fame that their cameras did not freeze in winter mountains of Korea while German's did. none of the cameras got electronics, nothing to do with electronics.

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 16, 2013)

The electronics allow the camera to know what the lens is doing and record it in EXIF as well as communicate distance for the matrix metering to be optimal. I think for this particular kind of lens and it's typical work, you could do without the electronics.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 14, 2013)

half a century ago, the Japanese beat the hell out of "unbeatable" Germans and drove them out of the market.

I would like to continue to use high quality Japanese equipment but it's not bad someone else can beat them on quality, at least cost-performance for the moment.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Mar 14, 2013)

leica is still doing well... just in case you did not notice up in your asian cave.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
rtogog
By rtogog (Mar 14, 2013)

Henry, Leica has to share with Japanese company (Panasonic, Sony etc) to maintain its existent. Only some buyer still blind!

1 upvote
makofoto
By makofoto (Mar 15, 2013)

Japan is the number on buyer of Leica gear. When you're in the ritzy parts of Tokyo, you see german luxury cars, not japanese

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 15, 2013)

@yabokkie - Japanese beat the hell out of "unbeatable" germans? Really? I can't actually think of a German lens maker who's out of business. Rollei and Contax are gone, but they used...Zeiss glass which is still around.

@ rtogog - it's more like, "Samsung, Sony and Panasonic have to put German lenses (Schneider, Zeiss and Leica) to get noticed! They still need the German names to sell cameras.

1 upvote
kewlguy
By kewlguy (Mar 15, 2013)

@yabokkie; if you ever tried Leica lenses, you'll know the German optics beat the cr@p out of the Japanese lenses... not to mention Zeiss, Schneider... their market share is small because of the higher price - for a good reason!

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 15, 2013)

Leica and Zeiss used to make very good lenses as third grade Japanese but I think the companies lost expertise to make good consumer lenses for good dozens of years ago.

actually I know a Japanese guy who seriously tested the tiny plastic lens from a disposable fujifilm which looks about the same as a Leica lens stopped down (the Leica got bad CAs but fair enough it was not designed for color).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 16, 2013)

Neither Zeiss nor Leica ever made "good consumer lenses". They have licensed some of their processes and patents to Panasonic and Sony to use in their lenses - all to be able to imprint the name on their cameras.

Meanwhile, Zeiss and Leica still make superb, top notch professional grade lenses (and Leica cameras). They've never lost that edge. They've only gotten better. Problem is, they're too expensive for many pros.

And don't forget, Fuji is no slouch at making camera glass!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Mar 16, 2013)

> licensed some of their processes and patents

there is none that Japanese will need. they mastered all with respect more than half century ago and drove their teathers out of the market.

actually Japanese won't tell Germans the details of their lenses. how they plan, design, and make them. those third class Japanese makers only license the brands for marketing, which is against their longterm interests IMHO.

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 16, 2013)

Wow, I think we have a nationalist here! You need to read up on this and stop beating your drum about the almighty Japanese. You're not relating much reality.

0 upvotes
Higuel
By Higuel (Mar 14, 2013)

some $1300 for a lens that does NOT even close the iris as ordered by the camera...
from a white brand on top!

This confirms us all that Samyang has forgotten that their first major success, the 85mm f1.4 owns it to the fact that it was INDEED way CHEAPER then the options from the brands! WITH almost the same optical quality.
Start increasing the price like Sigma is doing and in no time Samyang is be story like many other brands who propose stuff way too expensive! They still have a looooong way to catch sigma in AF and ANY automation for that matter! Naturally they can try a crazy move like Sigma did with the SD1 sold at absurd prices, well, actually NOT SOLD! And in few months they had to cut the price to less then half!!! That is what Samyang deserves also!

0 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Mar 14, 2013)

You tell camera to close the iris. The camera tells the lens to close the iris. The lens closes its iris.

vs

You close the iris.

It's not that hard, really.

0 upvotes
AlpCns2
By AlpCns2 (Mar 14, 2013)

Tilt/shift lenses rarely, if ever, have aperture automation. The mechanics don't allow for it, and are actually very expensive to manufacture. Further, this is just a RRP.

