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Reuters showcases EOS-1D X multiple exposure modes

By dpreview staff on Aug 6, 2012 at 18:43 GMT

The multi-exposure functions of the latest Canon cameras have been showcased in a series of images shot at the London Olympics. Reuters photographer Mike Blake has written about the possibilities of being able to capture and combine sequences of images conveying the action and movement of disciplines such as gymnastics. Specifically, this has been made possible by the EOS-1D X's ability to produce composite images that combine multiple shots in different ways. All the original shots can also be saved, so taking these images didn't come at the expense of capturing the traditional 'front page' shot.

The Canon EOS 5D Mark III and EOS-1D X are both able to combine up to nine separate frames, with four options for how the images are then combined (giving control over whether brightness is averaged, added or selectively combined). This control over the way the data is combined sets the camera apart from multi-exposure functions that appear in a variety of existing cameras. Both Canons retain the ability to save all the original files, or just the composite image, and will do so for Raw, as well as JPEG, files. (via MyModernMet)

Jonathan Horton of the U.S. attends a gymnastics training session at the O2 Arena before the start of the London 2012 Olympic Games in London July 25, 2012.
REUTERS/Mike Blake
Huang Qiushuang of China attends a gymnastics training session at the North Greenwich Arena before the start of the London 2012 Olympic Games July 26, 2012. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Comments

Total comments: 226
12
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Aug 6, 2012)

> Both cameras retain the ability to save all the original files

Well that's not real multiple exposure then, it's just taking a load of separate images and combining them digitally. You may as well just use Photoshop as you'll have more flexibility over the image that way.

Wasn't there a digital camera that could take real multiple exposures (opening the shutter several times before reading the data off)?

2 upvotes
Michael H
By Michael H (Aug 6, 2012)

Wrong Andy, you might learn how the camnera works before posting errors. The cammera can retain all the images and also combine them. And if it is so easy, go and waste your time in Photoshop.

0 upvotes
PengukirCahaya
By PengukirCahaya (Aug 6, 2012)

Well Andy, how a multiple exposure works then?

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Aug 7, 2012)

Andy, it's both. It's taking multiple exposures AND making a single blended image. The difference is that you still have those multiple original images to use for other purposes, or for a post-processes blended image. So it gives you the best of both worlds.

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Aug 7, 2012)

It's the way multiple exposures has to work on a digital camera. Should the term only be applicable to film cameras since those are capable of "real" multiple exposures?

1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Aug 7, 2012)

Guys, actual multiple exposures is (as I said) taking several exposures of the sensor before reading the data off, in a similar way to film cameras. There's nothing technically stopping DSLRs from doing this as long exposure NR is good enough now.

What they are doing here is taking several regular shots, then combining them in post, just instead of using a computer it does it in-camera. While this will give you a similar effect, it wouldn't look quite the same as doing real multiple exposures just like adding fake vignetting to an image won't look quite the same as real lens vignetting does.

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 7, 2012)

wrong... anything captured using an electronic shutter for M.E. will be doing the exact same thing anyway.

this is simply the 'digital' version of M.E. the method of combination only differs from film slightly. a film camera still must execute MORE than one shutter actuation, thus likewise the digital one.

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Aug 8, 2012)

@sdyue as I said there's nothing stopping DSLRs from doing real multiple exposures with several shutter actuations (tho obviously wouldn't work with an electronic shutter). Of course doing it post is more flexible because you have the individual images to work with, but you won't get quite the same effect just like simulating any other photographic effect (soft focus, vignetting) doesn't look quite the same in post.

0 upvotes
David Hull
By David Hull (Aug 6, 2012)

I definitely enjoyed these types of shots. I never stopped to thing where they were coming from. Thanks for the info.

2 upvotes
Desert Cruiser
By Desert Cruiser (Aug 6, 2012)

This was really helpful and a nice feature to see in the diving competition. Kudos to Canon, isn't the digital world just great --- what's next?

Don....

