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Canon EOS M: hands-on preview of Canon's first mirrorless EOS

By dpreview staff on Jul 23, 2012 at 04:00 GMT
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Canon has, as expected, announced the EOS M - its first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera. Based around the same 18MP APS-C sensor as the recent EOS 650D/T4i, the EOS M is the first model to use a new, smaller 'EF-M' lens mount. It is launched alongside two EF-M lenses that use STM stepper motors optimized for use with the camera's hybrid AF system. As we've seen before in the mirrorless sector, the EOS M is predominantly aimed at the point-and-shoot upgrader market looking for DSLR quality and makes greater use of a 650D-style touch-screen interface. We've been using the EOS M for a little while and have prepared a preview, looking in more detail at Canon's first mirrorless EOS camera and how it handles.

UPDATE. We've recently updated this preview with our own images of the camera, having initially used those provided by Canon. We've also added more information about the camera and screenshots of its touch interface, so if you read our initial preview shortly after publication it's worth having another look. 

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Press Release:

DSLR-quality images at your fingertips: Canon launches the small and simple EOS M

London, UK, 23 July 2012 – Canon today expands its award-winning EOS range with the launch of the new EOS M. The company’s first ever compact system camera (CSC), the EOS M is designed for those who use photography to share their everyday passions – from food, to fashion and culture, music and art. Offering DSLR-quality imaging, creative features and Full HD movie creation in a compact and easy-to-use model, the EOS M is the perfect, take-anywhere partner for a new breed of enthusiasts who chronicle their lives through images, without necessarily considering themselves to be ‘photographers’.

The EOS M is available in sleek black, glossy white, stylish silver or bold red colours, and condenses Canon’s renowned EOS imaging heritage into a stylish, compact design. The model launches alongside two new lenses, the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM pancake and the EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM standard zoom, as well as a new compact EX Speedlite – the Speedlite 90EX – providing everything you need to capture stunning images every day. For those who want to push their images even further, the EOS M can also utilise Canon’s extensive range of EF lenses with the new Mount Adapter EF-EOS M, for even more creative freedom.

The quality of a Canon DSLR

Print your favourite moments in poster-size or crop your image for maximum impact – whether shooting the atmosphere of your favourite club or the intricate stitching of the latest must-have handbag – thanks to the EOS M’s high-resolution, 18 megapixel APS-C hybrid CMOS sensor. The large sensor also allows you to artistically blur the background for beautiful portraits, or for close-ups with impact.

With the inclusion of Canon’s DIGIC 5 processor, colours ‘pop’ and skin tones are beautifully natural, whilst a super-fast shutter allows you to capture split-second action. The atmosphere of evening shoots and challenging night-time scenes are also easily recorded in stunning detail thanks to the EOS M’s sensitive native ISO range of 100- 12,800 (extendable to 25,600).

For pin-sharp shots and professional-looking footage, this new design features a Hybrid AF System that supports super-fast, accurate AF when shooting stills and movies – allowing you to record any moment with confidence.

Shoot what you see and easily express your creative vision

Every aspect of the EOS M has been designed to make it simple to capture beautiful, creative, high-quality images. From the very first swipe across the bright, high- resolution, 7.7cm (3.0”), Clear View LCD II Touch screen, the EOS M gives you as much or as little control over your photos as desired. Simply select different shooting modes and settings via the on-screen icons, or let Scene Intelligent Auto adjust the camera settings according to the subject and shooting conditions, leaving you free to focus on composition and selecting the perfect moment to hit the shutter release button.

EOS M users can shoot with the confidence that comes from having the world's most comprehensive photographic system behind them. Whether you want to capture every detail of a close-up or zoom in to frame a subject in the far distance, any one of Canon’s extensive range of EF lenses can be connected via the new

Mount Adapter EF-EOS M for photographic flexibility.

With one of Canon’s Speedlite flash units, you can also explore creative lighting techniques to add an extra level of interest to your shots. Alternatively, create unique images with a range of Creative Filters like Toy Camera effect, Grainy B&W or even a filter that mimics the distortion of a fish-eye lens. The filters can be applied before the shot is captured, with the result previewed in Live View, allowing you to experiment with different effects before selecting the perfect treatment for your final image.

Turn film-maker with EOS Movie and Video Snapshot

When a moment calls for more than a still image, the EOS M lets you switch easily to Full HD video with stereo sound for superb results. Video Snapshot mode also helps family and friends avoid long home movie viewing sessions, guiding you to create exciting movies in-camera, with a professionally edited feel.

Extending the EOS System with dedicated accessories

In addition to compatibility with Canon’s existing EF lenses1, accessories and Speedlites, the EOS M launches with its own bespoke range of compact accessories. Two new EF-M lenses offer portability and high performance when using the new model – the EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM standard zoom and the
EF-M 22mm f/2 STM pancake lens. Both feature new Stepper Motor technology for exceptionally smooth AF performance, as well as precision Canon optics, while their compact designs offer the perfect form-factor to complement the camera’s pocket-sized body.

