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Nikon unveils D7100 mid-level 24MP APS-C DSLR with no low-pass filter

By dpreview staff on Feb 21, 2013 at 04:01 GMT
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Nikon has announced the D7100 - a 24MP mid-range, enthusiast-focused APS-C DSLR. The D7100 promises high resolution by making do without an optical low-pass filter in front of its 24MP CMOS sensor. It gains a more sophisticated 51-point autofocus system and a 7fps 1.3x cropped shooting mode that provides a 2x crop compared to a 35mm system. The D7100 has a recommended price of $1,599/£1,299/€1,399 with 18-105mm F3.5-5.6 VR lens.

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Press Release:

SUPERIOR CLARITY AND NIMBLE PRECISION: THE DX-FORMAT NIKON D7100 EMBRACES THE ADVANCED ENTHUSIAST WITH INTUITIVE ENGINEERING

Melville, NY (February 20, 2013) – Nikon Inc. today announced the D7100, the HD-SLR that ushers in a new era of DX-format image quality and functionality for the experienced shooter and photo enthusiast. The lightweight Nikon D7100 has an impressive array of intuitive features and controls bolstered by rapid performance and a robust feature set that includes a new 24.1-megapixel CMOS sensor, Nikon’s 51-point AF system and wireless connectivity.

“Solidifying Nikon’s ongoing commitment to the DX-format D-SLR customer, the innovative D7100 provides new ways for photographers to capture their creative vision with incredible detail and precision, whether through still images or HD videos,” said Bo Kajiwara, Vice President of Marketing, Planning and Customer Experience, Nikon Inc. “The D7100 blends the best creative features with advanced-level functionality to give the enthusiast exactly what they want  and that’s a great shooting experience before, during and after capture, from shooting to sharing.”

Engineered for Exceptional Image Quality

At the core of the Nikon D7100 is a new 24.1-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor, designed to render the truest, most detail-rich images possible and brilliant HD video. The innovative sensor design delivers the ultimate in image quality by defying convention; because of the high resolution and advanced technologies, the optical low pass filter (OLPF) is no longer used. Using NIKKOR lenses, the resulting images explode with more clarity and detail to take full advantage of the 24.1-megapixel resolution achieved with D7100’s DX-format CMOS sensor.

Driven by Nikon’s exclusive EXPEED 3 image processing engine, the D7100 realizes a focus on image quality that extends beyond staggering sharpness to outstanding images with a wide dynamic range in a variety of lighting conditions. A wide ISO range of 100-6400 (expandable to Hi-2 of 25,600) allows for more versatile shooting to capture challenging conditions such as nature at twilight or even sports under less-than-ideal lighting. Even at higher ISOs, noise is minimized for both still images as well as when recording HD video.

Performance and Features Geared for the Advanced User

The Nikon D7100 is designed for the experienced shooter ready to take their photography to the next level, who demands a camera that conveys reliability and performance, and who is eager to embrace the next photographic challenge. These features include:

  • New 51-Point AF System - The D7100 features Nikon’s professionally proven and lightning-fast 51-point AF system, with a new Multi-CAM 3500DX AF module. Additionally, the AF system and exposure are augmented with Nikon’s 3D Color Matrix Metering II 2,016 pixel RGB sensor and Scene Recognition System, which recognizes the scene prior to shooting in order to adjust AF, AE, AWB and other parameters. The results of this system are accurate and even exposures, sharp details and vivid color, frame after frame. For additional precision, 15 of the 51 AF points are cross-type, and the center point is functional at f/8, giving DX photographers an additional telephoto advantage when using a teleconverter.
  •  Rapid Response and Operation - To help ensure the decisive shot is not missed, the D7100 can shoot at up to six frames per second (fps) at full resolution and up to seven fps when using the new 1.3x crop mode at slightly reduced resolution. Overall operation and image processing is swift, while startup and shutter lag is nearly imperceptible with a release time lag of 0.052s* (CIPA). Image data is also written to dual SD card slots, which accept the latest high-speed UHS-1 and SDXC cards.
  • 1.3x Crop Mode - Sports photographers take note: Building upon the telephoto benefits of the DX-format, the D7100 has the unique ability to shoot in a 1.3x DX crop mode for both stills and HD video. While in this innovative mode, shooters will gain an extra telephoto boost (2X), and a boost in burst speed to seven fps, with 15.4- megapixel resolution. Additionally, while in this mode, the 51-point AF array covers more of the frame, allowing improved subject acquisition and tracking performance through the viewfinder.
  • New High Resolution LCD - The new, wide and bright LCD screen is 3.2-inches and features a super high resolution of 1,229K dots. Now photographers can easily compose and check critical focus for HD video.
  • New Viewfinder - Nikon has implemented a bright and high-contrast new OLED data display within the optical viewfinder that makes it easier to read and see shooting data. When composing through the viewfinder, users see 100% frame coverage, essential for proper framing.
  • Spot White Balance - A new feature for Nikon cameras, Spot White Balance allows for quick and precise white balance adjustment while shooting in live view. By selecting a desired point on the screen, users can set a custom white balance from a distance, even while using a super-telephoto lens. This is helpful for shooting video or when shooting under unfamiliar lighting when no gray card is available.
  • Durable Construction - Built to perform in a wide variety of conditions, the D7100 is built to the same moisture and dust resistance specifications of the venerable Nikon D300S. For durability, the top and rear covers are constructed of magnesium alloy, while internally, the shutter has been tested to withstand 150,000 cycles. Despite its robust construction, the camera remains lightweight, weighing in at approximately 1.5 pounds (body).
  • Enhanced Interface - To make it easier for users to quickly access frequently used functions, the “i” button has been added to the enthusiast-oriented control layout on the camera. 

