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Sigma US announces DP1 Merrill at $1000, arriving in mid September

By dpreview staff on Aug 31, 2012 at 05:00 GMT

Sigma Corportation of North America has announced that the DP1 Merrill will be available from mid September at a price of around $1000. The DP1M is the version of the company's fixed lens, APS-C compact camera with a 28mm equivalent, F2.8. It uses the same Foveon X3 sensor as the company's flagship SD1 DSLR, which captures three colors at each of its 14.6 million pixel sites. The quoted price is the camera's 'street price' reflecting what Sigma thinks the camera will actually sell for, rather than a more speculative recommended selling price.


Press Release:

Sigma Corporation announces pricing and availability of Sigma DP1 Merrill

New generation compact camera to hit US shelves in September for street price of $999

Ronkonkoma, NY, August 31, 2012 – Sigma Corporation of America (www.sigmaphoto.com), a leading researcher, developer, manufacturer and service provider for some of the world's most impressive lines of lenses, cameras and flashes, has announced that the Sigma DP1 Merrill compact digital camera will be available in the United States in mid-September for the street price of $999.

This upgraded, high-resolution, compact digital camera with a fixed lens is named in honor of Richard “Dick” Merrill, the co-creator of the Foveon X3 Direct Image Sensor technology that powers Sigma’s unique lineup of cameras. It differs from its predecessor, the DP1x, because its lens now includes one “F” Low Dispersion glass element to correct aberrations, and its resolution has grown by moving from Foveon’s 14.6-megapixel APS-C size image sensor to the 46-megapixel APS-C image sensor found in the company’s flagship SLR, the Sigma SD1 Merrill. The full-color Foveon X3 direct image sensor ensures outstanding resolution, richly gradated tones and images with a three-dimensional feel. A focus ring and custom Quick Set (QS) mode also improve the user interface.

“We are extremely pleased with the engineering and design involved in the upgrade of the DP1 Merrill,” said Mark Amir-Hamzeh, president of Sigma Corporation of America. “Its wide focal length, fixed lens and impressive sensor capture stunningly sharp images that are truly incredible, especially given the compact nature of the camera’s design.”

The Sigma DP1 Merrill boasts an exclusively designed, high-performance, telecentric 19mm F2.8 lens, which is the equivalent to a 28mm lens on a 35mm SLR camera.This camera differs from the DP2 Merrill, which was released in June, due to its wider focal length. The DP2 Merrill has a 30mm F2.8 lens, which is the equivalent to a 45mm lens on a 35mm SLR camera. Both cameras are compact and lightweight, and feature Super Multi Layer Coating to reduce flare and ghosting.

Other features of the Sigma DP1 Merrill camera include:

  • A dual, three-layer responsive ultimate (TRUE II) engine that now incorporates two TRUE II processors to improve the processing speed and overall quality of the final image
  • RAW and JPEG format recording to retain the full image detail of the utmost quality captured through the direct image sensor, as well as a JPEG recording format for convenience
  • Sigma Photo Pro processing software to convert RAW data quickly and easily
  • Manual focus for use when autofocus or focus-lock is not desired
  • Easy-to-use auto focus with a “nine-point select mode” which can select the desired focusing point from nine different frames, and a “free move mode” that allows shooters to select their desired focusing point
  • An advanced user interface complete with a custom QS menu and the metallic command dial to improve usability
  • Continuous shooting capabilities to capture up to seven RAW images per sequence
  • A large, highly visible, three-inch TFT color LCD monitor for great visibility
  • A hot shoe for the use of the dedicated external flashgun EF-140 DG (optional)
  • Movie mode for movie recording with VGA (640×480) size, with 30 shooting frames per second

For information about Sigma Corporation of America or information about the companies cameras and lenses, visit www.sigmaphoto.com.

Comments

Total comments: 364
123
RussD
By RussD (Sep 10, 2012)

Here is a link to the photographer's blog who made the images for the DP1 Merrill website (using the DP1). There is nothing here that is geeky about the camera, but some background as to why someone would choose this form factor and quality of a lens and sensor combination.

http://paulthackerphotographs.blogspot.com/

0 upvotes
obeythebeagle
By obeythebeagle (Sep 10, 2012)

The Luminous Landscape review was dead-on. A Nikon 800, which is five times both the size and price, has an edge, but this is the leading value in image quality by a long shot. Look at the images on the Sigma page--the lens alone is worth a grand.

For thirty years I carried a Leica CL with a 35mm Summicron, shooting Kodachrome 25--arguably the top image quality of its day. The Sigma is its spiritual reincarnation.

0 upvotes
pixelsoup
By pixelsoup (Sep 9, 2012)

I'd be sooo happy having one of these.
After seeing the test shots on Sigma's site several days ago I kept thinking and thinking of this camera (rather the 30mm version) in "photographic situations".
All the "lacking" are no big deal to me. One could crop and still have great photos. Don't need a zoom then. Didn't have one when I began taking photos.
But alas, ... finances keep me from getting one.
Great job, Sigma.
In about two to three years from now I could possibly get one.

0 upvotes
Eddy Teddy
By Eddy Teddy (Sep 8, 2012)

I have on loan both the Sony RX-100 and the Sigma DP2 Merrill this weekend. Sigma is sharper (much sharper), and in my opinion have more accurate colors in most cases. I compared those two also with my old EOS 20D and my Samsung EX1; Sigma is sharper. I have only compared jpegs. I think the Sigma performs well, but RAW writing time is slow. Biggest problem; battery life time is very week. The Foveon sensor might be the best ever made, but Sigma needs to do something with the battery. Of course the Sony Rx-100 is a much smaller camera; and should really not be compared to the Sigma. I'm sure the Sony will be a great camera to travel with. If I should take a picture of the love of my life, I would use the Sigma :-)

2 upvotes
npomokoji
By npomokoji (Sep 5, 2012)

Better to buy sigma ex dn 30/2.8 and some nex camera:)

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 5, 2012)

Say which Nex camera uses a Foveon sensor? And where is that model sold?

