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Carl Zeiss announces CP.2 25mm T2.1 fast cinema prime

By dpreview staff on Aug 30, 2012 at 10:28 GMT

Carl Zeiss has announced the Compact Prime CP.2 25/T2.1 cinema lens. It's a replacement for the existing Compact Prime CP.2 25/T2.9, offering a whole stop greater light-gathering ability. The company claims that the optical design has 'vitually eliminated' chomatic aberration, which means it can now offer T2.1 primes covering the 25mm to 135mm range. The CP.2 25/T2.1 uses the company's interchangeable lens mount system, with Arri PL, Canon EF, Nikon F, Micro Four Thirds and Sony E options all available. It will start shipping on October 1st, 2012, with an expected retail price of €3,300 (excl. VAT) or $4,500 (excl. VAT).

Carl Zeiss presents new Compact Prime CP.2 25/T2.1 lens at IBC 2012 in Amsterdam

 All eight lenses in focal length range 25-135mm now have aperture T2.1

OBERKOCHEN/Germany, 30.08.2012. - Carl Zeiss will present a new cine lens from the Compact Prime CP.2 lens family during the IBC 2012 in Amsterdam, the leading international trade show for film, radio and television, from September 7 to 11, 2012, in hall 11 booth G64. With an even larger aperture, the new Compact Prime CP.2 25/T2.1 lens from Carl Zeiss achieves outstanding images in challenging lighting conditions.

The Compact Prime CP.2 25/T2.1 succeeds the Compact Prime CP.2 25/T2.9, which will continue to be available as long as supplies last. “We are responding to the wish of many cinematographers and video producers who would like a high-speed CP.2 lens with a maximum aperture of T2.1 for the 25mm focal length range as well,” says Anna Rausch, Product Manager Cine Lenses in the Camera Lens Division of Carl Zeiss AG. “Our optical experts have virtually eliminated the chromatic aberrations on these lenses through a special design and selection of materials. We can now offer a constant max T-Stop of 2.1 for all of our CP.2 lenses in the focal length range of 25-135mm.” This gives users even more possibilities to compose their images and requires less effort with the lighting. The biggest advantage on set is that the light does not have to be adapted when switching lenses because they all have the same F-Stop. The lens speed is ideal for playing with the depth-of-field.

The Compact Prime CP.2 lens series, extremely popular among ambitious cinematographers thanks to its 14 fixed focal lengths from 15 to 135mm, will again be the center of attention during Carl Zeiss's presence at the IBC 2012. By using the interchangeable mounts for PL, EF, F, MFT and E, the lenses can be easily adapted to numerous camera systems, ensuring compatibility with future cameras as technology changes. Thanks to the interchangeable mounts and the 36 x 24mm image-circle illumination the Compact Prime CP.2 lens family is versatile to use — on HDSLR and HD video cameras as well as on professional cine cameras. The lenses are characterized by their robustness, a standard focus rotation angle of 300 degrees and uniform measurements. This combination makes the lenses ideally suited for every demand on the film set. All Compact Prime CP.2 lenses have a standard cine-style housing with gearing that allows the attachment of any standard follow-focus system.

All the new features that Carl Zeiss presented at the NAB Show in Las Vegas in April will now enjoy a European debut at the IBC 2012: two Compact Prime CP.2 lenses (CP.2 15/T2.9 and CP.2 135/T2.1), three Compact Prime CP.2 Super Speed lenses as well as the Compact Zoom CZ.2 70-200/T2.9. The new focal lengths 15mm and 135mm expand the offering of the Compact Prime CP.2 family and open up many new creative possi- bilities, from super wide angle to tele. The three Compact Prime CP.2 Super Speed lenses have an aperture of T1.5 and are available in focal lengths 35mm, 50mm and 85mm. These highlights as well as other cine and camera lenses can be experienced and tried out on the spot during the IBC.

Alongside the new features, Carl Zeiss will display behind a huge glass case all of its cine and camera lenses that are currently available on the market — lenses that guarantee images of the highest quality, regardless of whether they are used on cameras to shoot Hollywood movies, on HDSLR cameras or HD video cameras. The display will include the well-known Master Prime, Ultra Prime, Compact Prime CP.2 and Compact Zoom CZ.2, DigiPrime, Lightweight Zoom LWZ.2 lenses, as well as SLR camera lenses, which are ideal for getting started in the HD video segment.

In addition, Carl Zeiss and its partner ARRI will present the long-awaited anamorphic lens to public. Visitors to the Carl Zeiss stand will have an opportunity to try out a prototype of the lens that is currently in the final design phase on an ARRI Alexa Studio camera.