Sharing and Remote Shooting Simplified

Photographers know that moment when the shutter clicks and they have created something stunning which deserves to be shared. No matter where that moment occurs, whether in an urban landscape or isolated forest, they can now share their images wirelessly by an attached WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter.1 With this optional adapter the user has the ability to share images to a supported smartphone or tablet, shoot remotely from their device, and transfer photos from up to 49 feet away. The Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility application is available free of charge on Google Play™ for Android™ devices or from the App Store™.  When using the application, photographers can wirelessly transfer images from the camera to a mobile device and even remotely control the camera. 

Capture Exceptional HD Video

For those looking to create multimedia content, the Nikon D7100 has a wide variety of innovative features for capturing HD video at various frame rates. With a press of the dedicated video record button, video can be recorded at 1080/30p, or at 60i/50i (in 1.3x Crop Mode) for optimal playback on many HDTV’s when connected via HDMI. The D7100 also provides the ability to record stereo sound through the internal microphone, or attach an optional external microphone such as Nikon’s ME-1, through the dedicated microphone terminal. To reference audio, the camera also features a headphone terminal. Users can also get creative using Nikon’s  Creative Effects in real time. This feature lets users take advantage of modes like Selective Color or Color Sketch to create truly customized movies.

Full Control, Creatively

In addition to full manual controls, the Nikon D7100 features a variety of intelligent modes to create effects and special features so that users can unleash their creativity. Nikon’s Picture Controls can be applied to photo and video to change the color, tone and saturation of an image for creative control. When capturing still images, the same Creative Effects modes and filters available in video are also at the disposal of the user. By combining consecutive frames, the D7100 also has a high dynamic range (HDR) function to let users capture photos with a vast tonal range. 

NIKKOR, Speedlight and System Compatibility

For 80 years, the NIKKOR legacy has been providing world renowned optics for photographers. The D7100 is compatible with Nikon’s dedicated DX-format lenses and more than 50 FX-format lenses. NIKKOR lenses offer the ultimate in sharpness and clarity in photos and HD video. For added versatility, the camera features a built-in flash, or can act as a commander in Nikon’s popular Creative Lighting System (CLS). 

WR-1 Transceiver

In addition to the D7100, Nikon also announced the WR-1 Transceiver for Nikon D-SLR cameras. This device uses 2.4 GHz radio frequency for maximum range when communicating with the camera, extending the range and functionality2 for remote shooting applications. The communication range between WR-1 units is approximately 394 feet3, and 15 channels are available. Users also have the ability to remotely control a camera (with a WR-1 used as a receiver) attached by operation of another WR-1 (used as a transmitter), and also perform simultaneous or synchronized release of shutters on several cameras using the WR-14. Furthermore, there are a wide variety of options for remote shooting, which include dividing remote cameras into groups and controlling each group separately and interval timer photography. Remote shooting by combining the WR-1 with WR-R10/WRT10 wireless remotes is also possible5.

Price and Availability
The Nikon D7100 will be available starting in March 2013 for the suggested retail price (SRP) of $1599.95* with the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 VR lens or $1199.95 for the body only configuration. Additionally, the new MB-D15 battery grip and the WR-1 transceiver will also be available in March 2013, and pricing for these products is not yet announced. The WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter is currently available and has a suggested retail price (SRP) of $59.95. 

For more information on the new Nikon D7100 and other Nikon products, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

1 WI-FI SPECIFICATIONS AND COMPATIBILITY

This camera’s Wi-Fi® capability using the WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter can only be used with a compatible iPhone®, iPad®, and/or iPod touch® or smart devices running on the Android™ operating system. The Wireless Mobile Utility application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera. For compatibility and to download the application, please visit:

For iPhone®/iPad®/iPod Touch® <https://itunes.apple.com/en/app/wireless-mobile-adapter-utility/id554157010>
For AndroidTM Google PlayTM <https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nikon.wu.wmau>

Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPad and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Android and Google Play are trademarks of Google Inc. Wi-Fi® and the Wi-Fi CERTIFIED logo are registered trademarks of the Wi-Fi Alliance. All Nikon trademarks are trademarks of Nikon Corporation.

2 Functions limited.

3 Approximate range at height of about 1.2 m/4 ft; varies with weather conditions and presence or absence of obstacles.

4 Only a camera with a ten-pin remote terminal can be employed as a master camera.

5 This requires pairing of the WR-1, WR-R10 and WR-T10 units in use. Maximum number of controllers that can be paired: 20 - (WR-1) or 64 (WR-R10)

* SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.