0 upvotes
John K Lee
By John K Lee (Sep 5, 2012)

Great for serious Bushwalking! Just read the LL Review. For serious bushwalking where every gram of discretionary weight is relevant, then on an Image Quality per Weight criteria, I would select the DP1 (and the DP2) ahead of all other camera combinations.

3 upvotes
Drew Conway
By Drew Conway (Sep 5, 2012)

Snooze... Something really new, Sigma? Please? Zzzz....

0 upvotes
ddolde
By ddolde (Sep 5, 2012)

Another whiner

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 4, 2012)

I do hope DPR will do a review on the Merrill cameras. I imagine they will go on the back burner since they are such niche products. The Luminous Landscape review is like David Pogue's review of the RX100; it's a rave but not much else. As if you need an "expert" to tell you that a $1000 point and shoot camera with a non-zoom lens, short battery life and serious noise above ISO 400 is not really for a casual user.

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
1 upvote
unlearny
By unlearny (Sep 4, 2012)

The dp2-m reminds me of the Canonet 2.8 I used to use, and all of those great 45mm cameras of old... what later model P&S cameras had a 45mm f2.8 lens?

This camera reminds me of a Nikon, the Nikon 28Ti QD 35mm, to be exact... a very cool camera to pay tribute to.

If mainstream Photographers figure out the imaging power of these cameras, and start to embrace the brand and really funding Sigma, I bet we'll see a Hologon Based "DP0m" in no time... how about a fast macro DP3m? Since these cameras cost about the same as a lens, I would clear a shelf in my collection for whatever sigma can come up with.

Hopefully sales will support the kind of game changing features that need to be developed to make the next SD a truly competitive tool.

2 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 4, 2012)

Part IV:

The maximum wordcount is NOT so that its funnier for you to write posts in three parts, its so that people like you cant annoy the sh out of others by posting their wisdom in posts that take two browserpages to read.

2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 4, 2012)

His multi-part posts were much more informative and helpful than this post of yours.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 4, 2012)

It's too bad this "wisdom limit" doesn't apply to Ken Rockwell.

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 4, 2012)

not true
i liked my post

0 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (Sep 5, 2012)

people are laughing over your comments because another ID10T tries to be funny but failed

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Imagician
By Imagician (Sep 4, 2012)

Part - III

It's very important to recognize that a great image is not just about sharpness (which, in case of DP2 M, is a result also of the lens that comes with it), but also the accuracy of colors and dynamic range.

In the case of this 46 MP Foveon sensor, the colors look accurate enough in good light, if a little muted in default settings, but the dynamic range (reminiscent of slide film, which was worse) is not in even in the same ballpark as some of the new Nikon/Sony sensors.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Sep 4, 2012)

Thanks. Good info, especially in combination with the Luminous Landscape review. It is certainly a resolution monster, as expected. It's great that Sigma gave it a lens that matches the sensor quality. That high quality lens helps justify the high price. I do wish enthusiasts would stop going on about the color. In the earlier cameras the color was just terrible, but Foveonistas enthused over its perfection. This generation is clearly much better, but no better than the competition, also very good.

I'd love to see this sensor continue to improve, but I'm afraid the basic approach will always limit it to low ISO use. Cutting the resolution would improve that, but also lose what makes the sensor unique. Perhaps they can build this on a different substrate with better properties? No idea. I doubt Sigma has the research money to develop it adequately. More likely is that someone will figure out another way of stacking sensors. Probably Sony.

0 upvotes
Imagician
By Imagician (Sep 4, 2012)

Part - II

The difference between the 5D II and SD1 images was also wide but not so much, but the 5D II is a much better sensor than the 24 MP APS-C chip of the D3200.

I also "downrezzed" the Nikon D800 E to 24 MP. It showed a better resolution than the Sigma, unquestionably. I uprezzed the Sigma image now to 30 MP and downrezzed the D800 E one to 30 MP. The Sigma was still holding up well, but it showed that now the SD1 was at its limit. I was just bowled over.

The per-pixel sharpness is jaw-dropping. I didn't compare the other sensors since as far as resolution is concerned, these 3 cameras are the Bayer benchmarks. Perhaps, the M9 also should have been checked.

This is not a P&S. It cannot do what most P&S do and the RX100 does rather well. But what it does, it does to a perfection that is unrivaled by any thing less than the D800 (which I didn't check) and D800 E.

2 upvotes
unlearny
By unlearny (Sep 4, 2012)

Nice to see that you get it about the SD1, and that you felt it important enough to post a novel about it. That is how I used to be on these boards, but the crowd don't like it. I have posted an RX100 vs DP2m full sized jpegs on Flickr you might wanna visit.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/9729517@N04/sets/72157631312117380/

0 upvotes
Imagician
By Imagician (Sep 6, 2012)

Unlearny, thanks. I had not known about the Foveon sensor till a week back, but what I found has got me very interested. However, I am a landscape shooter, and having access to at least a few focal lengths is crucial. The SD1 is more practical from that point of view than the DP2 M or DP1 M, but the cost is still a deterrent. I have, indeed, seen your comparison before I posted here. The difference is vast, but these are different tools.

0 upvotes
Imagician
By Imagician (Sep 4, 2012)

Part -1:

The review at LL helps shed light on what this product can or cannot do. IN summary, it's an astounding engineering achievement designed to satisfy a narrow objective (a much sough-after one for people who have shot with ISO 50 slide film before digital came).

What I did was to compare the SD1 images (which it shares the sensor) from a resolution point of view with those from the Nikon 800 E, the Canon EOS 5D III and the Nikon D3200. These are the best sensors that Nikon (both APS-C and FF) and Canon (FF) have. I didn't check with Sony A77 (same sensor as in the D3200) nor the 18 MP Canon sensor, since the latter is now dated and not particularly highly rated.

The images from the SD1 were first "uprezzed" from 4800 * 3200 (around 15 MP) to 6000 * 4000 (exactly 24 MP), to match the D3200 and EOS 5D Mark-II. The D3200 never knew what hit it. The resolution difference is ridiculous: the SD1 was much better.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Robert F. Tobler
By Robert F. Tobler (Sep 4, 2012)

Read this before commenting:
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/sigma_dp2m_review.shtml

5 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 4, 2012)

At LL there's a review of the DP2 Merrrill.

