Previous news story    Next news story

Nikon Coolpix P7700 preview - 12MP CMOS-based enthusiast compact

By dpreview staff on Aug 22, 2012 at 04:01 GMT

Nikon has revealed the Coolpix 7700 a CMOS-based enthusiast compact camera with class-leading zoom lens. Its 28-200mm lens has a maximum aperture range of F2.0-4.0, making it a whole stop brighter than its predecessor, the P7100's. The P7700 is built around a 1/1.7"-type 12MP back-illuminated CMOS sensor, enabling 1080p30 video and 8fps shooting. The bigger lens means there's no room for an optical viewfinder but the P7700 gains a flip-out swivel LCD instead. We've had a chance to handle the P7700 and have prepared a preview looking at the changes.

Jump to:


Press Release:

NIKON’S COMPACT COOLPIX P7700 COMBINES FIRST-CLASS IMAGE QUALITY, TOP-TIER OPTICS AND UNPARALLELED CREATIVE CONTROL

Nikon’s New Flagship COOLPIX Camera Sets the Standard for Performance, Versatility and Functionality for Those Who Expect The Best and Need The Convenience of a Compact

MELVILLE, N.Y. (August 22, 2012) – For the compact camera user only satisfied with the very best, today Nikon Inc. introduced its new flagship COOLPIX camera, the P7700. This powerful and versatile point-and-shoot camera features a sharp 7.1x zoom NIKKOR ED glass lens with a maximum aperture of f/2 and a 12.2-megapixel CMOS sensor. Conveniently compact and loaded with innovative features and manual controls, the COOLPIX P7700 will capture still images and Full HD 1080p video with stunning sharpness and vivid color, whether used as the ultimate go-to travel camera or D-SLR companion.

The COOLPIX P7700 is ideal for those looking for a compact camera with high performance and a complete feature set which will allow them to capture high quality still photos and Full HD video. For photographers looking to step up from traditional point-and-shoot cameras to professionals who crave complete creative control, the P7700 offers one of the most comprehensive feature sets available in its class. Featuring a new 12.2-megapixel CMOS sensor, a high-performance NIKKOR lens and full manual control settings, Nikon’s new flagship COOLPIX camera can unleash a photographer’s inner creativity and inspire truly magnificent images.

“Nikon’s new COOLPIX P7700 pushes the boundaries of traditional point-and-shoot cameras, offering stunning image quality and fast performance along with the freedom to customize every shot,” said Bo Kajiwara, Vice President of Marketing, Planning and Customer Experience, Nikon Inc. “Nikon’s flagship COOLPIX P7700 is a powerful and versatile companion that consistently delivers incredible results in various shooting scenarios.”

Exceptional Clarity, Powerful Performance
The COOLPIX P7700 sports a large 1/1.7-in 12.2-megapixel backside illumination (BSI) CMOS sensor that offers excellent tonal range and vivid color reproduction.  Additionally, high-speed image processing helps achieve fast continuous shooting at approximately eight frames-per-second (up to six continuous shots) affording the ability to freeze a fleeting moment with exacting precision. The P7700 delivers extremely rapid performance from a quick startup time to lightning-fast autofocus recognition to help ensure the moment is captured.

The P7700’s high-performance 7.1x zoom f/2 NIKKOR glass lens is equally as essential in providing the very best clarity and sharpness that professional photographers have come to expect from Nikon. With a large maximum aperture of f/2, the optics cover an equivalent range from 28 to 200mm, allowing for tack-sharp images and HD video throughout the entire focal range. An evolved Lens-Shift Vibration Reduction (VR) function minimizes camera shake for shooting blur-free photos while handheld or in challenging light. Combined with the COOLPIX P7700’s powerful CMOS sensor, this bright, large-aperture NIKKOR lens provides reduced noise, beautiful background blurring, fast performance and high image quality whether shooting stills or Full HD video.

Uncompromising Creative Control
Every photo and HD video is truly in the hands of the photographer, as the P7700 offers unprecedented creative control for its class, from easy automatic options to full manual controls. For even more control in users’ images, the COOLPIX P7700 supports RAW shooting, providing the ability to capture and edit uncompressed images without losing image quality. Customizing every shot has never been easier as Nikon’s flagship COOLPIX camera features full manual control (PSAM) and 19 unique and versatile Scene Modes and Scene Auto Selector, ready for any shooting scenario. In-camera special effects and filter effects such as Nostalgic Sepia, Vivid and Painting help satisfy amateurs and enthusiasts alike. With the P7700, features like a noise reduction filter, tone level information, COOLPIX Picture Control and versatile bracketing functions open the door for even more creative control and freedom when capturing still images. To capture the most amount of available light, users can also activate consecutive shot combining technology, or use the HDR effect for a wide dynamic range image.