1 upvote
CarvingPhoto
By CarvingPhoto (Aug 6, 2012)

Canons not the first to come up with this. My 2006 Panasonic L1 had this features. So did my D700 (up to 10). But anyways, good use of the multiple exposure. Kudos to the photographer, not Canon.

0 upvotes
GabrielFF
By GabrielFF (Aug 7, 2012)

My pentax k-r features a multi exposure mode too...

0 upvotes
sir_bazz
By sir_bazz (Aug 7, 2012)

Yes, every Pentax DSLR released since the K10D, (back in 2007) has also had this feature. Funny how it's a gimmick when non-Canon DSLR have a new "feature" but it becomes a wow tool when Canon finally add it.

Question though....if this article is about the technology being used at the Olympics as some have suggested then why bother with the 1Dx in the story title?

1 upvote
alexdpx
By alexdpx (Aug 7, 2012)

It was never claimed that this is something new from Canon.

"This control over the way the data is combined sets the camera apart from multi-exposure functions that appear in a variety of existing cameras."

I guess it simply mean that Canon can now do it better than anyone else. Why the 1Dx in the story title? Because that's what the Reuters were using. If they were using Nikons, they would have showcased whatever Nikon has.

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
sir_bazz
By sir_bazz (Aug 7, 2012)

The problem for many people is that as soon as you introduce the camera model into the headline, it's no longer about the photography.....seems more like free, (or maybe paid), advertising.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 7, 2012)

kudos to Canon... not the photographer, all they have to do is press the shutter button.

all others FAIL to offer M.E. (Pany/Pentax/etc)... that has 0.07s time slices which ONLY 14fps will allow. any others offering 11, 9, 7, 4, or lower, pale by comparison.

0 upvotes
sir_bazz
By sir_bazz (Aug 8, 2012)

Actually any of those cameras will do 0.07s time slices as a slice of time is the equivalent of the exposure time, (shutter speed).

The 1D X just lets you get more of those slices for each second of time.....which may or may not be useful dependent on what you're trying to achieve.

0 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Aug 6, 2012)

When were these shot? No one is in the seats. i know there were complaints about empty seats at supposedly sold out events. (we tried for tickets and failed) but I never did see so many empty seats during the competition.
It looks like a set up shoot to me, which is not the samething as capturing someting creative in the daily coverage.

0 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Aug 6, 2012)

OK I should read before opening my mouth, it clearly say
s training session.

3 upvotes
tech_head
By tech_head (Aug 7, 2012)

Did you read the caption?????
Both shot at training sessions.

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Aug 6, 2012)

First. Just because we've gone digital, I still wish cameras had multiple exposure capability like this. Second. Clearly, the still camera, even super high-end ones, are under duress. Video. Multiple exposure. HDR. Needed to compete with other formats.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
1 upvote
raincoat
By raincoat (Aug 8, 2012)

Don't they? I don't actually get how this differs from existing multiple exposure capability.

0 upvotes
Gully Foyle
By Gully Foyle (Aug 6, 2012)

Ridiculous.

I expected the first real-world news we'd hear on the flagship Canon would relate to its better known virtues.

PS
And I think that Reuters and dpr are out of the equation. Canon just prods Reuters and Reuters publishes to the internet.
Bad stitching too.

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Aug 6, 2012)

I love this feature on my 5Dmk3.

I use this feature recently for doing star trails:
http://frontallobbings.blogspot.ca/2012/07/5dmk3-multi-exposure-part-1-additive.html
By being able to see the exposures being built on the screen, I can decide in the field if I want to stop it or carry on.

Like the Olympus OMD's Live Bulb mode, you can also use this mode to watch all sorts of exposures being built on your screen. This is very beneficial to long exposure photographers and at any of the 9 points you can decide to stop and save.

For me as well, I also use this feature to stack and to improve the usable dynamic range of my photos. In this workflow capture you can see the benefits:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/kinematic/7696561690/in/photostream

It does seem like a gimmick, but it's much more useful than the HDR mode in the camera. Here's a great write up at CPN about the feature:
http://learn.usa.canon.com/resources/articles/2011/1dx_multiple_exposures_article.shtml

7 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Aug 6, 2012)

You make some very good points as to why creative professionals would be willing to use Canon's version of in camera multi-exposure while working serious events, such as the Olympics, instead of trying to use the more amateur oriented versions found in other cameras.