Seems much more apt to cite that than the SD1Mer.

0 upvotes
Robert F. Tobler
By Robert F. Tobler (Sep 4, 2012)

@HowaboutRAW: if you had actually checked my link, you would have noticed that it *does* point to the review of the DP2 Merrill.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Sep 4, 2012)

Robert F. Tobler:

No, I just read SD1 Merrill, so thought dslr. Funny that. But it's perfectly normal to switch the two names.

0 upvotes
DancingPhotoPanda
By DancingPhotoPanda (Sep 4, 2012)

What worries me more in terms of comments here aren't the people pointing out possible issues with this camera, but the near fanatic herd of holier-than-thou "supporters" (who I'd like to think are paid shills for some other company) describing why this camera is so awesome and what you shoot with isn't in what are possibly some of the most condescending and insulting ways imaginable. No amount of actual insults towards Sigma or negative reviews could possibly hurt the brand as much as its "supporters" are.

OTOH, I'm having trouble imagining which company would waste money on trollish astroturfing given the market performance of the last few Sigmas. Have you people considered calming down, realizing that people have differing opinions, and letting people decide for themselves what they like? Right now you're just hurting the image of the company you claim to love.

1 upvote
ddolde
By ddolde (Sep 4, 2012)

You are a paranoid schizophrenic

5 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (Sep 4, 2012)

Actually ddolde, he's partially right.

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Sep 4, 2012)

I wrote a comment below in support of this camera, and I have never owned a Sigma product, nor do I work for them. Right now I shoot m43 + Canon P&S.

You are correct though, that DPReview boards are plagued with paid shills. However, it is not only these boards. It is any kind of forum anywhere on the Internet that has to do with product marketing, politics, etc.

Check out this article: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-15869683

In addition, here in the U.S. at least, Homeland Security is active everywhere on the Internet, including as fake forum posters, to monitor people, entrap them, slander them, whatever the case may be.

I've come to the conclusion that this is the new reality, and we just have to live with it. Most posters are honest, straightforward, and unpaid, and if we aren't smart enough to figure out what the information we are reading is worth, then we don't deserve the benefit of that information.

1 upvote
King Penguin
By King Penguin (Sep 4, 2012)

Wow, I didn't know there was money in posting comments......I can be bought, I can do subversive, which companies pay the most dosh and I'll sign up.................. and then I can upgrade my photo kit quicker:)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Sep 4, 2012)

@King Penguin

It's simplistic to think that companies put out want ads for paid posters. They don't want to advertise (literally) that they promote their own products as seemingly disinterested consumers.

The people who do this for the big camera companies are hired in other capacities. If you post for Canon, let's say, you probably have a position in the marketing department, and coordinating this kind of publicity would be in addition to all of your other responsibilities. Of course, there are fanboys who post in favor of companies without any type of compensation whatsoever.

Are you really in shock, or just playing around? I mean, this is so well documented, I don't even know where to start. Type in "amazon paid reviews" on Google and read the top four or five hits. That might get you up to speed.

I hope this helps.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 4, 2012)

DancingPhotoPanda I have never run into a more mature and level headed group of people than the Sigma users. You are talking nonsense.

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 4, 2012)

It's a bit like the uopcomming election. No matter who wins, we will be stuck with our fellow citiizens. Turning to cameras, Sigma can't even produce a decent instruction manual so it's beyond unlikely they would have somebody posting comments. This is just my opinon but I think the source of the hostility here is people reviewing the camera who have never seen one, let alone examined the results.

0 upvotes
ammca66564
By ammca66564 (Sep 9, 2012)

I'm not a paid shill. I'm a guy who's willing to put up with the short-comings of the DPs in order to get the beautiful images they can (usually) produce.

I've reached the point where when I think of a state of the art Bayer sensor camera, I kinda lose enthusiasm. I'm just willing to put up with Sigma's short-comings.

And I'm very, very excited to have an improved (even if not up to spec with everyone else in the market) DP available.

0 upvotes
ddolde
By ddolde (Sep 4, 2012)

If you think it's got issues try shooting medium or large format film. Now that's a major pain. I know I tried it and just can't go back. I've a DP2 Merrill coming this week and am wondering if I'll still need my Hasselblad H4D-31. I don't mind slow I'm used to the large format film contemplative approach.

1 upvote
57even
By 57even (Sep 4, 2012)

It's very cool that some companies are willing to make niche cameras with exceptional capabilities in some areas, even if they lack the "spec sheet" appeal of some of the feature-creeper cams everyone loves to love and have a few obvious foibles that would probably kill the appeal as an all-rounder.

But it's not an all-rounder, it's a rather slow and quirky compact single lens camera with low ISO IQ that shames just about anything else under 36MP.

No-one has to buy it, but some people love it so why be so negative? Just buy what you like. It's a camera, not a bit of man-jewelry. It doesn't have to impress your friends.

BTW it's not for me, at least not until I can afford a specialist camera for every eventuality, but that does not mean I can't see the point. It's like a shrunken MF landscape rig that you can slip in a pocket, and that's kind of amazing.

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
Zig Ermeson
By Zig Ermeson (Sep 3, 2012)

There we have it, this camera is not for puss ies:
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/sigma_dp2m_review.shtml

3 upvotes
RStyga
By RStyga (Sep 4, 2012)

..It is also for enthusiasts who don't know how to take photos but know how to pretend that they do by having an idiosyncratic cult camera. I have used a DP2 and indeed I was immediately impressed by its sharp and lively images but DP2 uses CDAF which is a revelation if you normally shoot with so-so adjusted PDAF DSLR cameras. Also, Foveon sensors are indeed superior in pixel-sharpness to Bayer-type interpolating sensors but not in colour accuracy (especially in higher ISO modes, in which they are grossly inferior). As for resolution, a 4.7MP x 3 Foveon practically outputs 8-10MP resolution-equivalent images and for the case of the Merrill series produces 20-24MP resolution-equivalent images (superb but hardly a Medium-format resolution nowadays). Yes, they are much cheaper than SOME cameras producing comparable-resolution images BUT AF speed, functionality etc ARE important too. Let's not get carried away...