Additionally, the EOS M will ship with the new Speedlite 90EX flash unit as standard. Lightweight and highly-compact, it offers a maximum guide number of nine and supports wide-angle lenses, making it an ideal general-purpose flash for everyday use. A wireless master function also allows the control of multiple flash guns wirelessly, allowing more advanced users to experiment with a range of creative lighting effects.

EOS M – key features

  •  The quality of a digital SLR in a compact body

  •  Scene Intelligent Auto

  •  Be versatile with interchangeable lenses

  •  Create out-of-focus backgrounds for high impact

  •  Easy-to-use touch-screen

  •  Atmospheric photos in low light

  •  Full-HD video with Video Snapshot Mode

1 Via Mount Adaptor EF-EOS M

Canon EOS M specifications

Price
MSRP$799.99 with 22mm lens, €849/£769 with 18-55mm lens, €1049/£949 with 18-55mm + 22mm lenses, €979/£879 with 22mm lens + EF adapter
Body type
Body typeRangefinder-style mirrorless
Sensor
Max resolution5184 x 3456
Other resolutions3456 x 2304, 2592 x 1728, 1920 x 1280, 720 x 480
Effective pixels18 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors19 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (22.3 x 14.9 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorDigic 5
Color spacesRGB,Adobe RGB
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800 (25600 with boost)
White balance presets6
Custom white balanceYes (1)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal
File format
  • JPEG: Fine, Normal (Exif 2.3 compliant)
  • Design rule for Camera File system (2.0),
  • RAW: 14bit RAW
  • Digital Print Order Format [DPOF] Version 1.1 compliant
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Digital zoomNo
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points31
Lens mountCanon EF-M
Focal length multiplier1.6×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3
Screen dots1,040,000
Touch screenYes
Screen typeClear View II TFT LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeNone
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed60 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program AE
  • Shutter priority AE
  • Aperture priority AE
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Creative Auto
  • Portrait
  • Landscape
  • Close-up
  • Sports
  • Night Portrait
  • Handheld Night
  • HDR Backlight Control mode
Built-in flashNo
External flashYes (via Hot-shoe)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-eye
Flash X sync speed1/200 sec
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self timer
Continuous drive4 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Partial
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±2 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (3 frames in either blue/amber or magenta/green axis)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (60, 50 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Storage includedNone
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (HDMI mini)
WirelessEye-Fi Connected
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion LP-E12 rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)230
Weight (inc. batteries)298 g (0.66 lb / 10.51 oz)
Dimensions109 x 66 x 32 mm (4.29 x 2.6 x 1.26)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
GPSOptional
GPS notesvia GPE2

Additional images

Top-down view of the Canon EOS-M with 22mm F2.0 'pancake' prime lens.

Rear view of the Canon EOS-M (Silver)
Canon EOS-M with Speedlite EX-90 (included with the camera in most markets) Canon EOS-M shown wih EF 70-200mm F2.8 IS lens, using optional EF-EOS M mount adapter
471
I own it
64
I want it
35
I had it
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Comments

Total comments: 1229
6789
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Jul 23, 2012)

i think they should have benchmark the M to Fuji X100
but without those stupid problems
then, it would really take off....

now , it seems to be too cramped
and too limiting

0 upvotes
riknash
By riknash (Jul 23, 2012)

Hurray for Canon finally entering the race AND letting me use my insanely heavy EF lenses. I can't wait to slap a 800/5.6 onto this baby! LOL !!

1 upvote
zxaar
By zxaar (Jul 23, 2012)

please do because canon has obviously made this body to match your 800/5.6 which shall be the canon's most sold and popular lens. I mean how come someone buy a mirrorless and can stop the rush to put a 800mm lens for walk around and day to day use.

5 upvotes
insane dreamer
By insane dreamer (Jul 23, 2012)

I think you missed the sarcasm.

0 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (Jul 23, 2012)

I think you missed the sarcasm fail.

0 upvotes
Chris_in_Osaka
By Chris_in_Osaka (Jul 23, 2012)

Finally, Canon have joined the mirrorless market, even if they are the last ones to the party. Next, perhaps they'll release something to compete with the excellent Olympus OM-D....in about 3 years or so from now.

8 upvotes
TongY
By TongY (Jul 23, 2012)

price is ridiculous, but compare with Sony Nex 5n it support speedlite with out a adaptor and perfect for old manual lenses. due to the shorter flange, Contax G will fit better then on Nex.