4 upvotes
BryMills
By BryMills (Aug 6, 2012)

I think they're great images, but it's the sort of thing that might become a bit boring if it's overused.

3 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (Aug 6, 2012)

So, less than half an hour for people start to complain here. Good work, people.

2 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Aug 6, 2012)

yeah and look at THEIR crap pictures.. lol.

3 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Aug 6, 2012)

I seriously doubt that this new creative function can be added to current Canon cameras by way of a firmware upgrade, since they don't have the new, faster, and more powerful DIGIC 5+ processors and upgraded sensors installed. But, at least we get to see more of the new features headed our way in the replacements for our 60Ds and 7Ds when they arrive, and you can bet they'll be equipped with the new hybrid phase/contrast detection CMOS sensors as well.

1 upvote
the_wallbanger
By the_wallbanger (Aug 6, 2012)

The overlapping opacities is disappointing. The effect is best realized when the subject's movement creates space between each exposure.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 6, 2012)

That's why it still takes some skill to pull off these kinds of shots and it's not for just any kind of action.

2 upvotes
h2k
By h2k (Aug 6, 2012)

I understand this is a very fast solution to get a potentially interesting pic - which could also easily fail.

Otherwise, if you have a bit of time, wouldn't it be better to take series of shots and mix them in Photoshop using Photomerge and mix modes? It would also remove the need to have a very fixed camera position.

0 upvotes
Scrozzy
By Scrozzy (Aug 6, 2012)

I quite like the idea of doing it in-camera. It ultimately saves time, and if you're happy with the output, then why complicate things. Plus not everyone has the know-how or money to invest in extra software. Although admittedly the case-in-hand is a bad example, as you're likely to be minted or subsidised, but I'm sure you get the idea.

3 upvotes
Music Hands
By Music Hands (Aug 6, 2012)

while in theory I would agree, Scrozzy - if one can afford this camera, one can easily afford Photoshop, or PS Elements.
I'm impressed with the short intervals - but not the resulting combined image.

0 upvotes
tongki
By tongki (Aug 7, 2012)

well,
that's a different between photographers and photoshopers,
I guess ...

0 upvotes
alexdpx
By alexdpx (Aug 7, 2012)

It doesn't look like real sports photographers take pictures with Photoshop and Photomerge in mind.

0 upvotes
Deleted-pending
By Deleted-pending (Aug 6, 2012)

Bad colors and banding. Multiple exposures is a gimmick and can be done in 1 single clic in any PP soft.

3 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Aug 6, 2012)

Why clutter the camera with functions that are much better performed during post-processing? Software that does this has been around for years.

2 upvotes
Ropo16
By Ropo16 (Aug 6, 2012)

The Olympus E-30 had this in 2009. Another solution looking for a problem eh, dpreview? Now it's a great feature now the pay masters have slapped it on.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Aug 6, 2012)

Grow up. We're fully aware that some cameras have already had this feature (though not with quite the same level of control). What's news is that one of the world's leading news agencies are using it and blogging about it.

Had Reuters been getting great shots with the E-30, we'd have posted about that.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
17 upvotes
Scrozzy
By Scrozzy (Aug 6, 2012)

Maybe when Olympus showcase their hardware capturing the biggest event of the year in a prime location and with a large news agency, then they will get the same sort of article written. Oh, but wait - that will NEVER happen. 50p if you can guess why.

2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 6, 2012)

I am sure the effect is much more impressive at 12fps vs 5 and people actually use Canon cameras for pro sports and at the Olympics.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Ropo16
By Ropo16 (Aug 6, 2012)

So because the features is used by a camera brand commonly used by agencies in a professional context it now has merit?
What's next proffessional Canikon Art Filters?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Aug 6, 2012)

Because a feature is used in a professional context, it makes it interesting.

Brands and 'merit' have nothing to do with it. This isn't a review, we're not saying anything about it being a good feature in one camera and not in another, we're just saying 'News agency takes interesting pictures using feature on new camera.'