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
pca7070
By pca7070 (Sep 3, 2012)

After using the DP2M for a while, don't want to pick up my E-M5 again.

1 upvote
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Sep 4, 2012)

You should give it away. I'd be happy to use it regularly for all the things it does better than any Sigma.

0 upvotes
Marx81
By Marx81 (Sep 3, 2012)

This interesting cam seems to attract also a relatively high number of comments from people with reduced social skills . Using offensive terms under Internet cover isn't cool .

0 upvotes
lxstorm
By lxstorm (Sep 3, 2012)

Exactly pal it is easy to find Sony sensor gamut for example but impossible Foveon one. There is no reliable information what is the real bit depth of Foveon sensor. There are no FF or medium format Foveon sensors. Only childish comments like "I am a very-very professional very pro, I trashed my Leica, I trashed my Hassy, I trashed my Linhof in favor of Foveon your are plain a.h. in case you are not adoring Foveon&Sigma" ;)

BTW as per Wiki color vision deficiency affects a significant percentage of the population but not everybody so their is nothing wrong with some Foveon unhappy photographers ;)

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 3, 2012)

lxstorm that's a silly post. The only people I see routinely acting obsessively and rudely are the anti-Sigma types. It's a bit sad to watch.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Sep 4, 2012)

Condescension is also rude. Plenty of that from Foveonistas.

0 upvotes
For a few clicks more
By For a few clicks more (Sep 3, 2012)

Vey small but very effective.

1 upvote
Alex Ken
By Alex Ken (Sep 2, 2012)

This camera brings classic style and I like it, I know many people also have hobby the same as my hobby.I will wait until launch day to buy one

2 upvotes
MarceloSalup
By MarceloSalup (Sep 2, 2012)

What a non-event. One would think that, today, you could easily develop an interchangeable lens body. Who wants to be limited to the lens that a manufacturer chooses for you?

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Sep 2, 2012)

I would think that 99% of all cameras that are sold have a non removable lens.

3 upvotes
panpen
By panpen (Sep 2, 2012)

So true. I cannot even imagine all those suckers paying thousands for Leica X1, X2 or Fuji X100 being able to take a decent shot because they are restricted by manufacturers to use a fixed focal lens. Poor saps.

0 upvotes
King Penguin
By King Penguin (Sep 2, 2012)

Argumentum ad hominen...........

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 2, 2012)

ok, i cant find out who has been sarcastic and who is serious about this.

but to the guys that meant it serious:

there are guys that like zooms and guys that like primes.
and of those guys that like primes, there are some that like one focal lenght more than others.

i for example like fast 50ies, so he cheapest version of getting a camera with a fast fifty, is to buy a d700 and a 50 1.4, which i did

if someone would offer me a compact camera with a FF sensor and a fixed 50 1.4, i would certainly buy it.

for everyone else: go and buy a superzoom or whatever :)

nothing beats a primelens with a matched sensor, thats why i bought a ricoh GXR 28mm

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Sep 3, 2012)

True. It's in a different league where a prime is matched to the sensor.

0 upvotes
ToasterFlyer
By ToasterFlyer (Sep 3, 2012)

Huh?? Sigma does produce the SD1 and SD15.. (just an fyi)

0 upvotes
MarcMedios
By MarcMedios (Sep 4, 2012)

@Roland... I don't follow your argument at all, sorry. If 90% of the cameras sold have a fixed lens, it is probably because 87% of them are point & shoot, so they don't qualify in this forum (which I assume are professionals or at least advanced amateurs)

@Inevitable - you are right... and wrong. There are many of us who keep an series of lenses which will be used depending on the need. But, even if you ONLY like primes (which to me is weird, since most modern zooms and most modern camera+software+lens combos easily beat primes) why limit yourself to ONLY one prime that a manufacturer chose for you?

There are moments when you want a 50 (I also have the 50 1.4) and there are times when you want a telly (I have a 70-200 2.8) or a wide angle (I have a 20-35) or a nice range for a catalog shoot (I have a 24-105).

I would think that, as you improve and improve and improve, you would want to be less limited by your equipment. Not more.

0 upvotes
panpen
By panpen (Sep 2, 2012)

I have a DP2 and it is as good as my M8 with 28mm Elmarit third version at iso 100 and 200. Anything above 400 is for black and white as color is completely lost. While the DP2 is an amazing camera that replaced my $4k M8 with a manual lens, I would never pay $1k for the Merill version. If iso 400 and 800 were good I would have given it a second thought. In the last two months Adorama had tons of DP1 and DP2 demos or E+ for less than $300. $1000 is a stretch even for a great camera like Sigma DP

1 upvote
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Sep 2, 2012)

An APS-C cam that can't shoot higher than ISO400 seems like a waste of money at any price point. My $400 NEX C3 + 18-55 kit lens will shoot usable shots up to ISO3200. Hell my D40 has usable ISO800, and came with 2 lenses and a bag for $350 shipped. This Foveon deal just didn't seem to click. Sigma needs to stick to third party lenses.

1 upvote
alfpang
By alfpang (Sep 2, 2012)

Foveon sensors outresolve APS-C by quite a bit. This is a specialised piece of kit, for those who want unique and unmatched colour reproduction at DLSR resolution in a mid-sized compact body.

It's almost like comparing slide film to print film...

1 upvote
mbpm
By mbpm (Sep 2, 2012)

I agree with panpen here.

1 year-old DP2x: $700
-Same features as the DP1 Merrill
-24.2mm/2.8 lens

New DP1 Merrill: $1,000
-Much 'improved' move mode VGA (640×480)
-19mm/2.8 lens

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
leventhan
By leventhan (Sep 2, 2012)

duh the DP1M has an APS-C sensor dude

0 upvotes
mbpm
By mbpm (Sep 3, 2012)

@leventhan:

Duh, the DP2x also has an APS-C sensor.

-_- do a little research before posting, dude.