Nikon D7100 specifications

Price
MSRPBody only: $1199.95/£1099.99/€1179, With 18-105mm F3.5-5.6 VR lens : $1,599/£1,299/€1399
Body type
Body typeMid-size SLR
Sensor
Max resolution6000 x 4000
Other resolutions6000 x 3368, 4800 x 3200, 4800 x 2696, 4494 x 3000, 4496 x 2528, 3600 x 2400, 3600 x 2024, 2992 x 2000, 2992 x 1680, 2400 x 1600, 2400 x 1344
Image ratio w:h3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels24 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors25 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
Image
ISOISO 100 – 6400, Lo-1 (ISO 50), Hi-1 (ISO 12,800), Hi-2 (ISO 25,600)
White balance presets12
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • JPEG
  • NEF (RAW)
  • NEF (RAW) + JPEG
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points51
Lens mountNikon F
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3.2
Screen dots1,228,800
Touch screenNo
Screen typeWide Viewing Angle TFT-LCD monitor
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage100%
Viewfinder magnification0.94×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/8000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Aperture-Priority (A)
  • Manual (M)
  • Programmed auto with flexible program (P)
  • Shutter-Priority (S)
Scene modes
  • Autumn Colors
  • Beach / Snow
  • Blossom
  • Candlelight
  • Child
  • Close-up
  • Dusk / Dawn
  • Food
  • Landscape
  • Night
  • Landscape
  • Night Portrait
  • Party / Indoor
  • Pet Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Sports
  • Sunset
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range12.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flashYes (Hot-shoe, Wireless)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-eye, Slow sync, Rear curtain
Flash X sync speed1/250 sec
Drive modes
  • Single-frame [S] mode
  • Continuous low-speed [CL]
  • Continuous high-speed [CH]
  • Quiet Shutter Release
  • Self-timer mode
  • Mirror-up [Mup] mode
Continuous drive6 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 seconds)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (2, 3, 5 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (60, 50, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 424 (30, 24 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
Videography notes1080i60, 1080p25 in NTSC countries, 1080i50, 1080p24 in PAL countries
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC x 2 slots
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini Type C)
WirelessOptional
Remote controlYes (Optional, wired MC-DC2 or wireless WR-1 and WR-R10 )
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes (Water and dust resistant)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion EN-EL15 rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)950
Weight (inc. batteries)765 g (1.69 lb / 26.98 oz)
Dimensions136 x 107 x 76 mm (5.35 x 4.21 x 2.99)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingYes
GPSOptional
GPS notesGP-1

Additional Images

946
I own it
282
I want it
75
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 286
12
Arsen
By Arsen (Feb 21, 2013)

I think I found my second body to my D800E. I was looking at the D5200 as a second body, needed something smaller and lighter than my D800E and something for my wife and kids to use. This looks great on paper and thank you Nikon no Pass filter.. I was one of the first ones to get the E in Canada and everyone around me said I am crazy.. After 12,000 pictures, no issues with Moiré. My Best camera I have ever owned. Glad I swapped systems last year to Nikon.. They are truly coming out with great camera's. The only thing they need is a small compact professional camera like the Sony RX1, without the crazy price..

8 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 21, 2013)

Sony had a choice to bring out the RX1 with a crazy price, or not at all. Gotta start somewhere. And i'm glad they did, because even if this one's not for us, a couple times later it will be, so the sooner we'll get there. Which-ever brand it is.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Arsen
By Arsen (Feb 21, 2013)

I agree, I am glad Sony came up with the RX1.. Thank god for sony coming up with Full Sensor camera in a little body. These manufactures don't understand that people who use high end SLR Camera's also want a small portable camera with very little to no loss in quality. My wife stops me at times to take my D800E with us. She says its to big(In the camera area:) ) , but I refuse to use the S95 or her iphone or my Blackberry z10.. I am so picky with quality. I have room for a 2nd SLR body like the D7100 and a small professional compact camera like the RX1.. I guess I will go broker.

0 upvotes
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Feb 21, 2013)

Interesting specs.
Wonder whether the card slots door is as crappy as on its predecessor and other Nikons...

3 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Feb 21, 2013)

I'm sure those slot doors are crappy. You'd better stick with your Nex3. ;-)

3 upvotes
d3xmeister
By d3xmeister (Feb 21, 2013)

Geez, aren't your lips hurting from that much kissing of Nikon's butt ?

3 upvotes
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Feb 21, 2013)

@Guidenet: wrong.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

@d3xmeister
Why would you think Guidenet is kissing anything? The D7000's SD slot door is not "crappy". And the SD doors are not particularly substandard on any of the Nikon DSLRs that I can think of. But as with all companies, perceived quality of workmanship varies by price points.

1 upvote
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Feb 21, 2013)

@marike6: indeed it is. Had problem with it opening all the time on D80 (sorted out DIY style), same problem with my D7000 and have tried on D600 - same issue...
I have also tried on Pentaxes, Canons, Olympuses of some friends of mine and guess what - no problem here (to be fair, friend's 5DMkII had somehow loose battery compartment door :)) - often on much cheaper cams. Is it really that much to want this sorted out on $1200+ cameras?

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
King Penguin
By King Penguin (Feb 21, 2013)

Door opening all the time? Bizarre, what the hell are you doing with your cameras?

0 upvotes
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Feb 21, 2013)

pulling them out of my camera bag for instance... :D (pulling a camera out of the bag with lens facing downwards is a real pain in the behind if the door is loose like this)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

...maybe you just have hands full of thumbs! ;-p

1 upvote
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Feb 21, 2013)

@Timmbits - this IS a possibility, of course :)

0 upvotes
Marksphoto
By Marksphoto (Feb 21, 2013)

Thank goodness I didn't buy the D7000 a week ago as I planned. Now I will probably find it even cheaper on craigslist.

Thank you Nikon for premature obsolescence :)

0 upvotes
Earthlight
By Earthlight (Feb 21, 2013)

Seems to me Nikon continues to put out great products instead of dumbed down, crippled stuff in order to milk the customers.

At this point my Canon gear is pretty much complete for what I need. I will use it until it has no practical value and if at that time Nikon still dominates like this, I will happily jump ship.

5 upvotes
Stollen1234
By Stollen1234 (Feb 21, 2013)

so what is really great about this? D7000 is good and i dont think there are major addition to this camera...now who is milking lol

1 upvote
d3xmeister
By d3xmeister (Feb 21, 2013)

You mean world class AF combined with a buffer worse than on most P&S is not ,,crippled,, ? And that in a time memory is cheap as chips.

