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OMG Life creates Autographer - a wearable automatic camera

By dpreview staff on Sep 24, 2012 at 08:00 GMT

British newcomer OMG Life has created Autographer, an 'intelligent' wearable camera that uses an array of built-in sensors to take pictures automatically triggered by changes in its environment. It uses a semi-fisheye lens with a 136° angle of view in front of a 5MP backlit-CMOS sensor, and the shutter is triggered at key moments based on input from GPS, acceleration, direction, temperature, proximity and light sensors. The company thinks it should appeal to anyone interested in recording an event without having to operate a camera, or as an additional tool for documentary photographers. Images are stored in internal memory, and can be transferred to a smartphone using Bluetooth for viewing; alternatively they can be compiled into movies using the supplied software. It'll go on sale in November from the company's website for £399.

It would be easy, especially after the buzz of 'proper' photography announcements from Photokina, to dismiss Autographer purely as a gimmick - especially given the company name. But OMG Life is actually a consumer spin-off from the scientific imaging company Oxford Metrics Group, and the Autographer is a slimmed down, higher spec, consumer-friendly version of the Vicon Revue, an automatic camera that was originally designed to aid treatment of patients suffering from severe memory impairment such as Alzheimer's disease. So, in terms of the technology at least, there's a bit more substance behind it than you might at first think.

It's also, as far as we're aware, a unique concept; a camera that attempts to make informed decisions about the best time to take pictures. This marks it out from time-lapse devices which simply take pictures at pre-set intervals - the idea being that it's more likely to capture 'interesting' moments. Whether that's enough to persuade buyers to pay the asking price is a different question, but we're hoping to give one a try to see how well it works.

Jump to:


Press Release:

Autographer: Introducing the world’s first intelligent, wearable camera

Document your life in a different way

24th September 2012, London: OMG Life today announces the launch of Autographer, a new type of digital camera that will change the way we think about photography.

Autographer – available to purchase in November 2012 – is a hands-free, automatic camera that can capture thousands of photographs a day through a custom wide-angle lens, enabling users to ‘see the unseen’.

Autographer uses five on-board sensors and GPS capability to identify the perfect time to take a photo, based on changes in light and colour, motion, direction and temperature. For instance, Autographer might capture an image when the wearer speeds up as they run for the bus, moves from a warm pub to a snowy street or turns around to greet a friend.

All the wearer has to do is put it on and go, and at the end of the day, watch their ‘unseen’ moments unfold through natural, unpredictable images and stop-frame videos, revealing a surprising new take on their world.

Simon Randall, Head of OMG Life, says, “The beauty of Autographer is that you don’t have to stop to take a photo or spend your day looking at life through a lens. You can live your experiences to the full while Autographer spontaneously captures the stories that happen all around you.

“Photos are a great way to document and share life experiences, but they can sometimes be a bit predictable with the same postcard views and posed smiles – pointing a camera lens at people often changes the fabric of the moment. Photographers go to great lengths to capture life in an authentic and natural way and see the Autographer as a great new way of effortlessly doing this.”

Simon adds, “We’ve spent a lot of time developing our wide-angle eye-view lens which is at the heart of the Autographer’s story-telling ability. It gives a unique first-person perspective that allows the wearer to tell their story uninhibited as they see it.

“Imagine it – your wedding day from a new angle, your child’s first birthday captured for posterity, the spectacle of a festival in all its glory or a surprising view on an African safari, even your cycle route to work mapped.

“Individual images offer a fascinating slice of life, while an Autographer stop-frame video lets you relive a whole day’s activity in just a few minutes. It’s not just a new camera but a whole new photographic approach.”

Autographer’s sensors capture metadata alongside the images, meaning users can reconstruct a unique digital record of their day – where they were, where they went, even what the temperature was.

They can then view and share their Autographer photos at the click of a button, or easily create story-telling mementoes such as GIFs and stop-frame videos using the Autographer editing software. Bluetooth connectivity also enables users to easily download their shots while on the move.

Simon adds, “Autographer doesn’t just effortlessly capture images, it captures stories. This offers limitless possibilities for creatives and professionals too. As the device is hands-free and wearable, it’s more versatile than a traditional camera in many circumstances; it’s only limited by the imagination of the wearer.

