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Nikon unveils D7100 mid-level 24MP APS-C DSLR with no low-pass filter

By dpreview staff on Feb 21, 2013 at 04:01 GMT
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Nikon has announced the D7100 - a 24MP mid-range, enthusiast-focused APS-C DSLR. The D7100 promises high resolution by making do without an optical low-pass filter in front of its 24MP CMOS sensor. It gains a more sophisticated 51-point autofocus system and a 7fps 1.3x cropped shooting mode that provides a 2x crop compared to a 35mm system. The D7100 has a recommended price of $1,599/£1,299/€1,399 with 18-105mm F3.5-5.6 VR lens.

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Press Release:

SUPERIOR CLARITY AND NIMBLE PRECISION: THE DX-FORMAT NIKON D7100 EMBRACES THE ADVANCED ENTHUSIAST WITH INTUITIVE ENGINEERING

Melville, NY (February 20, 2013) – Nikon Inc. today announced the D7100, the HD-SLR that ushers in a new era of DX-format image quality and functionality for the experienced shooter and photo enthusiast. The lightweight Nikon D7100 has an impressive array of intuitive features and controls bolstered by rapid performance and a robust feature set that includes a new 24.1-megapixel CMOS sensor, Nikon’s 51-point AF system and wireless connectivity.

“Solidifying Nikon’s ongoing commitment to the DX-format D-SLR customer, the innovative D7100 provides new ways for photographers to capture their creative vision with incredible detail and precision, whether through still images or HD videos,” said Bo Kajiwara, Vice President of Marketing, Planning and Customer Experience, Nikon Inc. “The D7100 blends the best creative features with advanced-level functionality to give the enthusiast exactly what they want  and that’s a great shooting experience before, during and after capture, from shooting to sharing.”

Engineered for Exceptional Image Quality

At the core of the Nikon D7100 is a new 24.1-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor, designed to render the truest, most detail-rich images possible and brilliant HD video. The innovative sensor design delivers the ultimate in image quality by defying convention; because of the high resolution and advanced technologies, the optical low pass filter (OLPF) is no longer used. Using NIKKOR lenses, the resulting images explode with more clarity and detail to take full advantage of the 24.1-megapixel resolution achieved with D7100’s DX-format CMOS sensor.

Driven by Nikon’s exclusive EXPEED 3 image processing engine, the D7100 realizes a focus on image quality that extends beyond staggering sharpness to outstanding images with a wide dynamic range in a variety of lighting conditions. A wide ISO range of 100-6400 (expandable to Hi-2 of 25,600) allows for more versatile shooting to capture challenging conditions such as nature at twilight or even sports under less-than-ideal lighting. Even at higher ISOs, noise is minimized for both still images as well as when recording HD video.

Performance and Features Geared for the Advanced User

The Nikon D7100 is designed for the experienced shooter ready to take their photography to the next level, who demands a camera that conveys reliability and performance, and who is eager to embrace the next photographic challenge. These features include:

  • New 51-Point AF System - The D7100 features Nikon’s professionally proven and lightning-fast 51-point AF system, with a new Multi-CAM 3500DX AF module. Additionally, the AF system and exposure are augmented with Nikon’s 3D Color Matrix Metering II 2,016 pixel RGB sensor and Scene Recognition System, which recognizes the scene prior to shooting in order to adjust AF, AE, AWB and other parameters. The results of this system are accurate and even exposures, sharp details and vivid color, frame after frame. For additional precision, 15 of the 51 AF points are cross-type, and the center point is functional at f/8, giving DX photographers an additional telephoto advantage when using a teleconverter.
  •  Rapid Response and Operation - To help ensure the decisive shot is not missed, the D7100 can shoot at up to six frames per second (fps) at full resolution and up to seven fps when using the new 1.3x crop mode at slightly reduced resolution. Overall operation and image processing is swift, while startup and shutter lag is nearly imperceptible with a release time lag of 0.052s* (CIPA). Image data is also written to dual SD card slots, which accept the latest high-speed UHS-1 and SDXC cards.
  • 1.3x Crop Mode - Sports photographers take note: Building upon the telephoto benefits of the DX-format, the D7100 has the unique ability to shoot in a 1.3x DX crop mode for both stills and HD video. While in this innovative mode, shooters will gain an extra telephoto boost (2X), and a boost in burst speed to seven fps, with 15.4- megapixel resolution. Additionally, while in this mode, the 51-point AF array covers more of the frame, allowing improved subject acquisition and tracking performance through the viewfinder.
  • New High Resolution LCD - The new, wide and bright LCD screen is 3.2-inches and features a super high resolution of 1,229K dots. Now photographers can easily compose and check critical focus for HD video.
  • New Viewfinder - Nikon has implemented a bright and high-contrast new OLED data display within the optical viewfinder that makes it easier to read and see shooting data. When composing through the viewfinder, users see 100% frame coverage, essential for proper framing.
  • Spot White Balance - A new feature for Nikon cameras, Spot White Balance allows for quick and precise white balance adjustment while shooting in live view. By selecting a desired point on the screen, users can set a custom white balance from a distance, even while using a super-telephoto lens. This is helpful for shooting video or when shooting under unfamiliar lighting when no gray card is available.
  • Durable Construction - Built to perform in a wide variety of conditions, the D7100 is built to the same moisture and dust resistance specifications of the venerable Nikon D300S. For durability, the top and rear covers are constructed of magnesium alloy, while internally, the shutter has been tested to withstand 150,000 cycles. Despite its robust construction, the camera remains lightweight, weighing in at approximately 1.5 pounds (body).
  • Enhanced Interface - To make it easier for users to quickly access frequently used functions, the “i” button has been added to the enthusiast-oriented control layout on the camera. 