9 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (Aug 6, 2012)

Ropo16, I agree completely.

I had to read DPR's summary twice and, Mr Butler, it still read as if that is a unique feature of the Canons.

References to previous implementations (or even better: its availability in other/affordable cameras) would have been greatly appreciated to many readers of the DPR.

Still, it's news that big agencies are not frowning at the Art Filters anymore :)

1 upvote
Meuh
By Meuh (Aug 6, 2012)

pentax had this in there k10d too around 2006?

1 upvote
JackM
By JackM (Aug 7, 2012)

multiple exposures + 12-14fps = unique. Duh.

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
1 upvote
alexdpx
By alexdpx (Aug 7, 2012)

"This control over the way the data is combined sets the camera apart from multi-exposure functions that appear in a variety of existing cameras."

That's acknowledgement that Canon DID NOT had it first. They just do it better now.

In case you're wondering, that quoted statement above in in the second paragraph of this article.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
jonny1976
By jonny1976 (Aug 7, 2012)

you should have written :

" reuters show amazing samples of multi exposure at the olympics!"
just this.
this sound more like an ads for canon than a real interest for multi exposure. even the article of reuters sounds more like ads than other.

1 upvote
Russ Houston
By Russ Houston (Aug 6, 2012)

Is this a new feature for Canon? I thought most cameras had this for the past several years.

Still, this photographer put it to good use. Interesting article.

0 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Aug 6, 2012)

think first .. write later....

1 upvote
Russ Houston
By Russ Houston (Aug 6, 2012)

Serious question. I honestly thought most cameras had this feature already. If the flagship Canon didn't then that raises an interesting question of why this feature would migrate up the chain instead of down like most features. Is it because it might be viewed as a gimmick? Obviously this guy put it to good use, so why wouldn't it be on the flagship models originally.

No judgement here. Just random wonderings. Flame away.

0 upvotes
ozan yigit
By ozan yigit (Aug 6, 2012)

not many cameras. mostly nikon in digital, certainly nikon, minolta etc in film. as of nikon 801 9 exposures, f4 and f5 as many as you like. every nikon DSLR that i know of had multiple exposures. consumer models limited to 3 exposures, higher-end bodies 10 exposures. blending mode is auto-gain or not. operational in high speed or timed-exposure modes too.

0 upvotes
Apewithacamera
By Apewithacamera (Aug 6, 2012)

Great Stuff thanks for sharing!

3 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (Aug 6, 2012)

On a serious side, though: could this ability be added via firmware update? It seems a neat thing to have on most fast bursting dSLRs (and SLTs).

0 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (Aug 6, 2012)

People complaining how useless, ugly, unecessary and other negative comments those images and camera function are in 3... 2...

3 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (Aug 6, 2012)

So it has multiple exposure mode like the 5D3 but not HDR. Curious.

0 upvotes
loock
By loock (Aug 6, 2012)

With this function, Canon eos 1D-X has finally caught up my Pentax *istD from 2003... :)

6 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 6, 2012)

At 2.8fps your *ist would have just shown the gymnast taking off and landing, though. So it's not quite the same, right?

9 upvotes
HonourableTyr
By HonourableTyr (Aug 6, 2012)

Still, catching up with features almost 10 years after Pentax introduced them to a digital body. Sad that the big players are taking a long time to innovate creative options.

0 upvotes
jjnik
By jjnik (Aug 6, 2012)

Nikon has had this since at least the D3 - up to 10 exposures in a single image and you can use the highest burst rate (up to 10 or 11 fps) - though I don't believe you can still save the individual images.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Fearless_Photog
By Fearless_Photog (Aug 7, 2012)

Since way before that, the D200 had it also. Although in that case it didn't also save the individual frames.

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Stephan Peters
By Stephan Peters (Aug 7, 2012)

Lookes like you are hung up on the examples given here, there is sooooo much more you can do with multiple exposures. I loved that part on my fiilm cameras and I love it now on my M III

Stephan

0 upvotes
Total comments: 226
12