3 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

oh but they have that at Nikon!
d5200 and d3200 are plenty dumbed down!

0 upvotes
Tom_N
By Tom_N (Feb 21, 2013)

Seems to me that improved auto-focus is a benefit not only to "machine-gun photographers" (the ones obsessed with huge buffers), but also to those who control the time of the shutter release.

And yes, if you have a D7000, you might not want to rush to trade it in, but not everyone has a D7000 (or its counterpart in other brands' lineups).

1 upvote
disasterpiece
By disasterpiece (Feb 21, 2013)

Not that's it's bad, but nothing really shocking to drive me away from my D7000. This is just the expected update to a more-than-two year old model. I guess I'll be buying more glass, then moving to fullframe.

4 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Feb 21, 2013)

Nice camera, fully featured.

Should come with a magnifying glass though... to help you find the Movie Button.

And a red patch to put over the red button, to make it bigger...

.

2 upvotes
Illumina
By Illumina (Feb 21, 2013)

It's position is standard nowadays in nikon DSLR and i don't need magnifying glass..
U need to check ur eyes..

1 upvote
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Feb 21, 2013)

Or better yet, go buy a movie camera. then you'll know what the button does. They've put movie cameras and stereo recorders on our SLRs. Maybe next a toaster and a blender to make drinks with nice large buttons you can't miss? ;-)

5 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

LOL
amusing

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

"fully featured" - thanks for the laugh!

1 upvote
BobYIL
By BobYIL (Feb 21, 2013)

Remarkable that Nikon began concentrated on Toshiba sensor for DX products, first the D5200 today the D7100. I am sure they have some sound reasoning for not employing 24MP-DX Sony sensor anymore. Now a probability comes to mind: Is Toshiba working on the next generation FF-sensors for Nikon?

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

Sony is a direct competitor... why would anyone want to use their competitor's parts if they don't have to? using a sony sensor was problably just buying time to source things at the price point they wanted it at all along.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

Sony's sensor business is not a competitor to Nikon. Sony's DSLR business is but that is a completely separate entity.

0 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (Feb 21, 2013)

Oh noes! Now my D90 is lagging two generations behind ;(

1 upvote
mehigh
By mehigh (Feb 21, 2013)

Are you ready to embrace 24 MP and upgrade your PC to handle all this load?

I think the D90 can easily still be used until 2015 with absolutely no issue..by that time this D7100 will be 7-800 Eur

2 upvotes
disasterpiece
By disasterpiece (Feb 21, 2013)

D90 wouldn't be bad if you have good glass for it.

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 21, 2013)

@mehigh
I have just upgraded my PC for different reason but here is what I've spend.

Intel i7-3770K - $229.99 (NCIX priced-matched to Micro Center)
ASRock Z77 professional - $129
Patriot 16GB DDR3 - $67.99

Total: $426.98 and that's with the fastest Intel mainstream processor. I could save $40~50 with cheaper motherboard and memory and a 2TB HDD is only $104.98. If my computer is really old and cannot handle 24mp RAW, what's $400 to upgrade it when I am spending $1200~1500 on a camera?

EDIT: would -> could

Comment edited 53 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
ptox
By ptox (Feb 21, 2013)

@Peiasdf: don't forget the SSDs!

The Samsung 840 Pro is probably the best value high performance model at the moment, but even the last-generation SandForce drives are fine for photo editing, and they're cheaper still...

0 upvotes
EDWARD ARTISTE
By EDWARD ARTISTE (Feb 21, 2013)

Wow. I'm a canon guy but is is just getting ridiculous.

While canon looks to protect product differentiation by cutting basic features, Nikon is giving users what they want in a cam body. Heck, this might be my first Nikon. S besides the qc issues, these mid range Nikon bodies are making canon look pretty bad.

My money is on canon burying their head in the sand and acting like this camera doesn't exist.

Bravo.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
29 upvotes
naththo
By naththo (Feb 21, 2013)

Yup definitely looks like it Canon is bury their head in sand. :(

8 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Feb 21, 2013)

As a long-time Canon user, I +1 your comment

4 upvotes
papparazzi
By papparazzi (Feb 21, 2013)

BUT...does that Nikon comes with issues? Focusing and dirty sensor? I prefer my LOW canon any day, than problematic cameras with QC issues...!

4 upvotes
JakeB
By JakeB (Feb 21, 2013)

Very sad that the best Canon shooters can reach for is vastly exaggerated Nikon quality control issues.

In other words, you get a good copy, it beats the heck out of the Canon equivalent.

4 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

@Edward: you seem to be overlooking the 5200 and 3200... both grand examples of cutting out features. I'd just look at this camera for what it is, partisanship aside. It's simply a great camera, sure value, good investment.

@pipirazi: not that Canon haven't had their issues as well... for example, a toxic handle on some cameras, faulty lenses in s100... so don't buy a D600... there is no logic that would suggest they'd replicate the d600 issue to other models.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 21, 2013)

Honestly, the T4i is an excellent competitor to anything Nikon has below the D7000, and even the D7000 itself. Canon hasn't released anything APS-C above the Rebel line for almost 3 years, so really the main issue is product age, not features. 60D and D7000 competed very well, even if paper-specs may have suggested otherwise. It could still be argued that for high action uses, the nearly 4 year old 7D is as good or better than this D7100. So no, it isn't like Nikon is running away with it.