“It’s a perfect tool for the foreign correspondent on assignment, the artist wanting to document their creative journey or the art director wanting to capture the story behind the photo shoot.”

Autographer is created by Oxford Metrics Group (OMG), the Academy Award®-winning organisation behind some of the world’s most advanced motion-capture and image processing technologies.

Simon Randall says, “Since 2009, OMG has been responsible for developing Microsoft’s SenseCam technology, a wearable camera that automatically captures thousands of pictures a day. Marketed as Vicon Revue, it has proved of great value to people with memory impairment, helping them recover ‘lost’ memories and manage their lives more effectively.

“However, we always believed this ‘moment capture’ technology could have much wider applications, which is why we’re so excited to launch Autographer. We are hugely looking forward to seeing the innovative ways in which people will use Autographer to capture the unseen moments of daily life and the creative output this will inspire.”

Autographer will be available to buy online via www.autographer.com in November.

Autographer’s five sensors and GPS

  • Accelerometer: measures how quickly or slowly the Autographer is accelerating.
  • Colour sensor: Autographer’s ‘eye’, perceiving light and brightness and adjusting the image accordingly.
  • Magnetometer: determines which direction the camera is facing.
  • PIR: motion detector that uses infrared light to sense moving objects.
  • Temperature: inbuilt thermometer, measuring ambient temperature.
  • GPS: Autographer’s locator pinpointing the camera’s position on earth.

Technical specifications*

  • All glass wide-angle precision optics; 136o field of view
  • OLED display 
  • 8GB internal memory
  • Bluetooth
  • 5 Megapixels
  • Fixed focus
  • Weight 58g
  • Width 37.4mm (with side buttons); length 90mm (95.5mm with lanyard ring); thickness 22.9mm (with clip and lens)

*Specifications subject to change without notice.

Software

  • The Autographer app is designed to help you view, tag and share your images on the go.
  • Easy sharing buttons to post a single image or a unique Autographer creation to Facebook and Twitter.
  • Create image sets, gifs and stop-frame videos.

Additional images

Comments

Total comments: 106
12
Reg Natarajan
By Reg Natarajan (Sep 29, 2012)

A bit more miniaturization and this thing could be integrated into a pair of glasses.

0 upvotes
Aalzagax
By Aalzagax (Sep 29, 2012)

I've been reading the comments all along, it seems to me everybody is viewing this from the "photographic tool" sense but I think is not really the point with this device, it seems more like a "reality documenting tool", go beyond the snappers and think about millions of persons arround the world, acting as sensors for register of the world conditions, over the years, imagne the amount of useful information that researchers could get, and the knowledge that could benefit us all. Think of it as a OCT unskilled photographer that would take so so pictures but could register everything around that picture, muliply it for millions, then sistematize that data, then analize it... neat.

Of course, the price seems a bit high, so it might not get to millions so the purpose of it might wane...

0 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Sep 27, 2012)

Rogue mobile (cell) phone users already give photography a bad name, this should just about finish street photography off world wide. If you cannot ban phone-cams then just ban "cameras" as they are easier to spot.

0 upvotes
Aalzagax
By Aalzagax (Sep 29, 2012)

You mean cell phones give photography a bad name because people take horrible snapshots? Or you mean some of those "privacy" things? There should be no limit on what one can register on public realm, why would citizens be restricted while goverments can put cameras everywhere?
The purpose of this device seems to me completly different of those "rouge" cell photographers that thake photos with mean intentions -the minority of them-, as I see, this device is intended to record slices of reality with lots of data in it. wearing it every day through years can give you lots of information besides just images. Analizing all that information can of course create new knowledge that can be useful for everyone.
Please, try to see beyond the snapshooting fetures of this.