Sharing and Remote Shooting Simplified

Photographers know that moment when the shutter clicks and they have created something stunning which deserves to be shared. No matter where that moment occurs, whether in an urban landscape or isolated forest, they can now share their images wirelessly by an attached WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter.1 With this optional adapter the user has the ability to share images to a supported smartphone or tablet, shoot remotely from their device, and transfer photos from up to 49 feet away. The Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility application is available free of charge on Google Play™ for Android™ devices or from the App Store™.  When using the application, photographers can wirelessly transfer images from the camera to a mobile device and even remotely control the camera. 

Capture Exceptional HD Video

For those looking to create multimedia content, the Nikon D7100 has a wide variety of innovative features for capturing HD video at various frame rates. With a press of the dedicated video record button, video can be recorded at 1080/30p, or at 60i/50i (in 1.3x Crop Mode) for optimal playback on many HDTV’s when connected via HDMI. The D7100 also provides the ability to record stereo sound through the internal microphone, or attach an optional external microphone such as Nikon’s ME-1, through the dedicated microphone terminal. To reference audio, the camera also features a headphone terminal. Users can also get creative using Nikon’s  Creative Effects in real time. This feature lets users take advantage of modes like Selective Color or Color Sketch to create truly customized movies.

Full Control, Creatively

In addition to full manual controls, the Nikon D7100 features a variety of intelligent modes to create effects and special features so that users can unleash their creativity. Nikon’s Picture Controls can be applied to photo and video to change the color, tone and saturation of an image for creative control. When capturing still images, the same Creative Effects modes and filters available in video are also at the disposal of the user. By combining consecutive frames, the D7100 also has a high dynamic range (HDR) function to let users capture photos with a vast tonal range. 

NIKKOR, Speedlight and System Compatibility

For 80 years, the NIKKOR legacy has been providing world renowned optics for photographers. The D7100 is compatible with Nikon’s dedicated DX-format lenses and more than 50 FX-format lenses. NIKKOR lenses offer the ultimate in sharpness and clarity in photos and HD video. For added versatility, the camera features a built-in flash, or can act as a commander in Nikon’s popular Creative Lighting System (CLS). 

WR-1 Transceiver

In addition to the D7100, Nikon also announced the WR-1 Transceiver for Nikon D-SLR cameras. This device uses 2.4 GHz radio frequency for maximum range when communicating with the camera, extending the range and functionality2 for remote shooting applications. The communication range between WR-1 units is approximately 394 feet3, and 15 channels are available. Users also have the ability to remotely control a camera (with a WR-1 used as a receiver) attached by operation of another WR-1 (used as a transmitter), and also perform simultaneous or synchronized release of shutters on several cameras using the WR-14. Furthermore, there are a wide variety of options for remote shooting, which include dividing remote cameras into groups and controlling each group separately and interval timer photography. Remote shooting by combining the WR-1 with WR-R10/WRT10 wireless remotes is also possible5.

Price and Availability
The Nikon D7100 will be available starting in March 2013 for the suggested retail price (SRP) of $1599.95* with the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 VR lens or $1199.95 for the body only configuration. Additionally, the new MB-D15 battery grip and the WR-1 transceiver will also be available in March 2013, and pricing for these products is not yet announced. The WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter is currently available and has a suggested retail price (SRP) of $59.95. 

For more information on the new Nikon D7100 and other Nikon products, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

1 WI-FI SPECIFICATIONS AND COMPATIBILITY

This camera’s Wi-Fi® capability using the WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter can only be used with a compatible iPhone®, iPad®, and/or iPod touch® or smart devices running on the Android™ operating system. The Wireless Mobile Utility application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera. For compatibility and to download the application, please visit:

For iPhone®/iPad®/iPod Touch® <https://itunes.apple.com/en/app/wireless-mobile-adapter-utility/id554157010>
For AndroidTM Google PlayTM <https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nikon.wu.wmau>

Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPad and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Android and Google Play are trademarks of Google Inc. Wi-Fi® and the Wi-Fi CERTIFIED logo are registered trademarks of the Wi-Fi Alliance. All Nikon trademarks are trademarks of Nikon Corporation.

2 Functions limited.

3 Approximate range at height of about 1.2 m/4 ft; varies with weather conditions and presence or absence of obstacles.

4 Only a camera with a ten-pin remote terminal can be employed as a master camera.

5 This requires pairing of the WR-1, WR-R10 and WR-T10 units in use. Maximum number of controllers that can be paired: 20 - (WR-1) or 64 (WR-R10)

* SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.

