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DxO Labs announces its ViewPoint for distortion correction

By dpreview staff on Sep 5, 2012 at 13:00 GMT

DxO Labs has created DxO ViewPoint - a piece of software to remove geometric distortion from images. As the name implies, ViewPoint is designed to remove the distortion introduced by the position of the shooter, whether that be the distorting effect seen at the edge of wide-angle images shot close-up, or the correction of converging verticals caused by perspective.ViewPoint is available either as a stand-alone tool or as a plugin for Adobe PhotoShop (CS3 or newer) or Lightroom (version 3 or newer). It is available for both Mac and PC.


Press Release:

DxO ViewPoint: the new solution for restoring the natural proportions in photos

The indispensible software for social, urban, interior, and architectural photography

September 5, 2012 – DxO Labs announces the upcoming availability in September 2012 of DxO ViewPoint, its new software solution for Mac and Windows entirely dedicated to correcting distorted elements on the edges of photos, and to fixing problems with perspective (such as keystoning). Based on DxO Labs' exclusive geometric correction technology, DxO ViewPoint allows photographers to easily and efficiently restore the natural proportions of the subjects in their images as an integral part of their workflow.

Changing the point of view

The deformation of subjects located on the edges of photos is due to the use of wide-angle lenses, and affects numerous situations, particularly social photography (e.g., events, marriages) and photo reportage. Thanks to its dedicated tool, DxO ViewPoint easily fixes this flaw, automatically restoring the natural proportions to distorted faces and bodies to make them look as normal as those in the center of the image.

Problems with perspective such as keystoning have a big impact on urban, interior, and architectural photography, and are most frequently tied to the photographer's vantage point when shooting the scene. DxO ViewPoint eliminates unsightly vanishing points and convergent lines, and corrects the most complex perspective problems without having to resort to expensive shift lenses or to a view camera.

Each of these features comes with advanced controls for fine-tuning settings and for obtaining optimal precision when producing larger prints. For example, some tools offer the possibility of virtually changing the shooting position of the photographer so as to perfectly align the vertical lines along the edges of the image.

A clear and intuitive interface

DxO ViewPoint has a workspace composed of a large viewing area along with simple and intuitive toolbars and control palettes. Thanks to the software's explicit icons, photographers can readily identify the rights tools for applying their corrections in just a few clicks.

The corrections palettes are detachable so as to enable working in multi-screen mode and displaying the full image. A visualization palette and a composition grid allow for precise placement of anchor points for fine-tuning adjustments.

Two display modes are available: single image for making corrections with a maximum of accuracy, or side-by-side for manipulating the original image while viewing real-time corrections.

Powerful and effective

DxO ViewPoint automatically applies corrections while taking into account such shooting parameters as focal length and sensor size, and while respecting the image proportions, for a more natural rendering. And thanks to its automatic cropping feature, DxO ViewPoint maximizes the field of view for optimal results.

Accessible to all

DxO ViewPoint is available as a standalone application for Mac and Windows, and also as a plugin for Adobe® Photoshop® CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, and Adobe® Photoshop® Lightroom® 3 and 4.

Availability and price

DxO ViewPoint will be available for Windows and Mac during the course of September 2012 in DxO Labs' online store (www.dxo.com) and at photo resellers at the following prices:

  • USD: $79
  • EUR: 79€ (Suggested retail price, including VAT)
  • GBP: £69 (Suggested retail price, including VAT)

Comments

Total comments: 52
marketing7007
By marketing7007 (Sep 6, 2012)

Sorry, "did NOT well illustrate..."

jonathan7007

0 upvotes
marketing7007
By marketing7007 (Sep 6, 2012)

Dpreview or DxO did well illustrate what these tools do. (Yeah, PS6 has some versions. Adobe heading off DxO.)

Wide angle fixup offered very good and you can make some forms of shape change more acceptable. I have DxO Optics Pro 7.x - would like the distortion control tools available in LR because I get lazy about exiting for a few images to use DxO tools.

Visit the DxO to see all their tools and benefits. No affiliation w/DxO but I really appreciate having someone besides Adobe making tools and want to see them survive as alternative. Adobe will just slow down if they are the only game in town.

Long ago I had 2,3 developers ready to go for Tri-X and Plus-X, Ilford, whatever, as the client's and my needs differed from shoot to shoot. So it goes with software and RAW conversion. We would all be well served to be using more alternatives.