3 upvotes
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (Mar 14, 2013)

Anyone who buys this lens plans to spend a few minutes adjusting movements per shot. How hard is it to set aperture on the lens instead of the camera. What a dumb comment.

1 upvote
Michaels7
By Michaels7 (Mar 14, 2013)

Samyang doesn't make Af lenses.

0 upvotes
DarkShift
By DarkShift (Mar 16, 2013)

Canon and Nikon versions have auto aperture which is a big plus for professional work. If one shoots a lot with these things then automatic aperture simply saves time. Manual aperture is not hard, its just cumbersome if it has to be done over and over again.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
probert500
By probert500 (Apr 17, 2013)

Really?

0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (Mar 14, 2013)

Samyang/Rokinon/Vivitar/Polar/Bower/Opteka/Falcon same difference.

2 upvotes
AlpCns2
By AlpCns2 (Mar 14, 2013)

And?

0 upvotes
balios
By balios (Mar 14, 2013)

Can you rotate the direction of tilt and shift independently of each other, like the Canon 24mm?

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 14, 2013)

Samyang's description of the lens suggests this should be possible (although the translation into English isn't great):

"To make Tilit-Shift function even more seamless, both the lens mount as well as Tilt-Shift section may be rotated on the optical axis. The Tilt-Shift section may be rotated left by 90 degrees (with 30 degree adjustment), while mount of the lens may be rotated both in left and right direction by 90 degrees, also with 30 degree adjustment."

The product shots support this too - the TS mechanism is more-or-less the same as the newest Canon TS-Es, and there's a clear gap between the tilt and shift sections that would mark the rotation point.

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Mar 14, 2013)

I don't see that "clear gap", Andy.

In the picture above, the dovetail for the shift mechanism is milled directly into the bottom of the tilt goniometer.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 14, 2013)

I don't know if it's exactly what you try to describe, but this: http://alphacorner.eu/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/samyang_24mm_ts.jpg
seems to confirm that it's possible (tilt towards the camera, shift right).
(image from: http://alphacorner.eu/index.php/inne/targi-focus-on-imaging-2013#samyang)

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 14, 2013)

Joseph, I think the picture above is misleading. Try this one, showing Samyang the lens from the rear of the mount:

http://www.samyang.pl/images/stories/Samyang/24mmTS/24mmtsmin.jpg

I think that gives a better idea of the lens's construction.

Samyang's product shots also clearly show the lens in 2 different configurations, with the tilt movement rotated 90 degrees between them. Of course it may be a case of having to unscrew the tilt mechanism, rotate it and screw it back together (and there's no sign of a release lever for a tilt rotation lock).

0 upvotes
Wick Smith
By Wick Smith (Mar 14, 2013)

Can someone tell me why the default rotation of the Canon lenses (and perhaps others) is that when the shift is "up and down" (the most common, I would guess), the tilt is "left to right". It would seem that having the tilt and shift in the same axis would be the most useful. Is there something limiting about this configuration? I think I might have read somewhere that it causes more vignetting.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Mar 14, 2013)

Sorry, I can't tell you why it's a default position. Both positions can be useful at different times. Perhaps they had to settle on one position for manufacturing/consistency purposes. Whichever position they set, they'd have someone wanting it the other way around.......

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 15, 2013)

The 'Shift up/down, Tilt left/right' combination is arguably the more useful option for architecture - when shooting the front of a building at an angle, you can shift upwards to control perspective and tilt sideways for extended DOF without having to stop down unduly. Chances are manufacturers have done some research into how their products are used, and found this to be a common application for wideangle T+S lenses.

0 upvotes
Chez Wimpy
By Chez Wimpy (Mar 15, 2013)

"Chances are manufacturers have done some research into how their products are used, and found this to be a common application for wideangle T+S lenses."

Since it is the default orientation for all Canon TSE lenses UWA to telephoto... I suspect it has less to do with utility than product lineup aesthetics. It helps for stitching large MP landscapes, but it needs to be changed for product photography and general one-shot landscapes (with rise and fall). Thankfully the 24TSEII has a simple switch.