Nikon D7100 specifications

Price
MSRPBody only: $1199.95/£1099.99/€1179, With 18-105mm F3.5-5.6 VR lens : $1,599/£1,299/€1399
Body type
Body typeMid-size SLR
Sensor
Max resolution6000 x 4000
Other resolutions6000 x 3368, 4800 x 3200, 4800 x 2696, 4494 x 3000, 4496 x 2528, 3600 x 2400, 3600 x 2024, 2992 x 2000, 2992 x 1680, 2400 x 1600, 2400 x 1344
Image ratio w:h3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels24 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors25 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
Image
ISOISO 100 – 6400, Lo-1 (ISO 50), Hi-1 (ISO 12,800), Hi-2 (ISO 25,600)
White balance presets12
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • JPEG
  • NEF (RAW)
  • NEF (RAW) + JPEG
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points51
Lens mountNikon F
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3.2
Screen dots1,228,800
Touch screenNo
Screen typeWide Viewing Angle TFT-LCD monitor
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage100%
Viewfinder magnification0.94×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/8000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Aperture-Priority (A)
  • Manual (M)
  • Programmed auto with flexible program (P)
  • Shutter-Priority (S)
Scene modes
  • Autumn Colors
  • Beach / Snow
  • Blossom
  • Candlelight
  • Child
  • Close-up
  • Dusk / Dawn
  • Food
  • Landscape
  • Night
  • Landscape
  • Night Portrait
  • Party / Indoor
  • Pet Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Sports
  • Sunset
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range12.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flashYes (Hot-shoe, Wireless)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-eye, Slow sync, Rear curtain
Flash X sync speed1/250 sec
Drive modes
  • Single-frame [S] mode
  • Continuous low-speed [CL]
  • Continuous high-speed [CH]
  • Quiet Shutter Release
  • Self-timer mode
  • Mirror-up [Mup] mode
Continuous drive6 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 seconds)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (2, 3, 5 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (60, 50, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 424 (30, 24 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
Videography notes1080i60, 1080p25 in NTSC countries, 1080i50, 1080p24 in PAL countries
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC x 2 slots
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini Type C)
WirelessOptional
Remote controlYes (Optional, wired MC-DC2 or wireless WR-1 and WR-R10 )
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes (Water and dust resistant)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion EN-EL15 rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)950
Weight (inc. batteries)765 g (1.69 lb / 26.98 oz)
Dimensions136 x 107 x 76 mm (5.35 x 4.21 x 2.99)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingYes
GPSOptional
GPS notesGP-1

Additional Images

945
I own it
282
I want it
75
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 286
12
mbrobich
By mbrobich (Feb 26, 2013)

There should be a D400. According to Nikon Europe, they have been told that "..the D7100 is not the D300(s)'s replacement.."

http://nikonrumors.com/2013/02/24/nikon-europe-the-d7100-is-not-positioned-to-replace-the-d300s.aspx/

This should keep the D300 crybabies happy...

0 upvotes
Zimbabwe
By Zimbabwe (Feb 24, 2013)

I have old D300. And still I do not see reason to upgrade. Frame rate, megapixels, AF points all is not important from my side.

If someone needs them - buy camera that has it.
More megapixes, more CPU time, more battery energy, more disk space...
biggest isue - when I shoot uncompressed RAW with D300 from red LCD screen - I asuume image should have mostly red pixels. I expect RAW has some like
EE88 0023 0161 ED55 0034 0211 binary patterns. But it has some garbage in which red color is received by green and blue channels about 30 percents.

So camera has more megapixels than color filter can support. And till now there are was no words about color filter.
Of course I wait some in-camera GPS or wireless GPS by bluetooth.
But last one feels impossible to accept from Nikon marketing.

And some very crazy idea - interchangeable sensors. Need more megapixels - buy one. Need more speed - buy less megapixels. Is some sensor dirty - buy another one and replace....

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Clyde Thomas
By Clyde Thomas (Feb 24, 2013)

Where is the high speed sync flash rating? Am I missing it?
I see flash sync as 1/250th... ok fine. But what about HSS?

0 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 24, 2013)

Bring on the D400 now that this is of the way.

1 upvote
Kwang M Yi
By Kwang M Yi (Feb 23, 2013)

I think camera manufacturers thrive on selling high-margin lens, and sacrifice on the sale of body. That's why I chose Leica R bodies over Nikon's F bodies, when prices were compatible during analog days.
Leica was simple to operate, and the Nikon's high-end line offered the latest and greatest technology for photo journalists, but the lens were noticeably inferior to Leica.
Who cares if camera shoots like a machine gun, or if camera is equipped with multiple auto focus sensor, all I want is just one of two images that lasts forever. Who needs tens of thousands of useless images that will benefit hard drive manufactures. If a photographer cannot manually focus, nor set the proper lighting, then another hobby might suit them better.
It's really unfortunate for photographer that neither Leica nor Contax no longer available to mainstream photographers, so we are dealing with constant upgrading of gears, which, in the end does not make any better image than our first digital rebel.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 23, 2013)

I would be interested if Leica sells Laichi drinks but for cameras and lenses, no thanks.

0 upvotes
jimkahnw
By jimkahnw (Feb 22, 2013)

I don't care what others say. I bet the new processor solves the moire problem. Look at the results at normal viewing distance--that's what counts. I pre-ordered mine yesterday from BH.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Feb 22, 2013)

Buffer Size (RAW, Lossless 14-bit) - 6
Buffer Size (RAW, Compressed 12-bit) - 9

not big at all

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 23, 2013)

I agree the buffer size is too limited.
I think 12-bit RAW should be enough.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Feb 22, 2013)

Crop 2 mode is for JPEG only? Or in RAW too?

0 upvotes
mano42
By mano42 (Feb 22, 2013)

That "innovative" crop technology is old as hell, even my FZ8 could do it...

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 26, 2013)

It's been out for years even on the cheapest of digital cameras, some mfrs call it "Intelligent Zoom" or "Smart Zoom." Apparently the person who wrote the Nikon D7100 press release had not heard of them.

0 upvotes
attomole
By attomole (Feb 21, 2013)

So does this kill of any speculation that there will be a d400, I suppose so.
Shame really the D300, D700 and D3, I think were a high point as a canonical line up at the top of the Nikon range. Good update though
My head and heart says d600 though if i want to spend this much, the headline price is about that of some internet prices for the 600 now. or save some money and space and go for MFT or mirror-less APSC

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Feb 22, 2013)

Was the line canonical or Canonical? Or maybe Nikonic? And then there are the Nikonoclasts who discredit imaging altogether.

0 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Feb 23, 2013)

Classicist! Intellectual!

0 upvotes
NJHr
By NJHr (Feb 21, 2013)

Is that weight figure correct? It seems impossibly light for a DSLR of this supposed build including batteries. Its 75g lighter than the very compact K5. Amazing if true.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 22, 2013)

99% Chinese plastic?