0 upvotes
Tan68
By Tan68 (Sep 27, 2012)

mercy. a great way to start a day. i have been ignoring this article, but i am happy i opened it. this is great.

if they want "a unique first-person perspective that allows the wearer to tell their story uninhibited as they see it", i recommend adding some triggers.

an.. "app" to link this to one of this to one of those body vital signs monitors. a picture of whatever has caused a spike in heart rate or blood pressure would be good. a patch to detect moisture at the brow will help capture truly embarrassing moments. voice recognition will sew up the rest. oh, Betsy.

really, it would be interesting to have the device constantly recording.. when an 'oh, goodness' moment arrives, the camera can retain the preceding 5 minutes or so. wonderful for accident investigation. i think some point/shoot do this with a feature called diary or some such.

great laugh for the morning. thanks, guys.

1 upvote
CaseyComo
By CaseyComo (Sep 27, 2012)

Wow...all the crappiness of cell phone pics, without the bother of a phone!

0 upvotes
Multifot
By Multifot (Sep 27, 2012)

The next device that will produce tons of flat-stupid and non-interesting pictures. But fully automatically now. Clip it and go to shoot weddings. Profit!

3 upvotes
Greg Henry
By Greg Henry (Sep 26, 2012)

It's actually an interesting idea... but the price (???).. I think not.

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

come on guys, its not useless, its not their problem tht you dont have a dog or little kids where you could attach one of those hehe

i see that hanging from a lot of thing and iam not only talking about toilet seats, also used as a door spy could be fun, its just no "tool"

but its still a cool product for random ideas, an intervallometer would be cool though

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 53 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

on the oher hand, if its not at least 5m watersealed its completely pointless

edit: just saw the size of it, thought of it more like 40x15x5mm but thats way to big, better forget about bluetooth and build it in a normalusb flash drive

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 25, 2012)

Useless device, for useless files money can buy

2 upvotes
drummercam
By drummercam (Sep 25, 2012)

Pure ego trip. Get a life.

2 upvotes
aris14
By aris14 (Sep 25, 2012)

Ι wish it won't be famous after a crime act...

1 upvote
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 25, 2012)

That's when i think it will be (famous) !!!!

0 upvotes
tongki
By tongki (Sep 25, 2012)

there will be a lot of trash picture from the output of this device

1 upvote
DavidsfotosDotCom
By DavidsfotosDotCom (Sep 25, 2012)

This concept is fantastik! I'm from S. CA but have sort of a NY attitude when it comes to: Bureaucrats, Cops (bullies disguised as public servants) & other dumb ass people. So many times I've wished I had something like this to document these, other interesting situations & car drivers trying to knock me off my motorcycle!

2 upvotes
VLampa
By VLampa (Sep 25, 2012)

Some of the privacy concerns here are based on the assumption that the camera automatically uploads everything it takes on the internet. It doesn't. The onus is still on the user to select which photos to upload and bear responsibility for whatever privacy issues it begets.

Also, no one's forced to buy this. :D

0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 25, 2012)

Might be the only way to sell (by force ) !!!

0 upvotes
David Elliott Lewis
By David Elliott Lewis (Sep 25, 2012)

If this concept proves successful, it could also be enhanced by a "pro" version, complete with a large sensor, a high quality lens and a SDXC memory card slot.

0 upvotes
David Elliott Lewis
By David Elliott Lewis (Sep 25, 2012)

Its usefulness as a biographical recording device could be enhanced with an audio recording option. This option, if turned on, could record a user selectable audio sample, from 5 to 30 seconds with the photo at its midpoint.

For this feature to work, however, audio would need to be continuously buffered so the last 15 seconds of sound would be always be available for storage.

To be fair, it should alert anyone standing in its presence by displaying in bright illuminated red letters - "RECORDING AUDIO". Maybe the camcorder user interface of a flashing red dot could also be employed.

As a safeguard against unwanted recording, it should have an easy to access button to delete the most recent audio sample and photo.

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

so you want a hero2 :) admit it

0 upvotes
EPHEBE
By EPHEBE (Sep 25, 2012)

At the end of the day , DC is Dying .

0 upvotes
Martin Ocando
By Martin Ocando (Sep 24, 2012)

This is the perfect combination, along with Facebook to have the public private-life experience. Now your life will be seen by the entire world like a movie. Bye bye intimacy.

0 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (Sep 24, 2012)

An odd camera, no doubt, but it might be successful, who knows!