"The size of the image sensor used in the DP2x camera is 20.7mm x 13.8mm. It is approximately seven to twelve times larger than sensors used in ordinary compact digital cameras."
http://www.dpreview.com/news/2011/2/8/sigmadp2x

0 upvotes
leventhan
By leventhan (Sep 3, 2012)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_sensor_format

see the"Sensors equipping most DSLRs and mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras"

0 upvotes
mbpm
By mbpm (Sep 3, 2012)

Fine, let me play along.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/APS-C
"All APS-C variants are considerably smaller than 35 mm standard film which measures 36×24 mm. Sensor sizes range from 20.7×13.8 mm to 28.7×19.1 mm."

DP1 Merrill: Sensor size is 23.5×15.7mm
It does not matter that they raise the sensor's size by 2.8x1.9mm. the DP2x is still considered to have an APS-C sensor. The changed crop factor of 1.7 to 1.5 does not matter and still does not change the fact that the DP2x has pretty much the same features as the DP1 Merrill.
http://www.dpreview.com/news/2011/2/8/sigmadp2x
"Sigma DP2x Compact digital camera with an APS-C size, 14MP image sensor."
I know that the Foveon X3 format for early DP series resembles the Micro Four Thirds system, but it is not considered as one.

"Sensors equipping most DSLRs and mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras" Your point is not valid because the size difference of the sensor still does not justify the price value of the DP1 Merrill. Period.

1 upvote
Abbas Rafey
By Abbas Rafey (Sep 2, 2012)

I don't know why there is too much talk about sigma. I own 7d and Nikon 60d and Sd14. I really admire the IQ of the Sd14 though I don't like it's slowness. The best thing to do is compare the prints and you can see the Foveon power.
Years back some one posted comparison shots between D3 and SD14 in DP where you can refer.
Sigma has to improve in processing speed, and lowlight efficiency to bring the IQ of Foveon to its peak but if you are a land scape or studio shoter then it's well match.
Once again I like whatever comes in my hand though I prefer canon for it focusing capability
Wish you all best shoting day

2 upvotes
Esa Tuunanen
By Esa Tuunanen (Sep 3, 2012)

Hard to improve low light efficiency when whole design principle of Foveon sensor is what causes low efficiency.
This explains it well.
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1027&message=36405363

More promising is developing this kind sensors whose goal is similar to three sensor system used in video cameras but doing splitting light to colours at pixel level.
http://www.f8daily.com/Foveon-like-sensor-patent-from-Panasonic-Flash-sync-patent-from-Olympus-9535027

0 upvotes
Danel
By Danel (Sep 1, 2012)

I was just looking at the photos over on the Sigma site. They certainly look sharp. In fact they look too sharp. The over sharpening is obvious on the smaller versions of the photos. They were obviously heavily processed to look very sharp on the full sized versions of the photos because some of them look just awful on the smaller sizes. I'm not sure I like even the larger versions though. They don't look natural for some reason that I can't quite put my finger on. The photos are very visually impressive no doubt. I just don't know that they look real.

4 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Sep 2, 2012)

I'm a fan of Sigma and I have the same sentiments. There's also noise and banding in some of the skies. Yet, I would still consider by using its low resolution modes and minimize the artifacts.

0 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Sep 2, 2012)

Sharpness in small size has nothing to do with the one at full size.

3 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Sep 2, 2012)

I'm not sure which samples you're looking at but the ones I've seen haven't been sharpened; there are no sharpening artefacts. I suspect that the camera does not have an anti-aliasing filter but haven't been able to confirm this. If you pixel-peep the original D800e images, you'll see a similar quality at pixel level.
Have a look at
http://www.ephotozine.com/article/sigma-dp2-merrill-sample-photo-gallery-19830
The random textures on the stonework and foliage are handled better than in any camera that I've ever seen. The lens shows no CA or smearing. Whilst this camera is limited by its speed and fixed focal length lens, if you want the best low ISO image quality for e.g. landscapes, this camera is hard to beat.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Sep 2, 2012)

@gsum - the DP1M online samples of Cowboys are definitely sharpened. Yes, there are no sharpening halos, but not all sharpening methods produce halos.

But - as the DP1M has no AA filter and detects all color info at the same position, the starting point (at pixel level) is much sharper than normal cameras. So ... the sharpening does not have to be so extensive.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 2, 2012)

Danel wrote: "In fact they look too sharp. The over sharpening is obvious on the smaller versions of the photos."

Nope. I own an SD1 and that is what you get with that sensor. It sounds like you have little to no experience with a camera that takes truly sharp pictures.

6 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 1, 2012)

too late sigma, i bought a gxr with a12 28mm two days ago and iam LOVING it

now give me a FF K-mount module and a 16mm film module

0 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Sep 1, 2012)

I would only wish the lens was an equivalent of 35 mm, not 45 ...

0 upvotes
HBowman
By HBowman (Sep 1, 2012)

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/878793-REG/Sigma_c78900_DP2_Merrill_Compact_Digital.html

That already exist ...

0 upvotes
helmus
By helmus (Sep 3, 2012)

For this reason, I have a X100 :o)

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 1, 2012)

I wonder how the new Fuji (XE-1) will compare in terms of size, weight and cost. It will certainly be superior in terms of features, speed and noise. Image quality should be close enough to the Sigma, based on what the X-Pro 1 can do, and for a few hundred over the Sigma, you get an interchangeable lens camera. I guess we'll know next week.

0 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Sep 2, 2012)

Will take the orbs to new heights -- free, of course

0 upvotes
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Sep 1, 2012)

Thing is, I can see it appealing to mountaineers, for example - but only if it was cheaper. Or if they kept the price and added some weather seals, toughed up the body. Presto, you've got a compact rough-weather camera that doesn't weigh much and can spit out wall-filling 150dpi prints like nobody's business. As it stands... it's a kind of portable point-and-shoot that produces huge files in good light. For the money one of those 40mp Nokia phones would make more sense in that role.

3 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Sep 1, 2012)

Suddenly we have a compact cam that can keep up with the D800E in terms of sharpness. Not bad.