1 upvote
fastprime
By fastprime (Feb 22, 2013)

Who knew a low pass filter was so heavy!

5 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (Feb 21, 2013)

The removal of the low-pass filter is a good idea. Apart from the minor resolution changes, what it does is (if you've compared the D800/e) remove a kind of veiled look to images that the filter imparts. Almost like reducing spherical aberration present in the lens. Images look "cleaner" and less diffuse at larger print or viewing sizes.
The only thing I would have done would have been to round the grip, make it a little larger, so it was more like the D300, which is a much more comfortable camera to hold than the D7000.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Feb 21, 2013)

...and introduces unavoidable aliasing. Nikon are insane. A low-pass filter is a prerequisite except for that small number of pixel peepers and perhaps one or two scientific applications. With so many pixels there is really no need for this.

Perhaps the technology really does solve the problem of aliasing but it seems ot me that it is an insurmountable digital barrier. The Fuji X-pro 1 was supposed to have done that also, and does not.

This is one camera I won't be buying and is a very disturbing development.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 21, 2013)

Disturbing ... really?

You've got that the wrong way round. With so many pixels there's no need to put one IN.

7 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Feb 22, 2013)

There's always going to be some chump in a striped shirt; and while the aliasing may not happen so close-up any longer, it will happen further away. And let's just think about the striped features of a city.

Landscape photographers may not be affected, but human and urban will.

3 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 22, 2013)

Pretty much: Everyone will be besides landscape and astrophotographers.

1 upvote
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 22, 2013)

It'll be fine. D800E users take thousands and thousands of photos before they ever notice slight moire, and even then it's easily corrected in Lightroom, or automatically in JPEG. The benefits outweigh the cons by a magnitude. And if you're getting 'too much' detail then just turn off the default raw sharpening altogether, yea there's a crazy idea! ;) The JPEG samples seem perfect out of the box.

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Feb 22, 2013)

Aliasing? Nothing that hefty amounts of NR or gobs of post processing won't solve. Avoid video, subjects with lines, waves, or ripples. Or maybe buy another camera.

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

Why don't you guys just study the test shots published on this site, comparing the 800 and 800e?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 26, 2013)

"The removal of the low-pass filter is a good idea.... what it does is remove a kind of veiled look to images that the filter imparts. Almost like reducing spherical aberration present in the lens. Images look "cleaner" and less diffuse at larger print or viewing sizes."

Indeed, and when I just checked upon this, noticed that my 1972 vintage 35mm film SLR camera already had this pesty low-pass optical filter summarily removed from it. Maybe that is why images taken with it look so amazingly great?

0 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 21, 2013)

Why, why why - because it is a consumer body, not pro.

2 upvotes
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Feb 22, 2013)

nowadays i see that companies like to try untested
technology with consumer body and iron out the kinks
then put them to a pro body.

perhaps this is the way of the future

1 upvote
Fixx
By Fixx (Feb 22, 2013)

that has been always the case. Fastest shutter speeds were in consumer bodies even in film era, as fast shutters got easier broken.

0 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Feb 21, 2013)

I commend Nikon for the features and price point of this camera. But why do they keep dumbing cameras down and frustrating their customers?

Why the low buffer rate in RAW?
Why change the battery grip from one camera body to another?
Why no full metal lens mount for those big lenses?

In the past, Nikon has made some really stupid ass decisions that frustrate me to no end. These include:

Why did the D700 only have a 95% viewfinder? That was a deal breaker for me.
Why did Nikon take so long to deliver FX?
Why no dedicated AF on button in the D600 and D7100?
Why change the C-S-M autofocus button on the D600 and D7100 when everyone's used that?
What the hell was the gimicky 1 series?
Where's Nikon's answer to MFT?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 21, 2013)

Darn. This is why Nikon designs the cameras and not you...

10 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Feb 21, 2013)

Fanboys at it again?

Nikon claims this is their top of the line DX camera and targets sports shooters specifically with the 1.3x, but puts a ridiculously low buffer rate in this camera? Is that not idiotic?

Of course, you can't answer any of the criticisms I level at Nikon.

Now I see that the dumbing down of cameras is specifically targeted at Nikon fanboys.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
SHood
By SHood (Feb 21, 2013)

Buffer in Crop mode can hold 14 Raw images.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 22, 2013)

wow... brilliant... Sony can do 2 times as much in it's 600$ camera. With no crippled crop mode what so ever. You really think we should thank Nikon for these 14 images?

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

Just to add to that list:
...why no bracketing in the D3200?
...why does the d5200 even exist, when all it offers is the full versions of the firmware the 3200 wasn't allowed to have, and only adds a second microphone and a hinge? and for how much extra money for that?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
walnist
By walnist (Feb 21, 2013)

Looks like a great camera, but launch price in € is too close to the D600 (which is now around €1500).
But perhaps market price will drop quickly, around €1000 would be about right.

1 upvote
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (Feb 22, 2013)

The D600 is a s*** camera compared to this. The AF points on a D600 are a joke. Also, the prices of the lenses you need to buy to benefit from FF are astronomical. If not you get soft corners and variable apertures... no thanks.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

you both make valid points

0 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (Feb 21, 2013)

ISO performance is my only concern...but everything else looks fantastic

0 upvotes
photobeans
By photobeans (Feb 21, 2013)

Looks like a great successor to a great camera. I'm done with DSLRs though, would buy a Sony NEX 6 over this. NEX and m43 cameras are wonderfully sized and the perform good enough.

5 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

I find the size of NEX and m4/3 cameras to be too small to use comfortably and to support a decent, easy to use control layout.