0 upvotes
mr.izo
By mr.izo (Mar 14, 2013)

"..at an RRP of $1299.99."

this is note real store price, if you ask me. in eu i know for sure price will be 800-900€, maybe even less in some special pre-ordering. fot states i guess price will be somewhere about 1k$ for this samyang, rikonon ehatever (asian way of branding, hehe) lense.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 14, 2013)

RRPs are only very rarely real store prices.

1 upvote
sirkhann
By sirkhann (Mar 14, 2013)

Go go Samyang.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 14, 2013)

Rokinon? What's that? You mean: Samyang. Cause that's the actual name of a company. Rokinon is just a local brand.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 14, 2013)

I'm not sure how much more clearly we could have stated that in our news story.

14 upvotes
Nextime
By Nextime (Mar 14, 2013)

Why not just get the Samyang from B&H for $999?

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

Because they're not available either? Because they're one and the same?

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Nextime
By Nextime (Mar 14, 2013)

Well obviously they are the same. That was my point entirely.
Why pay $300 more for the Rokinon branded version? Both versions will presumably be available at the same time.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

Because maybe you're comparing "recommended retail" to an advertised pre-order street price when no one actually sells for RRP? No one knows what the actual price for either will be when they start selling, but I would be very surprised if both were available. I'm guessing this is only a placeholder at B&H and subject to change.

0 upvotes
Nextime
By Nextime (Mar 15, 2013)

I believe that B&H will honor their pre-order price. As for "no one actually selling for RRP" is blatantly untrue. The Samyang 24mm sold for RRP for more than a year. An other example is the Sony / Zeiss 24mm, and I could go on.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 15, 2013)

Of course they'll honor it - or better it when the lenses come in. That's my point about the price changing. They could rebate money later.

Do you really think there will be two of these in the USA? One called Rokinon selling for $300 more than an exact duplicate Samyang cousin?

Does it not occur to you that the badging might change when they actually arrive at B&H?

I'm just sayin' - your original statement struck me as somewhat funny. Of course anything's possible, but still, funny.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 17, 2013)

Because the Rokinon at B&H is the same price as the Samyang.

0 upvotes
Maxfield_photo
By Maxfield_photo (Mar 14, 2013)

Want!

1 upvote
kewlguy
By kewlguy (Mar 14, 2013)

I got my Canon 24 TSE for $1700, this Samyang is not cheap either. The only aberration on 24 TSE L is severe coma in the corners (unshifted) - hopefully the Samyang's better corrected in this regard (while on par in other parameters).

2 upvotes
feraudy
By feraudy (Mar 14, 2013)

I suppose you have the first version of the Canon lens. The second version leaves it in the dust.

1 upvote
kewlguy
By kewlguy (Mar 14, 2013)

Nope, mine is the TSE II.

2 upvotes
kodachromeguy
By kodachromeguy (Mar 13, 2013)

I wish someone would make a shift lens specifically for APS-C or micro 4/3, maybe 15, 18, or 20 mm . It could be smaller than these bulky full-frame units.

6 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

? If you can fit it on full frame, it should fit on APS-C and in fact should perform even better.

1 upvote
kodachromeguy
By kodachromeguy (Mar 14, 2013)

Coverage is fine, but most of the ones for full-frame are too long focal length to be useful n 4/3. The Canon 17mm is an exception.

5 upvotes
feraudy
By feraudy (Mar 14, 2013)

Somewhat agreed. There could be a shift lens compact camera too, with the lens permanently shifted, and the lens design optimized for that position.
However if you are serious into photography you are probably going to be going to full frame or larger format.

2 upvotes
3dreal
By 3dreal (Mar 14, 2013)

Allesfoto.de BIG has a 12mm? shift lens madefor m43. for around 1100 euro. an experts thinks its not sharp in the corners. so why cant dpreview test that one?
btw: my zeiss 35/2.8 pc-distagon has 15° steps.
If only we could real see the ZEISS apo-pc-distagon 25/3.5-check google. It was too expensive to build. but perfect. let hope for the end of the year. but i have less hope it will be in the HQ-line which has MF-quality at 3000 euro each...But there will be more Zeiss.

