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Olympus working on new body for 'Pro' Four Thirds lenses

By dpreview staff on Aug 17, 2012 at 18:04 GMT

Olympus has issued a press release, confirming that it is working on a camera body for use with its range of 'Top Pro' lenses. According to the press release Akira Watanabe, manager of Olympus's Imaging SLR Planning Department acknowledges that while Olympus has 'pushed the boundaries of performance' with the Micro Four Thirds OM-D E-M5, 'it did not deliver with the legacy high end lenses from the E-system'. Although the statement is vague and very brief, it is the most formal confirmation yet of the company's plans to continue to support its Four Thirds lenses. Released in 2010, the 'pro-grade' E-5 is a camera that many commentors and Four Thirds users had assumed would be the last in the line.

Although Olympus's recent Micro Four Thirds cameras like the OM-D E-M5 offer competitive performance (usurping what was once the E-5's claim of 'world's fastest autofocus'), they cannot match the E-5's speed when used with Four Thirds lenses.

The 'pro-grade' E-5, released in 2010, is Olympus's flagship E-system DSLR, and offered what Olympus claimed was the 'world's fastest' autofocus system.

Press Release:

Olympus working on new body for top-pro lenses

Akira Watanabe, manager of Olympus Imaging's SLR planning department, confirmed today that the company is definitely working on a body to deliver the focusing performance expected by users of the Top Pro lens series like the ground breaking 90-250mm f2.8 fixed aperture zoom.

Watanabe has been delighted with the success of the OM-D which has pushed the boundaries of performance for system cameras but acknowledged that it did not deliver with the legacy high end lenses from the E-System. Whilst further information wasn't forthcoming, he was keen to emphasise that Olympus is actively developing a solution and will announce more details in due course.

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Comments

Total comments: 266
12
narddogg81
By narddogg81 (Aug 17, 2012)

olympus should just become a third party lens manufacturer. i would buy their lenses, dont want to buy their cameras.

3 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Aug 17, 2012)

They've actually made some excellent cameras over the years. The E-510 was far ahead of Canon's entry-level at the time in most ways other than dynamic range.

2 upvotes
citizenlouie
By citizenlouie (Aug 17, 2012)

I also wish they would make lenses for third party. For example, I would love to use Zuiko lenses on Penta K-30.

However see how many contribution Olympus has made for modern DSLR concept.

LiveView for DSLR (comprehensive and sensible implementation, not just "we also have it". There are things like magnified MF check, WB preview, aspect ratio shooting, real time histogram, spirit level indicator, multiple exposure overlay, etc., some are implemented long before competitors caught up)
First effective sensor dust reduction technology
In-body image stabilization
Miniaturization (especially with current OM-D)
Weather proof as a "system" (entire list of 4/3 HG and SHG lenses are weather proof, to accompany E-x flagship line of camera body. Underwater housing for even the entry level E-620). When they released OM-D, they also released weather proof flash, lens adapter and grip, so the entire "system" is WR.

6 upvotes
AlbertSiegel
By AlbertSiegel (Aug 18, 2012)

Fuji was first with live view.
Minolta and Pentax both had in-body image stabilization long before Olympus.
Pentax always had the smallest SLR bodies.
Canon had weather sealing on their top end pro gear.

The only real innovation from Olympus has been the anti-dust features on the sensor which quite honestly I feel are the most important off all you've listed.

0 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (Aug 18, 2012)

> Fuji was first with live view.

First *DSLR* was the Oly E-10.
First *ILC DSLR* was the Fuji S3, but after the E-10.

> Minolta and Pentax both had in-body image stabilization long before Olympus.

Yes, but it was clearly inferior to in-lens IS (what gave IBIS initially bad name). Oly's implementation of IBIS competes with the in-lens ISs. (E-M5's IBIS outdoes the in-lens IS.)

> Pentax always had the smallest SLR bodies.

Check the Oly E-420 or E-620. They are painfully small.

> Canon had weather sealing on their top end pro gear.

But never openly states that or provides warranty coverage for damage by elements. Same with Nikon. Admittedly, Oly playing marketing games here and provides special warranty, but only for 1 year and only in Japan.

> the anti-dust features on the sensor

They were not the first (IIRC 3rd) to bring it. But it was first anti-dust which actually worked.

0 upvotes
AlbertSiegel
By AlbertSiegel (Aug 18, 2012)

>First *DSLR* was the Oly E-10.