0 upvotes
papparazzi
By papparazzi (Feb 21, 2013)

You guys that bash Canon for not having competition can't be for real... wake up...The 7D is competing with the D300s which was done very good! The MKII will be the camera we should compare to this...Guess what..I'll leave you to wonder...

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Feb 21, 2013)

I'm done with DSLRs now but will admit this a fantastic camera!

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

same here

0 upvotes
The A-Team
By The A-Team (Feb 21, 2013)

Nice features. Same old clunky body and ergonomics. No thanks.

5 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

If the ergonomics are good, why change them?
and if you do own a 5dmk3, how is this chunky?

3 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

They are good? Huh? What? Ever touched any really good camera? Obviously not.

1 upvote
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 21, 2013)

The grip obviously changed though. More like the D600 now.

0 upvotes
ngollan
By ngollan (Feb 22, 2013)

I'm missing a contoured thumb-rest, which the optional battery grip actually has, and which would help a lot, especially with heavier lenses.

Apart from that, the more clunky Nikon style generally fits my (rather slim and "girly" but long-fingered) hands better than what Canon does.

I hear Hasselblads have good handling.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Feb 21, 2013)

Everyone at Canon is surfing monster.com right now.

13 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Feb 21, 2013)

They managed to include an M4/3s camera in an APS-C body. I just wish they could cram an A-PSC mode in an M4/3s body.

8 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 21, 2013)

It's called Panorama! :)

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

"They managed to include an M4/3s camera in an APS-C body."

What? You seem confused.

"I just wish they could cram an A-PSC mode in an M4/3s body."

That would be called a Samsung: NX20, NX300

0 upvotes
camcom12
By camcom12 (Feb 22, 2013)

I think mpgxsvd is referring to the new Panasonic GH3.
As for APS-C sensor in a m4/3 body, simply check get a Sony NEX-x.

0 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (Feb 21, 2013)

You cant beat this for 1199!

7 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Feb 21, 2013)

Does Canon have any answers to this? This is a great camera at a fairly reasonable price.

5 upvotes
007peter
By 007peter (Feb 21, 2013)

Don't know. Canon 70d is coming in March, but the SPEC won't beat this D7100. Canon 7D mk2 (coming in July) is better, but its going to retail around $2000.
Based on Value for Money, I don't think Canon has an answer for this.

11 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 21, 2013)

You have an inside line on the Canon business plan?

1 upvote
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (Feb 21, 2013)

So some of us are stilling wondering if a D400 at 1699 to 1899 for body only, to match a Canon 7D mark 2 is still a possibility in late summer or is this it for DX from Nikon this year. D400 with 10fps, newer processor and 20mp new Sony sensor maybe next?

1 upvote
NiallM
By NiallM (Feb 21, 2013)

@tkbslc he's 007, of course he has inside info, that's his job.

1 upvote
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Feb 21, 2013)

When can we have a FF body at the price of the D7100.......

3 upvotes
Devendra
By Devendra (Feb 21, 2013)

tomorrow ! :)
mark my words - just write it on the wall as a reminder!

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 21, 2013)

There are plenty of used ones. If you also want it to have the specs of the D7100, then wait 4 years or so.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

You would probably have to look at a manufacturer that doesn't have too much invested in a multitude of APSC and FF models aready... Samsung maybe? or a MFT manufacturer perhaps? (wlthough they would probably seek to reinvent the wheel by introducing a sensor larger than apsc but smaller than ff)

0 upvotes
huyzer
By huyzer (Feb 21, 2013)

Wish it had a swivel back screen.

5 upvotes
ir Bob
By ir Bob (Feb 21, 2013)

You don't need one with the WiFi module. You just use your phone as the screen.

0 upvotes
LJ - Eljot
By LJ - Eljot (Feb 21, 2013)

Swivel back screens are one of the best features a camera can have. Using a phone for that seems not that handy unless you attach it in some way to the camera. Also they restricted the wi-fi compatibility. I don't want to buy an iphone just to use it as an display. A proper liveview over HDMI feature would be nice.

3 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (Feb 21, 2013)

Are you saying that people actually use liveview?

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

@irBob - so you'd rather have to hold something extra in your third hand? and deal with the lag that is involved? seriously?

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Tom_N
By Tom_N (Feb 21, 2013)

If using a phone as a display would be "not that handy", wouldn't carrying around a LCD monitor with HDMI and A/C power cables dangling from it be even less so?

Even if you managed to find a battery-powered device that took HDMI input (most only support for output), that arrangement would still be much the same as carrying the phone ... only with that dangling cable.

1 upvote
G Davidson
By G Davidson (Feb 21, 2013)

Wow finally a real update to my D300! I have waited a long time or this and the specifications sound excellent. I can only hope it is indeed a new sensor, improving on the (already good?) one in the D5100. Very happy to hear this news. Semi-pro DX is here to stay.

3 upvotes
007peter
By 007peter (Feb 21, 2013)

Many d300 owner criticized D7100 saying its not a real replacement, but then again, D7100 is retail for $1199, a D400 would have cost around $2000. I much rather have this D7100.

5 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (Feb 21, 2013)

there is no way to sell a crop sensor camera at $2000.

2 upvotes
ButterflySkies
By ButterflySkies (Feb 21, 2013)

With a 6 frame buffer on highest Raw settings, the D7100 is clearly not a D300s replacement.

7 upvotes
mgrum
By mgrum (Feb 21, 2013)

Jun2

Tell that to Sigma!

