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Lexar announces 256GB SDXC UHS-1 card

By dpreview staff on Sep 17, 2012 at 18:16 GMT

Lexar has announced its Professional 256GB SDXC UHS-I memory card, offering the industry's highest storage capacity to date in an SDXC card. In addition to providing longer recording times for HD video capture, the Class 10 card offers a guaranteed read speed of 60MB/s, enabling faster transfers of video files and high resolution images to a computer. It will become available in October with a retail price of  $899.99 in the US and £670.99 in the UK.

Press Release:

Lexar Announces Industry’s First 256GB SDXC UHS-I Memory Card

New High-Capacity 400x SDXC UHS-I Card Offers Impressive Performance
and Extended Capture of High-Resolution Images and 1080p Full-HD and 3D Video

Fremont, CA, September 17, 2012 – Lexar, a leading global brand of flash memory products, today introduced the industry’s first 256GB Secure Digital Extended Capacity (SDXC™) UHS-I memory card, the Lexar® Professional 400x SDXC UHS-I card. The Class 10 card leverages the SD 3.0 specification to dramatically accelerate workflow and allows photographers to capture, store, and transfer a large number of high-quality photos and extended lengths of 1080p full-HD and 3D video with a minimum guaranteed sustained read transfer speed of 60MB per second.* When paired with a compatible card reader, such as the Lexar® Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader, the Professional 400x SDXC card quickly and reliably transfers images and video from the memory card to the computer.
 
“Professional photographers and videographers are being tapped to capture more HD video, in addition to still photos, when out on assignment. These new demands often leave them with less time and resources to shoot,” said Manisha Sharma, director of product marketing, Lexar. “High-performance, high-capacity cards like this one enables these photographers to gain back time normally wasted on changing cards or transferring images.”
 
“By utilising Micron’s industry-leading, 128Gb, 20nm NAND flash memory process technology, Lexar is the first to market a 256GB SDXC card,” said Wes Brewer, vice president, products and technology for Lexar. “Using a combination of creative die-stacking techniques and uniquely engineered firmware in our UHS-I capable controller, we were able to design and produce this product sooner than our competition. With the introduction of this product, we have achieved the optimal blend of price and performance desired by our retail and non-retail customers.”
 
The Lexar Professional 400x 256GB SDXC UHS-I card includes a free copy of the latest version of award-winning Image Rescue® 4 software to help with the recovery of lost or deleted photo and video files, even if they’ve been erased or the card has been corrupted.** All Lexar memory card designs are tested in the Lexar Quality Labs to ensure performance, quality, compatibility, and reliability with more than 800 digital cameras and memory card devices. The Professional 400x SDXC UHS-I card comes with a limited lifetime warranty and free dedicated professional technical support.
 
The Lexar Professional 400x 256GB SDXC UHS-I card will be available in October for purchase with an MSRP of £670.99 from leading retail and e-tail outlets worldwide. For additional information about Lexar Professional products, visit www.lexar.com.
 
Follow us online!
Twitter: http://twitter.com/lexarmemory
YouTube™: www.youtube.com/lexarmediainc
Facebook: www.facebook.com/LexarMedia

*Minimum 60MB/s read transfer, write speeds lower. Speeds based on TestMetrix certified tester. Actual sustained speed may vary depending on host device.
**Image or other data recovery is not 100% guaranteed.

Comments

Total comments: 15
otropogo
By otropogo (Oct 2, 2012)

Have run into a frustrating obstacle in using my Lexar SDXC UHS-1 card with USB 3.0 under Knoppix 7.0.4 (in a Delkin USB3.0 card reader attached to a Sabrent expressbus adapter in a Toshiba A50 laptop).

The laptop has an internal SD/XD card slot, and in that position the card is mountable and readable. But in the external USB3.0 reader (which normally achieves transfer rates two to three times faster than the Toshiba's internal card slot), the card's icon appears only fleetingly under Knoppix, alternately flashing by as "64GB file system" and "sdx1". If I manage to click on it while the icon is visible, the response is "...not found".

A 16GB SDHC card in the same reader appears and mounts normally.

Is this issue addressed in a more recent Linux kernel update? Knoppix 7.0.4 uses kernel 3.4.9.

There's no such problem under Windows 7 using the device driver supplied with the Sabrent expressbus adapter.