Does the E-10 count as a DSLR?. There was no reflex mirror.

>Yes, but it was clearly inferior to in-lens IS (what gave IBIS initially bad name). Oly's implementation of IBIS competes with the in-lens ISs. (E-M5's IBIS outdoes the in-lens IS.)

That is all subjective and relative. Anyway, my statement is still correct.

>Check the Oly E-420 or E-620. They are painfully small.

That they were, but Pentax was always about small SLR cameras long before Olympus. See E-1 vs Pentax *ist D

>But never openly states that or provides warranty coverage for damage by elements.

Not sure about warranty, but Canon has always stated the weather sealing ability clearly on their pro brochures... At least here in Japan they did.

>They were not the first (IIRC 3rd) to bring it. But it was first anti-dust which actually worked.

This I did not know. Thanks for pointing that out.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Anders Ostmoe
By Anders Ostmoe (Aug 17, 2012)

I have have waited for this. Now it feels sensible to extend my ft lens collection.

3 upvotes
bcalkins
By bcalkins (Aug 17, 2012)

It would be interesting if they did the hybrid sensor idea with an MFT mount with 4/3 mount adapter with a pro body spec. Have to be an EVF, though, maybe higher res and larger than the EM-5. Basically an EM-5 with larger body and PDAF.

By interesting I mean it would also be something that MFT owners might move 'up' to and gain access to some of the excellent 4/3 glass without the AF performance hit.

Not that an updated E-5 isn't interesting on its own, just not interesting to me as a MFT only user :)

0 upvotes
Domagoj Batinic
By Domagoj Batinic (Aug 17, 2012)

that's not gonna happen , this will be body aimed only at 4/3 lenses. what it should be E-5 size body, weathersealed, sensor and IBIS from E-M5, and (pleeeeease Olympus) huge OVF, maybe hybrid VF to give options like magnify view in VF

0 upvotes
TOM SKY
By TOM SKY (Aug 17, 2012)

For Olympus to get good edge in the market is to release retro styled Full frame body in an uncompromising package of high durability, fast performance and image quality just as Fujifilm or Leica did with M9 gaining great interest Olympus has the full potential to follow with even greater product the question is if Olympus can afford NOT to do it.

0 upvotes
ptox
By ptox (Aug 17, 2012)

So, basically, Olympus should quit their successful niche and compete from scratch against the largest camera manufacturers.

Brilliant!

2 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Aug 18, 2012)

ptox: That's what they did with the pen series micro 4/3 system. Started from the bottom and have been clawing their way up right alongside Panasonic.
What they should have done was start at the top with a high end model to let people know they meant business and could have faith invested in them.
Users have had to sit through 4 years of less than stellar pen cameras (that played second fiddle to models from Panasonic, a company that has no history in stills cameras) just to get to the EM5 (which only just compares to low end FF cameras from ages ago), and now they get told it's not the best with PRO lenses.

0 upvotes
ptox
By ptox (Aug 18, 2012)

fmian: are you identifying a precedent? because I don't see one.

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Aug 18, 2012)

I don't have time to delve through camera release history, but Fuji seem to have created the X100, X10 and XPro1 with this mindset.
Create the best possible camera they can based on the specs at hand, and try to out do the competition with something bold and fresh. They took a chance and stuck to a traditional design philosophy and were given accolades as a result.
Olympus on the other hand meanders about for 4 years rehashing versions of the E-P1 until they get to the EM-5, and then exclaim that it isn't good enough.

0 upvotes
wlachan
By wlachan (Aug 17, 2012)

It's good to know 4/3 wasn't dead but it must be in a very difficult spot. Would Olympus be able to produce a super high performance body that is affordable enough when compared against Canon & Nikon's similar DSLRs? And how about those way overpriced lenses? It's like half the weight and engine of a Ferrari but asking for the same price because it can accelerate just as fast. Hello?

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
revio
By revio (Aug 17, 2012)

Well, same "performance" (in your example a car´s acceleration performance) at much lower weight. If it possible to make it, WHY should, and how could, that cost less to design and manufacture???

Answer: it doesn´t cost less, rather sometimes more, to make smaller things perform as well as, or better than, bigger...