2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 22, 2013)

Yep. DSLR kill mirrorless in ergonomics by a mile. There's simply no comparison. Not to mention a comfort you get while shooting with anything longer than 90mm, not the struggle of mirrorless.

2 upvotes
SRHEdD
By SRHEdD (Feb 22, 2013)

I tried that route. Sold my D7000 kit for a NEX6 and 7. Lasted a couple of months. Not even close to the same user experience. MAYBE the images were okay, but the bodies/lenses are just too small and fidgety. Back to Nikon now (D600), much more intuitive, responsive, and rewarding. No camera is perfect, so I'll take Nikon's imperfections over Sony's. A D600 with a small zoom on a strap is still convenient enough to take most anywhere.

2 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Feb 21, 2013)

Nice to see so many cameras coming without the AA filter. I used to shoot an M8 and moire was not an issue on a single frame I shot.

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

As the pixel density of sensors continues to increase the need for the low pass filter will continue to diminish. I have a feeling the next generation of DSLRS from Nikon will all be sans the AA filter.

1 upvote
cyberstudio
By cyberstudio (Feb 21, 2013)

I am not 100% sure about that... if we take the sharpest lenses at their optimal apertures (diffraction-limited) and the sensor still outresolves that, then we would be perfectly safe from moire.

2 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Feb 21, 2013)

Well as a Canon user who used to own a 7D....I have to say this Nikon looks pretty impressive with this large a feature set at this low of a price. Canon...figure out your pricing if you plan on selling 7D2's!!!!!!

7 upvotes
EDWARD ARTISTE
By EDWARD ARTISTE (Feb 21, 2013)

Exactly what im saying. Dont forget about the 70d- this is the 70d's price range, and is almost certain not to come with these features

3 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Feb 22, 2013)

From what I've seen, the more expensive 5D3 outsells the d800. Canon knows what they are doing with pricing. Nikon's problem, admittedly, has been poor management with production volumes leading to cutting prices which drastically cut profits.

0 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Feb 22, 2013)

The 5D3 outsells the D800 because there are already more Canon users out there invested in Canon glass who aren't going to sell all their glass for a new Nikon D800 (well....most won't).

4 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Feb 21, 2013)

It seems pretty clear Nikon intends this camera to be the top segment DX camera which probably means you're right, NO D400

2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Feb 21, 2013)

"Durable Construction - Built to perform in a wide variety of conditions, the D7100 is built to the same moisture and dust resistance specifications of the venerable Nikon D300S. For durability, the top and rear covers are constructed of magnesium alloy, while internally, the shutter has been tested to withstand 150,000 cycles. Despite its robust construction, the camera remains lightweight, weighing in at approximately 1.5 pounds (body)."

Something about this statement tells me "NO D400!"

3 upvotes
wootpile
By wootpile (Feb 21, 2013)

W-h-e-re I-s T-h-e F-l-i-p-S-c-r-e-e-n . . .

3 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

in Sony. Or Canon.

2 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 21, 2013)

Where is the dislike button ?

2 upvotes
Nafees A Bazmi
By Nafees A Bazmi (Feb 21, 2013)

Nikon gone crazy..... what is the need of this model when it has no Touch/ articulated Screen, faster frame rate and many other features people wanted more.
these specs can be found in earlier and cheaper models :(

2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Feb 21, 2013)

Why are you looking for an articulated touch screen in a higher-end model? Have you seen what an articulated screen does to the D5200? It takes away space for REAL BUTTONS. A touch-screen is NOT the same as a real button. You can't feel it or even USE it while your eye is to the viewfinder.

7 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

@JDThomas

I was aobut to post the same thing. Look at every camera with an articulated screen. The control layout SUCKS for the buttons on the back of the camera since you can't put any on one side to make room the the hinges.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Feb 21, 2013)

I really LOVE my D5200 because of the screen and the IQ, but handling is a nightmare.

Of course I can get past that because I only use the D5200 when I'm not working and I have time to adjust the settings and there's no "I can't miss the shot" pressure.

You have to make concessions. If they put an articulated screen and kept all the control features that were needed it would be bigger than a D800. (And everyone would complain about that).

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

No use whatsoever for a touch screen. Hard buttons are preferable in most situations. Touch screens are near useless with gloves on cold Winter conditions, which is one reason you never see high end DSLRs with them.

Faster than 6 fps is not a feature that the majority of people need, but is for specialized sports applications, spec sheets, and for spray and pray shooters. But with today's high resolution sensor, blazing fast fps will take require huge processing power which is only possible in a higher price bracket (see the 7D release price). So it's a tradeoff and I think Nikon made the right choice for price/performance for this model.

8 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Feb 21, 2013)

Despite the layout, this is a pretty nicely spec'ed camera especially at the price point.

1 upvote
GabrielZ
By GabrielZ (Feb 21, 2013)

So no Nikon D400 then?

0 upvotes
JEROME NOLAS
By JEROME NOLAS (Feb 21, 2013)

This is like 300 hp in Geo Metro...who really needs it? When you people realize it won't make you a better photographer?

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 21, 2013)

Have you ever seen a Subaru Impreza WRX?

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 21, 2013)

No camera will make anyone a better photographer, but some will provide you will better features/usability for making high quality images.

100% VF, good IQ and handling and solid AF performance are just a few things that can distinguish a given model from the next. If you don't know why you need it, it's likely you don't.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Devendra
By Devendra (Feb 21, 2013)

looks like you automatically disqualified yourself?

0 upvotes
yudhir
By yudhir (Feb 21, 2013)

A 58 also mid-level?
D7100 also mid level?
Dpreview?

5 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 22, 2013)

D400 as the top DX?

It feels good to speculate, haha.

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Feb 21, 2013)

Good machine. Simply good!

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 21, 2013)

DPR, what does that mean in the spec table: "Wireless Built-In"?