Full HD Video Unleashed
Creativity continues beyond still images with stunning Full HD 1080p video capability combined with unprecedented movie customization options for its class. Capture HD video using Auto, Manual, Aperture-priority or Custom Movie Mode and enjoy several creative options also available for still shooting, including COOLPIX Picture Control and noise reduction while flexibly adjusting ISO sensitivity, shutter speed and white balance. 

Taking HD video to the next level, the COOLPIX P7700 is capable of intelligent autofocus while recording in any mode as well as optical zoom when shooting in Auto mode. For pristine stereo sound, the P7700 incorporates a built-in stereo microphone, an external microphone input, a HDMI mini connector and HDMI-CEC support.

Intuitive Operability
The P7700’s 3-inch vari-angle LCD monitor, with a wide-viewing-angle and 921,000-dot resolution, offers comfortable shooting from any angle, giving the freedom and flexibility needed to capture every spontaneous moment. Whether shooting videos overhead at a concert or inverting the screen to capture a creative self-portrait, the vari-angle LCD of the P7700 provides users the ability to rotate the screen to adapt to any shooting scenario. The LCD screen can also be flipped closed for protection when not in use. 

Furthermore, the COOLPIX P7700’s intuitive ergonomics and control system allows the user to easily access menus and manual controls, ensuring fluid operation. This lightweight point-and-shoot features quick menu, mode, exposure compensation and sub-command dials, all arranged to achieve natural and smooth shooting adjustments on the go. Additionally, the COOLPIX P7700 has a camera body composed of durable yet lightweight magnesium alloy.

Optional Accessories Expand Creative Control
The COOLPIX P7700 offers compatibility with several optional Nikon accessories for enthusiasts who demand versatility and first-class performance. Nikon’s Creative Lighting System (CLS) supports advanced wireless lighting and creative flash shooting by controlling flash output independently for a master unit and a remote unit group. The P7700’s hot shoe allows for compatibility with Nikon Speedlights (SB-910 and SB-700) as well as the GP-1 GPS unit and ME-1 external stereo microphone.

Price and Availability

The COOLPIX P7700 will be available in September 2012 for a suggested retail price (SRP) of $499.95*. For more information about this COOLPIX camera and other Nikon products, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

*SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.
Specifications, equipment and release dates are subject to change without any notice or obligation on the part of the manufacturer.

Nikon Coolpix P7700 specifications

Price
MSRPSuggested retail price : $499.95
Body type
Body typeCompact
Sensor
Max resolution4000 x 3000
Effective pixels12 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors13 megapixels
Sensor size1/1.7" (7.44 x 5.58 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
Image
White balance presets5
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationOptical
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • JPEG Exif 2.3
  • NRW (RAW)
  • 3D pictures: MPO
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)28–200 mm
Optical zoom7.1×
Maximum apertureF2.0 - F4.0
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Tracking
  • Face Detection
Digital zoomYes (4x)
Manual focusYes
Normal focus range50 cm (19.69)
Macro focus range2 cm (0.79)
Number of focus points99
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFully articulated
Screen size3
Screen dots921,000
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeNone
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed60 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program (P)
  • Shutter-priority (S)
  • Aperture priority (A)
  • Manual (M)
Scene modes
  • Back Light
  • Beach
  • Black and White Copy
  • Close Up
  • Dusk/Dawn
  • Fireworks Show
  • Food
  • Landscape
  • Museum
  • Night Landscape
  • Night Portrait
  • Panorama Assist
  • Party/Indoor
  • Pet Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Scene Auto Selector
  • Snow
  • Sports
  • Sunset
  • 3D Photography
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range10.00 m
External flashYes (via hot-shoe)
Self-timerYes (10 or 2 seconds)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingNo
Videography features
Resolutions 1920 x 1080 (15, 30 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 30 fps), 640 x 480 (120, 30 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Storage included86 MB
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini)
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionNikon EN-EL14 Lithium-Ion & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)330
Weight (inc. batteries)392 g (0.86 lb / 13.83 oz)
Dimensions119 x 73 x 50 mm (4.69 x 2.87 x 1.97)
Other features
GPSOptional

Additional images

81
I own it
20
I want it
11
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 266
123
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Aug 22, 2012)

If you can live without an optical viewfinder (I can't), then this camera would seem to be a better buy than Nikon's new 1 series, due to its more robust control set and flip out screen.

1 upvote
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Aug 22, 2012)

Speaking of enthusiast - how about EVF and and at least 1" sensor?

1 upvote
RPJG
By RPJG (Aug 22, 2012)

I can't tell if this is a serious question. Have you heard of the Nikon V1?

2 upvotes
lokthefish
By lokthefish (Aug 22, 2012)

RPJG the V1 is a toy, not a serious enthusiast camera. Enthusiast cameras should have lots of manual controls, which the V1 does not. Nikon has lost the plot.