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

@kodachromeguy - I see what you were after now. If it's a 24mm you're actually after, you miss out. But with focus stacking, maybe this becomes a non issue.

0 upvotes
miles green
By miles green (Mar 13, 2013)

By the way, i really don't understand why this company can't get its own name right... I do love my Samyang / Bower / Rokinon fisheye though!

3 upvotes
miles green
By miles green (Mar 13, 2013)

Aaaaah! Nooooo! And Pentax too please!
Maybe Samyang will do it...

0 upvotes
Infrabasse
By Infrabasse (Mar 14, 2013)

May 2013
http://www.samyang-lens.co.uk/samyang-t-s-24mm-f35-ed-as-umc-lens.html

0 upvotes
vodanh1982
By vodanh1982 (Mar 13, 2013)

What is the different between this and tilt & shift the camera?

0 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Mar 13, 2013)

In a nutshell (given that there are entire books written about this topic)..... Shifting a lens off-centre parallel to the film plane will allow converging lines to be brought parallel. This is very useful for architectural photography and can also be used to assist panoramic stitching. Tilting a lens with respect to the film plane allows the plane of focus to be shifted to gain sharpness across the intended image.
Hope this helps. Perhaps Google something like 'lens movements', 'tilt and shift lenses', or 'Scheimpflug effect' to get more info.

2 upvotes
wildbild
By wildbild (Mar 13, 2013)

this is a lens. not a technical camera. that's the difference

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Mar 13, 2013)

Looks interesting. Note that the tilt and shift are on the same axis in the photo. The article says that the lens can be turned 90 degrees relative to the mount, but it's not clear if the movement mechanism can also be turned so the shift and tilt axes are at 90 degrees to each other.

Why no Pentax mount? Pentax don't make a TS lens and a good number of Pentax users have been keenly awaiting the Samyang....... With a Pentax FF camera expected in the next year or so, the lens would be even more relevant.

0 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Mar 13, 2013)

Correction - DPR's article says it will support canon, Nikon, Sony at the start. Samyang's own website says they will support Pentax mount. Perhaps it's just a timing/availability issue..... Rod.

0 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Mar 14, 2013)

Pentax users had been expecting a FF next year.....for the past ten years LMAO!

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 14, 2013)

^ yep. That's the reason. No FF camera, hence: lower demand for a 24mm T&S.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Mar 13, 2013)

60% chance of being as good if not better than nikon/canon equivalents....well maybe like 50% for canon and 90% chance of being better than nikon T-S.

100% for Sony since they don't have TS as far as I know. (aside from old Minolta lenses)

1 upvote
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

? How do you come up with these numbers? I don't see Nikon or Canon TS lenses as bad. There's actually more of a chance it won't be as good as either!

1 upvote
feraudy
By feraudy (Mar 14, 2013)

Stevo is right.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 14, 2013)

Mssimo is right.

3 upvotes
RobG67
By RobG67 (Mar 14, 2013)

No, Stevo is right!

(cue Daffy/Bugs argument scene)

1 upvote
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Mar 14, 2013)

I made up the numbers, based on nothing really aside from my gear lust habits.

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

My guess is that it will have the same shortcomings as most TS lenses - chromatic abberations, coma, etc. It's just too hard to make a large enough image circle to be useful without some loss in performance. (Unless you want to jack the price up to $4000.) On a 35mm form factor, there's only so much you can do - hence the continued existence of view cameras.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Mar 14, 2013)

nikons TS are no match to canons.
so this should be nice for nikonians

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

Really? I've never actually seen a comparison from a technical sense, but I thought both were somewhat problematic at the corners. Having seen raw captures from both, I think the Nikon and Canon produce great results - neither are actually turds.

0 upvotes
probert500
By probert500 (Apr 17, 2013)

Less filling

0 upvotes
John M Roberts
By John M Roberts (Mar 13, 2013)

I hope this will motivate Nikon to upgrade. I don't place much weight on that though.