0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 22, 2013)

It's like what's in 7D I suppose. It fires "instructions" through the built-in flash to a compatible off camera flash unit, if I understand it correctly.

0 upvotes
ThomasH_always
By ThomasH_always (Feb 21, 2013)

A "mini update" for the Least Important Customers of Nikon: The passionate photographers with skills. Or so it looks. We waited for years and years to get the same sensor, which the beginner models had for a long time. Canon is more clever about that: they simply placed the same sensor in all DX cameras, and so the speed of operation, functionality versus size are the differentiators.

But, lets nonetheless see here the Silver Lining: We have a new mid-range DX model at last, our existence has been noticed by Nikon's product planers.

However, the D7000/D600 controls in terms of their ergonomics are not my favorites, and the D7100 does not correct the mess in any significant manner. I really hate this left side mode selector, and the bizarre under wheel even more. Its op in the dark or with gloves is not possible.

2 upvotes
Tap0
By Tap0 (Feb 21, 2013)

What on earth are you talking about ? You are one deluded Canon fanboi.

6 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

Considering the overall features to price ratio this is the best DX camera ever made.

5 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 21, 2013)

Great this announcement is out of the way. Looks good. D400 and D750 are next.

3 upvotes
imax2k2
By imax2k2 (Feb 21, 2013)

There is no D400 coming, this body is weather sealed, has top of the line AF, decent sensor in FPS, This IS the D400 in a compact body, the ergonomics are not really the deal breaker, the AF is controlled the same way all the way to D4, AF-On can be reconfigured to AF-L/AE-L button.

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

The only thing this lacks compared to a D300s successor that could make a significant practical differnce is it's 6 shot buffer depth. I doubt that would be enough to justify a full D300s successor at the $1,800 -$2,000 it would have to cost.

Though I could maybe see either a D8000 or a D9000 in D7100 class shell with a D800 class meter, maybe an AF on button, D300s style mode dial, 7-8 fps, and a bigger buffer at $1,500-$1,600 instead of a full D300s type body. But even that camera probably wouldn't have enough of a market to be worth it for Nikon.

Than again after canon shows their hand Nikon might just release a firmware update that increases the D7100 buffer depth like Canon did for the 7D.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
d3xmeister
By d3xmeister (Feb 21, 2013)

So at this time there's only one way to shoot fast with Nikon: a D4. I don't need that but I imagine some do.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

Another home run for Nikon. I hope for canon's sake they don't go for another bunt with whatever camera they put up against the D7100.

8 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (Feb 21, 2013)

There is room for a D400 at a price of 1600 to 1900 for body, if they make body bit stronger like D300s and add CF card slot as many pros want, faster fps to compete with rumoured Canon 7D mark 2 at 10fps, maybe use the 20mp sony sensor to do it. Work on ability to change Aperature control in video mode while live so new G AFS lenses work, not just older lenses. Does anyone know how the video of D800 or D4 compare with this feature. Can you change aperature in live mode on new (non mechanical Aperature) lenses with FX.
Lastly add an articulating screen like Olympus E5 DSLR or Canon's DSLR rotating screens. Ideal D400 and I would imagine many pros or semipros would pay extra for body. There is a price point missing in lineup now and this is it.
This would interest video shooters who are pro or semi pro. Also have ability to output video to external recording devices.

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

I doubt the 7DII is going to be 10 fps, especially if it is 24 megapixels. If those speeds are possible with 24 megapixels why is the 1DX only 18 megapixels and the D4 only 16 megapixels?

Now if canon reuses the same 18 megapixel APS-C sensor they have been for the last 5 years, which seems more likely anyway since the T4i didn't get a new sensor either when it sorely needs one to compete with the D5200, I could see 10 fps.

1 upvote
imax2k2
By imax2k2 (Feb 21, 2013)

I don't think there is any room for a D400, this is pretty close to it anyway, this body is weather sealed, the SD cards are pretty fast and cheap. And I hope that this can change Aperture while shooting video.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

If they could sell it for $1500-$1600 there could be room for a D300s successor. Though it won't be called a D400. it will be either a D8000 or a D9000 and maybe even be a D7100 shell with an AF on button, D300s style mode dial, 7-8 fps, and a bigger buffer instead of a full D300s type body.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

So... Nikon, what's up with this 6 shots buffer?! Come on, people WHINED like crazy when Sony's A77 came out shooting over 20 shots, and you give less than a HALF OF THAT?! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!

And what the heck is this 1.3 crop?! Can't make full resolution? Come on, it's a joke. Why the heck you make an advantage out of it. What next? Make 1" sensor crop a huge advantage over APS-C? We all know it's a joke, no matter what your PR team says.

And where the heck did the AF-ON button vaporised? Are you serious? How this is suppose to be semi-pro camera?!

This camera belongs to 2007, not 2013. Hope that at least image quality compensates for all it flaws, cause otherwise it looks like Nikon intentionally cripples it's APS-C bodies to make people buy FF gear as they simply will be forced to in order to get something that's usable.

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

Yeah the 6 shot buffer is the only disappointing thing about this camera and may indicate a replacement for the D300s is coming. I mean the D5200 has an eight shot buffer. This having a smaller one is really annoying and the only reason it would make sense is if a D300s replacement is coming.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 21, 2013)

Where you all got this "6 shots buffer"? From this: "To help ensure the decisive shot is not missed, the D7100 can shoot at up to six frames per second (fps) at full resolution"? Read again, and don't stop at the word "frames".