4 upvotes
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Aug 22, 2012)

You seem to be a lot of fun, RPJG :). Since when is V1 enthusiast?

0 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Aug 23, 2012)

How droll.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Aug 22, 2012)

Glad to see that they are finally concentrating on the focal ratio. It is an improvement but still not quite what I would want. I would rather see a smaller sensor and an F1.8-F2.8 lens with the same focal length range.

I couldn't care less about the view finder but I understand that it works well for some people. Hopefully, the articulating screen will be sufficient for those users.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Paul Farace
By Paul Farace (Aug 22, 2012)

Dear Nippon Kogaku Designers:
close, but still no cigar! OPTICAL VIEWFINDER!!! And I'd buy one!
Really, I mean it!

3 upvotes
Gully Foyle
By Gully Foyle (Aug 22, 2012)

Well telling them Paul. You not buying? Scared to death, they are...
Thankfully this is a pre-production so there's time for them to prepare the final model with an OVF just for you to buy it.

Seriously now, what can a crappy OVF do at 200mm? Most of the time you'll NEED to be using the LCD anyway.
Why do you people think it's a deal breaker? It just doesn't make sense.

3 upvotes
RichardAB
By RichardAB (Aug 22, 2012)

Well Paul, Nikon cater for you with the P7100, you'll be able to buy it, a superb camera, at a discounted price now. Something tells me though that you'll have a reason why that camera doesn't light your cigar either.

1 upvote
lokthefish
By lokthefish (Aug 22, 2012)

guys, if you're serious photographers, you'll understand that being able to hold the camera up to your eye is essential for good stability and for use in bright outdoor lighting. that's why no optical viewfinder is a deal breaker! this camera is aimed at the serious end of compact cameras, but lacks this very important feature.

4 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Aug 22, 2012)

To be of any use, an OVF must be so big that it compromises compactness. In zoom, an OVF is also useless unless is like that of a DSLR, which also negates compactness. Action shots can involve situations that preclude holding a camera close to your eye. Burst shots and OIS can offset certain problems. An LCD can tilt too.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Gully Foyle
By Gully Foyle (Aug 22, 2012)

Then it seems that the Lumix LXx series, the Canon Sxxx series or even the Pentax Q are aimed at un-serious photogs.
Hell, the Lumixes and the Ss sell like S-Bob's Krabby Patty!! Who's buying them, I wonder!

I'm trying to find reason in these comments in defense of these OVFs, but I can't.

EDIT--typo

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
JordanAT
By JordanAT (Aug 22, 2012)

Crap, just bought a Sony as my last ditch for a field camera; I really wanted an articulating screen (sometimes I have to take pictures above my head/into areas I can't see) but just couldn't justify the G series Canon with only F2.8 and such a short zoom range.

I say good riddance to the viewfinders - who wants to walk around with their camera plastered to their face when they can go waist-level. Wish my D3 had an articulating screen - I used to pop the pentaprism off my F4 for waist level, but that's not an option (or a smart move even if it were) on a D3. (Note: I wouldn't want to lose the OVF on my D3, but a waist-level finder would be really nice at times)

1 upvote
dbo
By dbo (Aug 22, 2012)

Apparently Nikon is too solicitous about harming its own business with the V/J 1 instead of preparing the long term business in this area.

Re-designing the 1 Series to APSC and putting in a CX sensor into this P7700 would have been the right thing for the near future.

However the specs are looking quite well. The Lens speed is with f4 at 200mm impressive for a compact. Controls were already well placed and configurable with the P7100.
But why only 30p video? This not suitable for a premium compact in these times.

1 upvote
TacticDesigns
By TacticDesigns (Aug 23, 2012)

Might as well lose business to yourself than someone else. [grin]

Comment edited 8 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Franka T.L.
By Franka T.L. (Aug 22, 2012)

Nikon, you've got almost every details right, except .... OK .... where's the GPS. It really should be build in there.

0 upvotes
TacticDesigns
By TacticDesigns (Aug 23, 2012)

Instead of increasing the price of the camera with GPS hardware, Nikon should come up with a iPhone / Android app that tracks your position in a log on your phone. Then have the camera and phone communicate through WiFi to add this info directly to the exif data in the picture right in the camera. You get location data for next to nothing without having to figure out how to sync this data to your pictures later on the computer.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
TacticDesigns
By TacticDesigns (Aug 23, 2012)

With all the manufacturers adding WiFi to their cameras, this might very well be in the next gen.

0 upvotes
lokthefish
By lokthefish (Aug 22, 2012)

no optical finder! so disappointed Nikon, I would have rushed out and bought this camera, here I was thinking Nikon have finally made a great compact...but no :( might have to go the Fuji X10 after all.

2 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Aug 22, 2012)

An optical viewfinder with a 7x zoom would probably have been pretty useless. They could have put an EVF on it.