1 upvote
Domagoj Batinic
By Domagoj Batinic (Aug 17, 2012)

"It's like half the weight and engine of a Ferrari but asking for the same price because it can accelerate just as fast. Hello?"

why not? Pagani Zonda or Koeniggsegg come to mind

0 upvotes
BobT3218
By BobT3218 (Aug 18, 2012)

You need to do more research comparing like for like, image quality, build quality, DOF, size, weight and lastly price. You will then realise what a bargain the Zuikos are.

1 upvote
mrb375
By mrb375 (Aug 17, 2012)

I have switched to Nikon and Sigma.. but the current E-5 and 12-60 lens is very nice. The 4/3rds sensor (however) tends to blow out highlights and has less in RAW for shadows.

I've owned OM, EP-x, E-420, 520, 620, and E-30. All perform *decent* but lose out to APS-C & FF.

2 upvotes
Midnighter
By Midnighter (Aug 17, 2012)

Why compare to old cameras? With the new Sony sensor in the EM-5 there is not enough of a difference between 4/3 and APS-C to be worth a damn in my opinion. As for Full Frame, sorry but with comparable sensor technologies in all those sizes both four thirds and APS-C are eaten alive. Area = 221mm four thirds, 329mm APS-C and a whopping 864mm for FF.

3 upvotes
Ross the Fidller
By Ross the Fidller (Aug 18, 2012)

The highlights don't blow out in the E-M5 (with the Sony sensor) like they did in the models with Panasonic sensors. It does have a much better dynamic range (I started with E410, then E520 & E30)

0 upvotes
mrb375
By mrb375 (Aug 18, 2012)

The new EM-5 looks like a nice piece, but I like the flexibility of Nikon more. Why Olympus fervently continues with 4/3's and m4/3rds is beyond me. They have to grow or (unfortunately) die.

0 upvotes
Ross the Fidller
By Ross the Fidller (Aug 19, 2012)

I'm afraid your idea of growing is not what Olympus thinks. They are fine with the 4/3's sensor size & so long as they keep growing with M4/3's cameras & also support the 4/3's lenses, then I don't think they have any problems. The mind set of other brand users becomes a little coloured, especially when they haven't used Olympus gear.

0 upvotes
mrb375
By mrb375 (Aug 19, 2012)

I guess what I mean is, if the buyer has $1100 to spend, the best choice would be a Nikon D7000 over the EM-5. If you look at the costs of m4/3rds lenses- again Nikon wins.

0 upvotes
MtOlympus
By MtOlympus (Aug 17, 2012)

Attention Olympus: just put the new sensor in the E5 body and not change the controls, and I will buy one. I want to have my 12-60 lens mounted on one body and the 50-200 on another, because I don't always have time to change lenses, but it is important to me that they both bodies function the SAME.

1 upvote
Entropius
By Entropius (Aug 17, 2012)

Besides, they've pretty much nailed down a good set of ergonomics for a while -- there's no *reason* to change them.

1 upvote
Jarkko Lehtinen
By Jarkko Lehtinen (Aug 20, 2012)

I think some people like small cameras (like OM-D serie(s)) but some like bigger ones. The bigger ones offer better control because the buttons are bigger. Bigger body make sense with a heavy and bright long tele lens, too.

So some like EVFs, some traditional OVF. I think the new E-7 is needed for bigger hands, better ergonomicis in cold weather, a faster C-AF and OVF. For the time being both M4/3 and "full" 3/4 lines are needed.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
1 upvote
TOM SKY
By TOM SKY (Aug 17, 2012)

M4/3 is a downgrade for sake of convenience and portability time for Olympus to roll the ball with FF camera

2 upvotes
ptox
By ptox (Aug 17, 2012)

Just what we need -- less innovation.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Aug 17, 2012)

too late for me, i dumped my E1 and lenses years ago when i realised they were never going to be competitive with nikon and canon. selling the lenses as if they were FF equiv. was a big mistake.

4 upvotes
QuarterToDoom
By QuarterToDoom (Aug 17, 2012)

As much as I like the image quality from my EPL-1 it has nothing on the ergonomics and the "enjoyment" I get out of shooting my E-1. I for one welcome our new Olympus Pro 4/3 camera overlords.

