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Canon announces EOS C100 professional video camera

By dpreview staff on Aug 29, 2012 at 11:54 GMT

Canon has announced a the EOS C100, a 'budget' addition to its Cinema EOS range of professional video cameras. Designed for independent videographers, the C100 offers the same core technology as the C300, including its 8.3MP Super 35mm image sensor, in a smaller package. Its EF lens mount means it's compatible with all of Canon's SLR lenses, as well as the company's specialist Cinema EOS optics. The C100 records 1920 x 1080 Full HD movies to SD cards at a bitrate of 24Mbps, offers an ISO range of 320-20000, and can output uncompressed video directly to external recorders. It will be available from November 2012 at a price of $7,999.

Press release:

Professional quality and flexibility for single shooters – Canon unveils the EOS C100

London, UK, 29 August 2012 – Canon today adds to the Cinema EOS System with the launch of the new EOS C100 – a compact, versatile interchangeable-lens professional video camera designed for independent videographers. Based on the core performance of the acclaimed EOS C300, the new model combines impressive hardware specifications with a range of new automatic features – making it ideal for professionals who shoot without a crew, or EOS videographers entering the Cinema EOS System for the first time.


With Canon’s Super 35mm 8.3MP Bayer-filtered CMOS sensor at its core, the EOS C100 combines exceptional image quality with a design approximately 15% smaller than the advanced EOS C300. The camera’s powerful imaging system enables the same processing as three-chip RGB systems, delivering exceptional colour, wide dynamic
range and proven low light performance, while extensive NLE support makes it suitable for a wide range of users and production purposes. With Canon’s EF mount users have immediate access to over 60 class-leading EF lenses, as well as the freedom to experiment with the company’s expanding EF Cinema Lens line-up.

First-class camera system

Designed to offer leading quality and portability, the EOS C100 features a specification designed around the needs of single operators. Its advanced imaging system utilises the widely-used AVCHD codec, with the CMOS sensor recording 1920x1080 (Full HD) resolution video to SD cards1 at 24Mbps with 4:2:0 colour sampling – delivering sharp, vivid, professional-quality video. Uncompressed video can also be output directly to external recorders via an integrated HDMI terminal, complete with embedded timecode data.


Equipped to provide exceptional performance, the EOS C100 allows users to capture high quality images for a range of creative outputs. Support for 24/25/30p and 50/60i frame rates offers flexibility, and an ISO range of 320-20,000 provides extensive exposure control and low noise in all lighting conditions. A new Wide Dynamic Range gamma setting makes it possible to shoot in demanding, high contrast situations – achieving a dynamic range of up to 800% without the need for extensive colour grading in post-production. Additionally, Canon Log Gamma enables the capture of high quality video rich in exposure latitude and dynamic range, and ensures footage has a consistent look and feel when used alongside other Cinema EOS cameras in multicamera
shoots.

Easy operation for single users

As well as full manual control, the EOS C100 integrates a range of new automatic features to support independent operators such as documentary makers or news shooters. A new One Shot AF button enables users to instantly check focus, with the central image area automatically checked prior to recording. Push Auto Iris evaluates exposure and makes any required adjustments before shooting, while new Auto White Balance uses the power of Canon’s DIGIC DV III image processor to detect and balance colour information – allowing operators to focus on the story in front of them.

A new graphical user interface enables videographers to conveniently adjust standard camera settings using the LCD screen. Operators can fine-tune Gamma settings, with the camera displaying both ‘before’ and ‘after’ curves on-screen, while White Balance settings can be altered using the camera’s joystick lever, with a colour/plane graphic displaying the amount of compensation being applied in real time. Additionally, support for continuous, automatic focus and iris adjustment will be added by a firmware update in 2013, providing fast, smooth performance when used with specified models in Canon’s range of EF Stepper Motor (STM) lenses.

The EOS C100 also offers highly flexible storage, recording to two SD card slots. Users can record to both cards simultaneously with Double Slot Recording or use Relay Recording to automatically switch across memory cards when the one in use becomes full. In-camera down-conversion also allows operators to convert HD footage stored on one card to SD resolution on the other – ideal for operators who want to reduce the size
or resolution of footage before transferring or web hosting.

Professional design, professional audio

The EOS C100 features the same modular concept made popular by the EOS C300. Engineered to provide mobility and durability, it features a robust build and lightweight construction ideal for use in a number of situations. Its magnesium alloy frame provides strength and rigidity while keeping weight to a minimum, allowing
users to enjoy both versatility and comfort – even during all-day use.

A large, high quality 8.8cm (3.5”) Vari-angle LCD is situated on the rear of the camera body, which can be manoeuvred to offer easy access to a range of function buttons situated behind the display. An adjustable handgrip also offers DSLR-like ergonomics during handheld shooting, and can be removed altogether for shooting in tight spaces or as part of a multi-camera rig. The camera’s button layout also has been designed taking user feedback into account, with all recording buttons now featuring red markings for added convenience during shooting. Up to 15 assignable buttons also provide high levels of customisation, allowing each user to optimise camera operation to suit their own requirements.