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

@peeve1

http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d7100/spec.htm

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Feb 21, 2013)

Thanks. I see also values up to 9 for RAW, and up to 100 for JPEG (OK, 33 for full-res). It is not like casual sports shooters need every bit of minute details the lossless 14-bit RAW provides (not visible to a naked eye anyway). And at the ISOs the sports shooting is done (not the base) the last 2 bits are just noise.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

Right.... so now if Nikon releases camera with horrible buffer - noone needs it. If Canon or Sony releases camera with lower buffer (though not even nearly as bad as this one) than it's a deal breaker?
Eh... don't be so blindfolded.

3 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 21, 2013)

12-bit RAW is enough for me but JPEG definitely not.

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Feb 21, 2013)

I bet everyone at Canon is talking about the Nikon D7100 today. That is never a good thing.

5 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Feb 21, 2013)

Canon is too complacent to notice what the competition is doing. :-)

5 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 21, 2013)

I think D800 is a better camera but looking at the prices 5D3 is the clear winner. it's a shame, and reality.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

@yabokkie

WTF are you talking about. The D800 is cheaper than the 5D Mark III so if it is the better cam it is most defiantly the "clear winner."

3 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 22, 2013)

I said clear winner of the maker,
and of course, clear loser of the user.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 22, 2013)

@yabokkie

You said no such thing.

0 upvotes
Todd Ka
By Todd Ka (Feb 21, 2013)

Looks great. Can't wait to see the new D400...

1 upvote
DrWhom
By DrWhom (Feb 21, 2013)

While I'm sure that the image quality will be class-leading, and I appreciate the weather sealing and better AF, I'm a little miffed that Nikon still wants us to buy a separate WIFI/GPS module, and that articulating LCDs are for consumer grade products only. Not to mentions that DX lenses have some quality/coverage holes, and FX lenses are too big (for me).

I've been holding on to my D90 for a long time now, and I was really hoping that the D7100 or D600 would be my next move. The more I think about it, the more I like the idea of the m4/3 system, with its collection of excellent primes and compact f2.8 zooms, along with excellent video support and built in WIFI (Panasonic GH3).

I can't help but feel that Nikon isn't sure what to do with DX, and that they see mirrorless as a gimmick. I hope that I'm wrong!

2 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (Feb 21, 2013)

There have been rumours lately about a DX mirrorless system... Let's see if it comes out true!

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 21, 2013)

we don't have to worry about GH3. just leave it alone.

APS-C DSLR is fading out the market. we don't get anything by cropping, we only lose part of the image, and the light projected to that part of image. it's the small pixel pitch that counts.

we don't care if the camera can take more than we want, as long as we have enough data processing power.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

yabokkie - if so than m4/3 should be doomed right off the bat. We know it's not true. Just like we know what you said about APS-C DSLRs is not true.

2 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Feb 21, 2013)

To be fair about the lack of articulating screen there is an expectation of ruggedness and all-weather capability that would be compromised by the addition of an articulating screen. Were it built to meet the expectations of demanding photographers it may add expense and bulk far in excess of its utility.

2 upvotes
DrWhom
By DrWhom (Feb 21, 2013)

@Photomonkey - GH3 is weather-sealed, magnesium body, and has fully articulating screen. I think Nikon is just stuck in an SLR paradigm as far as their upscale body designs go.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

DrWhom - and at the same time has got tiny sensor, crippled AF, and rather awkward controls? Thanks, but if I'd be buying a camera in a DSLR size I'd buy a DSLR. No need to get stuck in poor m4/3.

2 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 22, 2013)

@Plastek - DrWhom's reference of GH3 is about articulating screen, that it can be made on a weather-sealed camera, without compromising its robustness.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 22, 2013)

An articulating screen attached by a couple of plastic hinges will never be as durable as a non articulating screen set into the chassis of the camera. This is why enthusiast/pro DSLRs don't have them and probably never will.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 26, 2013)

"An articulating screen attached by a couple of plastic hinges will never be as durable as a non articulating screen set into the chassis of the camera. This is why enthusiast/pro DSLRs don't have them and probably never will."

Yeah, and besides, I understand Nikon is actually saving right about US$0.495 on every D7100 by NOT adding an articulated screen to the design. It all comes down to the simple fact that for the Japanese camera makers, money is indeed honey.

0 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Feb 21, 2013)

Cool. I'm not sure i'm a fan of a 24MP DX sensor though.. I mean not unless the ISO is at least as good as the D7000's.

I'm not sure i understand this insane persuit of pixel resolution (other than a lame marketing stand point) when what they could do is improve ISO performance and keep the sensor pixel density the same as the sensor tech improves. I have the D7000, and 16MP is more than enough.. I would trade the extra density for better ISO capability.

0 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Feb 21, 2013)

dynamic range goes hand in hand with that as well.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 21, 2013)

more pixels doesn't hurt those who think low resolution is better. people can reduce the resolution any time, and all the way to a single pixel.

3 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 21, 2013)

If it has the the same sensor as the D5200 it will have better iso and DR than the D7000 did.

0 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Feb 21, 2013)

yabokkie - Sure you can downsample, but that's not my point. The point is about how pixel density at the sensor level and how it directly effects ISO and dynamic range capability. I would choose better ISO and better dynamic range than pixel density.

I'm going to have to assume what Josh152 says is right though. Well hopefully.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 22, 2013)

> I would choose better ISO and better dynamic range than pixel density.

but how pixel density can affect ISO or DR? it's not a simple story and they may not be relavent in the first place.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

nice

1 upvote
Justin Francis
By Justin Francis (Feb 21, 2013)

Another rehash of old tech. Ho hum.

4 upvotes
Howard
By Howard (Feb 21, 2013)

But their "old tech" is newer than Canon's old tech (I am being serious).

18 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (Feb 21, 2013)

So what's old tech? The new 24mm sensor? The AF system? (present only in the D4 and D800/E)? The OLED status bar below the viewfinder?