0 upvotes
iudex
By iudex (Aug 22, 2012)

The lens speed is nice and this is a giant step compared to P7100 (1 EV throughout the focal range). With tiny 1/1,7" sensor there is of course not big DOF control, but it seems with D7700 you can get the shallovest DOF among all 1/1,7" enthusiast conpacts: f4 on 200 mm eq. allows the best DOF control, e.g. P7700 with 200 mm and f4 and subject 3 m far makes 23 cm DOF, whereas the much faster XZ-1 with 112 mm and f2,5 is capable of only 47 cm: http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Aug 22, 2012)

Will it even focus at 3m at the long end?

0 upvotes
ebsilon
By ebsilon (Aug 22, 2012)

official samples at
http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/coolpix/performance/p7700/sample.htm

IQ quite OK in good light and ISO80. The ISO200@200mm f/4 is also OK, but some detail smudging. Low light IQ yet to be seen, but I guess it could be considered good enough as a travel camera or second camera.

0 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (Aug 22, 2012)

Very nice, now make it with the CX sensor. Cut the zoom down to 105mm to save size.

2 upvotes
ebsilon
By ebsilon (Aug 22, 2012)

that would be a killer camera - basically a Nikon V2 with retracctable lens and sviwel screen

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 22, 2012)

SO you want a NIkon RX100? How boring it would be if every camera were exactly the same.

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Aug 22, 2012)

Tsk Tsk...

They should have IMPROVED on the Optical Viewfinder rather than have junked it.

Had they made the OVF better than the G12 and G1x, this could have been a come from behind winner, overtaking those 2 aging runners.

Another missed chance...

.

3 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Aug 22, 2012)

Yep. You wonder if manufacturers really have a pulse on what they are doing sometimes, or not.

Or not.

C

1 upvote
RichardAB
By RichardAB (Aug 22, 2012)

CameraLabTester, Are you seriously trying to suggest the Canon G1X's OVF is better than the P7100's?

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Aug 22, 2012)

Richard, the OVF of these models (G1x, G12, P7100) seriously needs to be improved to lift the game and give a serious challenge to the Leica Peephole. Right now, they feel like plug ins, plopped there just for the specs.
Fuji is trying, but Nikon and Canon who together holds a substantial market share are really NOT.
Gone are the days when these manufacturers say to the enthusiasts: "I have something nice for you..."
Now they just blurt out: "I have some left overs from yesterday for you, rehashed, reheated and resalted."

.

2 upvotes
LiSkynden
By LiSkynden (Aug 22, 2012)

WHATTA...??? It has the Canon style filp out screen!!! :O

But how many dial wheels can there be in one camera? lol. I counted 6.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Aug 22, 2012)

The more the merrier! And with real markings on 3 of them - you can actually see what they do, what are the current settings and how far and to which direction you should turn them to set what you want, without looking at the screen all the time!

0 upvotes
schaki
By schaki (Aug 22, 2012)

Lol at all no-viewfinder-whiners. These so called viewfinders in compact cameras are next to useless anyway like the one in Fujifilm X10 wiht only 85% coverage. SO, nothing to miss really...
My old 2mp Coolpix 700 from 1999 had a good viewfinder to be in a digital compact and also the Powershot G1. But in general for newer cameras, it is and remains crap.
Between. Dropping the tilt-up screen for the new flip out is something of a mistake. Shooting comfortably from belly-level in SP is quite nice.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Calvin Chann
By Calvin Chann (Aug 23, 2012)

I found the OVF on the X10 almost unusable. No indication of point of focus or any exposure information, you're shooting blind.

0 upvotes
PatMann
By PatMann (Aug 22, 2012)

Very good effort, but not quite there for me. With a 24-120 equivalent and an optical finder or EVF, this would be very tempting. I shoot pictures in daylight outdoors, and that requires a finder. After shooting for quite a while with the 16-85 on DX cameras, I'm sold on that focal range, but starting at 28 makes it too limiting as a 1-lens solution for me.

I'm still waiting for a compact camera that's good enough compared to my current DSLR to be worth the investment and allow me to leave the big clunker at home once in a while. Haven't had one since I gave up my Coolpix 5000 for the D70.

3 upvotes
iudex
By iudex (Aug 22, 2012)

You have other choices that meet your focal range requirements: S100 and LX7 and partially EX2.

0 upvotes
Foggiato Michel
By Foggiato Michel (Aug 23, 2012)

Iudex, You have right.
Nikon P7700 body : perfect
Nikon 28-200 mm lens: bof!
Improvement: 24-120 1.4-4 : ideal
mfo

0 upvotes
iudex
By iudex (Aug 23, 2012)

Yaeah, there´s always some "but..."
LX7: great fast lens, but a bit short (the same goes for EX2)
S100: really small and thin, the only pocketable one, but awful f5,9 on the long end
RX100: big sensor, nice fast lens, but a bit short and not sufficiently wide (plus no hot shoe, tilting screen)
G1x: slow lens, bulky.
P77OO. great focal length, fast lens, nice controls, but bulky
The ideal pro compact would be small like RX100, with 1" sensor, 24-120 mm f1,8-4 lens and (at least optional) EVF. Will there ever be one?