0 upvotes
otropogo
By otropogo (Oct 2, 2012)

"...write speeds lower." That's the understatement of the decade. I've just bought a Lexar Pro SDXC 64GB card for my D800, hoping for 40MB/s writes to extend the camera's buffer.

But it writes at 27MB/s emptying the buffer after 15 continuous RAW+Fine Jpeg shots, or 32 frames of Fine Jpeg.

My card sports the same specs as this 256GB version. I suggest considering a smaller but faster "90MB/s" Panasonic Pro or Sandisk Extreme Pro card, which "guarantee" 45MB/s writes.

I find the lack of critical reviews/comparisons of flash memory and USB3.0 devices in the photography press scandalous. Buying these products is a total crap shoot.

Until I worked my way up through a number of Class 10 SDHC cards, the fastest writes I experienced were from a five year old Sandkisk Ultra CF card. And although that card writes at only 15MB/s (yet gets the same 15 RAW shots from the D800's 13 shot buffer!), it still reads faster than the Lexar SDXC on the USB3.0 bus by a large margin (85vs56MB/s)

0 upvotes
otropogo
By otropogo (Feb 10, 2013)

A short time after buying the above Lexar 64GB 400X SDXC card, I found a Fotosource store selling Lexar 600X SDXC cards, rated at TWICE the write speed of the "400X" version I bought. Staples, where I bought my 64GB card, still carries nothing faster than 400X. Very frustrating!

I wish Nikon had been more forthcoming with advice on what sort of card to buy for the D800. I don't expect to need 60MB/s write speed very often, but had I had the choice, I would rather have bought a 16GB card with that capability than the 64GB one at half speed.

One other peeve recently discovered is that Knoppix 7.0.4 cannot handle the 64GB sdxc card on the USB3.0 port. The card reader becomes inaccessible, preventing the reading of even lesser cards until the Lexar is removed. Strangely, Knoppix CAN read the same 64GB sdxc card on the Toshiba's internal SD/XD card slot. But that's little consolation, as that slot reads at less than half the speed of the USB3.0 port.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Sep 20, 2012)

Almost $4/GB. Like 2005 or so.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
abi170845
By abi170845 (Sep 19, 2012)

Come on! this is the price of a decent 15inch laptop!

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 18, 2012)

In 2003, a 1 GB Memory Stick cost almost $400.

Now 32 GB SDHC cards sell for as low as $30. 62 GB SDXC cards are falling in price too.

A 256 GB SDXC might be an alternative to mechanical drive storage for a tablet computer. Or it might be essential if people shoot GH3 type video at 70mbps using the lower compression QuickTime formats.

However, the darned hazard is that you can end up storing too much on a tiny thing that is easy to misplace or might become corrupted, so that you lose too much work.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 18, 2012)

You've got it, Cy, especially with the last sentence.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 18, 2012)

For its size and weight, this baby is more expensive than platinum. Make sure the family cat does not swallow it accidentally.

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Sep 17, 2012)

I remember being amazed when computers in the shops had this size of a HARD DRIVE...

.

2 upvotes
DStudio
By DStudio (Sep 17, 2012)

Don't lose this card - it's almost as valuable as the photos on it.

Now you can put all your eggs in one basket.

But if that bothers you, you can buy two of them, for only slightly less than the cost of your new dual-slot D600 body.

We need new products like this that push the edge of technology, but the initial prices are a bit of a shock, and the use cases are somewhat limited right now.

1 upvote
Deeso
By Deeso (Sep 17, 2012)

For that price I can get d7000 body D:

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Sep 17, 2012)

Does SDXC spec support files bigger than 4GB or is that a camera specific feature?

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Sep 17, 2012)

Ah it looks like the simple answer is yes. But how many SDXC cameras out there actually let you write files bigger than 4GB?

0 upvotes
Zebooka
By Zebooka (Sep 18, 2012)

It is filesystem specific feature. Not even connected to card.
You can format you card to NTFS or ext3 (but of course it wont then work in digital cameras)

But, yes, SDXC by standard should use Microsoft's exFAT filesystem that supports this.

PS: Why do you need your camera to write files bigger than 4 GB?
AVCHD has built-in support for chunking long enough videos into 4 GB chucks. And I still don't understand who wants such long simultaneous videos. Usually people write small parts and then mount them in to single movie using Final Cut or Adobe Premier.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 18, 2012)

A 4k videocam, or any camera that shoots low-compression / high-bitrate video can easily burn up over 32 GB in about 1/2 hour.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 15