OK, I'm off the soapbox now! Go look at www.dxo.com. I am going to go and find out if as a customer I get a discount on the plug-in.

jonathan7007

0 upvotes
Matt Random
By Matt Random (Sep 6, 2012)

Too bad I recently purchased Optics Pro for the optics correction. Sounds like this will be an easier way to get the same thing.

0 upvotes
Bearsdenoboe
By Bearsdenoboe (Sep 6, 2012)

"Rip-off Britain" again? Or is it only the VAT? According to my calculator, $ 79 = € 62.54 = £UK 49.58 ! Is it not time that cameras, electronics etc. were sold here at a fair price? What would it cost from Hong Kong?

0 upvotes
stevecimo
By stevecimo (Sep 6, 2012)

I'm told the distortion tools in DOP 7 are better then those in PS ,
and that VP preforms these corrections better and is easier to use then those built into DOP.

Just a little surprised at the price.

0 upvotes
MichaelRose
By MichaelRose (Sep 6, 2012)

I beleive that CS6's Adaptive Wide Angle feature does al/most everything that this product does-- I find it very powerful and easy to use.

However, the cooresponding feature in LR (4.2 RC 6 [844780] is latest version) Develop/Lens Corrections/Manual although quite handy, is of
limited use since each control acts globally in a single plane.
For minor corrections, it works okay...

'You cannot select individual objects/lines for alignment'

0 upvotes
meanwhile
By meanwhile (Sep 6, 2012)

So many people claim that xyz does this already for free, or ABC has this built-in and is as good. How about a shootout DPR?

0 upvotes
meanwhile
By meanwhile (Sep 6, 2012)

Or perhaps make it a public shootout? Put up a few RAWs with difficult distortion issues, and let people submit their best edit and documented workflow.

0 upvotes
CMYK Rick
By CMYK Rick (Sep 5, 2012)

This feature is already available in DxO under a different name (Cylindrical anamorphosis). Perhaps what they're offering is a standalone version.

0 upvotes
Jim Evidon
By Jim Evidon (Sep 5, 2012)

As a U.S. buyer, I wonder if I can get it at the Euro price and get the VAT knocked off as a non-Euro resident. Or is it more probably that DXO simply charges more to U.S. customers?

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
rrr_hhh
By rrr_hhh (Sep 6, 2012)

1€ = 1.26$
The EU VAT is fluctuating between 19-21%; let us make it 20%. This means that without VAT and converted into $. You would have to pay 83$, compared to the price of 79$ in the US.

You don't have anything to complain about : unlike US software corporations like Adobe or Niksoftware who charge about 25% more in my country.

2 upvotes
wkay
By wkay (Sep 5, 2012)

What does this give me that PTLens and Camera Raw dont?

1 upvote
boels069
By boels069 (Sep 6, 2012)

AFAIK, DxO uses focus distance and aperture as parameters for correction.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Sep 6, 2012)

Not sure about Camera Raw, but PT Lens doesn't do anything that DxO can't easily better.

0 upvotes
James A Rinner
By James A Rinner (Sep 5, 2012)

Corel PaintShop Pro has been doing this for many many years!

2 upvotes
Andreas Stuebs
By Andreas Stuebs (Sep 7, 2012)

That is why I use it along side PSE and Gimp.

0 upvotes
leerob
By leerob (Sep 5, 2012)

Isn't it a part of Dxo software already?

2 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Sep 6, 2012)

Yes it is. Made availble for Ps and Lr users, who'll have the best of both worlds - at a price!

0 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (Sep 5, 2012)

Photoshop will do most of what DXO does, sometimes much better (Transform/Warp.) But for someone who doesn't have or want Photoshop, this will be a very nice add on.

1 upvote
pitraks
By pitraks (Sep 5, 2012)

The perspective correction in photoshop does not work well if you ask me. If you shoot a building pointing upward (like in the example above) and then correct the perspective, the proportions are way off. Shooting with wide angle the building is always too high in relation to the width.

I think the correction should also take the angle of view and lens characteristics into account. That would really allow for 'shift lens' replacement by software. Only in terms of geometry, not IQ.

But I don't know if DxO can do this. If it does, I'll buy it without a doubt.

1 upvote
AlanG
By AlanG (Sep 5, 2012)

In cases like that one has to change the height to width proportions. DXO has a slider for that which you can use at the same time you correct the convergence.

0 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Sep 5, 2012)

Transform/Warp in photoshop is not the same thing, it is far too simplistic to be compared to this. Photoshop does have an equivalent, but it is called Lens Correction with lens profiles that account for exact lens distortions, chromatic aberration, vignetting, etc. which Transform/Warp can't address.