0 upvotes
Tim the Grey
By Tim the Grey (Aug 19, 2012)

I run my Old E-1. It's 8 years old, and I love using it. It just WORKS. I also have a D700, and if I'm honest, I grab the E-1 if I NEED to get the shot just now. That may change, but right now, I KNOW what that E-1 will do...
Oh, and I also know it can handle ANY rain any time. The Nikon is tucked away for now!
So, yes, I like this announcement, if it's for a new E?. If it's just an m4/3 adaptor, then I stay away.
And all those claiming Zuikos are big, and heavy, etc. just please go TRY one? You might find it's way better than you thought.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
AntnioGM
By AntnioGM (Aug 17, 2012)

This is very good news for me. I'm one of those naives that still use and love those noisy 4/3's cameras and a lot of 4/3 lenses.
Just hope they can make that future camera as good or better than the E-M5.
And please Oly designers, do try to correct some mistakes you made on the E3 and E5, such as the size of the buttons and the lack of a MSC mode that can be activated with only a finger.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Fleabag
By Fleabag (Aug 17, 2012)

This is why I still have my 300f2.8

5 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Aug 17, 2012)

I hope those get cheap sometime on the used market, but I doubt they ever will...

0 upvotes
TOM SKY
By TOM SKY (Aug 17, 2012)

Micro 4/3 Format has become well established via Olympus and Panasonic wide range of products. Regardless of the amazing beneffit of the portable format I personaly believe Olympus would win greater audience with adding Full Frame Camera confirming its truly professional approach and over all status of real player in the photo market. Expanding the range with full frame option not only would spin the interest of the legendary Zuiko lenses devoted fans and reawaken the spirit but would also offer greater quality options for studio and landscape artists.

1 upvote
Ross the Fidller
By Ross the Fidller (Aug 18, 2012)

I think you've made your point in several places, but it ain't ganna happen.

0 upvotes
TorsteinH
By TorsteinH (Aug 18, 2012)

Do everybody want a larger sensor than 4/3s? I dont! The so called FF cameras are just a camera with a arbitary sensor size. Cameras that needs mirrors to work will soon be a rareity. In the meantime I can do with an updated E-5 with a new sensor, wi-fi built in and 5 way IBIS to use on my fine ZD lenses.

0 upvotes
Chris_in_Osaka
By Chris_in_Osaka (Aug 17, 2012)

OLYMPUS, how about the quality and value of 4/3's lenses FOR MICRO FOUR THIRDS? As a former 4/3's user (various E system cameras from the E-1 up to the E-3) and current m4/3 user (E-PL3 and OM-D), I WON'T EVER be going back to the E system (if I want to lug around a heavy body, I've got a 5D Mark II...which I hardly touch now thanks to the OM-D), but I miss the High Grade and Super High Grade lens range, the mid level High Grade in particular (competitively priced plus lens hoods and cases included). Please, enough with the overpriced plastic on one end and Leica wannabe metal lenses on the other...give me a designed for m4/3 weather sealed 50-200mm 2.8-3.5 and so on.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
Domagoj Batinic
By Domagoj Batinic (Aug 17, 2012)

patience, you'll get them. olympus is just starting to bring out great lenses. first they had to establish the m4/3 system and they couldn't do that by introducing expensive high end glass right off the bat. as the system matures it will get the glass like we know from 4/3 range

1 upvote
3a
By 3a (Aug 17, 2012)

i may sound naive,
why does Olympus lenses (say 300 F2.8), which just have to cover half the image circle of a Full frame counterpart be this heavy (i guess 400gm more than nikon) and this costly (almost 1000+$ more) ?
i guess if Olympus had invested in making smaller and lower cost lenses (with similar quality), once they stopped making Film cameras, they would have been a more popular brand now.
i guess i made the right choice of moving from E-30 to D300s, even-though i was not dissatisfied with E-30.

2 upvotes
MatijaK
By MatijaK (Aug 17, 2012)

"smaller and lower cost lenses (with similar quality)" - Does not compute.

The SHG 4/3 lenses are big, heavy and expensive because they are close to being optically perfect. Also, it is much harder to create a quality lens for a small sensor; the larger the sensor, the more forgiving the glass needs to be.

If you go for small, light and inexpensive, you get m4/3 lenses, and those aren't exactly the best ever.