2 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Jul 25, 2012)

It shares the same flange distance as the NEX's = 18mm.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lens_mount

0 upvotes
russbarnes
By russbarnes (Jul 23, 2012)

No viewfinder + ugly as hell + yet another Canon price gouge = FAIL

14 upvotes
Kabe Luna
By Kabe Luna (Jul 23, 2012)

Nothing to see here. I'm not interested in adapting huge-ish EF lenses to a mirrorless camera–that defeats the point for me of having a (nearly) pocketable, lightweight camera system. What's more, without at least dedicated external controls for exposure mode and exposure compensation–let alone a single fast prime–this camera is a non-starter. Honestly, the Nikon 1s, with their significantly smaller zooms and blistering fast AF, are more appealing. Too bad neither have articulated screens.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (Jul 23, 2012)

An ultra-conservative follow-the-leader (who Canon clearly thinks is Sony NEX) product designed to in no way compete with Canon's other products while leveraging as much as possible. They even followed Sony's much criticized pancake+zoom+adapter initial lens set... although the 22mm f/2 is faster than Sony's more versatile (non-zoom-lens overlapping) 16mm f/2.8 and converters.

Inside, it's a Canon. Unfortunately, that means things like it's not really APS-C (1.6X, not 1.5X). However, the good news is it likely shares a lot of the Canon firmware features -- I'm especially hoping for support of tethered operation and maybe CHDK can be ported to it?

It should be a very cheap camera for Canon to make... I wonder how quickly street prices will reflect that fact?

1 upvote
bgbs
By bgbs (Jul 23, 2012)

Don't know what to think about this announcement. From the outset the camera does not look as sexy as Nikon 1. Plus the price point is a little steep. I thought Nikon J1 was expensive, not anymore. One thing to look forward too I guess would be its high ISO capabilities. If the AF is slow as someone has said it is, this is a bigger bummer for this camera. I love my Nikon 1 because of the AF speed, and that it has a built in flash, which is extremely useful when taking this camera on outing. The image IQ of Nikon 1 is better than any P&S to date, but a little worse than DSLRs'. For most situations Nikon 1 is a winner. If anyone is interested in better IQ, then I think this Canon model would be a be a perfect upgrade; better high ISO and better IQ across the board because of its bigger sensor.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Hentaiboy
By Hentaiboy (Jul 24, 2012)

From PC World preview:

"During our brief hands-on with a pre-production model, what was immediately noticeable about the EOS M is just how quickly and effortlessly it can focus. It was set so that we didn't even have to press the shutter button halfway down; every time the camera was pointed to a near object from a far object, the focus changed almost immediately and it was spot-on accurate".

0 upvotes
locke_fc
By locke_fc (Jul 23, 2012)

Wow, a lot of negativity in the comments here. Rough summer so far guys?

Granted, it could be better, but it looks pretty interesting to me. Lens roadmap is my main concern, but that 22 f2 pancake should be fun to shoot with.

4 upvotes
tmirani
By tmirani (Jul 23, 2012)

yeah, seriously. loosen up guys.

1 upvote
Eleson
By Eleson (Jul 23, 2012)

To defend some of the whiners :)
It doesn't bring that much new to the market, does it?
Except the Canon brand of course, and that has a value for sure.

All cameras a good choice at a certain price point, what price is that for this camera?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
ayamaguchi17
By ayamaguchi17 (Jul 23, 2012)

One word. ------ YUCK!!!!

1 upvote
mantra
By mantra (Jul 23, 2012)

nice camera but the electronic viewfinder where is it?

every brands did develop a electornic viewfinder , at least better then use the monitor

0 upvotes
sir_bazz
By sir_bazz (Jul 23, 2012)

Having watched the EOS-M hands on at youtube I have to say that my Nokia 808 has faster AF than this thing and it fits in my jeans pocket.

Canon should stick to high end DSLR's as that seems to be all they're good at these days.

7 upvotes
thirteenguy
By thirteenguy (Jul 23, 2012)

it's the low end consumer market that makes the real money, son.

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
turretless
By turretless (Jul 23, 2012)

It's a really strange animal. No tilt/swivel screen, no focus peeking to compete with Sony Nex-Xs. Adapter to use EF lenses? How much space would you save caring around this instead of an entry-level DSLR? Where is the market?

1 upvote
StevenE
By StevenE (Jul 23, 2012)

They're still withholding digital zoom ( a la T3i), and no articulating screen...

... that's a bust for me

0 upvotes
Tom Hoots
By Tom Hoots (Jul 23, 2012)

It just smacks of "not enough camera body to hold onto." With nothing much in the way of right-hand grip, and nothing virtually at all for the left hand to hold onto, how are you going to manage a big lens on the thing?

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Jul 23, 2012)

Your left hand is typically supposed to be resting underneath the camera body and/or the lens, supporting the camera and/or lens from below. In the case of larger larger lenses, your left hand ends up positioned entirely underneath the lens. So there isn't any need for anything to be on the left side of the camera body for your left hand to hold onto!

As for your right hand, you have a thumb grip on the back and finger grip on the front. If you have your left hand properly supporting the camera from below, there shouldn't be any need for your right hand to be doing much work holding the camera.

Apparently, you need to brush up on your camera holding skills.