0 upvotes
Wick Smith
By Wick Smith (Sep 6, 2012)

CS 6 has a new feature called adaptive wide angle filter, which is different from the lens correction feature and certainly more sophisticated than a warp transform. I'd like to know if this dxo product claims to do more than this.

http://www.adobepress.com/articles/article.asp?p=1856948

0 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (Sep 6, 2012)

Graybalanced. I'm quite familiar with and use both CS5 and DXO. Warp is far better than anything DXO can do for pulling a designated part of the pic into shape, especially for superwide panoramas. DXO does lens and basic geometry correction better than anything, but it cannot isolate the top or side 1/8 or so of a pic without pulling everything else along with it. Glad to have them both.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 5, 2012)

If anybody knows this: will it work for video clips also, or only stills?

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 5, 2012)

What they don't mention is that moving the pixels as far as they have in the building shot lowers the image quality.

0 upvotes
patchfree
By patchfree (Sep 5, 2012)

AAAhhhrgh! A new software only for functions offerred many years ago by numerous photoretouching softwares. I am using these functions directly inside Corel PhotoPaint. Nothing new or innovative and what a price!

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Sep 5, 2012)

I've tried Lightroom 4 and DxO Optics Pro 7's demos and I can tell you Lightroom distortion correction is not that good, at least compared to Pro 7. What you have here is Pro 7's distortion correction tools made available as a plug-in. It will be useful for Lightroom and Cs owners, as it complements and optimizes the software's editing capabilities. Shame about the price, though. €79 is quite steep for a plug-in, but I guess if they made it less expensive, the package of Lr4 + this plug-in would eat into DxO Optics Pro 7's sales - and that wouldn't be very clever.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
_sem_
By _sem_ (Sep 6, 2012)

I agree DxO's perspective correction is good at what it does, was demoed several times. But a lot of it depends on the availability of the "lens module". They are notorious for delays. You can't do much with unsupported lenses or when using macro add-ons. While Adobe has a profile creation tool, and the free Hugin can generate a lens profile if you are able to produce a good pano set of images.

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Sep 6, 2012)

I'm sure that, with over 8000 modules, the chances of finding a lens-body combo that isn't on DxO's database is very remote.

0 upvotes
jwkphoto
By jwkphoto (Sep 7, 2012)

DxO has very few camera-lens combinations for my Sony a300. When I shot with Canon and DxO there was very little problem other than my 5D was junk and I switched to Sony. With the 5D the shutter release button fell apart after 8,000 shots and cost over $200 to fix. Because of being a Minolta owner for 40 years and loads of lenses, I went with Sony. The a300 has over 30,000 shots on it and still works perfectly, the besrt camera I've ever owned but DxO kind of forgot about it.

0 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Sep 5, 2012)

The first example image with the couple is a joke. Hopefully. No serious photog would ever place the main subject so close to the edge of the frame. Especially on a wide angle lens.

The second example can be done easily with PS which every serious photog has.

So the question remains : What is the reason to buy this extra piece of software which then has to be incorporated into the workflow.

2 upvotes
bgillies
By bgillies (Sep 5, 2012)

I don't think the first example is a joke at all. It shows that the software opens the door to new possibilities.

3 upvotes
Steve Balcombe
By Steve Balcombe (Sep 5, 2012)

But it is a joke. The example attempts to hide the inescapable fact that the wall in the 'corrected' version is curved and would look dreadful if not cropped away. It's basically a dishonest representation of what the software does.

And as already said by others, this is old technology packaged up at an extortionate price.

0 upvotes
bgillies
By bgillies (Sep 5, 2012)

For sure there will be problems indoors. But there is a better example on the DxO website of an outdoor wide-angle close-up wedding photo that shows how an unusable photo can be salvaged.

0 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Sep 5, 2012)

Not every subject is fully under the photographer's control. And the effect can be very disturbing even on subjects where there's no geometrical or human form to appear distorted - such as foliage, where there's sometimes a distinctly "smeared" effect that is characteristic. I've been using the Nikon 14-24 for a few years and this effect often bothers me.

1 upvote
DStudio
By DStudio (Sep 6, 2012)

Hey SeeRoy, what makes you think you know anything about this? All you have is the best wide angle zoom in existence and a lot of experience!

0 upvotes
backupgeek
By backupgeek (Sep 5, 2012)

Aperture Plug In would be nice too.

1 upvote
Archer66
By Archer66 (Sep 5, 2012)

Yet again $1=1Eur.