0 upvotes
keysmith
By keysmith (Aug 22, 2012)

Hmm more dials than entry nikon's SLR or SLD.. That's good and useful for us (shows tha nikon's SLRs like 3100, 5100 need more buttons like direct WB, ISO etc).
OK good control.. is it enough? Nowdays Sony has introduced RX100 with more compact body (S90 like) than p7700 and 1'' sensor. That makes P7700 already DOA model (also all othe models like lx7, s100). I would be impressed if it’s 1/1.7’’ sensor could produce something NEAR rx100 quality. Sony keeps the best sensors for its self. I think p7700 has no luck to become bestseller against rx100.

3 upvotes
peterwr
By peterwr (Aug 22, 2012)

If it had a viewfinder, I'd buy one like a shot. But it doesn't, so I can't. Pity. :-(

6 upvotes
ngollan
By ngollan (Aug 22, 2012)

No viewfinder, no money.

7 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (Aug 22, 2012)

I'm also disappointed by that.

3 upvotes
VetPsychWars
By VetPsychWars (Aug 22, 2012)

Have you never heard of accessory optical finders that fit the shoe?

3 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Aug 22, 2012)

If you know of a 7x zoom accessory optical finder, please let us know.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Calvin Chann
By Calvin Chann (Aug 22, 2012)

Nikon makes a G. Kind of late.

0 upvotes
wootpile
By wootpile (Aug 22, 2012)

It's a G12.. a camera that came out in 2010 and weighs less. Good to see Nikon still in the enthusiast compact camera area but if they have decided to go with 1 inch sensor (as in J1)... where is it? small sensor is not very "enthusiast" any more. 2010 standards.

APart from that, the design, flipscreen, exterior buttons, everything is great.

This is what Nikon should have used their 1 inch sensor in - it would have been a killer!

3 upvotes
Mark B.
By Mark B. (Aug 22, 2012)

Aside from the lack of a VF, it's better than the G12, which started at f/2.8 at 28mm and went to f/4.5 at 140mm. This is f/2 at the wide end and f/4 at 200mm - pretty significant.

1 upvote
megaresp
By megaresp (Aug 22, 2012)

I agree with you.

Nikon's seeming inability to imagine that an enthusiast might be interested in buying a highly portable camera that contained their 1" sensor, had a fixed lens and proper controls shows just how poor their product development teams are.

3 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Aug 22, 2012)

The G12 has a VF and this camera has a better lens, faster and longer range. So apart from the swivel screen and the pixel numbers, what exactly are the similarities in your opinion?

2 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Aug 22, 2012)

I applaud the choice of 1/1.7" BSI-CMOS. Up until recently, 1/1.7" CCD was the standard enthusiast-compact sensor type, with BSI-CMOS produced in 1/2.3" format only. But those 1/1.7" CCD compacts have often been sufficient in providing quite good IQ. I guess introduction of BSI-CMOS in 1/1.7" format will make quite dramatic improvement in low-light capability of enthusiast compacts.

Regarding those of you demanding 1" sensor: Sony RX100 is f4.9 at 100mm eq, this Nikon is f4.0 at 200 mm eq. Furthermore, Sony's sensor is FSI-CMOS, which implies lower sensor surface area utilization compared to BSI. Let's see how will the lens and BSI advantages of P7700 translate into offseting the larger sensor area of RX100.

2 upvotes
RAG64
By RAG64 (Aug 22, 2012)

Er, f4.9 on a 1" sensor is much brighter than f4.0 on a 1/1.7" sensor. And much better signal to noise ratio anyway.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Aug 22, 2012)

@RAG64

- Nikon P7700 lens is probably quite brighter than f4.0 at 100mm eq. It is f4.0 at 200mm eq.

- no, f4.9 on 1" has much shallower DOF than f4.0 on 1/1.7". But it is not brighter in terms of sensor surface illumination. That means that for a given scene and a contant ISO, RX100 will require longer shutter time than P7700. Regardless of the sensor size.

0 upvotes
Nightwings
By Nightwings (Aug 22, 2012)

No EVF - No OVF = No Sale.

I'll hang on the my P7100.

4 upvotes
RichardAB
By RichardAB (Aug 22, 2012)

And what a great camera the P7100 is. I wouldn't trade the OVF for an f stop, quite happy to use ISO 200 instead of ISO 100, or 400 instead of 200.

The P7100's OVF is basic but it does the job.