5 upvotes
sir_bazz
By sir_bazz (Jul 23, 2012)

And that leaves your middle hand free to drive the touch screen. :)

6 upvotes
tmirani
By tmirani (Jul 23, 2012)

No, actually, you would would easily be able to use the thumb of your right hand to control the screen.

0 upvotes
sir_bazz
By sir_bazz (Jul 23, 2012)

Maybe if you have little baby thumbs you could.

Have a look at his video starting at about 2:10

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPyhM2x9gT8&feature=player_embedded

Everything on the interface looks cramped and cumbersome to use even with a womans slender index finger. (You can also see the subpar AF performance).

0 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Jul 23, 2012)

Yoo funny.

How come that Nikon and Canon make the very worst mirrorless cams ?
Are they soooo afraid of loosing DSLR market share ?
Obviously.

3 upvotes
pc168
By pc168 (Jul 23, 2012)

As a D700 owner, I'm quite disappointed with the Nikon 1 What a DC sensor! Now it comes the Canon mirrorless with aps-c sensor. We've no idea how good (or bad) it would perform, but at least sensor size does matter!

1 upvote
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Jul 23, 2012)

The white one is sexy. It's all about the autofocus though, if it's not faster than something like the Fuji x-pro1 I couldn't justify it. That sensor would offer better image quality than every m4/3(excluding OM-D) camera.

0 upvotes
ageha
By ageha (Jul 23, 2012)

Just check out the AF speed on youtube.

2 upvotes
ageha
By ageha (Jul 23, 2012)

"Battery Life (CIPA) 230"

lol

21 upvotes
privater
By privater (Jul 23, 2012)

maybe canon use a Pentium 4 EE for its cpu

3 upvotes
flipmac
By flipmac (Jul 23, 2012)

Canon's first mirrorless - an entry level with minimal physical controls, no EVF, not even an option for one, no built-in flash and may not even be bundled with one. On top of that, it costs $800 with the pancake, more with the zoom, which isn't small BTW. Doesn't seem appealing especially considering the competition in this price range: G5, E-PM1, NEX-F3, NEX-5N, GF5, etc.

That said, it'll probably sell well because of the brand recognition and the fact that there are so many Canon users out there that can use their lenses on this.

Also, where is this lens for your APS-C DSLR, Canon? How many years has it been and yet there still isn't a relatively fast and affordable primes in the normal range, i.e 35mm to 50mm equiv.

0 upvotes
G10Rebel
By G10Rebel (Jul 23, 2012)

I I will actually skip this one for now and get 60D or 650D..

3 upvotes
AngusCNH
By AngusCNH (Jul 23, 2012)

Maximum shutter speed : 1/4000 sec....

Oh..... How super fast it is....

2 upvotes
WASBA
By WASBA (Jul 23, 2012)

Not good another big company's movement. If there is same mount as EF-S, this will be much better but EF-M and Adapter system? They are thinking people will buy this camera to use their many EF lenses with adapter. My personal concern is...
1. New Mount EF-M, 22mm f2 and 18-55 bundle are only supported lenses for this body without adapter. I know adapter system has lots of issue so far.
2. Point and shoot looking mirrorless camera? Love om-d or nex7.
3. Overall, There is no reason to change current my micro 3/4 or nex ones.

1 upvote
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Jul 23, 2012)

The OM-D and NEX7 cost double what this costs.

0 upvotes
highwave
By highwave (Jul 23, 2012)

In the US:

OM-D with 14-42mm: 1100$

NEX& with 18-55mm: 1350$

EOS-M with 22mm: 800$

neither of them cost double over here

2 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Jul 23, 2012)

Double? Nope. The OM-D with the 14-42 is $1100. Add the $300 zoom to the Canon and you'll pay as much. You'll have a 22mm prime in addition, but far less camera (maybe not even a flash.) All in a bulkier package.

1 upvote
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Jul 23, 2012)

Funny thing is, this is the first Canon atempt to get into the mirrorless band wagon, and hop, many are already throwing rocks on them. Get real people, this will sell, and Canon will improve it to sell even better. If they are smart (and I think they somewhat are, they are not bold, but that's a a different story), their marketing will play the already known score: it will be quite easy to make a "heavy weapon" high end mirrorless camera and position it to compete with the NEX 7 (or whatever)... Again, this is not about you, enthusiast photographers, this is about profit, EPS etc. So far, so good for Canon here, in the actual market conditions. Have a look on how Sony (camera division) is doing, please... My opinion. Cheers! :)

8 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Jul 23, 2012)

Canon is smart enough to make a 35mm equiv. at launch
But where is the one for EF-S?!

BTW, where are the size comparison pictures?

3 upvotes
Kwick1
By Kwick1 (Jul 23, 2012)

Lame, lame, lame. They decided on the "small body with huge lenses" approach like NEX. Total fail. They're so afraid of losing their DSLR base that they couldn't do something truly innovative. And then to launch with the dumbed-down entry-level version first - another fail.