5 upvotes
mark moe
By mark moe (Sep 1, 2012)

Hmmm. Fixed lens that's not especially fast--kind of wide but not a landscape wide. Definitely not a portrait lens.

$1000...

...I hope they are OK with both the cameras they will sell.

1 upvote
OldZorki
By OldZorki (Sep 1, 2012)

Just checked images on (very slow) Sigma site.
Image quality is absolutely STUNNING. Sharp from corner to corner, beautiful color and almost no distortion.
Comparing it to compacts, even advanced as RX100 is completely unfair. THis one is in different league.
I do not know about operational quirks (never had Sigma in my life), quality after ISO 400 (probably bad) and not sure if Lightroom or DXO will support it - but if they do, I will buy this little gem in heartbeat. If they not - well, I may still do.

6 upvotes
solsang
By solsang (Sep 1, 2012)

I have used the dp1 and dp2 a lot, there is Lightroom support, though the raws can seem to be benefit from using the supplied sigma raw converter (which is as slow as the camera...)

Portraits done with foveon can be truly stunning, yet in low light it tends to loose colour saturation, though keeping clarity for good black and whites - i seldom used iso 800 on the old models, and the cameras auto iso was only selecting between 100 and 200!

Battery life could be 200 shots, spare batteries are fair priced and unlocked so copy batteries work fine, though there has been loads of things going wrong with the old models, especially the motor wearing out (they so much should have put a fixed lens instead of the extending, that is my main turnoff)

Manual focus by thumbwheel is great, though 1,2,5 meters is the settings which are written on it for longer distances, useful enough for zone focusing.

It has no grip, so a franiec is a must, as well as a autolenscap, and of course a viewfinder:)

2 upvotes
solsang
By solsang (Sep 1, 2012)

The merrill model lacks the mf numbers on the focus ring, requiring you look at the screen for distance or focus confirmation, though rotating the ring while using af changes to mf, very useful indeed!

And merrill has the fixed lens which means no more waiting and screaming motors, now the only wait is the raw write time (which is 10 seconds with a good card yet there is a 7 pic buffer, so one can go on shooting, i have missed that so very often on the old :)

Battery life 100 shots on merrill does simply reflect the fact that is takes longer time to process images, though the chip does have some work with the 50mb raw files:)

2 upvotes
paulbysea
By paulbysea (Sep 1, 2012)

Definitely worth considering as a compact carry everywhere camera. And despite what some of the uniformed comments posted previously good value for money.

2 upvotes
Snaaks
By Snaaks (Sep 1, 2012)

1.000 bucks for an P & $ camara. Not a winner i'm afraid.

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
xrsdb
By xrsdb (Sep 1, 2012)

It's so different from a p and s camera u r talking about. Just go to flick and search DP1m, u'll be scared by the official sample images. Scared, I mean.

5 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Sep 1, 2012)

This is hands down the sharpest compact camera you can find out there.

7 upvotes
jpatkinson
By jpatkinson (Sep 1, 2012)

I wouldn't categorize this as Point & Shoot, by a country mile. The images (http://www.sigma-dp.com/DP1Merrill/jp/samplephoto.html) are unlike anything I have ever seen before. I would consider getting one of these, for that reason alone.

4 upvotes
solsang
By solsang (Sep 1, 2012)

Sigma is a totally different beast, small and yet slow, annoying and yet incredible, somehow makes leica quality photos (in good light) yet too slow operating to be named p&s, i have tried, a lot...

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 2, 2012)

At its ideal iso range it does a noticeably better job than the Leica solsang.

0 upvotes
solsang
By solsang (Sep 2, 2012)

Thanks for telling Basalite, i love the thousands of photos i got from my dp1 and dp2, and comparing to leica then was only at small resolutions.

Now with resolution tripled and still edge sharp, i can see how it could equal the m9 with a leica 28mm lens at iso 100, though leica owners might cringe at the fact (i actually find it hard to believe, yet images i have found are comparable:)

0 upvotes
Azfar
By Azfar (Sep 1, 2012)

1000$ fixed focal lens camera with VGA video recording. Seriously ?

4 upvotes
photofan1986
By photofan1986 (Sep 1, 2012)

Have you seen a low iso sample at least?

5 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 1, 2012)

I think it's fair to say it should not be judged as a video camera.

2 upvotes
solsang
By solsang (Sep 1, 2012)

The old dp1 and dp2 had QVGA, this is huge;)
The video is good for documenting things, the lack of stabilizer makes is almost useless unless tripod mounted, though possible in the right hands, see how the old video could be: http://www.rytterfalk.com/2008/03/01/sigma-dp1-movie-clip/

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (Sep 4, 2012)

For a camera that can approach or do the lower end of medium format with a real good lens, I think it's wroth it. Whether the camera pros/cons are good enough for your needs and wants as a photographer is a different matter, but I think the price is right.

0 upvotes
RichardAB
By RichardAB (Sep 1, 2012)

Thanks for doing that and providing a link, it's interesting. Like you say on Flickr your comparison is unscientific, however it gives an indication.

Whatever someone's individual preferences, both cameras are capable.

On a broader front, it also demonstrates that differences between the results of most digital cameras are not huge when low ISOs are used. Given control of the shutter, aperture, ISO and white balance, a good photographer will probably produce good outcomes with almost any digital camera.

0 upvotes
unlearny
By unlearny (Sep 1, 2012)

If anyone cares I took some side by side photos using both the Sigma DP2 Merrill and the Sony RX100 and posted full size jpegs on Flickr.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/9729517@N04/sets/72157631312117380/comments/#comment72157631347851076

cut and paste or search "rx100 vs dp2 merrill" on FLICKR

I therefore need to save up a tad before I can buy my DP1-M...I hope Lensmate will get going on some accessories.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
RichardAB
By RichardAB (Sep 1, 2012)

Please see my comment immediately above unlearny's which is in reply. I must have made a mistake, thought I'd clicked on reply but mustn't have done.

0 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Sep 1, 2012)

Hi unlearny,

I declare that the DP2 eats the RX100's lunch, IQ-wise.