Not for me, though!

0 upvotes
Fois Giovanni
By Fois Giovanni (Sep 24, 2012)

Well... what about picking your password when using a bankomat and spread it to cell phones? Will you remember to switch off before go to WC? Big Brother works by the fact that after some time, you forget that are on line! IMO this device is intended for forbidden use!

4 upvotes
Diopter
By Diopter (Sep 24, 2012)

We need a "newcomer" to finally get a camera resembling a cell phone.
Real news on the cameras start right after Fotokina ...
Go Canonikon, go!

0 upvotes
pntbll248
By pntbll248 (Sep 24, 2012)

Interesting applications in the ecological sciences too, if it's somewhat weatherproof. Neat idea, I'm intrigued to see where it goes.

2 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

+1 on the waterproof

1 upvote
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (Sep 24, 2012)

I am NOT a legal beagle, and I hate getting harrased in public while taking a picture of a building, BUT ...

I see legal implications written all over this (besides trying to get through customs at the airport).

Google street view had to automate software to go through ALL their images and blurr out faces and license pllates. It is actually funny because even the faces on billboards are blurred out.

What happens when people start posting video blogs or live visual diaries and somebodies wife sees their husband with their X?

You ARE responsible for what you post online and it is almost irretrievable.
The number of people trying to erase their digital past is growing.

For a history of this idea see Steve Mann / cyberman;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Mann

And don't be surprised to be assaulted...

http://eyetap.blogspot.ca/2012/07/physical-assault-by-mcdonalds-for.html#!/2012/07/physical-assault-by-mcdonalds-for.html

1 upvote
OnTheWeb
By OnTheWeb (Sep 24, 2012)

The technology is clearly going to outpace and obliterate the existence of restrictive laws.

Just like jet-ski's on lakes... they have no laws or rules that they follow like boats used to have to. Cops pretty much ignore complaints about them now.

1 upvote
VLampa
By VLampa (Sep 25, 2012)

Your concerns are valid, though I guess the responsibility still falls upon the user to pick and choose which photos should and shouldn't be uploaded. If there are 1000 photographs to sort out each day, though, that might be too tedious for most people. :D

0 upvotes
Mike Davis
By Mike Davis (Sep 24, 2012)

If this catches on, Facebook will have to buy a lot more hard drives.

3 upvotes
paulbysea
By paulbysea (Sep 24, 2012)

I must admit I am intrigued by this. Not as a photographer though. It is the possibilities for documenting normal every day life of millions of people, storing it and allowing historians in a 100 years access to it in much the same way Census data is released for research.

2 upvotes
gail
By gail (Sep 24, 2012)

Interesting possibilities as a spycam, if the shutter button sound and any focus-assist light can be shut off.

I wonder if someone was wearing one at Prince Harry's Vegas party. :P

0 upvotes
Ahmet Aydogan
By Ahmet Aydogan (Sep 24, 2012)

Concepts like OMG Autographer, Lytro and femtophotography are definitely welcome in the world of photography. Pushing the technological and conceptual boundaries, getting image makers to explore their art/craft in new ways can only enhance the process. Will all, or any, of these technologies succeed? Only time will tell, but in the meantime they provide even more tools for all us so that we can continue to explore the world around us. There's nothing wrong with that.

8 upvotes
GabrielZ
By GabrielZ (Sep 24, 2012)

Well said.

0 upvotes
mzillch
By mzillch (Sep 24, 2012)

Flopping around on your chest, swaying and pivoting left and right constantly while walking, taking misdirected, odd angle photos that are only sharp in bright sunlight but in indoor conditions are most likely blurred? Pass.
[and bypassing the necklace and using the pocket clip on the outside of a shirt will droop and shoot the ground, I bet]

These need to be smaller and mounted to glasses or a helmet;, any other mount will be problematic.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
OnTheWeb
By OnTheWeb (Sep 24, 2012)

So invent the stabilizers springs to keep the thing still and retire early :) Some kind of gyro-thingy would appeal to many apple customers who seem to have lots of unallocated funds for accessories.