Imagine if they had launched a truly pocketable system that used an APS-C sensor and tiny, jewel-like lenses (think affordable Leica), what a stir that would have caused? Or how many bodies they would have sold if they had joined m 4/3?

Total fail, Canon.

6 upvotes
Ryan_Valiente
By Ryan_Valiente (Jul 23, 2012)

Imagine if they can defy the laws of physics.

3 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jul 23, 2012)

The whole "it has to fit in your pocket to be worthwhile" attitude is going to change as people get more familiar with these mirrorless systems. People have to understand that even with a "huge" lens, the overall camera package is still a lot lighter and less bulky than a DSLR with equivalent lens. Just put an NEX next to any APS-C DSLR, and you'll see for yourself.

3 upvotes
turretless
By turretless (Jul 23, 2012)

T3, you still have to carry a bag. For me it doesn't make any difference, what size of bag is on my shoulder. The bag is a bag is a bag.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Jul 23, 2012)

@turretless- not everyone carries a bag. I was at a street fair today, and I saw at least a dozen people using DSLRs. None of them had a bag. Just the camera on a strap hanging from their shoulder. In a few years, when I go to the same street fair, I expect to see most of these DSLRs being replaced by mirrorless cameras like the EOS M.

Besides, keep in mind that a lot of current Canon DSLR users will be slipping one of these EOS M bodies into the side pocket of their camera bags. It'll make a great secondary body. I'd probably keep the 22mm pancake on it, but it could take an EF lens on it if I need a second body to swap between lenses without having to constantly mount/unmount lenses.

0 upvotes
highwave
By highwave (Jul 23, 2012)

@turretless

Not true at all

m43 at least has very small lenses. I can carry my lenses in my pockets whereas my friends with their FF cameras carry huge backpacks for their gear.

It does make a big difference. For the most part you don't even need a dedicated camera bag. You could use your school bag or work briefcase to carry all your system. Good luck doing that with an SLR.

I'm not familiar with the NEX system.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
BoyntonBlade
By BoyntonBlade (Jul 23, 2012)

If I'm ever in the market for an ugly poor mans version of the NEX 7, i'll be all over this camera.

9 upvotes
russbarnes
By russbarnes (Jul 23, 2012)

Ha ha ha ha. So true. Except it will still cost you the same anyway :)

3 upvotes
Jens_G
By Jens_G (Jul 23, 2012)

Just get one of the cheaper Nexes?

0 upvotes
diforbes
By diforbes (Jul 23, 2012)

I am disappointed that Canon chose not to enter the "enthusiast" end of the mirrorless market with a competitor to the Fuji X1 Pro and Sony NEX 7. With the EOS M, Canon has only reinforced the positions of the Panasonic and Olympus m4/3 as the serious photographer's mirrorless cameras of choice. Such a shame.

2 upvotes
Jote
By Jote (Jul 23, 2012)

It has a decent exposure bracketing (unlike NEX) - EAT THAT, competition!

0 upvotes
hpunetha
By hpunetha (Jul 23, 2012)

Can EF-S lens also be used with it

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jul 23, 2012)

Yes, the adapter allows both EF and EF-S lenses to be used.

0 upvotes
wootpile
By wootpile (Jul 23, 2012)

Excellen first entry into the mirroless market by Canon. Smart positioning - provides a second body for current lens owners, provides a stylish (matching leather cases) colorful and easy to use small camera for new shooters. And - it is competitively priced. Under 1000 at launch for 22 + adapter.. more like 800 once the hullaboo settles.
Someone wrote in the m43 forum a post on why Canon will take over the M market . I totally agree. Canon is offering a excellent sensor and compatibility with their lens line. Shame on Nikon (I am a Nikon owner) for choosing the 1 inch path which can only go so far and offers ridiculous bokeh.

0 upvotes
turretless
By turretless (Jul 23, 2012)

Yeah, I'm just looking forward to use my 70-300L with this body :D

0 upvotes
ChrishsChan
By ChrishsChan (Jul 23, 2012)

No electronic viewfinder is a big mistake, how can you hold a small camera with big lenses using LCD for composing, speically under bright sunlight.

0 upvotes
wootpile
By wootpile (Jul 23, 2012)

That´s what the flipout lcd on the next model is for :)

0 upvotes
BoyntonBlade
By BoyntonBlade (Jul 23, 2012)

This makes me want to sell my NEX.

No really. LOL

12 upvotes
Jens_G
By Jens_G (Jul 23, 2012)

Why?
Even 1st gen Nexes have better sensors, Nex by now also has a much bigger range of lenses. Nex has a tilting screen, etc.

The only thing this Canon has that I'd like on Nex is a 35mm equivalent pancake.

1 upvote
chyll2
By chyll2 (Jul 23, 2012)

sarcasm 101

1 upvote
MonteCarlo67
By MonteCarlo67 (Jul 23, 2012)

For $799 with the 22mm lens I might grab one. My only big question is that the preview says the new flash will be included in "some" markets. I hope the U.S. is included.

