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Mobile Arts Festival touted as world’s largest

By dpreview staff on Aug 17, 2012 at 19:10 GMT

A gallery of images shot with the three-lens Olloclip iPhone accessory gives a taste of what's to come what organisers are saying is the world's largest 'mobile arts' festival. The L.A. Mobile Arts Festival begins this Saturday at the Santa Monica Art Studios in Los Angeles, California.

The nine-day event will encompass not just camera phone photography, but also video, sculptural and performance art related to mobile devices.

The event will showcase upwards of 600 individual works created by more than 240 artists from over 30 countries around the world. Submissions came not only by email, but in keeping with the newfangeled spirit, also via Twitter and Instagram.

“This is a celebration of this young medium,” said Nathaniel Park, co-founder of iPhoneArt.com, which organized the festival.

Further work will be showcased online once the festival is under way, beginning next week.

The work of Helen Breznik (Instagram handle helenbreznik) will be included in the L.A. Mobile Arts Festival, which starts this Saturday and will feature 600 mobile art images and video, sculptural and performance installations.
iVajo's Dandelion was one of the Olloclip contest winners. Click on the image above to view more of the winners.

Comments

Total comments: 21
Matthew Bartok
By Matthew Bartok (Aug 30, 2012)

How are they presenting these photographs ? I would assume that they are not enlarged prints hanging on a wall. I am not saying that these images are lacking in artistry or vision, just quality.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Aug 20, 2012)

Just so no one misunderstand my posts - the girl and the chair and that photo of a dandelion I actually find rather attractive. And if Helen and iVajo needs this kind of tools to make that kind of images ... then thats a fact.

Its just that they can do it with any digital camera ,,, if the really want to.

0 upvotes
azmish
By azmish (Aug 18, 2012)

The expression of 15 minutes of fame has now (due to technology) become 2.3456 seconds and ANOTHER opportunity to market a product.

YAWN

1 upvote
WalterPaisley
By WalterPaisley (Aug 19, 2012)

Ha ha, so true, but in such tiny splinters of time I think the word "peep" would be more appropriate than "fame".

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Aug 18, 2012)

Its three aux. lenses. A wide angle. A fish eye. And a macro. This, and much, much more, have been around for ages.

Where is the news?

Where is the revolution?

Other than in the manufactures ads?

Btw - the images shown can be made by almost any camera - and its been able to do for lots of years.

Nothing to see here - please move along.

1 upvote
magneto shot
By magneto shot (Aug 21, 2012)

both android and iphone has...inferior small sensors...apart from n8 and 808, there really isn't any mobile phone camera worth spending time on...

0 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Aug 18, 2012)

Android world is much larger than Apple IoS, and the burst speed of an Android phone camera is faster than my wife's iPhone 4s sluggish camera.
That's why I didn't join this festival. I prefer Android

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
What do I know
By What do I know (Aug 18, 2012)

This is why art is dead, where is the art in this?

0 upvotes
photo_rb
By photo_rb (Aug 18, 2012)

If your definition of art requires painstaking craftsmanship, then you're right.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Aug 19, 2012)

That is a fruitless discussion. people cannot agree upon whats art in the first place. And maybe it does not matter. In reality we have different opinions. And what is sellable (art) is decided upon the marketplace anyhow.

0 upvotes
photo_rb
By photo_rb (Aug 18, 2012)

In his day, not many people had much use for Van Gogh and his "squiggles". Didn't look at all like "real painting."

1 upvote
Jacques_t
By Jacques_t (Aug 18, 2012)

There is something to be said for taking a photo and having a person 'work it' to conform to the artist's vision. What I find disturbing about digital art and 'artists' is that any Tom, Dick and Harry can press a button on a phone, apply an instant filter and call it 'art'. Where is the artist in the art in that process?

Digital art becomes forgettable very quickly, it does not hold much value, other than instant monetary value.

I have no problem with technological progress, but don't leave the 'artist' out of 'art'.

5 upvotes
Turbo Hampster
By Turbo Hampster (Aug 18, 2012)

Any old Tom, Dick or Harry can slap a bit of paint on a canvas and call it art!
And it in the case of "modern" art it seems they frequently do..

4 upvotes
maboule123
By maboule123 (Aug 18, 2012)

I guess the REAL artist in all that process is the guy who invented the filter. Then, as you said: Any Dick, Tom & Harry becomes an artist, but that was also said when digital cameras came out, remember? I agree with you, but then again I accept (snif) that monetary value is a fact that's always involved in art.

2 upvotes
Jacques_t
By Jacques_t (Aug 18, 2012)

Agreed with both, the only thing missing from your analogy TH is the bit about the artist having 'vision'. As a person who designs buildings and public spaces one has to have a vision before you can even put pen to paper (or lines and solids in a CAD program!). You can have evolving vision or a finite vision but in the end you, the artist, has to work and 'sculpt' your art. Pressing a button to apply a filter does not, in my opinion, make an artist...

I came across this post on a photography section on a well known mac forum...needless to say I rolled my eyes! :) The OP posted this...

"Hey guys, can you suggest any tips on how to take photos like they’re being taken by a professional? Strategic poses and angles? I am going to use photo apps like Pixlr-O-Matic and add the finishing touches (then share) in Instagram. (or vice versa)"

2 upvotes
maboule123
By maboule123 (Aug 18, 2012)

Well, it seems that ever since silver halide left town, and it was replaced by electronic technology, we can't stop progress, can we?
Remember TV? It wasn't supposed to stay.
Cinema was booed by theater, and the list went on.
I truly admire what these guys are doing.
These image manipulating programs are far more friendly user than Photoshop, and they are cheap.
Welcome to the 21st Century!!

0 upvotes
digitall
By digitall (Aug 18, 2012)

What has technology, ubiquity and speed got to do with 'art'?

2 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (Aug 18, 2012)

Not sure why your asking that but it's probably mentioned in one of the links up there ...so, quick response

Technology: allows more people to participate in art through the use of camera phones and app programs to manipulate the photos taken with the camera. Seeing how "art" is interpreted differently by everyone, it also forms a new subsection, consideration and thus appreciation of the new "art" as produced by the technology ...a big circle really.

Ubiquity: by definition, this festival is based on it ...mobile phones are everywhere and the "art" being produced is mainly by cellphones

Speed: lets face it. Its the world today ...the faster the better for most. If people can do it fast, more people will do it, thus more "art" will be produced. The whole concept of snapseed, hipstamatic and all these pres set apps are speed, thus the correlation between the two.

0 upvotes
digitall
By digitall (Aug 18, 2012)

Mine is a rhetorical question, but thank you for your considered reply. My point is that art is nothing to do with quantity, speed of transmission, etc. Art has been available to those with an artistic temperament for millennia.

2 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (Aug 20, 2012)

Yes it has, but art also changes. Look what the camera did ...so should the question be "what does technology, ubiquity, speed and a camera have to do with art?" Art and art forms change. That's life. Art is all opinion, and opinion's form, change, stay the same, differ and are similar. That's why technology, ubiquity and speed are part of art today.

0 upvotes
digitall
By digitall (Aug 22, 2012)

Art does change but change is a quantity, not quality. I do not know how you can hold that 'Art is all opinion' and that 'opinion's form'...
Opinion is a facet of language, spoken and written. Art, within the realms of painting, photography etc., is to do with expression and is about expression of emotion. Great art is an emotional experience and the technological aspect is a realtively trivial part of artistic achievement. However, I find your assertions interesting if unconvincing.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 21