0 upvotes
Lyndsay Williams
By Lyndsay Williams (Sep 25, 2012)

when I originally designed the Microsoft Sensecam, which the Aotographer is based on, I used the accelerometer for image stabilisation. When the camera was bouncing on the chest, no images taken. There has been over 10 years of experimenting to get the Autographer to this stage for consumers.

3 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

see google glasses

0 upvotes
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (Sep 24, 2012)

"Hey guys look what pictures I.... I mean my camera took"
Take the person out of the equation and photographs lose so much value.

Now, if we're talking security, journalism, sports then capturing that moment is more important for certain people. But man, it's enough that cameras have become all auto exposure super stabilization fast focusing devices that just need a trigger pull, when the perspective, composition and any artistic expression is all that's really needed, and that's what a camera like this take away...

0 upvotes
VLampa
By VLampa (Sep 25, 2012)

Then again, you're not obliged to replace your DSLR with this device. Why the assumption that only your values on what a photographer should and shouldn't be is valid?

2 upvotes
Matthew Miller
By Matthew Miller (Sep 24, 2012)

Basically: it's the tech for the gargoyles in Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash (published 20 years ago).

0 upvotes
doctorbza
By doctorbza (Sep 24, 2012)

i think this is interesting. it raises some questions about the role of the photographer in the making of good images. it also raises questions about the future of photography and how we interact with images. it might also be a one-trick pony. i'd like to play around with it, for sure.

0 upvotes
doctorbza
By doctorbza (Sep 24, 2012)

aaaaaaaaaand it's $700, so i won't be trying it out any time soon. maybe hack about 75% off that and we'll talk.

2 upvotes
smallcams
By smallcams (Sep 24, 2012)

This would benefit many so-called "photographers" by giving them half-way interesting pictures.

8 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Sep 24, 2012)

I don't see any opportunity for this to go terribly wrong...

0 upvotes
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 24, 2012)

Exactly what the market was missing, one more useless device !!!!!!
OMG !!!! what is gonna come next ?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
VLampa
By VLampa (Sep 25, 2012)

Exactly what the comment thread was missing, one more useless comment !!!!!! OMG !!!! what is gonna come next ?

1 upvote
Petrogel
By Petrogel (Sep 25, 2012)

OMG !!! Trashy comments for trashy gadgets

0 upvotes
Quirino2k
By Quirino2k (Sep 24, 2012)

I bet this would be used by paranormal investigating shows.. since it would be triggered by acceleration, direction, temperature, proximity and light sensors..

"Is there anyone here? Use this camera to take a photo" Then later be surprised that it did take pictures.

:)

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Sep 24, 2012)

This could be the perfect "red light camera" that could automatically report your speedometer to the proper authorities!

And it could show exactly where you were, and which subversives you were meeting with!

Could this explain why Homeland Security has ordered nineteen million of them?

OK... just kidding :)

4 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (Sep 24, 2012)

I think they would need 200 plus million. Right? Of course, getting everyone to wear thier's could be a bigger problem.

1 upvote
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Sep 24, 2012)

A deep thinking hidden behind the mask of humour. Well done Marty !

2 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

no they make cheap versions to sell at wallmart for that mission hehe now they start to tell us its normal that some guys where camera glasses and camera watches so no one cares in a few years

0 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (Sep 24, 2012)

OMG I don't have this much free time.

0 upvotes
Pixel Judge
By Pixel Judge (Sep 24, 2012)

I bet the next iPhone will have this function built-in.

0 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Sep 24, 2012)

There is already an app that triggers the internal camera based on many different events or conditions.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Sep 24, 2012)

This would be a great spy cam. Tear apart the casing and build it into some inconspicuous. It even uploads automatically.

0 upvotes
timccr
By timccr (Sep 24, 2012)

Machines can't think, have no imagination and don't understand what a sub text is. Rather like the people who came up with this idea.

0 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Sep 24, 2012)

Well said. That's 100% like the monkey's or donkey's paintings (cf: http://youtu.be/i_qlt_qbfYw ).

Some take that for art... good enought for them !

0 upvotes
VLampa
By VLampa (Sep 25, 2012)

I suspect your creativity is also lacking if you can't think of ways to use this.