0 upvotes
G Davidson
By G Davidson (Feb 21, 2013)

I have to admit, looking at it more carefully, it is indeed not a true successor. I was a little taken in by the claims of D300 similarities in the press releases. Yet issues of build and buffer depth come up and the fps fall short. However, my main concern with other 'affordable' Nikons like the D600/D7000 are more about their AF abilities. If this has a next-generation sensor in terms of output and the AF is better than the D300, it may well be enough of an upgrade for me... As someone happy with the 6-7fps and the AF coverage.

It may be a good way to stay in the DX game and then (maybe) get into FX in another generation.

1 upvote
Joachim Gerstl
By Joachim Gerstl (Feb 21, 2013)

A bird- and wildlife photographers dream. I wish I had this camera 10 years ago.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

but you can still take pics today! ;)

0 upvotes
snegron2
By snegron2 (Feb 21, 2013)

I am glad I didn't sell my Nikon 17-55mm 2.8 AF-S DX lens! Thank you Nikon!

0 upvotes
007peter
By 007peter (Feb 21, 2013)

Likewise, I'm glad I sold my Canon 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM ;-)

9 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (Feb 21, 2013)

Yes these specs could satisfy even me I think, (wanted a D400). Would have preferred CF slot but dual SD is okay and lighter than D300 body (for personal travel use and good enough for pro use), as long as this one is durable for long term use that is, and the quality controls issue do not surface like other models. Fps speed and 51 pt AF is great, so hopefully no AA is also not a problem, with benefit of more detail (without moire?). Waiting for final analysis from critics testing, but this looks very promising. Good job Nikon.

2 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 21, 2013)

I guess there will never be a D300 replacement just like there won't be a 7D II. FF is moving down market and there only needs to be a low-end and high-end APS-C from now on.

I was very interested in the D7000 as a upgrade for my D90 but this, I don't feel the excitement. Maybe because so much has happened in the last two years with EVIL/mirrorless and FF cameras.

3 upvotes
Retzius
By Retzius (Feb 21, 2013)

Thanks Nikon. Some DX primes would be nice though...

8 upvotes
ngollan
By ngollan (Feb 21, 2013)

I'm not sure if fast DX primes would be a mechanical advantage over FF. Their build is limited by the rather huge entrance pupil which requires big, heavy front elements, and I guess especially Nikon are running into limits with their "industry's biggest" flange distance too.

0 upvotes
mgrum
By mgrum (Feb 21, 2013)

DX primes wouldn't offer much in the way of weight saving (except for very wide lenses) but would in terms of image quality as they can be optimised for centre sharpness as the expense of corners (which fall outside the sensor on DX)

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
G Davidson
By G Davidson (Feb 21, 2013)

Ooh I think an affordable, bright 16mm, 18mm, 24mm would be great news. The newer FX wide primes are very expensive, DX ones could probably be a lot more affordable, as long as the mount can make use of them (some say small, wide primes are hard to make for DX).

0 upvotes
ngollan
By ngollan (Feb 21, 2013)

mgrum, wouldn't that mean that you'd just end up with something that's (almost) as heavy and almost as expensive as an FX lens, but would make you buy new glass if you ever decided to go FX?

For the Nikon it would mean calculating new lenses, setting up production, marketing, and it'd end up not even saving you money (not like anything they did would ever do that). On top of that, it would cut into Nikon's obvious push to establish FX at the upper end of the current DX market, so it's likely not going to happen.

0 upvotes
jwaif
By jwaif (Feb 21, 2013)

From Nikon USA site for stills
NEF (RAW): Lossless compressed, compressed 12 or 14 bit

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

Nikon pulled out all the stops on this update. I'm sure some will still desire a D400, but it's hard to imagine a nicer DX camera specs wise.

Weather sealing, no OLPF, AF to f8 means my using TCs with my 70-200 f4 VR. Nice.

IQ should exceed the already superb D5200 and if video quality is as good as the that camera, it's going to be a monster all-around DX shooter.

Looks like my other body is getting a baby brother.

18 upvotes
Deeso
By Deeso (Feb 21, 2013)

While it's quite safe to assume that the D7100 is a killer camera for landscapes, portraits and city shooting, with 6fps and a relatively small buffer is hard to see it as a full replacement for the d300s. Sports shooters still have to look for "deprecated" models like the D300-D700 because the only model able to shoot over 8fps maintaining focus accuracy (D4) is way too expensive unless your news agency pays for it.

A D400 is still necessary for nikon even its is classified as niche product because Canon will unveil rather soon a 7DmkII which will be a speed demon. Very likely a "baby 1DX"

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
David Naylor
By David Naylor (Feb 21, 2013)

Lol, it is kinda funny how Nikon and Canon shooters use the other brand's latest cameras to demand new products from their own brand. Don't get me wrong, I love the competition.

Meanwhile, on the Canon forum, the D7100 is used to demand huge IQ improvements in the Canon 7D m2.

4 upvotes
Deeso
By Deeso (Feb 21, 2013)

You are right. There's always certain envy on fanboys when their brand fail to deliver a 100% perfect product. But hey. I'd be perfectly fine with the D7100, I'm not a sports journalist anyway.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

re: buffer... well, I guess Nikon had to leave something out, so this can't threaten a higher profit producing d400

0 upvotes
donaldxr
By donaldxr (Feb 21, 2013)

Regarding the videography notes: It says 25p for NTSC and 24p for PAL. Shouldn't it be the other way around? It's usually PAL regions that gets 25p because 50/25 is the standard there.