1 upvote
Rowland Scherman
By Rowland Scherman (Aug 22, 2012)

Should have known, when I saw the price, that the sensor would be tiny. Hard to believe that glowing press release, but hope springs, etc.

1 upvote
RichardAB
By RichardAB (Aug 22, 2012)

If you keep to ISO 400 or below you won't feel inhibited by the sensor if the results of the P7100 are anything to go by.

I'd suggest you don't dismiss it so easily.

1 upvote
nguyenthanhhieuthanson
By nguyenthanhhieuthanson (Aug 22, 2012)

small sensor
i hope 1 nch or 1.5 inch same G1X

3 upvotes
steve joseph
By steve joseph (Aug 22, 2012)

My old Minolta Dimage 7 has a 1/1.5 sensor, 28-200mm equiv, f/2.8 to f/3.5 lens, and lots of buttons. I have been waiting to get an updated version of it for years. All this need is an add on evf, and I'm there.

2 upvotes
Esa Tuunanen
By Esa Tuunanen (Aug 22, 2012)

Because of travel TV in rear eating so much space todays same size cameras won't come close in ergonomics even if there is EVF.
In whose place they still commonly use crappier lower resolution ones than in 2004's Dimage A2.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Aug 22, 2012)

It's a wannabe Canon G series camera. Stop cloning Nikon and get your own design ;)

3 upvotes
Realfi
By Realfi (Aug 22, 2012)

I understand it's not a requirement for everyone but I need the option of a viewfinder. No LCD cuts it in bright Western Australian sunlight. I would gladly have paid for an optional plug-in EVF because the camera looks very good in other respects.

I really wish SOMEONE would release a fast lens semi-compact semi-compact with a decent viewfinder/viewfinder option!

If only Fuji would put their hybrid viewfinder in an X10 successor!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
David Lawrence
By David Lawrence (Aug 22, 2012)

Check out the Olympus XZ-1. I'm lovin it. $360 at Amazon.

2 upvotes
Elaka Farmor
By Elaka Farmor (Aug 22, 2012)

I´m not a Nikon fan, but I like this camera. But is it too much to hope for that there will be an improvement in IQ comparing to P7100....?

1 upvote
spitsi
By spitsi (Aug 22, 2012)

i like new nikon and looking forward for detailed review!

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (Aug 22, 2012)

Great update NIKON but I feel that the Fuji X10 is still the better camera in this segment. As for Sony, sure the RX100 has the larger sensor, but it has a slower lens at the long end, no OVF, no hot shoe, and lacks the solid construction and retro looks of the X10.

2 upvotes
Elaka Farmor
By Elaka Farmor (Aug 22, 2012)

" I feel that the Fuji X10 is still the better camera in this segment"
I feel the opposite.

1 upvote
D1N0
By D1N0 (Aug 22, 2012)

"I feel the opposite"

Irrelevant

0 upvotes
Ithackermike
By Ithackermike (Aug 22, 2012)

I agree with ybizzle. I'm a die hard Nikon user for 15+ yrs and I seriously considered the 7000 and 7100 for my wife but ended up getting the x10 instead. And this was pre Orbgate. I haven't regretted it. The 7700 would've made it a much harder decision but in the end the larger sensor, zooming with a ring on the lens rather than a thumb switch and the equally fast lens gives the x10 the advantage.

3 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Aug 22, 2012)

It is not "still with 1/1.7" sensor", it is a line of cameras with 1/1.7" sensor.
If you want more - get Nikon 1 or - D3200.
Very good that Nikon has f/2 lens. It is 1 stop better than modern Canon's G-line.
Canon had killed it with dark lenses for the sake of larger zoom.
I hope Nikon will improve lens to f/1.8 or f/1.4 in future models.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
BG_CX3_DPREVIEW
By BG_CX3_DPREVIEW (Aug 22, 2012)

hmm, still a 1/1.7, the line up is overloaded, will this one still fit in? I wonder.

It has it all for the enthousiasts, external controls, buttons etc, but the 1/1.7 does not create enough bokeh, pitty.

0 upvotes
Deeso
By Deeso (Aug 22, 2012)

Much better than the P7100, quite competitive to the Pana LX7, but behind the Sony RX100. Good 2011 camera.

2 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Aug 22, 2012)

Twice as many dials and buttons as your average mirrorless model. In a sort-of compact. Wow! Did Nikon market research tell them people didn't like the Nikon 1 oversimplified controls? Hope so. Hard to explain six dials and a similar number of buttons any other way.

OK, this won't have the IQ of the RX100 and isn't as tiny. It's not an enthusiast's dream camera. But for almost anyone else this would be just great, especially for travel, where that longish, fastish zoom would be very nice. A sixty-something friend who recently bought a G12 for its sturdy feel and familiar controls would have loved this. I could have recommended it to my globe-trotting dad with confidence. Nikon just needs to market this correctly and I think they'll do very well.