Carl Zeiss will start shipping the new Compact Prime CP.2 25/T2.1 on October 1st, 2012. The expected retail price is EUR 3,300 (excl. VAT) or US$ 4,500 (excl. VAT)*.

*Status: August 30, 2012

Comments

Total comments: 38
AtlasEmarket
By AtlasEmarket (Sep 3, 2012)

Well and Perfect , But price is ... little high !

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

"Carl Zeiss and its partner ARRI will present the long-awaited anamorphic lens to public. Visitors to the Carl Zeiss stand will have an opportunity to try out a prototype of the lens that is currently in the final design phase..."

Wow, considering that Bausch & Lomb had developed anamorphic lenses way back in the early 1950s, the Germans are a bit late coming to the anamorphic lens game, it seems. About 60 years too late, in fact.

Regarding this CP lens -- it is a still photo lens with a larger focus ring and plenty of witness markings on it. I guess for some, that will be worth US$4,500. For others, not.

0 upvotes
lxstorm
By lxstorm (Aug 30, 2012)

It is not an anamorphic lens footage just an outdated photo lens Zeiss

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3c_dOMVXRhw

I wish Hollywood will come with something on a par using all their modern bells and whistlers ;)

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

You probably won't be able to shoot that scene lit with nothing but candles with an T2.1 lens. I believe they used something like a T0.7 lens for that famous sequence, right?

0 upvotes
Camediadude
By Camediadude (Aug 30, 2012)

Thanks for the tip on the Kubrick film, it is now saved up in my Amazon instant prime waiting list for later ... I have heard of this film a whle back. It sounds so good ...

0 upvotes
mick232
By mick232 (Aug 31, 2012)

Well, Bausch & Lomb actually was founded by German immigrants, so you're not quite right there.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 31, 2012)

@ mick232: Yeah, Bausch & Lomb is a German company, I suppose because the founders were European whites. Voting Republican this year, are we?

Anyhow, Bausch & Long of North Korea have already had anamorphic lenses way back in the summer of 1952. How come Arri of East Germany is only developing them now, some 60 years later?

0 upvotes
vtinitus
By vtinitus (Aug 30, 2012)

Call me uninformed but why does it not come in Sony/Minolta A/AF mount too? I recon that Sony E has probably better chances to sell well, considering their cameras but Sony's SLT Alphas aren't to bad when it comes to video too, aren't they? Or did Sony push the E mount through royalties and so forth?
I own one awesome A55 myself, but don't have any need for such a lens though. I'm just puzzled...

1 upvote
BJL
By BJL (Aug 31, 2012)

For motion photography, E mount is far more attractive than alpha mount: NEX bodies offer an EVF (without the light loss of a pellicle mirror system) and Sony offers multiple professional video cameras in E mount.

0 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Aug 30, 2012)

I bet they spend more time trying to read all those useless numbers on the lens than they spend actually shooting.

1 upvote
Jun2
By Jun2 (Aug 30, 2012)

distance scale for manual focus. accurate distance mark is very important for the focus. When shooting peoples on the move, distance mark can be used for estimated manual focus. These lens have more marks that stretched out means they can be used more accurately for manual focus.

0 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Aug 30, 2012)

falconeyes, I am not really 'in the know', butt ...

... the reason for the price is simple, Performance wide open must be PERFECT - that is the main point. Mechanics is even better than the DSLR lenses. The production volume is much smaller than SLR lenses. The lens is HUGE chunk of glass and even bigger one of metal. I had it briefly in hand mounted on some of the Full frame DSLR bodies - the lens dwarfed the camera and it was HEAVY.

Zoom cine lenses cost 5 figures and 1 is not necessarily the first digit.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

Well, according to the press release reproduced above, this is one of FOURTEEN (!!!) single focal lenses in the series. By the time you buy one of each, you are gonna be where, in the US$60,000 price range for them, correct?

That is quite a bit of money, really, and even then your maximum telephoto will be the 135mm lens.

Also, carting 14 different lenses to the set and keeping track of them -- you will need a dedicated "lens coral person" for that task probably.

0 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Aug 30, 2012)

Many filmmakers rent high end gear. Complaining about the price of pro film gear is like complaining about the price of airliners. You are not buying the plane you're renting a seat.

The prices are high but as sincezgsi says they are priced where they need to be.
If they don't get paid for their work why should they do the R&D?

2 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (Aug 31, 2012)

As I said in my reply below, I looked up the Zeiss web page for an answer. And they list both, SLR and cine lenses as being the same quality optically (except for flare control where they give the cine lenses an edge). So, R&D may be an issue for focal lengths not duplicated as an SLR lens (due to the smaller market). But otherwise, I think it is just the market which has deeper pockets.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 3, 2012)

A $1,000 lens dressed up and made to look like a lens worth paying $4,500 for.