0 upvotes
hiplnsdrftr
By hiplnsdrftr (Jul 23, 2012)

Would have considered it with a built in flash.

0 upvotes
fotobo
By fotobo (Jul 23, 2012)

So when is the EOS-M for those that consider themselves "photographers" coming out?

5 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

When you stop "considering" yourself a "photographer" and actually become a photographer.

9 upvotes
Onur Otlu
By Onur Otlu (Jul 23, 2012)

Considering/becoming issues aside, the line "without necessarily considering themselves to be ‘photographers'" really doesn't sound so good. An actual photographer would consider himself a photographer.
I hope, in the future, they do develop a model for "photographers".

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jul 23, 2012)

Believing that buying a more expensive or complex camera makes you a better photographer is like thinking that buying a more complex and expensive car will make you a better driver.

This lets you compose and shoot. Which is what photography is about.

0 upvotes
snowboarder
By snowboarder (Jul 23, 2012)

As great as Pentax K-01. At least Pentax has been designed
the way there is something to talk about :)
Canon and Nikon will wake up in a couple of years with
their pants way down... Just look how amazingly quick some
big companies thinking exactly the same way went down.
Blackberry, Nokia, Palm... Their were all huge. Everyone
had a Palm, remember? Everyone has a Canon...

5 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Jul 23, 2012)

Yeah but competition (any) does not have a 1D-X, right? A long way to have that, btw... Cheers! :)

2 upvotes
Donie
By Donie (Jul 23, 2012)

does it support user defined picture style???

0 upvotes
tanniewu
By tanniewu (Jul 23, 2012)

Well, this may not be an attractive camera to mirrorless camera owners, but it would be a good backup camera for existing Canon users.

1 upvote
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Jul 23, 2012)

Nice avatar

1 upvote
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Jul 23, 2012)

Pictured using EOS M.

2 upvotes
prepie
By prepie (Jul 23, 2012)

can't compare with Sony Nex-7, Nex-7 still better..

2 upvotes
chlamchowder
By chlamchowder (Jul 23, 2012)

It has on-sensor PDAF, so it might offer faster autofocus and better focus tracking than the NEX cameras.

But yeah...other than that, the NEX-7 looks better. But keep in mind that the NEX-7 costs much, much more.

0 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (Jul 23, 2012)

@chlamchowder: Check the Youtube Italian hands-on preview. You might be disappointed with the AF speed. In fact, in the video it is quite atrocious.

2 upvotes
chlamchowder
By chlamchowder (Jul 23, 2012)

Could you provide a link?

Also, the NEX series isn't known for fast focusing anyways. It wouldn't take too much to beat it.

1 upvote
thirteenguy
By thirteenguy (Jul 23, 2012)

fast auto focus? stop using mirrorless and point & shoots and jump for a 1Dx. DUH

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
ChristianHass
By ChristianHass (Jul 23, 2012)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPyhM2x9gT8&t=2m10s

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

Quit with the "slow AF" nonsense. Pay attention to that two seconds of demonstration and notice: off-center AF means contrast detect as phase detect sensor is center only, focus subject very close so this is more like macro focus than anything else. Drawing conclusions from that video is pointless.

1 upvote
Corkcampbell
By Corkcampbell (Jul 23, 2012)

Sorry, my mistake. Duh... Disregard my earlier message. The sun came out of the clouds, so to speak...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
miniTO
By miniTO (Jul 23, 2012)

more less what I expected... It appears to be a solid basic entry level camera and keeps itself distinctly separate from their DSLR line in features... not bad IMO.

However, why is this listed as a "Rangefinder-style mirrorless" there is no OVF???

1 upvote
mister_roboto
By mister_roboto (Jul 23, 2012)

It's kind of the (poor) term for no OVF "brick shaped" camera body.

1 upvote
chlamchowder
By chlamchowder (Jul 23, 2012)

I found that "rangefinder style mirrorless" categorization puzzling, too. It not only lacks an OVF....as of now it has no viewfinder at all (not even an option for a clip on one). There's also no accessory port I can see near the top, so the only possibility is a clip on OVF with no information display that will block the hot shoe.

I don't see how this resembles a rangefinder at all.

1 upvote
mister_roboto
By mister_roboto (Jul 23, 2012)

pretty much in shape only.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 24, 2012)

in shape it's MILC. Not EVIL, not Rangefinder-style.

0 upvotes
Corkcampbell
By Corkcampbell (Jul 23, 2012)

Shouldn't that (second price - with zoom lens) be dollars instead of euros?

1 upvote
nosnoop
By nosnoop (Jul 23, 2012)

No, apparently, they are not selling the 18-55mm bundle in US!
Tell me it ain't so!

1 upvote
Timbukto
By Timbukto (Jul 23, 2012)

This must be a ploy by Canon to get users to try out their first 'mirrorless' camera to have them swear off all mirrorless as a non-functional fad. An attempt to poison the well so no one will actually try competent mirrorless brands.