0 upvotes
JesperMP
By JesperMP (Aug 22, 2012)

It is the average mirrorless that has too few direct controls. It is not the P7700 that has too many.

2 upvotes
SW Anderson
By SW Anderson (Aug 22, 2012)

So, priced at $500 like a DSLR or ILC but with a smaller sensor and no optical or electronic viewfinder. I'll pass.

1 upvote
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Aug 22, 2012)

Only the cheapest couple of mirrorless models are around this price, and they don't have VFs either. They have bigger sensors, but their kit zoom are much slower, so the sensor advantage is not as great as it seems (with the kit lenses.) And this will get you over twice the zoom range in a smaller package. I'm not saying its ideal for you, but its a pretty solid camera for what it is. One clear advantage over almost all competitors are the controls. No touchscreen, but more dials than any mirrorless model (even the NEX-7.), or entry level dslr. Basically, any dial Nikon could include, they did. Mode, shooting mode, exposure comp., menu dial around 4-way controller, and control dials on front and back. I'm astounded. OK, they didn't put a dial around the lens (I think), but did give us a good half dozen buttons in addition.

I hope this is the start of a trend. I like touchscreens fine, but when there is room for a dial, add one. I'm going to have to try one of these out some time. Might find it suits me having so much control.

3 upvotes
SW Anderson
By SW Anderson (Aug 23, 2012)

I share your appreciation for dials and buttons, but can get along nicely without a touchscreen. The faster lens is good, too. Alas the lack of an OVF or EVF is a deal breaker. If one is offered later at a reasonable price, I'd be willing to take another look at this camera. But if the viewfinder costs as much as a good camera, forget it.

0 upvotes
Crac1
By Crac1 (Aug 22, 2012)

Hello,
Nikon Coolpix P7700 back with this. The viewfinder disappears, the sensor is still tiny and still increases the pixels ... Personally, I have imagined a more compact "expert" who would approach the Canon G1X. Device without a viewfinder (even too small) can make the "real" picture. Is a big difference between looking at a screen at arm's length, and put his eye against the camera back into the image you want to capture.
I dream of a Nikon S 3 (digital) that can meet or exceed the Fuji X100 or X-Pro1.

2 upvotes
MrTritium
By MrTritium (Aug 22, 2012)

For god's sake, there is nothing wrong with increasing the pixel count! The RX100 iso performance is as good as on the nikon 1. And the Nikon D800 is superior to D700 with 3 times smaller pixels, and its even slightly better than the 5DmkIII.

2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 22, 2012)

Very cool. 28-200mm with no aperture sacrifice and slimmed down to compete with LX5, etc. Not bad at all. Should be a nice addition to the high end compact field.

0 upvotes
Gary Yelland
By Gary Yelland (Aug 22, 2012)

Nikon seem to have a lot right with this camera, great lens, just good enough pixel count, I hope the low light noise is managed, good video capture. I really like the hammered body surface in a compact :) am not worried about the OVF absence.

Would have liked to see wifi, a bit longer zoom but then it wouldnt be as fast aperture I guess or as sharp hopefully

One problem might be the price point if it comes out at $500 it might be a tough sell with the competition at the moment.

0 upvotes
h2k
By h2k (Aug 22, 2012)

A brighter lens and doing away with the toy view finder - that's a good move. Also nice to see some kind of hand-grip. Too bad though the screen's an untouchable.

Let's see if Canon can compete with an upcoming Powershot G14 or G13. Compared to large-sensor compacts, the P7700 and peers have more zoom range, more depth of field and notably better close-up capabilities, so in many outdoor situations they can be advantageous for some. Nothing wrong with this class of cameras.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Aug 22, 2012)

Nikon weirdos ...
The V1 with it's 1'' sensor drives a toy speedlight and has a toy user interface while this cam with a serious almost pro ui drives a SB-910 but only has a toy sensor. arghh ...

So Nikon gives me either a good iq or good ui but not both at the same time. Obviously they don't want to jeopardize their DSLR cams.

10 upvotes
madmaxmedia
By madmaxmedia (Aug 22, 2012)

The Sony took everyone by surprise, this one honestly would have been a very nice update pre-RX100. Actually, if this would have been the P7100, then they could have really done something with the 3rd gen. Instead, the P7100 mainly corrected the problems with the P7000.

7 upvotes
Jan Kritzinger
By Jan Kritzinger (Aug 22, 2012)

1/1.7" sensor?

Oh dear...