I'd also like to add that m4/3 only allows for smaller wides and wide normals. Everything else, to be optically on the same level as 4/3, needs to be of the same size and weight. A 50-200 in m4/3 mount can be smaller and optically compromised, or it can be the same as the version in 4/3 mount if equal IQ is wanted.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
12 upvotes
citizenlouie
By citizenlouie (Aug 17, 2012)

Yes, 4/3 sensor is smaller than APS-C sensor. In fact, its squarer format means the image circle requirement is even less. However, with Super High Grade lenses (like 300mm f/2.8 you mentioned), Olympus takes the go-for-the-broke approach and delivers some of the near perfect lenses without considering much on the design constraints (e.g., size, cost to produce, material choices). They have the largest lens to sensor size ratio of any format for the sake of achieving absolutely best performance. For those who want something that competes well with other brands' offerings, HG is very good already. But SHG lenses are some of the near perfect lenses in every regard. SHG zoom lenses can beat most prime lenses easily.

If you just want some "smaller and lower cost lenses" as you said, you can just buy the standard grade lenses from Olympus, or m4/3 lenses. They're very similar in grade with competitors. HG lenses will exceed your expectation already.

2 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Aug 17, 2012)

Image circle isn't hard for telephotos: you don't actually save much by making a 300mm that only covers the 4/3 frame. But then you realize that your pixels are half as wide, so the lens has to deliver twice the resolution. Of course, this being the best tele that Olympus sells, it had better deliver that resolution with a TC, too -- so you've got to make a 300/2.8 that can deliver a sharp picture at 1200mm EFL.

Olympus did that, but it's not small.

1 upvote
3a
By 3a (Aug 17, 2012)

i guess i failed to convey my point.
lets say which lenses are the more popular with CaNikon ...
i will say its cheap to moderately costly lenses like 50mm F1.8, 400 F5.6, 300 F4, 100-400 etc. there is nothing in Oly lineup which can match the price-quality combo of the same. Oly either have super quality super costly F2 and F2.8 lenses or cheaper 5.6 lenses.

i was just trying to say why i moved out.
Atleast if Sigma continued making FT lenses, there would be more people following Olympus.

0 upvotes
Martin.au
By Martin.au (Aug 18, 2012)

Oly 50-200. 50macro, 1.4 teleconverter. Done

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Aug 18, 2012)

3a, ask your question on Nikon, Canon, Sony, Pentax lenses forums if you want to straight answer. Olympus users are very loyal and from what I can tell, this comment section are full of them and very few others.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Aug 18, 2012)

@ MatijaK: remember that, due to a shorter flange distance, it is possible to manufacture shorter and narrower lenses, as m4/3 bayonet has 6mm less in diameter than 4/3. Micro 4/3 lenses will always be smaller, if only by a notch when we consider very wide, constant apertures and fast telephotos.
@ Some people who have decided to plague this comment section with those ridiculous theories of «equivalent aperture»: get informed - preferably outside internet forums - before making your statements. I did. F/2 is f/2 in 4/3, APS or FF.

0 upvotes
jeerzz
By jeerzz (Aug 17, 2012)

OM-D Sensor upgraded
5-Axis IS
1/8000 shutter
Burst 9 FPS or over
Minimum ISO50

then shut up and take my house my money my car my life

11 upvotes
xaan
By xaan (Aug 17, 2012)

DPR, why is this rude behavior of Gothmoth acceptable???

2 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Aug 17, 2012)

It isn't, I just trimmed his 'contributions'.

10 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Aug 17, 2012)

In Internet slang, a troll is someone who posts inflammatory, extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community, such as a forum, chat room, or blog, with the primary intent of provoking readers into an emotional response or of otherwise disrupting normal on-topic discussion. AKA Gothmoth

3 upvotes
photosen
By photosen (Aug 17, 2012)

Good news, but it might make more sense to release a mid level camera so the user base can upgrade to something they can afford...

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Aug 17, 2012)

For low and mid end, there are plenty of m43. What is missing from m43 is the lenses in HG and SHG ranges, but if you can afford them, then you can afford a proper camera for them.

1 upvote
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Aug 17, 2012)

I think you are missing the point.

Olympus isn't creating this camera for the value market. This is strictly for the people who own or who will buy high end lenses. Without a new camera, it might be very difficult to sell those $2,000 lenses.

It really doesn't matter what we want or what we can afford. Olympus needs to move those expensive lenses off their shelves, and they need to make a nice profit while doing it.

2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 17, 2012)

If they put the E-M5 sensor in the E-5 body with the OVF and Phase AF of the E-5, they'd have a really nice, viable, camera. APS-C has almost nothing on that latest E-M5 sensor. Olympus is still the only one with F2 zooms.