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

Upgrade? How so?

1 upvote
John M Roberts
By John M Roberts (Mar 14, 2013)

So the axis of the shift and tilt can be modified without having to pay Nikon to do it each time. Check out Canon's T/S. Canon's offering in this area is one reason why I would considered having both systems. I'd rather not.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

Got it. Thanks.

0 upvotes
l_d_allan
By l_d_allan (Mar 13, 2013)

Samyang 14mm: own ... great lens for terrific price
Samyang 8mm fisheye: own ... very good lens (not great imo) for terrific price

Samyang 24 T/S: Too expensive for me. Wait a year or so to come down? BH has Canon 24 t/s for $2039-USD. If Samyang was 33% of Canon (~ $700) then I'd be interested. Maybe?

But still, the Samyang 14mm will work almost as well for me ... more FOV and probably about as much DOF.

I'm underwhelmed by the thought of taking 9 pano images to stitch together to get the panorama equivalent of 16mm or so.

1 upvote
Mike Sandman
By Mike Sandman (Mar 14, 2013)

You may be right if all you want is panorama shots, although a pano made from 3 shots taken with a 24mss TS lens is really quite easy to align. However, the main uses of a TS are (1) shifting to reduce the convergence of vertical lines in architectural shots and (2) tilting to adjust the plane of focus to change the effective depth of field. A 14 mm lens doesn't do either of those things.

1 upvote
Beau B
By Beau B (Mar 13, 2013)

Why wouldn't you just buy the Samyang 24mm TS that comes out this month for $999?

2 upvotes
Burnie
By Burnie (Mar 13, 2013)

funny.

0 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Mar 14, 2013)

LOL
Is this a joke or what?

0 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Mar 14, 2013)

Hey, great idea. I'm guessing the Rokinon will be better than the Samyang though. It has 3 syllables. So like 50% better.

0 upvotes
facebookcovers
By facebookcovers (Mar 13, 2013)

nice!

0 upvotes
rurikw
By rurikw (Mar 13, 2013)

It's nice that they still come out with these old wysiwyg things in spite of pp.

0 upvotes
BJN
By BJN (Mar 13, 2013)

You can correct perspective in post processing, but you can't fix out-of-focus or in focus areas. The TS lets you adjust the plane of focus and that's not something software can do after the shot with a conventional lens.

6 upvotes
John M Roberts
By John M Roberts (Mar 13, 2013)

Unless you prepare for it before shooting. I have seen some very impressive focus stacking with conventional lenses.

0 upvotes
Joesiv
By Joesiv (Mar 13, 2013)

I think people would PP it by stopping the lens' down then applying the blur.

0 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Mar 14, 2013)

@BJN, you can correct perspective in PP but it does not give the same effect as a proper shift in camera. You will also lose image area thus reducing your FOV. Some may also criticize the loss of sharpness from PC in PP.

3 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Mar 14, 2013)

With regards to tilt, sometimes it's all about speed. For example, shooting at with lens tilted to increase DOF will allow one to shoot at wider f/stops. Think flowers on a windy day. Another issue is diffraction. Shoot f/22 on FF and you'll get mushy results. Shoot f/11 with a properly tilted lens and you might not.

As far as shifting goes, sure you can correct for perspective, but you will effectively throw out some pixels and interpolate what's left on one or more sides of the photo, resulting in a loss of resolving power.

For those who think T/S lenses are all about throwing focus off in part of the image, this effect can be simulated in post, but it's not necessarily the same. Try doing that with a complex scene with many subject elements at various distances and in various parts of the frame and you'll see what I mean.

2 upvotes
rurikw
By rurikw (Mar 14, 2013)

Great pointers. I am so preoccupied with s I keep forgetting t. A TS lens might have some FOV advantage (easily overcome by zooming out a bit/ using a slightly wider lens) but I suspect optical deterioration at edges in shift would be similar to blur in pp. I get decent results even at 100% stretch. PS is a great interpolator. So the advantages of a TS lens over pp would be mainly wysiwyg and tilt. Certainly valid ones and at a price within reach of mortals.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 14, 2013)

If you think you can do the same in photoshop what this lens does - don't buy it. It's obviously not a product for you.