1 upvote
pentaxfun
By pentaxfun (Feb 21, 2013)

They seriously aren't even having it be like a 7100e and a d7100 where you can pick whether or not to have an AA? Are you freaking kidding me? Wtf!? According to articles on here as well as other highly regarded photographic sources, the consensus was always the pros of not having an AA-filter only outweighed the cons in a VERY very limit, narrow, ultra specific type of shooting situation. Like, only at a very narrow aperture range, in a specific shooting situation, it was better, but in the other 99% of shooting situations, the image quality was far better with an AA than without one, and thus, other than for a very specific niche of photography, for the avg typical photographers, having an AA-filter was much better than not having one. So, this is blowing my mind that they would really just offer it STRICTLY as a non-AA camera, and not even have it be an optional thing like on the d800. What the hell!!??!?

1 upvote
ageha
By ageha (Feb 21, 2013)

Didn't you notice something is wrong? Is it Nikon or is it you? ;)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
pentaxfun
By pentaxfun (Feb 21, 2013)

huh?

1 upvote
naththo
By naththo (Feb 21, 2013)

@pentaxfun is right re that. Having no filter you will have horrible side effect of moire. You don't want side effect of moire do you? It would take more time consuming to edit to remove the moire filter. Its okay for someone who can bother to fix it. But most don't. Most camera nowaday use AA filter. Even in computer game I play still has to use AA filter cos it looks awful without AA filter. Same thing. AA filter helps a lot sort out the problem with pixelate on edge and reduce the moire. And in addition to it. AA filter only reduce sharpness by a tiny bit. You just use software to sharpen again or use incamera sharpening. Then its all good. Simple task.

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

I'm betting there is not a single D800 user who doesn't wish they had gone for the D800E instead, myself included. Moire can happen with both cameras but it is so RARE that there simply are no downsides to the E version.

This camera should resolve fine detail exceptionally well. With that nice Nikkor glass, this camera is going to be sick. Like the M9, X-Pro1 and D800E the advantages to no OLPF are great and the disadvantages are little to none.

9 upvotes
pentaxfun
By pentaxfun (Feb 21, 2013)

Uh didn't dpreview compare the two cameras specifically to see the pros/cons and which one was better in which shooting situations/overall/etc, and they said that the d800e (the one without the AA-filter) only yielded superior image quality in a very small percentage of the total shooting situations they tested, like, only if the shots were taken at a very specific, narrow aperture-range in a specific shooting situation, it had better iq, but in the other vast majority of shooting situations the regular d800 had better iq than the d800e. Like, they even blatantly said something like, for most shooters, the d800 would be much better overall, since the shooting scenarios/settings in which the d800e had an edge were only a very narrow range compared to the total overall range of shooting situations, so the d800 would be better for most shooters and d800e only better for a minority of shooters with VERY specific types of photography.

1 upvote
ovatab
By ovatab (Feb 21, 2013)

Nikon should later introduce stick-on (or spray-on) AA filter and sell it to you in DIY kits for $200

0 upvotes
javaone
By javaone (Feb 21, 2013)

The higher the resolution the sensor the less likely it is to have moire. Once the camera is higher in resolution than the lens, the lens is your AA filter. Which DX zoom can out resolve a 24 Mega pixel DX sensor? Leica M9 has no AA and Leica has a some very sharp lens. I doesn't seem to hurt their reputation.

2 upvotes
harold1968
By harold1968 (Feb 21, 2013)

well the consensus was wrong
I have used a Fuji X-pro1, Leica M9 and Nikon d800E and can say that I will unlikely buy a camera again with a LP filter
Just fuzzies the picture and does nothing useful. Moire is irrelevant for modern sensors

2 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (Feb 21, 2013)

Actually pentaxfun, what they said was in RAW shooting the 800e was a bit better at certain, optimum apertures but that all 800e jpegs look better than the vanilla 800's.

Others have noted the same thing, Ken Rockwell sneered at the 800e until he tried one and decided the 800e pics look sharper and just better in some way.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

I suspect that with sensor technology evolving, we may have to start evaluating this on a case by case basis.

0 upvotes
MrMojo
By MrMojo (Feb 21, 2013)

Pentaxfun, your likes are like really out of control like someone is writing like a 14 year old girl, like, talks...

1 upvote
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 21, 2013)

Maximum shutter speed 1/8000 sec Good
(2, 3, 5 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps): 2EV stops! very good

Why the hell cant they do 2 EV stops in the D800?!?!?

0 upvotes
ageha
By ageha (Feb 21, 2013)

Wait for the D800S later this year. :)

4 upvotes
David Naylor
By David Naylor (Feb 21, 2013)

In general, both Canon and Nikon have been very slow to create flexible bracketing. How can it be so hard?

2 upvotes
Murray Rothbard
By Murray Rothbard (Feb 21, 2013)

Is it really $1000 better than the Sony A58?

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 21, 2013)

$1199.95 for the body only configuration.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

Does the A58 body cost $199 because the D7100 is $1199? The kit is plus the price of the lens.

4 upvotes
ageha
By ageha (Feb 21, 2013)

Of course

2 upvotes
calxn
By calxn (Feb 21, 2013)

It's like asking is the Sony A77 that much better than the A58.

2 upvotes
bloodycape
By bloodycape (Feb 21, 2013)

Well that kind of a trick question Calxn, as at least in the case of the A57, noise at higher ISO was a bit cleaner than the A65/A77, though feature wise the A77 is the better camera.

As to the original question, yes and no. If you prefer EVF then the A58 does have some advantages, not to mention it is a lighter camera by close to 200 grams. Otherwise the D7100 should have a faster and more accurate AF system, and better, though probably not that much better IQ vs the A58.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 21, 2013)

YES!