The EOS C100 also offers professionally-optimised audio and connectivity, supporting the capture of Dolby Digital AC3 or 16-bit Linear PCM audio at 48 kHz – the high quality signal required for professional broadcast content. A stereo microphone is built into the camera’s detachable handle, alongside audio control dials and two XLR terminals which enable users to connect to external microphones and other sources. The camera also features a new lockable HDMI terminal that ensures cables remain securely attached to the input during shooting2.

EF lenses and EF Cinema Lenses – power to create

As part of the EOS system, the EOS C100 is compatible with over 60 EF lenses and Canon’s EF Cinema Lens line-up, and complements a new duo of compact lightweight cine zoom lenses, the CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 L S and CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L S. Both new lenses offer outstanding mobility and quality, providing performance and value that makes them excellent options for independent professionals and production
houses alike.

In addition, Canon’s hugely-popular EF lens series for DSLRs offers virtually unlimited creative freedom, with options to meet any budgetary requirement. The EF-S range comprises a selection of compact, lightweight zoom lenses that merge high image quality with affordable pricing, while the full-frame EF lens line-up offers outstanding quality and flexibility – utilising luxury, class-leading optics in a range of focal length options ranging from 8mm to 800mm. Since the launch of the EOS System in 1987 over 70 million EF lenses have been manufactured, a measure of the system’s unparalleled quality, popularity, and ability to meet the needs of all kinds of photography and video users.

Canon EOS C100 – key features:

  • 8.3MP Super 35mm CMOS sensor; Full HD
  • High sensitivity, low noise
  • 24Mbps AVCHD to SD cards
  • Automatic shooting functions
  • Interchangeable EF lenses
  • Canon Log Gamma
  • Compact, modular, lightweight
  • Professional audio
  • Seamless workflow integration
  • CPS video support

1 SD, SDHC and SDXC card formats supported
2 Compatible HDMI cable required

Comments

Total comments: 99
canon l glass
By canon l glass (Nov 2, 2012)

How would this compare to the 5dmk3 for video ?

0 upvotes
COlela
By COlela (Aug 30, 2012)

I'm hoping that the Black Magic camera breaks the hegemony that keeps the prices for these cameras so high. I wonder what the profit multiple is? I would think new R&D costs are fairly low at this point in the digital imaging life cycle.

1 upvote
Daniel from Bavaria
By Daniel from Bavaria (Aug 30, 2012)

For my taste Canon is lately focusing too much the video business.

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Sep 14, 2012)

Right, video is a fad and will be gone soon. Who in their right mind would sit and watch videos ?

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Aug 30, 2012)

Just left the Canon Learning Center website, and I must say that their new C 100 is an exciting bit of cinematography kit that is destined to wind up in many a run and gun event/wedding/spot news multi-tasking image maker's camera bag. This new compact and light weight one chip design is sure to replace all of Canon's lineup of 3 chip camcorders. I can hardly wait to hear what real end users have to say about this video camera vs. the Red Scarlett, Blackmagic cinema camera, and the rest of its competition. I'm excited, and I don't even do video, YET. :)

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 31, 2012)

@ DonnieG, you are almost right on, 'cept for:

1. Canon does not manufacture 3-chip camcorders. Not even 3-chip still cameras, as far as I know. Almost nobody else out there do those any more, anyhow.

2. The EOS C100 is not a cinematography camera. Rather, it is a standard video camera that can record standard 1080p video at a maximum frame rate of 30fps, and use the consumer-grade 24Mb/sec AVCHD codec. You can get hundreds of digital cameras that can do all this as well, some priced as low as US$100-200.

3. I would love to see the rate cards of wedding guys buying this camera with the lenses and accessories for around $20,000 and try to have a decent ROI on their purchase.

4. By the time you put on the top handle, something you need to do if you also want to record audio and not just video, you will be at 3 pounds of weight or more w/o the lens. Not exactly "light weight" in most folks' books for a 1080p30 video-corder.

But otherwise -- I'm all with you on this, DonnieG.

0 upvotes
Shogi
By Shogi (Aug 31, 2012)

@ Francis

Canon certainly makes 3 chip camcorders. Please enjoy their lineup of said camcorders. http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/professional/products/professional_cameras/hd_video_cameras

And Sony, Panasonic, Ikegami, etc. all make 3 chip cameras..which are still the standard in professional videography.

Regarding the second point, the C100 is for narrative filmmaking, not a "standard video camera." With a "standard video camera" you have zoom and auto-focus lenses.

The target market for a camera like this is schools, independent film, documentary work, B camera, etc.