0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Mar 14, 2013)

Agree, about to post the same - if you can (and prefer to) do that something without adding new gear, it's not for you.

0 upvotes
3dreal
By 3dreal (Mar 14, 2013)

For these complex sceneries the only solution is Roundshot 220vr, slit-scan and tilt to increase DOF and getting shift at the same time. Stopping down only a bit and everything is sharp. Can be done with DSLR but only with stripscan-shooting-no action-shots possible. 360 or so images.

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 14, 2013)

@rurikw - it's more than that. (Unless I missed what you were saying.) You get to stop the TS lens down it's optimal aperture instead of having to stop it down to f16 or f22 where diffraction starts to ruin your shot.

A TS lens optimized at f5.6 with true top to bottom focus is more desirable than a regular lens stopped down to f22 where diffraction has already put a haze on things. You can tell a huge difference between these two effects. PP can't cure that so well.

0 upvotes
stevo23
By stevo23 (Mar 16, 2013)

Yes - I agree. Nothing really delivers the results of a TS lens. (Or PC as Nikon calls them.)

0 upvotes
rurikw
By rurikw (Mar 17, 2013)

stevo23 that's a good point which I missed since I am mostly interested in shooting architecture with wide angle lenses where you get enough dof without having to go down to diffraction-prone apertures.

0 upvotes
probert500
By probert500 (Apr 17, 2013)

A tilt and shift can do other things as well:

A photo of a box from the front - but also showing sides and top for dimensionality - tilt and shift.

Photograph of reflective object where you don't want to be reflected. Set camera to the side and shift.

Ironically for panos it's best to shift the camera not the lens , to avoid parallax aberrations. Would work for distant objects though.

0 upvotes
cangi
By cangi (Mar 13, 2013)

B&H is listing this lens for $999.00 in canon, nikon and sony mount with an expected release date of may 15th.

0 upvotes
Jeannot
By Jeannot (Mar 13, 2013)

This is great news, I will be waiting for a T-S 90mm now for still life work

0 upvotes
3dreal
By 3dreal (Mar 14, 2013)

There is a 80mm superrotator by arax

0 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Mar 13, 2013)

I've been waiting *forever* for this kind of lens to appear for either Nikon or m4/3 mounts at a decent price. This seems kind of high, not at all in the same price range as the Samyang fisheye, which is perhaps the value of the century. Bummer.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
viking79
By viking79 (Mar 13, 2013)

Buying a tilt shift lens is like buying a lens for a much larger sensor. It adds a lot of expense to the lens, otherwise image quality would drop too much in the corners. If you want to shift 10mm each way your full frame lens would need an image circle 20mm larger in diameter, which is about the same as a medium format lens. A medium format 24mm f/3.5 lens is very expensive.

4 upvotes
BJN
By BJN (Mar 13, 2013)

I bought a tilt mount for Micro Four Thirds that works well with my 60mm Micro Nikkor. The image circle is large enough for tilt without vignetting and provides focus plane control. Perspective can be corrected in post. A "full frame" lens on a tilt mount is a lot less expensive. The adapter is clunky to use, but it does work.

3 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Mar 13, 2013)

Been waiting for this: I have their 14mm lens, nice wide-angle option for full-frame. This will come in a bit cheaper than Canon's own, too, a nice bonus.

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (Mar 13, 2013)

Again, no Pentax? :-(

2 upvotes
Infrabasse
By Infrabasse (Mar 13, 2013)

Maybe not Rokinon, but Samyang has the same planned for pentax
http://www.samyang-lens.co.uk/samyang-t-s-24mm-f35-ed-as-umc-lens.html

Also there isn't really any rush, I think this type of lens would be a lot more usable on fullframe.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Andreas Stuebs
By Andreas Stuebs (Mar 13, 2013)

But it will serve nicely for my Pentax FF film cameras

1 upvote
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (Mar 13, 2013)

Aaah, yes! That's what I saw some time ago.
I was under the impression that Pentax support had been abandoned, but it was simply the same thing from another brand.
Thanks.