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Aug 30, 2012)

Samyang 24mm T1.5 ED rules!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (Aug 30, 2012)

To anybody in the knows ...

I've got a question: Why is it that cine lenses (in general, and from Zeiss, comparing their cine and SLR offerings in particular) are much more expensive than SLR lenses -- while at the same time, the resolution requirement for cine lenses must be on the lower end even considering 4k video, i.e. 8MP?

2 upvotes
lxstorm
By lxstorm (Aug 30, 2012)

Zeiss SLR lenses were around 5 - 35 grand USD a decade ago.

They are out of production since in terms of today cheap currencies the cost of manufacturing would result in insane figures.

0 upvotes
frettled
By frettled (Aug 30, 2012)

Production volumes for cine lenses are likely to be far lower than those for regular SLR lenses.

Also, cost due to rigorous quality control follows a near exponential curve.

You might as well ask why a Canon 1D-X or Nikon D4 are ten times the cost of a consumer level DSLR, they don't do ten times as much or deliver ten times the resolution…

4 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Aug 30, 2012)

@frettled: I would also like add, most cine lenses are calibrated for transmission stops rather than f-stops(aperture opening) which makes these more expensive compared to traditional SLR lenses.

0 upvotes
Imagefoundry
By Imagefoundry (Aug 30, 2012)

Low production volume is one reason, to be sure. The other one is that cine lenses have design requirements that simply don't matter for still photography - for example, no focus shift whatsoever when changing aperture. Or precise colour matching to existing range of lenses.

0 upvotes
3a
By 3a (Aug 30, 2012)

declicked aperture, transmission stops, low production volumes, high purchasing power of the targeted buyers... etc etc i guess :)

0 upvotes
BJL
By BJL (Aug 30, 2012)

Designs that minimize *focus breathing* are another constraint. That is, with many lenses, changing the focus changes the field of view, and cinematographers care about avoiding that far more than still photographers do, to avoid the framing changing during a shot as the subject moves closer to the camera and focus has to follow.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

While there are indeed some minute technical differences, when a lens is said to be a "cine lens" or 'cinematic lens" by its manufacturer, they will charge for it whatever they think that the deep pocketed camera and lens rental houses will in fact pay for it. The large equipment rental houses frequently pick these things up at 30-40 percent discounts off of the list prices, anyhow.

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (Aug 31, 2012)

Thanks for all the replies. Actually, I looked up the Zeiss web page for an answer. And they list both, SLR and cine lenses as being the same quality optically (except for flare control where they give the cine lenses an edge). Sure, the cine lenses have some dedicated mechanical properties but they are hardly increasing production cost much.

So, I go by the different markets, different prices, theory.

0 upvotes
Paul Guba
By Paul Guba (Sep 1, 2012)

The lenses are built to a different standard despite what you see on the boards here. They are matched throughout the whole series of primes and zooms so virtually no change in aperture or color. This is essential when you have multiple cameras on a shoot. Build quality is better and focus dampened to allow it to be pulled while shooting live.

0 upvotes
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Aug 30, 2012)

Prefect!

0 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (Aug 30, 2012)

I've just ordered mine - NOT !

2 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Aug 30, 2012)

Is this lens f/1.8 and did I read it right that the lens mount can change?

0 upvotes
pierpa
By pierpa (Aug 30, 2012)

From 2.1 to 2.9 there's 0.93 stops, not 1.

Pedantically yours,
8^)

0 upvotes
Steve Balcombe
By Steve Balcombe (Aug 30, 2012)

Not necessarily. T-numbers are rounded after measurement, not before, so it's perfectly possible for two lenses which are exactly one stop different to be labelled T2.1 and T2.9.

E.g. T2.070 and T2.927 are (to three places) exactly one stop apart.

:-|

2 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Aug 30, 2012)

costs almost nothing

2 upvotes
Holger Bargen
By Holger Bargen (Aug 30, 2012)

No Pentax mount?! :-(((

1 upvote
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Aug 30, 2012)

What a loss!!

3 upvotes
Camediadude
By Camediadude (Aug 30, 2012)

Why are cinema lenses so pleasing to gaze at? Is it becasue they ooze pure function ...

1 upvote
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (Aug 30, 2012)

Cuz of all those numbers~

1 upvote
OldDigiman
By OldDigiman (Aug 30, 2012)

It would look even nicer with another zero in the price

0 upvotes
Total comments: 38