3 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Sep 1, 2012)

Thanks Shogi for clearing that up for us. Now, as for my referring to the C100 as a cinematography camera, I chose to use that term based on the size of the camera's super 35 CMOS chip as compared to the tiny chips used in traditional video gear. So now, in additional to having extensive lens choices for professional one person video applications, the camera can offer up cinema quality depth of field control, and comes complete, right out of the box with everything you need to start recording, once you attach your favorite lens to the front and load your SD media. No cages or add on power sources or accessory monitors required. I find that significant for the price, others might not. But then I'm looking for results beyond the typical facebook, etc., post.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 1, 2012)

Like I said before, Shogi.... Canon does not make/sell any "3-chip" cameras now. Nobody else does, either. It's a single-chip CMOS world out there now, you know.

Nor do the others you had mentioned. Sorry. They WERE making them before, so you are partially right, I suppose.

Best get an ILC or DSLR for under $1,000 -- they all can do 1080p at 30fps to a 24Mb/sec AVCHD codec. No reason to pay a $7,000 surcharge for the Canon name. Just my 2 cents' worth, mind you.

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Sep 3, 2012)

If Francis Carver had bothered to read from the Canon pro camcorder product page he would have discovered that Canon has no less than four 3 chip cameras. They are the XF305, XF300, XHG1S, and XHA1S. All currently in production. Now just maybe Francis lives in a country where Canon doesn't make these products available. If that's the case, then of course he wouldn't be aware of these high end Canon products.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Amanecido
By Amanecido (Sep 4, 2012)

Hi to all. I am sorry if I am wrong but I take it that Donnie G is not a videographer yet. Probably a photographer already. If that is the case, I am afraid that his comments are somehow out of place. Excuse me for being too direct, but I am fed up with slideshows passing as videos. Still photography is an art in itself, but it is definitely NOT video. Video is totally different than photography. Both are equal unique and fantastic though.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 4, 2012)

With you on that, Amandecido.

It is fantastic that some folks out there would take a single CMOS sensor camera to be a 3-chip camera, like it was a 3-chip CCD sensor with prism something from the glory days. Wow.... But I guess some of us pick our cameras based on the number of chips it has, that must be it, surely. The more, the merrier, as that thinking goes.

0 upvotes
martian1
By martian1 (Sep 11, 2012)

Dear Francis,
Apparently you do not understand the point about 3-chip cameras - as stated before by Shogi and Donnie, in Canon Professional's current portfolio 4 out of total 7 cameras do have 3 sensors (either CMOS or CCD) and indeed with a prism. This is similar for Sony Professional, e.g. current XDCAM series - of total 11 cameras all have 3 sensors (PDW700, PDWF800, PMW200, PMW320, PMW350, PMW500, PMWEX1R, PMWEX3, PMWTD300) except 2 cameras with 1 sensor (PMW100, PMWF3). And similar for Panasonic Professional (here actually several consumer cameras have 3 sensors), etc ...
Hope this clarifies things.

1 upvote
jj74e
By jj74e (Aug 30, 2012)

mmm $8000....right in my budget...that was meant for my college education? food? car? bills? uh...

0 upvotes
WellyNZ
By WellyNZ (Sep 12, 2012)

It's not for you.

0 upvotes
Rooru S
By Rooru S (Aug 30, 2012)

Talking about overpriced cameras... Bunch of people here stated the alternatives and stil some people keep talking about 1lbs less, when obviously this kind of camera (and the competition) will be put on rigs and handled by a team. No excuses, Canon is charging premium and sadly, some people will pay just for the brand.

But the only good thing I can see here, is the new lenses. Geez, those are gorgeous lenses.

2 upvotes
Dan Clark
By Dan Clark (Aug 30, 2012)

Blackmagic Cinema Camera. 2.5K RAW. Yes, RAW! 13 stops of DR. Full copy of Davinci Resolve. Canon, Zeiss lenses. Use standard SSDs instead of custom media. $3,000. No brainer.

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

Seems like Blackmagic Design is once again promising that they will indeed make at least a few dozens of the camera you are talking about, but after setting various delivery dates this year and breaking all of them, I would not hold out much hope for the BCC to actually happen. You know, for real.

0 upvotes
LX5er
By LX5er (Aug 30, 2012)

Cameras are already going out for reviews. Shipments are to begin Tuesday, September 4.

It should be worth the wait!

0 upvotes
hiipolarbear
By hiipolarbear (Aug 30, 2012)

my friend at Singapore have already received one unit of Blackmagic, done the unboxing video and now working on reviewing video. I'm sure Blackmagic Cinema Camera is just days away.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

Main problem with the Blackmagic camera seems to be, since it has a totally one-off, and rather smallish sensor, there isn't a single lens matching it for coverage. Fisheye and UWA perspective shooting will not be possible with the BCC, unless some optics mfr will come up with something designed specifically for it.

Also, it looks like an oversized P&S, ergonomics on it are totally lacking, and so is the viewfinder, come to think of it. But I guess it is at least cheap -- if you consider US$3,000 cheap.