9 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Aug 18, 2012)

I was telling myself there is no way the only people reading this rumor are Olympus fanboys until I read your comment that erase all doubt.

Go read about SONY's two years old 16mp and 24mp APE-C sensor.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 18, 2012)

I don't even shoot Olympus, how can I be a fanboy? The sensor is the EM-5 is a new Sony sensor with similar density to the APS-C models. The only thing it seems to give up to APS-C is about 2/3 a stop of DOF control.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Aug 17, 2012)

I don't want them to make a camera body that can use their fantastic legacy lenses. I want them to make those great legacy lenses in m4/3s format so I can use them on a less expensive m4/3s camera.

4 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 17, 2012)

I think they will get to that, but a new body seems like a more viable option for now.

Plus "less expensive" is not re-buying a bunch of $1000-3000 lenses for a different mount, regardless of body cost.

3 upvotes
iShootWideOpen
By iShootWideOpen (Aug 17, 2012)

Olympus, Four Thirds, and Pro do not belong in the same sentence.

5 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 17, 2012)

Oh course, what could be "pro" about f2 zooms that are razor sharp and weather sealed.

11 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Aug 17, 2012)

Why not? Go back and look at winners of the wildlife challenges here -- there's a disproportionate representation of Olympus cameras, actually.

Just because it's a smaller sensor doesn't mean that you can't take good pictures with them. 4/3 is to fullframe as fullframe is to medium format, after all.

Your username says that you shoot wide open -- well, Olympus makes lots of lenses that are very sharp wide open, including f/2 zooms.

9 upvotes
veroman
By veroman (Aug 17, 2012)

Only someone who has not shot with Olympus 4:3 gear would say that the Olympus name and sensor platform do not equate with "pro." I'd suggest just the opposite: from the standpoints of build, weather sealing, speed, IQ, lenses, overall rendering, sharpness and color, few cameras are as "pro" as the E-3, E-30 and E-5 ... and the rest of the line comes pretty close, making them excellent backups for the higher end models.

5 upvotes
Peter 13
By Peter 13 (Aug 17, 2012)

F/2 zoom on m43 is f/4 on FF - not so sexy anymore.

2 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (Aug 17, 2012)

So you have to stop your lens down two stops on your chosen format to get the same depth of field? Or to get the lens sharp? That's a pain with long glass. Two stop win to Olympus!

3 upvotes
jkrumm
By jkrumm (Aug 17, 2012)

As an E5 owner, this definitely makes me happy.

5 upvotes
TheoFruendt
By TheoFruendt (Aug 17, 2012)

yes, me too. The statement about meeting the capabilities of the pro lenses... And with Sony on board there is certainly more to come. But let the Nikon & Cononic buddies continue to sleep.

4 upvotes
Jarkko Lehtinen
By Jarkko Lehtinen (Aug 20, 2012)

Me, too - even though I am just an "E-3"owner. Or perhaps that makes me more happy?!!

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (Aug 17, 2012)

I'd actually be interested in one of those. I just hope Olympus doesn't charge as much as it did for the E5.

5 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 17, 2012)

E-5 was priced in line with the competition. It was roughly the same price as the K-5, 7D, D300s at launch.

Olympus has the E-30 and E-620 models if you don't want to pay premium crop camera prices.

1 upvote
bluevellet
By bluevellet (Aug 17, 2012)

I disagree since it didn't offer the same performance as those cameras. But the high price is probably more due to low volume and a bit of price gouging from Olympus.

As for the E-30 and the E620, they were nice alternatives to the E3... 4 years ago. But since Olympus is likely only going to make a single 43 camera this time around, it'd be preferable if they didn't charge a premium for it.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Aug 17, 2012)

A new camera body for "Top Pro" lenses? How about a new body for their Top Super High Extra Great Pro lenses?

1 upvote
Entropius
By Entropius (Aug 17, 2012)

"Top Pro" isn't just marketing-speak, since it actually means something in the Olympus world. They have three lines of lenses, each line covering the range from ultrawide to telephoto: Standard, Pro (or High Grade), and Top Pro (or Super High Grade).

"Standard" is slow zooms (and a f/3.5 macro lens)
"High Grade/Pro" is f/2.8-3.5 zooms (and a f/2 macro lens), all weathersealed
"Super High/Top Pro" is fast, no-holds-barred excellent optics: f/2 zooms, 150/2 and 300/2.8 primes, etc.