0 upvotes
zos xavius
By zos xavius (Mar 13, 2013)

Samyang is the OEM.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Mar 14, 2013)

Samyang is the manufacturer. Rokinon is OEM.

0 upvotes
Johannes Zander
By Johannes Zander (Mar 14, 2013)

you'r both right.
http://searchitchannel.techtarget.com/definition/OEM

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Mar 13, 2013)

Will wait for some reviews. some of the samyang lenses have been really good performers, so wouldnt be wrong expect this lens to perform 90% of equivalent canon or nikon lens.

2 upvotes
Pentax_Prime
By Pentax_Prime (Mar 13, 2013)

So much for 'reasonably priced'; I'd have a real tough time spending $1300 for anything from Rokinon/Samyang/whatever-brand-they-are-using-today. Definitely 'cheap' compared to some of the alternatives, but very much a high priced speciality item.

2 upvotes
Stefan Stuart Fletcher
By Stefan Stuart Fletcher (Mar 13, 2013)

Drool...

0 upvotes
Lan
By Lan (Mar 13, 2013)

Too expensive!

1 upvote
Cane
By Cane (Mar 13, 2013)

It says in the spec it's for Pentax K, yet in the story it isn't. Which is it?

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 13, 2013)

Both. The spec table is based on the Samyang lens, which they've said will be made for Pentax K. Rokinon's release only talks about initial availability, in Canon, Nikon and Sony mounts. We've corrected the Rokinon specs to account for this, but in all likelihood a Pentax K version will appear eventually.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
klavrack
By klavrack (Mar 13, 2013)

It will, according to http://www.rokinon.com/product.php?id=202

0 upvotes
Cane
By Cane (Mar 13, 2013)

Thank you!

0 upvotes
Infrabasse
By Infrabasse (Mar 13, 2013)

Klavrack, I can't find anything relevant on your link.
Do you have another to share with us instead?

Comment edited 11 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
miles green
By miles green (Mar 13, 2013)

I hope they make it in Pentax mount... It was on the top of my list. :(

0 upvotes
Infrabasse
By Infrabasse (Mar 14, 2013)

If you can't have a Rokinon get the Samyang ;)
same thing

1 upvote
ToolMan78
By ToolMan78 (Mar 13, 2013)

Really an interesting lens for Sony users like myself, but I really was hoping for a lower price. If they had kept it under $900 I might have been interested. Still, I'm curious to find out how it reviews, my guess is that at that price point it will be as good as the Canon and Nikon offerings.

2 upvotes
StanRogers
By StanRogers (Mar 13, 2013)

You'll probably find that the "street" price is significantly lower than the RRP, especially at high-volume houses like B&H and Adorama. I don't know about $400 cheaper, but it might slide in just under a grand.

2 upvotes
SRT201
By SRT201 (Mar 13, 2013)

They already make an 8mm fisheye that outclasses the major brands. Let's hope this one is made with the same attention to IQ.

0 upvotes
carlosdelbianco
By carlosdelbianco (Mar 13, 2013)

Great news! I'm willing to buy my first Samyang very soon...

1 upvote
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Mar 13, 2013)

Yay, I love the new upsurge in independent premium lens makers. Let's hope this sees a flood of new quality optics.
I am looking forward to the real world performance of this intriguing lens. Yes, I can afford the Canon 24 TS-E II but I would love to save some money and support a manufacturer that wants to bring great lenses to market.

4 upvotes
QSMcDraw
By QSMcDraw (Mar 14, 2013)

Agree 100%. Now if we could see some Adobe facing some real competition as people rebel against the Cloud, we'd be in better shape in PP too!

1 upvote
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Mar 14, 2013)

For RAW dev. Lightroom suddenly has some competition from PhotoNinja. Some people also like Aftershot Pro a new attempt by Corel. Competition and choice is good for us.

1 upvote
QSMcDraw
By QSMcDraw (Mar 13, 2013)

Can't wait for some thorough reviews!

3 upvotes
Total comments: 145