So, the latest "deadline" for shipping it is September 4th? Wow, back at NAB they told us it's gonna ship in June.

0 upvotes
AllanZ
By AllanZ (Aug 30, 2012)

This is nearly head on competition with the Panasonic AF100 {:I

0 upvotes
ABM Barry
By ABM Barry (Aug 29, 2012)

It never ceases to amaze me when people talk about the Quote: "WHOPPING weight of this or that. I have seen guys (wimps) stating Oh this camera is 7 grams lighter than X weighing 234 Grams!

The population is becoming very Fat & very weak indeed!

"I'll just have a small coffee thanks, I can't lift a big cup all by myself!

Toughen up folks, focus on the cameras capability or the camera manufacturers will drop features that we would expect as standard inclusion by simply saying "Oh we think it would make it over 200grams therefore too heavy for the Blobbies!" LOL

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 29, 2012)

Price on this latest, boldest Canon attempt at overtaking Hollywood (EOS C100) is exactly the same as what the Sony price is on the NEX-FS700. To the penny. Little bit way too suspicious, I should think.

And whereas the EOS C100 by Canon can only do regular HD at a maximum frame-rate of 30fps, and is handicapped by a consumer-grade 24Mbit codec, the Sony camera can record 4K via a connected 4K recorder, can record perfect quality Full-HD slow-mo at 240fps, and has a 28Mb/sec recording codec. Oh yeah -- the Canon does not even have an HD-SDI jack, it seems, whereas the Sony FS700 does.

Also, since the EOS-C100 seems to do exactly the same thing for $8,000 than what the Canon EOS C300 does for $16,000, who will be a total fool after this time to spend $16,000 for a C300, when they can get this basic C100 for half the price exactly, I wonder?

0 upvotes
skolomon
By skolomon (Aug 29, 2012)

Where's the proffessional 50Mbps 4:2:2 MXF format?????
Only the amator AVCHD. Booo...
And $8K for this?!

1 upvote
Jogger
By Jogger (Aug 29, 2012)

most people looking at this bring their own external recorder. its the best solution really. that format you mention is for broadcast.. this isnt an ENG

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 29, 2012)

All professional external video recorders use the locking HD-SDI interface (via locking BNC jacks), something that this Canon EOS C100 cannot seem to do, since it only has a consumer-style HDMI jack.

Also, it is pretty lame when you need a tethered external recorder in the year 2012 just to record regular HD video.

0 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Aug 29, 2012)

Probably a dumb question, but how does 1920x1080 relate to 8.3MP? 1920*1080*Bayer filter would be 8.3M sub-pixels, but only 2.1M pixels, yes?

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 29, 2012)

RGB:
R: 1920x1080 = 2.073 Mp
G: 1920x1080 (x2) = 4.1472 Mp [they use double for green]
B: 1920x1080 = 2.073 Mp
Total RGB: 4x (1920x1080) = 8.2944 Mp or 8.3Mp
but all combined for a better RGB color capture 1080p

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 29, 2012)

it was specified before when C300 was released:

Effective Pixels: 3840x2160; Approx. 8.29Mp
Total Pixels: 4206x2340; Approx. 9.84Mp

0 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Aug 30, 2012)

Yes, I understand there are 8.3M sub-pixels, once you add all the R, B, and G.

But for "normal" cameras no-one counts sub-pixels (i.e. R + B+ G + G), they count full pixels, yes?

0 upvotes
asad137
By asad137 (Aug 30, 2012)

For a still camera, they don't count "sub pixels" -- a pixel is a pixel, and half of them are G, 1/4 are B, and 1/4 are R. They then apply a demosaicing algorithm to assign RGB values for each pixel by doing the appropriate interpolation to calculate what the "missing" color values should be for a given pixel are given the values of the nearby pixels with those colors.

If all you need is 1080P, though, you can take your 2x2 array and assign that to one final pixel, using the R, (G1+G2)/2, and B values without having to interpolate. It's probably a little more sophisticated than that, but that would be the general idea I think.

0 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Aug 31, 2012)

OK. Sorry if I'm not getting it, but the article and sdyue are referring to this as an 8.3MP sensor, whereas 192081080 only requires 2.1MP. So presumably, each "pixel" in the 192081080 image is made up of a 2x2 set of pixels from the sensor, i.e. 4 full pixels, which are made up o 16 "sub-pixels" (whatever the correct term is) of 8x G, 4 x R, 4 x B.

Is there a benefit to doing it that way, as opposed to building a bespoke sensor with 1920x1080 relatively huge pixels? I guess doing it this way, a firmware upgrade might give the capability f taking 3840x2160 images or video.

0 upvotes
Y Hafting
By Y Hafting (Nov 21, 2012)

To reduce moire, there is a low pass filter in front of the camera chip, making sure that light that would normally hit 1 pixel alone is spread around- approximately four. By having 4 times the pixel count, you counter the effect of low pass filtering almost completely, giving perfect sharp pixels at 1920x1080.