So this is why we waited so long! So Canon could survey all the advantages of all of its mirrorless competition...and create a camera with *NONE* of them.

Good play Canon...

29 upvotes
russbarnes
By russbarnes (Jul 23, 2012)

Agreed this is a VERY poor addition to the market bringing absolutely NOTHING to the table. When will Canon actually innovate with a new product again?

12 upvotes
GeorgeD200
By GeorgeD200 (Jul 25, 2012)

Actually, I think the G1x is pretty innovative. Not many other APS-c cameras with fixed lenses. I know it's not perfect -- we'd all like a faster aperture, but for corner sharpness it's a small marvel.

0 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Jul 23, 2012)

These cameras make sense to me with short pancake lenses but as soon as you strap on anything bigger, you have to wonder why folks don't just pick up something like the T4i/T3i.

22 upvotes
westcoastmatt
By westcoastmatt (Jul 23, 2012)

Agreed.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jul 23, 2012)

Depends on how big you want your camera to be. Believe it or not, there are a lot of consumers who feel that even a compact DSLR body like a T4i or T3i is too large and bulky. That's where a camera like the EOS M comes in.

3 upvotes
vlad2304
By vlad2304 (Jul 23, 2012)

When Nikon launched their One series, they offered at start 2 bodies (with and without EVF) and 4 lenses plus the adapter for Nikon full frame and APSC lenses that made sense when it is used with zooms because of huge crop factor.
People had choice but still there was a lot of complaint.

Now we are offered one body with 2 lenses and adapter that makes little sense for me ...

4 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Jul 23, 2012)

Of course it makes no sense to you, but that adapter will make sense to many of those who already own EF lenses

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
vlad2304
By vlad2304 (Jul 23, 2012)

Those who already own EF lenses also have EF bodies.

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jul 23, 2012)

*Large* EF bodies. This is small.

1 upvote
Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni
By Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni (Jul 23, 2012)

Well done Canon! After spending time, effort and money in R&D you have come up with mirroless camera which is 100 grams lighter than a DSLR. And lenses which are hardly any lighter than DSLR lenses. On top of that no on-board flash, no viewfinder.

28 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

Your insights really add a great deal to the discussion.

1 upvote
mrfocus
By mrfocus (Jul 23, 2012)

lens size is mainly controlled by the sensor size, take a look of Sony NEX 18-55 size and Pentax K-01 18-55 size, both about same size as DSLR. as canon has the moter built-into the lens, size is surely an issue

with APS-C size sensor, weight is hard to cut down compared to Nikon CX small sensor size, as Fuji X-pro concern, they make prime lens only to make it looks small, but once zoom lens comes , it is big as well,

if added on-board flash and viewfinder, it is like Sony NEX-7 or Pentax K-01, both are huge mirrorless camera.

4 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Jul 23, 2012)

About WEIGHT: - Sony Nex 7, body: 400g; Canon M, body: 402g. Your problem is?! Moving on: - Nex 7: no viewfinder, and, I agree, "on board flash". If that will make the difference for you, bravo! Cheers! :)

0 upvotes
ageha
By ageha (Jul 23, 2012)

What are you smoking? The NEX-7 has an EVF of course!

6 upvotes
bloodycape
By bloodycape (Jul 23, 2012)

NEX-7 also has tilting display, which adds a little extra weight to it too.

5 upvotes
Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni
By Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni (Jul 23, 2012)

"lens size is mainly controlled by the sensor size" : Exactly, that's what I wanted to convey. Why APS-C sensor size? A smaller sized sensor would have given a more compact and light weitht system - which is the objective of mirrorless camera I believe.
There are no diffrentiaters. In fact there are some ommissions as I have highlighted. If there is no gain on any front, then why would I buy a mirrorless camera - I will just by the DSLR. Even 1100D is better.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

Another variable controlling the size of a lens is the distance between the mount and the sensor. With a much shorter flange to sensor distance, they can actually make smaller lenses for the M mount. Notice the adapter require to fit an EF or EF-S lens to this camera? That's a big reduction in thickness to the M lenses.

0 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (Jul 23, 2012)

I do think an EF-M system using a 2X crop (yes, like 4/3) would have been a nicer addition to the Canon line - you'd get the theoretical sweet spot effect of the crop view on EF-S lenses, the increased zoom multiplier for telephoto lenses, the need for a new kit lens and wider angle EF-M primes (making cost more justifiable), and the smaller lens advantage of a smaller sensor.

You'd lose some DOF just as APS-C does to FF, but hopefully gain in cost advantages to justify brighter lenses to make (some of) it back.

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

Your wonderful zoom lens multiplier of 2X also applies to your wide lenses, which for someone who wants to shoot wide is no longer a wonderful advantage. It means you have to buy a wider lens to get the field of view you could get with an APS-C sensor/lens. This "theoretical sweet spot" is YOUR sweet spot. Nobody else cares about exactly what you would use this camera for. Reality being what it is, that just means you should go find a camera that fits your needs because this ain't it. Canon can't please everyone and they've made a tidy living not trying to.