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

bloodycape - yep, but at base ISO you got more detail and more material to work with. So in the end even in sole term of image quality A77 won quite easily for most uses with A57 (unless you did a lot of shooting under difficult light and don't like doing post-processing - than A57 would be better choice)

1 upvote
Edgar Matias
By Edgar Matias (Feb 21, 2013)

The 1.3x Crop Mode basically crops the sensor down to m4/3 size. Very cool.

7 upvotes
bloodycape
By bloodycape (Feb 21, 2013)

I don't really see how this is that new since the Sony SLT have been doing something similar(1.4x crop) for a while now. And I think on the 24mp SLT models the resolution also becomes about 15mp, while a little less for the 16mp cameras.

2 upvotes
David Naylor
By David Naylor (Feb 21, 2013)

Not sure I understand the point of that really. Make it 7 fps for real instead! =)

0 upvotes
AndyHWC
By AndyHWC (Feb 21, 2013)

Other than advantage of less pixels to process, helps W/B, metering and speed up AF. Does the new 1.3x crop mode provide any real advantage on image quality compare to cropping the full size image?

So what is 1.3x means? Does that mean if the lens is 300mm at 35mm eq It will boost to 450mm?

0 upvotes
Tom_N
By Tom_N (Feb 21, 2013)

I think they're saying that if the lens has an actual focal length of 200mm, and a "35mm-equivalent" length of 300mm in regular DX mode, the "35mm-equivalent" length would be 400mm in this DX plus 1.3x crop mode. That is, there's a roughly 1.3x crop factor above and beyond the 1.5x DX one, for a total crop factor of 2.0x as compared to full-frame.

2 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 21, 2013)

@AndyHWC
I take it to mean 1.5 * 1.3 = 1.95 so a 200mm FF lens will be 300mm on APS-C and 400mm on APS-C with crop mode.

EDIT: darn, Tom_N beat me to it

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

AndyHWC - no, it doesn't boost your lens to 450mm. Unless you assume that Photoshop boosts 50mm lens to 500mm (or more... if you want... 1 000mm quite easily...)

It's just a crop. A FLAW, not anything "good" as some people try to picture it.

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Feb 21, 2013)

hope Nikon's quality control doesn't screw this camera like they did with some of their previous cameras. My experience was terrible with Nikon products in past.

10 upvotes
PLShutterbug
By PLShutterbug (Feb 21, 2013)

And ... how many Nikon products have you owned? Or Canon? Or Konica, or Hasselblad, or any other camera brand, so you (and we) can put your "terrible" experiences in context?

A comment such as yours is not credible without specifics.

1 upvote
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Feb 21, 2013)

both D7000 and D800 I own have problem with oil leaking onto sensor. I have sent both the cameras for service quite a few times but I still have oil spots on the sensor. worst part of oil spots is that when they appear I am hundereds of kilometers from the nearest service center, photographing reptiles/amphibians. Before these two Nikon cameras I owned Pentax cameras(film) and then went to own Canon D-SLR's.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 21, 2013)

Does it have the same low pass filter as the D800E or no filter at all?

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

"Because of the high resolution and advanced technologies, the optical low pass filter (OLPF) is no longer used."

5 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Feb 21, 2013)

I don't think that quite answers the question. On D800E the second layer of the filter so it reversed the effects of the first. I think he's asking if does the same or just omits them altogether. I suspect it's gone completely. In the D800E they were left in place so the cover glass would be same thickness as D800. Here there is no regular model to match. So they can leave it out.

2 upvotes
007peter
By 007peter (Feb 21, 2013)

Based on the spec.... OMG, it is freaking AWESOME. I hope the upcoming Canon 70d in March will be able to compete. It seem like Nikon is making all the right moves lately.

3 upvotes
Haider
By Haider (Feb 21, 2013)

It's looks good but it's evolutionary not revolutionary...

2 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Feb 21, 2013)

And with photography evolution is more important than a revolution. Proven business tactic that works for everyone involved, so it is awesome in that respect.

I'm always of the mindset to wait and see how the camera performs in average buyers hands though, and not get carried away by specs alone. If there are glitches or whatever to be worked out, for example...

C

0 upvotes
Illumina
By Illumina (Feb 21, 2013)

Looks promising..

1 upvote
Illumina
By Illumina (Feb 21, 2013)

Sadly it doesn't have AF-ON button like d300s

5 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

Like the D7000 you'll be able to reassign the AE-L/AF-L button to act as AF-ON.

6 upvotes
ozpaul
By ozpaul (Feb 21, 2013)

Well I am not sure why they have bothered with this.... the lack of new lenses recently suggests they don't care about DX any more... They just want people to buy into FX.

0 upvotes
Illumina
By Illumina (Feb 21, 2013)

@marike6 : i know it.. But it is better to have dedicated button..

4 upvotes
ButterflySkies
By ButterflySkies (Feb 21, 2013)

Better in what way?
Both AE-L/AF-L and AF-ON buttons have the same custom settings to choose from, so the only difference is the painting.
Just paint it black and then write AF-ON on it, and there you go! your own, better, dedicated AF-ON button!

4 upvotes
zos xavius
By zos xavius (Feb 21, 2013)

people find the oddest things to complain about.....

1 upvote
MrMojo
By MrMojo (Feb 21, 2013)

The AF-ON button on other Nikon DSLRs is located in a slightly better spot than the AE-L/AF-L button. It's a more natural place for the thumb to rest when holding the camera.

It may not matter to some people but if you use the AF-ON button and shoot thousands of images a year it makes a difference in how the camera feels.

If you also like to use the AE-L/AF-L button for its original purpose the lack of an AF-ON button is a bummer.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 286
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