0 upvotes
LaFonte
By LaFonte (Aug 29, 2012)

As to who will buy this? Cinema rentals will buy it. Look, it is totally a budget deal if you think about this, you can have the c100 and tons of lenses. Instead of paying 20k for a lens you can get a great lens for 1k-2k for the canon system.
Fantastic for budget features and advertisement.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 29, 2012)

Just get an HDSLR or a mirrorless digital camera for $600 to $3,500, and you can use the same $1,000-$2,000 photo lenses on them that you are talking about, LaFonte.

When you have budget constraints, none of these Canon Cinema cameras and lenses and external recorders will be particularly budget-friendly for the non-Hollywood producer, I fear.

0 upvotes
LaFonte
By LaFonte (Aug 29, 2012)

Where I come from everybody is renting cameras for any production. Nobody wants to own anything these days because different production has different needs, things go old very quickly, so you simply rent what you momentarily need.

Actually as a rental, this canon would be very much non-Hollywood producer budget-friendly and great and cheaper alternative to Red with far more lenses choices.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

You must be coming from Los Angeles, New York, or perhaps Chicago (if you are in the USA). In the rest of the country, it is a good idea to actually own a camera, so when you need to shoot something, you have the means to do so.

0 upvotes
ET2
By ET2 (Aug 29, 2012)

$8000? Won't sell.

Why would anyone buy this when there is FS700 for that price?

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 29, 2012)

Who wants a WHOPPING 3.7 lbs Sony FS700 [w/o LENS] that's both larger, BULKIER SIZE, UNGAINLY, LESS ERGONOMIC, and HEAVIER (by ~1.0+ lbs? [extra heft of ~+30%]) than the new C100 ("smaller package" than C300, which is already lighter at 3.2 lbs)???
Every bit of unneeded size/weight that one can shed is welcome, especially for those closer to the lower 'budget' Cinematographer's end and can accept fewer features of the lowest model compared to it's higher model siblings.
I'm guesstimating C100 is 3.0lbs max... but it could be 2.7lbs min (15% smaller... lighter maybe too?)... at this moment... the C100's wt is 'TBA'.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 29, 2012)

even the PENTAX 645D is heavier than C300... never mind C100

3.7 lbs SONY FS700

3.26 lbs PENTAX 645D
3.20 lbs Canon EOS C300

3.00 lbs Canon EOS 1DX (1DC ?)
2.95 lbs Nikon D4

2.7 lbs Canon EOS C100 (est. according to "15% smaller" than C300)

2.09 lbs Canon EOS 5DMkIII
1.98 lbs Nikon D800/D800E

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
ET2
By ET2 (Aug 29, 2012)

"Who wants a WHOPPING 3.7 lbs Sony FS700 [w/o LENS] "

Anyone who wants a better camera than this Canon for the same price? FS700 outspecs in most way. 1080p 240 fps vs 24/25/30p and 50/60i frame rates .

Even Nex-5R has better video specs than this Canon .. and yes that's smaller too.

5 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Aug 29, 2012)

"Even Nex-5R has better video specs than this Canon .. and yes that's smaller too."

You really have no idea whatsoever what you're talking about do you? You may be getting hung up on frame-rates, but a NEX-5R has nowhere near as good specs as a C100 or C300, nor is it's IQ anywhere near the Canons. Shooting documentary with no crew, a C300 or the new C100 would be a superb choice.

4 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 29, 2012)

... i just read on Canon's EOS Cine site

the C100 is "almost a full pound less" than the C300

so we're talking ~2.2+ lbs (C100 including viewfinder) and say maybe ~2.3 lbs [not 2.7 lbs as i guesstimated above] vs 3.2 lbs (C300)

bringing the C100 closer to 5DMkIII/D800 FF size/weights (including viewfinder)

well below EOS C (1DX) too in handling size/weight.

2 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Aug 29, 2012)

who cares about the 1lb.. these cameras are going on rigs and tripods. the external audio solution alone would weight more than 1lb. geez.

2 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Aug 30, 2012)

ok... just read this:

C100 = 1020g (410g lighter than C300) ... or 2.25 lbs (0.95 lb lighter than C300)

who cares?
those who do HANDHELD !

not everyone is going to put a 1DX or D4 on rigs and tripods (both being heavier), so why presume C100 would be at all? doing rigs will happen, but at least much lighter. no reason to have unwanted weight that adds nothing.

if the body is already non-ergonomic and boxy (FS700/FS100) it makes sense to use a rig/tripod most of the time or do a shoulder rig.

3.7 lbs SONY FS700: no lens, doh!