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

@vlampa +1

0 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Sep 26, 2012)

When conscious gifted human beings accept to be replaced by automated toys, well, it can for sure produce photographs, but it has to be called "pieces of art" as well as a surveillance monitoring tape recording.

Probably good enough for you both. That's what we said above.

Note: it has to be recalled that the " +1 " attitude denote a deep lack of will and imagination that disqualifies to express oneself on the others creativity. My two cents.

0 upvotes
Michal59
By Michal59 (Sep 24, 2012)

A phrase from above report: " [it] allows the wearer to tell their story uninhibited as they see it". According to Eryk Mistewicz http://erykmistewicz.pl/bio-usa/, telling the story is a crucial point in social communoication today: those who can tell an interesting and well-documented story can easily gain publicity and win a favoured positoion. Not bad idea as a whole, IMHO. One thing bothers me, however - the privacy of other peopel confronted with the "electronic story-teller", not even knowing what's going on. Wonder what do you think....

0 upvotes
beautyintheeyes
By beautyintheeyes (Sep 24, 2012)

Can't wait for Hassy's OMG version!

4 upvotes
Elaka Farmor
By Elaka Farmor (Sep 24, 2012)

OMG.....! :-)

1 upvote
Lyndsay Williams
By Lyndsay Williams (Sep 24, 2012)

I designed the original version of this, Sensecam for Microsoft, in 1999. for people with memory problems and dementia. I wonder why this version is is so expensive? We always had the problem that the temperature sensor measures close to the temperature of the user (as on chest) not the ambient temperature. I wonder how this has been solved.

7 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (Sep 24, 2012)

I had the same problem with a watch that told the current temp. :-)

0 upvotes
joejack951
By joejack951 (Sep 24, 2012)

Measuring (with some degree of accuracy) the actual temperature with a device worn close to a human is a far more challenging thing to do than simply looking for a change in temperature as this device does. It doesn't even necessarily need to respond all that quickly which makes its job even easier.

0 upvotes
pannumon
By pannumon (Sep 24, 2012)

Measuring temperature of the temperature sensor at +/- 2 Celcius (4 Fahrenheit) accuracy is relatively easy. A calibrated sensor that is guaranteed to measure it's own temperature at +/- 1 C-deg (2 F-deg) costs quite a bit. Measuring air temperature at 1 C-deg (2 F-deg) accuracy additionally requires a shielded and ventilated system around the sensor.

It may be that the temperature measurement is quite accurate, but properly interpreting it may be quite challenging.

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 25, 2012)

i think they use the temperature just for checking if you wear it or not, and also if you get out in the cold, or get out in the warm so you leave one place and enter another, so it doesnt really have to measure the actual temperature but changes

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
MrTaikitso
By MrTaikitso (Sep 24, 2012)

Where is my comment? I hope DPreview didn't remove it because it contained witty British humor. If it was, I plan to close my account and stop supporting this site immediately after many years of patronage and constructive dialog - with humor inserted when the opportunity obviously invites.

If this is repressive socialism now spreading to our favourite photog site, we have something to worry about. It's called dystopia, and it appears to be spreading everywhere.

1 upvote
mikiev
By mikiev (Sep 24, 2012)

Or, it could be that people flagged your comment as "inappropriate".

0 upvotes
il_alexk
By il_alexk (Sep 24, 2012)

My comment was removed too. I guess marking jokes as "inappropriate"gives some people the same feeling as getting a "Like" on a social web site. I guess we'll see more censorship from social networks mob in the future, so get ready for your flickr account to be closed for posting a photo that upsets a couple of most active bigots.

0 upvotes
doctorbza
By doctorbza (Sep 24, 2012)

nothing compliments witty british humor like whining on the internet

2 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Sep 24, 2012)

You should try posting joke like mine (see below: a long way below). Nobody understood it.

0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (Sep 24, 2012)

Gordon Bell at Microsoft Research has been pushing this concept for years, and there have been various prototypes -- including SenseCam out of Microsoft Cambridge (which claims to have started in 2003):
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/cambridge/projects/sensecam/media.htm
Many of us have done smarter automatic capture control in existing cameras -- I've even done it using CHDK inside of Canon PowerShots.