8 upvotes
AllOtherNamesTaken
By AllOtherNamesTaken (Aug 22, 2012)

You can't bring out a camera like this with the RX100 & G1X already out and expect it to do well. I'm a Nikon fan but this is a fail IMO. This could have so easily been a huge hit, even with the 1" sensor if they didn't go APS-C. They got everything right except that sensor it seems. Very few P&S users use an OVF so I think it was wise to leave it out for the majority of the intended consumer base. The die hards will get a hot shoe option, I'm sure.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
8 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Aug 22, 2012)

It is much lighter and much cheaper compared to G1X, and from the specs seems much faster too. Totally different category, a good direct competitor for Pana LX7 and Samsung EX2F in $500 range, trading lens speed and wide end for extra zoom reach. And certainly beats Canon G12 to a pulp.

RX100 made all of them seem a little silly though, with their heavy bodies and serious controls. :)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Kim Seng
By Kim Seng (Aug 22, 2012)

Nice camera with pretty good design. It will be much better if it is a 1" sensor and it will sell like hot cakes. Anyway this camera will also sell well.

2 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Aug 22, 2012)

Agreed. The Sony RX100 is the compact camera to beat at the moment: fast AF and large sensor.

8 upvotes
bloodycape
By bloodycape (Aug 22, 2012)

I think using a 1in sensor would overlap with the 1 series, which would make marketing this or the other a bit harder, no?

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 22, 2012)

You guys think you could fit a 28-200mm zoom for a 1" sensor in a compact body?

5 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (Aug 22, 2012)

Meh...

2 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Aug 22, 2012)

Ugh, when are manufacturers going to stick a small evf in the upper left corner of one of these enthusiast compacts? (See nikon p60 if you need an idea it can be done). This camera with a compact evf with decent magnification and resolution would jump its way into my bag. No viewfinder, sorry Nikon just not for me.

C

3 upvotes
waitformee
By waitformee (Aug 22, 2012)

i dun get it... why is VF so important? There is a big screen for you to see behind so why still need a VF?

1 upvote
Lyle Aldridge
By Lyle Aldridge (Aug 22, 2012)

It's important because when holding a camera far enough from the face to use the rear LCD, it's not possible to hold a camera as steady as when using a viewfinder. Absence of a VF effectively nullifies the benefits of image stabilization.

Inability to use the LCD in sunlight is also a problem, but IMO, not nearly as bad as the inherent instability of the camera waving around in the air.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Aug 22, 2012)

Pretty much Lyle. Adding a finder whether optical or evf just gives you another tool to use that can help in certain situations for various reasons (I can think of a lot of them). It doesn't mean the P7700 is useless, I've used many cameras without viewfinders, its just that an "enthusiast level" camera should always have a finder of some kind- in my opinion.

It doesn't mean I don't like the P7700. I just think Nikon should and could differentiate themselves from the rest of the makers by doing something with an EVF on a camera like this.

I don't get why so many manufactures insist on making products that are so close to one another in design. Needs to be more free thinking in camera design.

3 upvotes
richardday
By richardday (Aug 22, 2012)

I would prefer a clip on (optical) OVF rather than an EVF, I don't like the delay imposed by EVF's. I know they are expensive, but then it's the users choice.
For a small pocket rocket it's not that much of an issue if one has a DSLR as an action camera.
If this new Nikon has a nice fast response and good ergonomics, it may well be the replacement for my much loved Ricoh GX200. I ran with the Nikon 1 V1 system for a few months before I become totally frustrated by it's weak ergonomics and somewhat flawed/buggy firmware, once again taught me not to be an early adopter, after nearly 60 years of photography, one would think you'd learn this! ;)

0 upvotes
Camediadude
By Camediadude (Aug 22, 2012)

Nice looking controls, and layout with triple control dials, huh... too bad I will never get around to use them. Nikon, you put an EVF in the budget P60 years ago, why could you not do it now? It would increase sales by a huge factor on an enthusiast cam like this, based on my own deep seated desires and my keen armchair economics :P

3 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Aug 22, 2012)

Great minds think alike. I just finished my comment and saw you were writing yours about the same time :).

2 upvotes
Camediadude
By Camediadude (Aug 22, 2012)

Haha, so I see, high five! Here's to some great EVF's to come in Photokina, let's hope! (fingers are crossed!)

2 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Aug 22, 2012)

DPReview. Last line of the first paragraph states 'We've had a chance to handle the P7100 and have prepared a preview looking at the changes.'

P7100.
Just thought I'd point it out.

Pull out screen is long overdue, and the design looks like it will handle better than the older models (they felt good anyway).
The lens brightness is a welcome thing too.

0 upvotes
Richard Shih
By Richard Shih (Aug 22, 2012)

Thanks. Fixed.

0 upvotes
mrtaufik
By mrtaufik (Aug 22, 2012)

Yawn ... boring ...

2 upvotes
jimrpdx
By jimrpdx (Aug 22, 2012)

Sad about the VF but they've been made so poor recently it's not worth the trouble (just what they wanted me to say no doubt!). Plenty of appealing controls, it will be interesting to hear more.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 266
123