3.26 lbs PENTAX 645D
3.20 lbs Canon EOS C300

3.00 lbs Canon EOS 1DX (1DC)
2.95 lbs Nikon D4

2.25 lbs Sony FS100 (1040g)
2.25 lbs Canon EOS C100 (1040g)

2.09 lbs Canon EOS 5DMkIII
1.98 lbs Nikon D800/D800E

add anything like a external recorder will at least put it below a FS700 WITHOUT any external recorders.

wt and size do matter, if tight shooting perspectives matter in Cine

if all one does is bulky rig/tripod shooting, it's clearly non-tight shots.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Tape5
By Tape5 (Aug 29, 2012)

''...while the full-frame EF lens line-up offers outstanding quality and flexibility – utilising luxury, class-leading optics..''

Only Canon knows what luxury it is that this camera is utilising. And class-leading ?

1 upvote
iwouldificould
By iwouldificould (Aug 29, 2012)

Canon "L" lenses are their "pro" models, while it is debated from time to time it is generally acknowledged that "L" stands for luxury. So as it turns out Canon, myself and I am sure many others know what sort of luxury the camera is utilizing; luxury glass.
As for you question, are you asking what class leading means or how the statement is justified? In meaning, it suggests one of more of the specs of the lens are better then or as good as the best examples of those models that share its "class". Generally meaning models that share a similar price and intended use. As for justification, that's easy if it fits the meaning of the statement in any way then it is justified. This is generally true of all logical claims based on empirical and measurable results. This is also generally easily proven or disproved with a little research. It is important to remember that for the claim to true you need only find evidence of at least one class leading spec, regardless of overall performance.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 29, 2012)

Luxury glass -- check. I hope it also comes with Corinthian leather -- another luxury feature I grew to love and demand over the years.

Re. the "Class Leading" part -- AFASIK, the Canon EOS Cinema line-up has no competition, sine the other manufacturers' similarly priced professional video cameras all offer higher resolution, better codecs, and so on.

Check into Panasonic, Red, Sony, etc.

0 upvotes
iwouldificould
By iwouldificould (Aug 29, 2012)

Corinthian leather; agreed that would be best. In a brighter future perhaps more furriers will be involved in lens and camera design as well. Could put you of risk of getting a dab of red paint on the equipment but well worth the risk.
The original statement was "class leading optics". I am sure you know this as you are a individual of discriminating taste, but optics can at best only affect resolution not define it. That is why we don't see 20mp lenses. Codecs are even further removed from this equation. Hence there are not any (AFASIK) lenses marketed as AVI compatible (I know that is not strictly speaking a codec, but I am sure you get my point). Codecs and resolution are features of a digital camera recording body and not the optics of the system.
Thanks for your advise on other cameras to check into but I am not really in the market for a cinema camera. Film making is not something I do.

1 upvote
jsis
By jsis (Sep 4, 2012)

how come their "Luxury" glass line-up looks more utilitarian and no bling anyways?

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Aug 29, 2012)

If you don't like it don't buy it... It is what it is and it will be used by film makers... Get over it...

2 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Aug 29, 2012)

Sure. But many film makers also do slow motion by lowering the rate to 24... Many much lower priced cameras with interchangeable lenses does 60p... You lose 50% of the detail, especially when you also add x2 tweening. The point was, why did Canon miss that, especially at that price? True, the 35mm large area sensor is an IQ win, but why miss out an otherwise easy-to-implement but very useful when you need it feature? This is quite frustrating since it has most of the features I want but misses out on the simple ones that I *need*.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 29, 2012)

"Film makers" use FILM cameras. Some videographers might end up using these strange-brew Canon jobs, however.

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Aug 29, 2012)

You should check up on how many 'films' are shot on real film these days.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

The vast majority, some 80 percent of "films" are still shot with film cameras, of course. With the digital jobs, the results are iffy and the quality questionable.

With film acquisition, you can create a 4K, 5K, even 8K scan today, plus you can scan in the camera negatives 50 or a 100 years from now for even better results.

Just look at films and TV shows that were shot with video cameras in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s. Most of it look like hell.

0 upvotes
jsis
By jsis (Sep 4, 2012)

Not really, film makers will always use film. It's never obsolete. On the other hand, even if they can afford to buy equipment like this, they wouldn't skimp by buying a budget model. This model is for 5D Mark II or 1D owners to "upgrade" to if they use their cameras more for cinematography.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Sep 6, 2012)

With the expected $1,100 priced Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 being able to record Long GOP video at 50Mb/sec and Intraframe at 72Mb/sec in-camera, there will be few fools buying a maximum 24Mbit/sec AVCHD camcorder for EIGHT THOUSAND DOLLARS.

Canon has perfected the art of making a company look totally ridiculous. Greedy as hell, too.

0 upvotes
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Aug 29, 2012)

Just 50i/60i at $7999? No thanks.

2 upvotes
jsis
By jsis (Aug 29, 2012)

... and suddenly, family jewels of 5D and 1D owners are getting smaller.