If you want a camera as an event recorder, rather than a medium for producing art, this is a commercial step in the right direction.

2 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Sep 24, 2012)

Autographer is in fact directly based on Microsoft SenseCam technology.

3 upvotes
Lawrencew
By Lawrencew (Sep 24, 2012)

Yep. I saw him demonstrate it at Cambridge when I was invited by Microsoft to visit their research facility.
As I stated reading this article it was the very first thing I thought of!

I notice on the OMG website. http://www.omgplc.com/news/2012/159/innovative-hands-free-consumer-device-launched-to-market

"Based upon the same Microsoft ‘SenseCam’ technology"

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
rowlandw
By rowlandw (Sep 24, 2012)

Does it have a manual shutter button or (even better) a voice command to override the automatic operation?

0 upvotes
Eugene CH
By Eugene CH (Sep 24, 2012)

What about Battery???

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Sep 24, 2012)

It uses a built-in battery (with USB charging) that's supposed to last an entire day - not impossible given that there's no rear LCD screen to power.

1 upvote
PicOne
By PicOne (Sep 24, 2012)

I wonder if this camera as described, is really a surveillance camera, and perhaps whether there are any legal issues involved using this?

0 upvotes
JJJPhoto
By JJJPhoto (Sep 24, 2012)

That was the first thing that came to my mind. I suspect that if this device becomes popular in the US we'll see at least one court case in the news where someone is prosecuted for illegally recording someone. Heck, we've already seen many cases here in the US involving people using cell phone cameras to secretly record photos and video. I just did a quick Google search and, based on laws prohibiting the use of hidden cameras, you could "potentially" be prosecuted just for walking into another person's home or business with this camera turned on in the states of Hawaii, Alabama, South Dakota, Minnesota, Maine, Kansas, Delaware, Michigan, Georgia, and Utah.

0 upvotes
takisgr
By takisgr (Sep 24, 2012)

dont worry after all you didnt take the shot
if the lawyer can justify it they will put the camera in jail instead !

0 upvotes
JJJPhoto
By JJJPhoto (Sep 24, 2012)

Unfortunately, I'm sure lawyers would argue two counter points:

1) The camera has an on/off switch that the wearer must activate before the camera "automatically" captures images.

2) The user is knowingly wearing an automated camera which captures images and is walking into private property without deactivating said camera.

I'm sure this device can be used for all types of creative time lapse work ... but there is that potential for criminal misuse ... and even the potential for "unintentional criminality" (breaking the law without criminal intent or malice) that could result in users paying expensive fines, legal fees, or spending time in jail just for wearing this gizmo around their necks in the wrong places.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 24, 2012)

The cameras might serve for surveillance, but not offer much for anything else. The fish-eye perspective is useful only for tracking people at shorter distances.

Lots of businesses and workplaces already have surveillance cameras. A wearable camera would enhance the means to keep track of shoplifters or slouchers. No law impedes image capture by the owner of a business or property of objects or people on that property. To bring a spy cam onto anyone else's property, or use it without their permission, is something else. Only phone cameras offer a nifty aliby or excuse.

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Sep 24, 2012)

Great idea for a device. It would be interesting to see how well the "intelligence" does compared to a simple time-lapse.

It rather falls down in the price department though. I can't see the amount of tech in this device justifying anything like that price tag. For a quarter of the price, I could see a lot people giving something like this a try on impulse.

0 upvotes
richardplondon
By richardplondon (Sep 24, 2012)

There was a story recently where someone hung a small robust digital camera set on interval timer, round the neck of his cat - just to see what it got up to all day.

Beyond the short-lived novelty of how accidental they looked, those pictures were just as banal as this thing will likely produce - but the circumstances were at least a little more surprising.

That was IMO an interesting use for the technology. This whole notion here, though, sems to just pander to self-absorbed egotism. It is not up to any of us, to decide how fascinating - or otherwise - we are. Bah humbug.

2 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Sep 24, 2012)

However, it's not up to you to decide how banal I am either. ;)

2 upvotes
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