2 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Feb 21, 2013)

Yeah i sort of agree with you. Well i mean all tech is a rehash of old tech.. .but the degree's of separation are relatively minimal, just so that Nikon can refresh it's lineup every 2 years. Nikon has a pretty diverse lineup too.

0 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Feb 21, 2013)

Just stop reading or talking about anything photographic for ten years and it will all seem new then.

1 upvote
Haider
By Haider (Feb 21, 2013)

Bayer sensor. Give us proper pixels an not interpolated clap trap.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

Go get Sigma and see how it ends. Your "proper pixels".

0 upvotes
007peter
By 007peter (Feb 21, 2013)

@Howard
Nikon fanboys have it so good they don't even know how to appreciate innovation.
Let see, Canon 60d is using a 3yrs old 18mp sensor from T2i. Canon 60d's 9 points AF is dated back to Canon 20d in 2002!

Now that is ANCIENT!

0 upvotes
Howard
By Howard (Feb 21, 2013)

Kudos to Nikon. As a long time Canon user (have had 3 EOS film bodies and 5 DSLRs over the years), I must say Canon has fallen behind in recent years. Still no 24MP APS-C body, and still no 30MP+ FF body (I know, I know, MP is not everything, but they can and should make high-res sensors with good performance).

Anyway, had I not heavily invested in Canon lenses, were I to start out today, Nikon surely looks very, very compelling.

9 upvotes
Roadtripper
By Roadtripper (Feb 21, 2013)

Had I not been talked into a Canon EOS 10s over the Nikon 8008s I went in to buy in 1990, I really think I would be happier with an expanded Nikon system instead of Canon. But, we make our beds....

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Feb 21, 2013)

Nikon didn't know how to make good modern cameras and lenses until 2007.

Canon EOS used to be way better than any rival before 2007. a new company was born late that year. this is no old Nikon which was thrown into the toilet already. this is a new star.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

yabokkie - In the last sentence... what garbage is that?!

0 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Feb 21, 2013)

When Canon comes out with some startling new cameras I fully expect to see the reversal of conversation that we see now. I have seen the same comments directed at Nikon and I expect that to happen again. Then the tide will turn and it may be Sony's turn in the sun with Canon and Nikon being excoriated for being such slow, unimaginative, overpriced, under-featured cr@p mongers.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

Photomonkey - I'd say that right now it's Pentax turn. They got the best image quality, outstanding lenses (that more than ofter beat crap out of Nikon) and each of their cameras is featured at least twice as well for photography as Nikon or Canon for any similar price tag.

Next probably will be Sony when they work out the flip-up mechanics for their SLT mirror, as right now their cameras offer outstanding ergonomics and tons of features Nikon users can't even dream of (they can't even get tilt-able LCD, lol!), only issue being 1/3 of the light lost due to beamsplitter not flipping up in single shot mode.

After that I guess it'll be back again Canon turn - when they catch up in APS-C sensors and decide to focus bit more on a photography and less on video.

1 upvote
Alphoid
By Alphoid (Feb 21, 2013)

The Canon Digital Rebel was the first sub-$1000 dSLR. Adjusted for inflation, the D7100 is $962 in 2003 dollars. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first camera breaking the same ground for professional dSLRs as the original Rebel did for dSLRs.

Exciting times.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 21, 2013)

Rebel isn't quite in the same category as this though... this may be an even better value.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Feb 21, 2013)

Alphoid - what? What are you talking about? That's as obscure stretching of theories that's completely unrelated to the reality as it gets.

0 upvotes
Sensor08
By Sensor08 (Feb 21, 2013)

Specs say "Wireless Built-In" but I guess that should be "optional".

1 upvote
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 22, 2013)

I think that's some kind of flash commander, using signal from the built-in flash.

0 upvotes
Dédéjr
By Dédéjr (Feb 21, 2013)

looking good. Now will have to wait and see what my pentax friends bring out!!!!

0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 22, 2013)

K-5 IIs?

0 upvotes
Neal Hood
By Neal Hood (Feb 21, 2013)

Very nicely spec'ed camera. They just seem to stay a step ahead of every other vendor.

5 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Feb 21, 2013)

If they've got their color reproduction sorted they might actually have a pretty good camera here.

1 upvote
SunnyFlorida
By SunnyFlorida (Feb 21, 2013)

Nikon all I can say is BRAVO!!!! You have set the high standard for APSC cameras!!

4 upvotes
Slapbass
By Slapbass (Feb 21, 2013)

Waiting for the D300 successor...here you are! ;)

1 upvote
io_bg
By io_bg (Feb 21, 2013)

No, this is the D7000 successor ;)

1 upvote
ThomCull
By ThomCull (Feb 21, 2013)

With that massive 6 NEF buffer. 1 second of Continuous Shoot? Why bother?

0 upvotes
hoxton fives
By hoxton fives (Feb 21, 2013)

the buffer capacity is 12 to 14 in the 1.3 crop mode which features the 7fps. so thats about 2sec shooting at full speed. not sooo bad for many uses?

0 upvotes
infohijra
By infohijra (Mar 3, 2013)

f they have got their color reproduction sorted they might actually have a good camera.

0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (Feb 21, 2013)

Looking at the price level, which is very consumer minded, I think there will probably be a D400. Maybe with the 20MP sony sensor and dual imageprocessor, so it can do 10fps or more.

4 upvotes
Franka T.L.
By Franka T.L. (Feb 21, 2013)

The only thing Nikon seems still wanting is their Video feature / control / recording. The Mfr really should made uncompressed RAW Video OUTPUT ( for external recorder ) , with time coding and better Audio standard on all their semi-pro / pro DSLR.

Canon really have some tough one to ant up to for their upcoming APS-C platform.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 286
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