Lots of people do professional work with High Grade lenses; it's just a designator that Olympus uses. They're one of the few companies that actually has a well-thought-out lens lineup, with the three complete lines.

3 upvotes
Jarkko Lehtinen
By Jarkko Lehtinen (Aug 20, 2012)

Yes, and even the "standard" line could be as good quality optically as some of the worst Canon "L" series. With Canon you have to know when L stand for quality and when not. Most of the cases it stands for quality but not always.

I am not talking built quality here. Olympus Standard lenses are usually optically good but slow and still not rugged or water proof like the higher grades Olympus lenses.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Aug 17, 2012)

wasted resources... olympus should focus on small mirrorless.

olympus has next to nothing to say in the DSLR market.
and they sure have no money to waste.

soon i can buy a FF sony NEX.
canon and nikon will bring FF entry level cameras.

who will buy this .... ?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Aug 17, 2012)

It's not wasted resources, it's continuing to sell bodies to people that have invested in Olympus glass. Who will buy it? People who have Olympus lenses.

They are focusing on mirrorless, but that doesn't mean they have to abandon their other mount.

6 upvotes
intensity studios
By intensity studios (Aug 17, 2012)

I don't really know anyone that has olympus slr glass... and that is coming from someone who is a fan of olympus.

1 upvote
supeyugin1
By supeyugin1 (Aug 17, 2012)

Why do you need a FF NEX with no lenses? Who is gonna use it? As well as FF NEX is not gonna happen, because it was designed for APS-C.

2 upvotes
intensity studios
By intensity studios (Aug 17, 2012)

I am a big fan of Olympus and have owned a loved a few of their cameras.

But the company is in serious financial trouble. Let's be real. Canon and Nikon pretty much own the DSLR market. How many people do you know that really shoot with an Olympus SLR? But Canon and Nikon are crap in the mirrorless market.

Olympus would really do itself a huge favor by putting DSLRs on the backburner for now and really putting all their effort and money into the mirrorless market where they have a chance to establish themselves as the leader in this emerging market.

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Aug 17, 2012)

They have put it on backburner for 2 years. The update is overdue, especially if it can be done practically for free using existing components from E-5 and E-M5.

3 upvotes
QuarterToDoom
By QuarterToDoom (Aug 17, 2012)

>How many people do you know that really shoot with an Olympus SLR?

I'm looking at a reflection of one in my monitor while I write this. I will never get used to the m43 ergonomics as as an Olympus users I look forward to finally getting an E-1 replacement.

3 upvotes
BruceB609
By BruceB609 (Aug 17, 2012)

I'd be interested to know how many E-1 users would be out there standing in line. The E-3 and 5 never could replace it or else I wouldn't be keeping a couple until Olympus figures out what we're talking about. It would be interesting to see the true blooded response if it was upgraded. Guess we can expect more bells, whistles and pixels on #7 though.

0 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Aug 17, 2012)

Not that I don't know where this comes from, but - Sources, DPR ?

"Press release" sounds quite official. Link to the quite official source ? Pretty please ?

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Aug 17, 2012)

That statement comes to us direct from Olympus. I don't think it has been published on any of its regional websites yet, but I will update this story accordingly.

3 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Aug 17, 2012)

Thanks !

0 upvotes
highwave
By highwave (Aug 17, 2012)

Like a Boss Barney

0 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Aug 17, 2012)

why on earth would i buy a smaller sensor DSLR?

make it FF or stick to the small body formfactor of m43 olympus.
it´s not as if they have resources to waste.

sony nex goes FF in a small body and here i get smaller then aps-c sensor in a DSLR body.

useless..... FF is the future.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Aug 17, 2012)

You shouldn't indeed. Just as you shouldn't comment here if you have nothing to say on the subject, which seems to be obvious.

6 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Aug 17, 2012)

Why stop at full frame? Maybe we should all have 8x10 digital backs..full frame is too small....right? Lets make a law to ban all non-large sensor cameras because Mr.Gothmoth says so. Forget price, lens size, weight, and F2 zoom lenses. Some people are so small minded. Here is the kicker, I have a D800e and I really miss my E-510, E-30, and E-5. They just have something magic about them. Sensor size was never a issue; slap a EM-5 sensor in the new body and I might have to pick one up.