There are additional full-size DP2 images at http://www.ephotozine.com/article/sigma-dp2-merrill-camera-review-19831

They impress that little old obsessive pixel-peeper, me.

Be sure to vet the hi-res images.

RAW looks even finer.

Any sensor that doesn't make a smeary mess out of grass is a sensor that excels.

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Sep 1, 2012)

They really do approximate the 15 mpix images to 45 mpix, do they?

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 1, 2012)

I suspect the current DP2 can do this as well. The Sigmas capture an amazing amount of detail (and having a non-zoom lens that doesn't collapse a million times probably doesn't hurt) but the Sigma is for people who will sacrifice everything (including $1000) for image quality. Otherwise, the Sony is better on all counts.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 2, 2012)

Unleamy why is you Prudential Plaza DP2M shot at 9408 x 6272 ??It looks horrible.

The first example clearly shows how bad the Sony looks in comparison. The Sigma is in another league, and that's an understatement.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Sep 1, 2012)

Having downloaded the sample images from http://www.ephotozine.com/article/sigma-dp2-merrill-sample-photo-gallery-19830
I'm amazed. The shots of the building show an incredible amount of detail, no CA but just a bit of noise. There seems to be no anti-aliasing filter.

For low ISO image quality and for its lack of useless 'features', this is undoubtedly the best compact for landscapes that I've ever seen.

2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 2, 2012)

The is no AA filter on any of the Sigma cameras.

0 upvotes
magneto shot
By magneto shot (Sep 1, 2012)

ah, finally...
To any interested readers, this camera is a must have. If you never owned any sigma, this is your best entry to see what is the Foveon all about. Now, its been many years since i owned a DP2.
I have GXR, M9, Sony A55 (sold), Nikon V1. But frankly, nothing beats the IQ of a foveon at low iso and the sharpness is unmatched. Even with the M9 without AA, the old DP2 images beats it flat.

Its not for sports and low light though. Using it in low light for portrait, landscape is no problem though, tripod cometh.

2 upvotes
King Penguin
By King Penguin (Sep 1, 2012)

I've just browsed the DP1/2 group on Flickr to see if I can see for MYSELF the differences between the Sigma sensor and the results I obtain from my Nik DX sensor as most of the comments here seem to be on what I can only call the Luddite side of things or the 'born again' photographer type (ie, completely fixed views and predudiced against anything they don't believe in) - you know the type!

My 5 min browse revealed that there are many fantastic images and the colour rendition and detail were impressive. Certainly I would be hard pressed to consistently achieve this with my Nik DX sensor and photoshop processing.

So maybe there is something special in the sensor......or maybe they are just better photographers!

I won't be buying one though as having invested in some nice Nikkor glass over the years, it would be expensive to change........

I think 99% of amateur photographers are probably like me.......ie, having invested in the glass of a particular system even if a different manufacturer brings out a brilliant new body or camera we don't bung our kit on eBay and then reinvest, we just wait patiently for our brand to bring one out and upgrade if and when we can afford it.

Am I right or am I right?

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Sep 1, 2012)

You are probably right. The DP1M and DP2M are probably sharper than any APS-C sensor out now. Its somewhat dependent on the kind of subject you are photographing, but the 24 MP APS-C sensors you can find is not enough to beat it. Maybe a 35 MP will - I dont know.

But - its also the lens. For some reason the DP cameras have unbelievable lenses.

2 upvotes
xrsdb
By xrsdb (Sep 1, 2012)

Haha, you are right. As you said many amateur users may not need two cameras. After all you cannot expect a foveon censor in room without flash or at at night. But for me, a fan of landscape, this is a must-have.

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Sep 1, 2012)

King... you are right. But...

Remember this is a fixed lens camera, and a niche product. As such, it really doesn't matter which lens system you own. This is designed to be a second camera.

I suppose some people might use it as their only camera, but the size, shape, limitations, cost, and unique sensor properties make it better suited as a companion camera for some other brand DSLR.

There are plenty of Nikon and Canon DSLR owners who also own fixed lens cameras like the Panasonic LX5 or Canon S100. This Sigma fills a similar, albeit much narrower, niche.

I think the high cost and all the limitations (poor video, poor high ISO performance, questionable handling speed, etc.) will guarantee that this will never be a mass market item. But it will make a nice toy for anyone with the means to buy it. And it does seem to produce very nice images when used within it's limitations.

4 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 1, 2012)

Marty has it exactly right. I've owned several Foveon cameras and I'm still not convinced the sensor has anything special. I believe its what the sensor does not have--an anti-aliasing filter. The mathematicians will tell you the AA filter makes no difference but this is false. Get a cheap SLR converted for infrared use and they dump the AA filter. You'll see the sharpness improves a lot, even with the resulting low contrast IR images. Even a D800 benefits a little from getting rid of the AA.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Bigbokeh
By Bigbokeh (Sep 1, 2012)

I think SIGMA should also fix the aperture at f8 and be done with it - Sorry guys but comparing SIGMA to Sony is like comparing a camera to a fish - if you gave me the Merrill with a fixed aperture I would prefer it to anything Sony calls a camera.

6 upvotes
Charrick
By Charrick (Sep 1, 2012)

That must be a joke. Yet it's a bit more sad than funny.

3 upvotes
FTW
By FTW (Sep 1, 2012)

you never owed a Sony, or used one, I guess.

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Sep 1, 2012)

Even if it does have the great colour and image qualty, there are too many limitations. So, I will first buy a few other cameras first and keep them, before I want to buy this, so that I can take also good quality photos when I have poor light, when I need to take actions, when I need to take shots of distant objects, when I need to have some certainly in reliably focussed, exposed, stablilised pictures at the right moment.

So, fine, it would be my 4th camera, assuming I win lotto :)

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
lxstorm
By lxstorm (Sep 1, 2012)

Regarding great colors one mights Google "foveon yellow cast"

There are only two companies that poses great heritage in superb color rendering historically they are Kodak-Film & Fuji-Film for obvious reason. Therefore if you are looking for good colors Kodak sensor based (phase one, Leica) or Fuji-Sony sensor (Nikon, Sony) photo instruments are preferable.