No, VAT does not explain it.

Some companies never learn.

DPR: link to www.dxo.com does not work.

4 upvotes
Richard Shih
By Richard Shih (Sep 5, 2012)

Thanks, fixed.

0 upvotes
rrr_hhh
By rrr_hhh (Sep 6, 2012)

You are surely not aware of the VAT level in the EU : between 19-21%. To-days change is at 1.26 $for 1€

aka : 79€ = 99$ and something. Take 20% away fr the VAT and that makes 83$. Methink that at 79$ in the US you have no reason to complain ! unlike US companies like Adobe or Niksoftware who are charging something like 25% more in my country (after VAT subtraction for fair comparison) M

1 upvote
SantaFeBill
By SantaFeBill (Sep 5, 2012)

I think this is a smart move on DxO's part. It gives you much of the unique lens correction capabilities of DxO Pro, but still lets you use your favorite RAW convertor/editor. Should be a good seller.

1 upvote
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Sep 5, 2012)

Correcting the keystone effect has never been much of a problem has it? But the wide angle edge distortion (which DxO always used to refer to as "volume anamorphosis") is an annoying form of distortion, even on non-human subjects. Personally I'd buy this on its own as a plugin at about £25. Keystoning I can fix already.

0 upvotes
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Sep 5, 2012)

The problem with distortion is when you have subjects in the frame at different distances. If you have someone standing near the camera and someone 10 feet back, there really isn't a way to truly fix the perspective issue, the person near the camera is still going to be vastly larger than the person away.

Basically I want a version of this that also incorporates magic, giving me the perspective of a longer focal length with the framing and camera positioning necessitating a ultra wide.

3 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Sep 5, 2012)

Since when has perspective qualified as "distortion"?

6 upvotes
MusicmanUK
By MusicmanUK (Sep 5, 2012)

Since perspective renderings were first invented.

Perspective is a 2D distortion of 3D reality - parallel lines do not actually converge. Things further away are not actually smaller than the same things nearer to the viewer.

Perspective is a convenient distortion that presents an illusion of distance. So convenient that we rarely thing about it as a distortion.

6 upvotes
_sem_
By _sem_ (Sep 5, 2012)

Yep magic is required at wide angles if you want straight lines straight and round objects in the corners round at the same time ;)

I'd point out that there are alternatives in panorama photo software, for instance the free Hugin. One can convert between different projections (conversions involving excessive stretching cause obvious IQ degradation in the affected areas).
Mind that DxO OP can defish but can't replicate the Fisheye Hemi plugin action, while this is possible in Hugin.
Generally, DxO is good with perspective conversions, so this ViewPoint may be useful to those that want to use it from PS/LR without using the rest of the DxO OP converter.

0 upvotes
jto555
By jto555 (Sep 5, 2012)

Hi Bradleyg5, this might help. : D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vbd3E6tK2U

'Ya can't beat Father Ted...

0 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Sep 5, 2012)

The notion that perspective is a form of distortion, however argued, approaches the condition of sophistry. Perspective is equally perceivable by stereoscopic vision, even if there's some neurological "software" involved, so rendering the 3d space in two dimensions hardly causes perspective to magically appear as a form of perceived distortion. There's no way in which this can be compared to, say, barrel distortion or CA. And in any case why on earth would any sane person want to eliminate perspective from a photograph - at least in the sense of wishing for two individuals at different distances from the camera to appear the same size? The keystone effect is a different case even if over-correction frequently looks disturbing. Having stitched hundreds of panos with many different lenses - both rectilinear and fisheye - the existence of different projections isn't exactly news to me BTW.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Sep 5, 2012)

Parallel lines do converge but never meet. This is analogous to Zeno's paradox.

There is no one proper way to represent a 3d space in 2d. Projecting spheres onto planes always presents challenges, the kinds tackled by cartographers. And lens designers.

Classical perspective comes in different flavors with different numbers of vanishing points. Which the artist chooses depends on the subject and desired effect. Perspective is a tool much like this application, a way of making geometric sense of images. It is simple and useful to artists, but can't do everything.

1 upvote
DougRight
By DougRight (Sep 8, 2012)

I have a bit of a distortion fetish. I love a hint of barrel in my wides and the play with perspective is part of a photo's story. That said, a competent toolset to control distortion in lr is a long overdue.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
nekrosoft13
By nekrosoft13 (Sep 5, 2012)

wish lighroom had those options, the current ones are not that good.

4 upvotes
Total comments: 52