0 upvotes
King Penguin
By King Penguin (Aug 29, 2012)

Mmmm......sure beats my Eumig standard 8 :)

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Aug 29, 2012)

How come DPR did not post the Sony EA50 NEX camera that was just released. Not to mention the 18-200 power zoom. Maybe if they had issued a press release under the CANON name, they would have made it.

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Aug 29, 2012)

Considering that the top items on dpReview right now are the Sony NEX-5R announcement AND the dpReview hands on of same, I'd say your CANON "would have made it" conspiracy theory is indicative of some personal problems, which you really should not be airing in front of other people, especially in a large online community.

4 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Aug 29, 2012)

So, it makes more sense to present a 30,000$ cine camera and 1ok lenses than an extesnion of the NEX camera line? That makes a ton of sense to you?

0 upvotes
robert1955
By robert1955 (Aug 29, 2012)

But DPR did two items on the Nex 5R, which is in most respects a model update, not radically new.
And the lens: I have checked elsewhere and I don't think Sony announced any lens today, especially not a superzoom [they already did that couple of months ago

0 upvotes
Katsoulis
By Katsoulis (Aug 29, 2012)

I'm really glad to see these cameras coming out, but I don't understand how the price point is justified. I see few practical improvements over a 5Dii or 5Diii - especially for 3 times the cost.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 29, 2012)

At $3,000, it would have its dedicated hard-core fans. But at 8 big ones -- without the lens? Naaaah....

0 upvotes
Stollen1234
By Stollen1234 (Aug 29, 2012)

great video..but its a wrong forum...99% are not using these kinds of videos...

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Aug 29, 2012)

Hollywood studio execs just ordered a double dose of aspirins.

...and smelling salts.

$7,999 just let the floor cave in on their studio lot.

.

1 upvote
Greg Gebhardt
By Greg Gebhardt (Aug 29, 2012)

I think you just spit into your OWN face!
Awesome hardware!

0 upvotes
abolit
By abolit (Aug 29, 2012)

canon just spit right into customers face.

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Aug 29, 2012)

Yes just what I wanted. 1080p @ 24 Mb/sec. 4:2:0 color. And only options for 24p and 30p recording. All for the "budget" price of just under $8000. Are they hiring NASA engineers now? Because this camera would have been cool about 6 years ago.

It is not that NASA engineers don't develop great things. It is just that all of the verification they must do takes a long time to produce a reliable product. In Canon's case I think they just have a bad case of Analysis paralysis.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
HBowman
By HBowman (Aug 29, 2012)

RED Epic fail. Oups I mean Scarlet/

Cmon Canon, how do you want to compete against red, seriously lol !

2 upvotes
AdventureRob
By AdventureRob (Aug 29, 2012)

I wonder if it can compete with the upcoming Panasonic GH3...

8 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Aug 29, 2012)

I'm waiting for GH3 too! nice post, ha-ha!

0 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (Aug 29, 2012)

Looks like a good move to me, undermines the BMD Cinema camera a bit, since the C300 is way to much ££ and has the excellent same all important chip.

Uncrippled HDMI out if you need it, 50P would be useful.

To compare the GH2 for many tasks to this is somewhat silly.

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Aug 29, 2012)

This C100 and C300 is silly for many task. The price is close to true digital cinema camera, like Red One, which gives you RAW output and high fps.

1 upvote
AshMills
By AshMills (Aug 29, 2012)

Try actually putting together a working RED camera kit for £5000.

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Aug 29, 2012)

Who are these "independent videographers" who can buy this camera for 8000? Most will stay with Panasonic GH2(the best sharp choise), Canon 60D or 5DM2. 8000$ can be all the budget of videographer, and they must buy one or two additional camera, lenses, sound...

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
MikeNeufeld30
By MikeNeufeld30 (Aug 29, 2012)

Have you see the cars they drive????

1 upvote
Howard
By Howard (Aug 29, 2012)

Video and cinema cameras again .. obviously Canon as a company has shifted their focus from DSLRs, disappointing (solely from a DSLR user's perspective).

5 upvotes
dbo
By dbo (Aug 29, 2012)

Hm.
Sensor is fine.
FHD is ok, but only 30p?
SR 4:2:0?
SD cards only

7.999,- ?

Sorry, that's a bit too few features for too much bucks.

5 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Aug 29, 2012)

Are you complaining about the lack of CF, because that's not a "feature". It's a video camera. At the same speed, large SD cards cost less than half of what CF cards do, and you can easily fill 20 64 gig cards in a day's shooting. That much CF costs more than the camera.

And it's easier to deal with large numbers of SD cards.

There's the added bonus of being able to change cards in the field without worrying about a grain of sand in a CF card's connector breaking one of the 60 tiny pins in the camera's CF connector and disabling the camera.

5 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 29, 2012)

$3,000 Blackmagic Cinema Cameras has comparable sensor, better audio inputs, a much better recording codec, a touchscreen LCD, and oh yeah, the BCC records to internal 2.5-inch SSD drive instead of SD flash cards.