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Sep 1, 2012)

Hmm, since when did Fuji start to make sensors for Nikon and Sony?

2 upvotes
iaredatsun
By iaredatsun (Sep 1, 2012)

Just because a company makes/made film capable of rendering good colour doesn't mean that they are necessarily going to make sensors capable of rendering good colour. The two technologies are so different that a company's historical heritage hardly counts.

4 upvotes
FTW
By FTW (Sep 1, 2012)

I ow a Fuji and a NEX-7 and there is no color in the whole Fuji Palette that I have not been able to reproduce with the NEX files until now. Fuji has this native color that has a certain appeal, specially on skin tones. But, with Sony Files I have been able until now to reproduce that in PS ACR without problems. Once you have the settings and save them, you do this with one click. Fuji was a champion to shoot against light, so I compared the Fuji and the NEX on same shot in full sun. The ADR system of the NEX brought me more detail in the surrounding than the Fuji, no flares on the Sony, light flares on the Fuji with the same focal length on both. Picture quality was excellent on both. I have seen many Foveon shots and all had at base that yellow warm touch. But these are bigotries, with today's soft we manage that anyway and change it to what we need. In the NEX, the colorimetric adjustment allows me to set what I like anyway and I see it on the display before i press the button.

0 upvotes
Essai
By Essai (Sep 1, 2012)

I have not seen a single photo made with a Sigma camera than can match the IQ of a D800 or a 5DIII.

Please someone, posts a few "unique to Foveon" pictures in the Sigma forum so we all know that you are not blind.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 1, 2012)

If you are not formally representing a group of people then you are not "we."

The Sigma SD1 and DP2M produces noticeably better detail than the 5DIII. You need roughly 30 megapixels to match it. The D800 obviously does but the finest detail will always be affected by the drawbacks of a Bayer sensor, something the Sigma Foveon sensor is not affected by.

If you have not "seen a single photo" made with those two Sigmas that obviously proves what I said then you haven't done much searching. I also suspect you can not be convinced otherwise.

8 upvotes
khaledgawdat
By khaledgawdat (Sep 1, 2012)

i own nikon d4 d800 and pentax 645d
pictures i make with the foven sensor are much better than my nikon and pentax. sigma cameras have superb sensors good lenses and very poor cameras. these are non professional cameras with incredible image quality. i enjoy using them and i love the picture quality but i cannot use it in a wedding or a professional setting.

9 upvotes
leventhan
By leventhan (Sep 1, 2012)

But I think that the Nikon d800e will outperform the Sigma DP1M. Well it's normal right? I mean with the huge price gap and the use of some filters to reverse the "AA filter effect".

But still, this foveon is just too damn cool.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Sep 1, 2012)

>If you are not formally representing a group of people
>then you are not "we."

The honorable gentleman is but availing himself of the "we" of royalty.

2 upvotes
Essai
By Essai (Sep 1, 2012)

still waiting... Fanboys are pathetic...

0 upvotes
FTW
By FTW (Sep 1, 2012)

you might be right, but seek a 14 mpix that does. Stay within the pixel count, your D800 takes the full sensor in 5 channels, applies the Bayer pattern filter for each color and calculates an overlay to get the best shot. So, if you consider that, you have 180 mpix in Foveon calculation, the Foveon has 3 layers of pixels with 15 mpix each, thus is a 15 mpix chip. He records the full picture in all 15 mpix in each of the 3 base colors and calculates the best picture in the processor unit. So, compare that to a NEX3 with 14 mpix and see if you can beat the sensor with that, what is very doubtful. Maybe you start comparing Fuji's X1 Pro to it, that could be a good discussion to start with.

0 upvotes
panpen
By panpen (Sep 2, 2012)

Essai. Why so much hatred? Did your mommy drop you in your head when you were a baby? You're free to make love with your Nikon whenever you feel the urge. Good luck

0 upvotes
inspiredan
By inspiredan (Sep 2, 2012)

http://outliner.jp/Foveon/bbsdata/13092-0.jpg

0 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Sep 1, 2012)

It seems Sigma hasn't heard about mirrorless cameras. I'd tell them, but it just feels awkward. :)

I wouldn't pay a penny less than $2800 for this.

1 upvote
lapsa
By lapsa (Aug 31, 2012)

I own a RX100 and a sigma DP1s etc this new 100 iso camera has brought very little to the table. I will keep the old for my odd landscape shot. Mind you the old Epson RD1 creates better so called film like landscape images

0 upvotes
jon404
By jon404 (Aug 31, 2012)

No flash? I use the one on my XZ-1 quite a bit, both for fill and to set off a Yong-Nuo optical slave. So this is not a snapshot camera, is it? More for somebody who takes the time to plan their shots -- and would have the time to attach a hotshoe flash if needed. Not sure if that's me...

0 upvotes
LaFonte
By LaFonte (Aug 31, 2012)

It is similar in price to x100 and that is also fixed lens and proved to be quite successful for fuji. I think there is much stronger market for this merill one now than it was for the first dp1. If it is reasonably fast and good ISO, I am sure lot of travelers will be pleased with it.

0 upvotes
farrukh
By farrukh (Aug 31, 2012)

Just sent Sigma an e-mail via the form on their website. The next thing I know, I receive an e-mail confirming my subscription :/

Great cameras for non sport-like activities, just wish they didn't add people to mailing lists in such a way!

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Aug 31, 2012)

I don't get the hate. I don't think there is a better camera out there for hikers and landscape shooters like myself. I want one.

If you need responsiveness or high ISO, look elsewhere, obviously.

But does YOUR camera have IQ this good? Seriously? I don't believe you.

10 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Sep 1, 2012)

The hate is only unfulfilled dreams. People see a camera with great detail and color fidelity (at low ISO) and would love to get it, but the camera fails in most common photographic situations as it is too slow and cumbersome.

But I agree - it is great for hikers and landscape shooters. In that case even the battery life is not so bad as one rarely takes 300 landscape photos on a one day trip.

2 upvotes
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