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
10 upvotes
Zamac
By Zamac (Aug 17, 2012)

I agree with Gothmoth - Oly lost me as a customer with their 2x crop sensor in a pro level dslr body. 4/3 is great for small mirrorless cameras, not for large dslr cameras. Go FF and I might come back!

5 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Aug 17, 2012)

I'll wait for your IQ to reach double digits before I remind you that the troll in an Olympus related announcement wouldn't be the one owning Olympus gear (me), but more likely the one commenting on why he wouldn't buy it with the argumentation of a 3 years old.

Somehow, I'm not holding my breath, though. Good luck with your quest :D

PS: Seen "DSLR" anywhere in the announcement ?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Aug 17, 2012)

'why on earth would i buy a small sensor DSLR?'
Because:
a) you are an intelligent, adult person, not some preteen boy obsessed with size issues;
b) Sensor size allows manufacturing smaller and narrower (thus cheaper) lenses while maintaining high levels of quality;
c) 4/3 optimizes light transmission (there's no light fall-off);
d) the other day you looked at one of your ISO 12800 photos and couldn't tell it from a Seurat painting, so concluded high ISO isn't such a tall order after all;
e) image quality is not behind most APS-C cameras (NB that's 'image quality', not 'pixel counting' or 'maximum ISO'; that's resolution, which is not necessarily the same as image quality).
Besides, they can't put phase detection contrast in a m43 body. And some of the constant aperture 4/3 lenses really require a DSLR body.
Cheers.

8 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Aug 17, 2012)

Again - good luck growing up. Let us know when you reach the maturity of a ten years old. Should get there within the next six or seven years, if nothing big pops in the way :)

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Aug 17, 2012)

Olympus 300mm f2.8 (eqv 600mm f2.8) Weight 3,290g
$7000

200-​500mm ​F2.​8 ​APO ​EX ​DG Weight 15,700g
$38,000

Ohhhh...I guess there is no 600mm f2.8 for full frame..I wonder why.

3 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Aug 17, 2012)

well there is no 40x zoom for FF either....

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Aug 17, 2012)

Some people have large collection of FT glass... Then, in what other system can you get fixed aperture f/2.0 zooms? How about 180-500mm equivalent f/2.0 of excellent optical quality? Other lenses, especially on the tele end, are significantly smaller and lighter than their APS-C and especially FF AoF and exposure equivalents.
Regarding the sensors, they came long long way. As all electronics, they progressed rapidly, and might be just good enough for most peoples' tasks. Modern 4/3-sized sensor (as in E-M5) rivals APS-C from 2 years ago and FF from 4 years ago. If those were good enough then, this one is good enough now, and other considerations (such as weight of the tele lenses or availability of f/2 zooms or focus speed...) might take precedence.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
veroman
By veroman (Aug 17, 2012)

FF is the future? I guess you haven't shot with the small-sensor Fuji X10.

1 upvote
ptox
By ptox (Aug 17, 2012)

"FF is the future" makes no sense.

The E-M5 already exceeds older FF cameras for dynamic range, high ISO performance and sharpness. And in a few years, we'll see a 4/3 sensor camera with D4-level performance.

That progression won't stop; at some point the IQ of sub-FF sensors will be more than enough for just about any need.

Oh, except narrow DOF! The most important thing ever. Gosh, and I almost forgot...

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
OniMirage
By OniMirage (Aug 17, 2012)

What isn't hinted at is HOW they will do it. They could very easily just make a hybrid system on the m4/3 mount. Previous patent documents surely suggest such a possibility.

2 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Aug 17, 2012)

Good for them if they pull it off. After all, it's the lens that takes the picture -- all the Olympus crowd is waiting for is a way to focus it.

1 upvote
brandtb
By brandtb (Aug 22, 2012)

The Scoop: I was just at Olympus US headquarters in Hauppage...and spoke to someone in a senior position about this. He first just chuckled...and said the interviewer interpreted a LOT into what was actually said in the interview...and it became somehow a possible "new DSLR" in the subsequent chatter. He said that it was highly doubtful that Oly will "upgrade" or add "new model" to the E3-E5 line. Sad to me because the ergonimics of these cameras are second to none...and that's important to me...high ISO IQ etc. etc. are other issues but not a concern for what I do

0 upvotes
Total comments: 266
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