Nice try, $$$$$ Canon $$$$$.

0 upvotes
peeder
By peeder (Aug 30, 2012)

A single 64GB SDXC card will hold over 5 hours of this camera's 24Mbit/s AVCHD video and 16 bit PCM audio output. So if you shoot continuously for an entire 24 hour day, you will only fill 5 64GB cards at the best quality setting.

And in that scenario, one hopes you are backing up the card data during the shoot, which you will easily have time to do in triplicate before the next card in series is full. And if you are using the redundancy in the body, recording to duplicate cards, you will therefore only need a maximum of 4 SDXC cards in any scenario. Class 10 will be more than fast enough for this recording format, and your 4 64GB cards will run you about $200 by the time this camera ships.

The same capability in CF for the 50Mbps C300 would run you about $800 (twice as many cards at twice the price).

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 31, 2012)

The "best codec" attainable with this camera is AVCHD version 1.0 at 24Mbit, which is definitely no broadcast quality anywhere where they use HDTV. In other words, this thing is great for events, such as weddings, funerals, B-days, Bar Mitzvahs, etc, but not for TV broadcasting, let alone theatrical releases.

0 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Aug 29, 2012)

Does this wunder-Canon has rolling shutter and tilts vertical lines when moving, same as normal DSLR?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Aug 29, 2012)

A camer this size generally sits on a tripod and does not pan much. Otherwise, you'd probably see rolling shutter. The spec summary does not mention 120p or 60p shooting, which might reduce the effect.

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Aug 29, 2012)

Most of the key feature list can be added in firmware to existing and future Canon DSLRs. Thousands of dollars for a measly few lines of code is not cool.

2 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Aug 29, 2012)

Cinema sensor is completely different type. It don't miss pixels as DSLR in video mode.That's why Digital Cinema camera has sharp output.

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Aug 29, 2012)

I wasn't talking about the sensor.

0 upvotes
blackninja12
By blackninja12 (Aug 29, 2012)

for example 1dx-c.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Aug 29, 2012)

How do you add a faster processor with "a few lines of code"Q

It's the same price as a 1DX (hey, what happened to the "thousands of dollars"?) and it's faster. Cameras that do cost less than this one, like a 5D III, also have substantially less processing power.

C100 - 249 mp/s
1DX - 217 mp/s
5D III - 149 mp/s

Sorry, but it's your post that "is not cool".

1 upvote
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Aug 29, 2012)

But processing power like that is cheap,so it makes you wonder why Canon went cheap with their DSLR's. There are consumer cameras costing much less than $1k that can do >240mp/s.

1 upvote
joejack951
By joejack951 (Aug 29, 2012)

And how long can those consumer cameras sustain that rate for? I just looked at the Nex7 review (I'm assuming that is the camera you are referring to) and it manages 24MP at 10FPS for 1.4 seconds. That's not much of a movie clip.

0 upvotes
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Aug 29, 2012)

No, I wasn't referring to the NEX 7, since its introduction price was over $1k. I was referring to the A65.
This wasn't about sustained speeds though, it was about processors. These cameras are limited in their sustained speeds because of limited buffer depth and secondly the bus speed (A65 doesn't even support extra UHS-I bus speed), not so much processing power.

But if you insist turning this into a buffer argument, the 5Dmk3 mentioned by Joseph can store up to 18 RAW frames (4 more than the A65) and a measily 7 RAW+jpeg. The latter is almost half of what the afore mentioned A65 can do. It's only in jpeg mode where the difference becomes huge in favor of the Canon.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Aug 29, 2012)

Weep not, o ye fellow paupers: Canon's own GF10 videocam sells for $1.2k and uses a 2mp sensor.

Actually, about 24mbps, or at most 28mbps, is about most people would ever need. Some fuss over hackware to boost the rates, but end up shooting limited action scenes, or defocus backgrounds, so that any advantage is moot. On YT, most viewers bother only to see the 480p 3mbps default versions anyway. To shoot decompressed video brings a whole kaboodle of challenges. More than anything, it's a sort of "union card" to confine the high end of the business to crews with big budgets. To shoot in AVCHD or h.264 MOV should be fine for just about anyone not committed to deliver Pixar-grade special effects.

1 upvote
joejack951
By joejack951 (Aug 29, 2012)

Troj, I didn't realize the A65 had a very similar sensor/performance spec. Regardless of what the actual reason for the lack of ability to continually take advantage of 240+ MP/s rates though, clearly this new camera can do it and no other camera in its price range can. Whether it's buffer, bus, or processor, some hardware changed to allow this camera to do what it can do. It's not as simple as software tweaks.

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Aug 29, 2012)

Do people honestly believe that the bitrate of cheaper cameras is the best the hardware can do? Modified firmware has already debunked that for a lot of the popular models.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 99