0 upvotes
Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni
By Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni (Jul 24, 2012)

@howardroark
The distance between lens and sensor can save you no more than 6-7mm of lens diameter. This is hardly 10% weight saving for medium lens. For larege lens which might have 77mm diameter it is still less. Major weight saving can be achieved on DSLR lens itself, a good example is 40mm pancake lens (which is full frame).

2x form factor is not really an issue for wide angle lenses. Nikon has made cheap, light weight 10mm lens for j1. I am sure they will make wider lenses too. However, on the other hand, it is difficult to make a light weight, cheap tele lens for cameras with smaller crop factor (1.5x / 1.6x). No one has made so far, for example, a light weight and cheap 400mm f5.6 lens for aps-c sensor.

0 upvotes
alyiwang
By alyiwang (Jul 23, 2012)

The price is insanely too high... Decent camera though!

3 upvotes
Jan Kritzinger
By Jan Kritzinger (Jul 23, 2012)

Nex sensor will be better, but the large aperture 35mm equiv pancake is nice - that's something the Sony lacks... thusfar.

1 upvote
imbimmer
By imbimmer (Jul 23, 2012)

Another nail on M4/3's coffin ... by the way, what was Nikon thinking when they picked up the "CX" format? ;-)

2 upvotes
Ryan_Valiente
By Ryan_Valiente (Jul 23, 2012)

They weren't.

:)

6 upvotes
westcoastmatt
By westcoastmatt (Jul 23, 2012)

Nikon CX would have been great if the lenses were actually smaller than the larger sensor M4/3rds, but they aren't.

I mean CX sensors are what, about half the area of M4/3rds? Imagine the lenses were half the size of M4/3rds -- you'd have a truly compact ILC system. I don't know why they weren't able to pull that off :(

3 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Jul 23, 2012)

@ westcoastmatt
probably for very small lenses the AF-motor size start to plays the leading role.

0 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Jul 23, 2012)

I wonder when Nikon will come out with a large sensor mirrorless system of their own?

0 upvotes
Alex P Scorsch
By Alex P Scorsch (Jul 24, 2012)

I think this camera could be just right for me. No viewfinder? Yeah , I like viewfinders, but this screen is supposed to be very visible in sunlight. The Rolleiflexes (or Hasselblads) didn't have viewfinders either and that didn't stop photographers from making great photos with them. Nowadays the younger generation can't even take a photo if it isn't on a screen. Maybe it would be good for one's creative juices to concentrate on composition by seeing an image on a screen larger than a tiny viewfinder. What I also like is that 35mm equivalent lens. I'm a real sucker for the 35mm and hope this lens is up to par. I can live with f/2. Great for people and places. I know that the sensor will give me quite professional results. Come on you guys seem a bit too conservative here. You can live without a viewfinder - THINK OUTSIDE OF THE BOX. If I buy this camera, it will live on my belt or hanging over my shoulder. I'll probably even sleep with it. Nice complement for a Mark II.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jul 23, 2012)

LOL at the GPS accessory receiver. Total money grab attempt by Canon. They can fit GPS inside $300 pocket cameras, but it needs a large and expensive hotshoe accessory to accomplish the same on a ILC and DSLR.

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

Yes, and the GPS receivers built into those tiny cameras are useless, slow, battery sucking gimmicks. If you want real GPS information it is better found outside the camera.

2 upvotes
rocklobster
By rocklobster (Jul 23, 2012)

As another poster said it doesn't offer any advantage unless you have a collection of Canon lenses and then probaly the only one is a slight reduction in overall size - ROCK ON M4/3!

11 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

Or if you want access to what is arguably the best and largest line of lenses and accessories available for any camera system.....details, details.

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jul 23, 2012)

The biggest lineup of lenses and flashes that make no sense on a compact body, sure!

Of course Olympus just had a 17mm pancake and a 14-42 on their first launch day, too. They've got a headstart but Canon has the money and user base to catch up.

7 upvotes
Jan Kritzinger
By Jan Kritzinger (Jul 23, 2012)

*sigh*

1 upvote
Ubilam
By Ubilam (Jul 23, 2012)

The M and any new M lens attached will fit nicely in your pocket too, right?

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

If you want a pocket camera then you don't want the best image quality available. Even with a great ILC camera, put a pancake lens on it and you either have no zoom or a zoom with crap IQ.

0 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (Jul 23, 2012)

@howardroark, you are confusing me, 1st
"Or if you want access to what is arguably the best and largest line of lenses" but then you kill it by stating
"If you want a pocket camera then you don't want the best image quality available"

I'd say very few people will by the EOS-M just so they can get access to a lens line up. If you wanted that you would by a DSLR.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

The EOS-M is also not a pocket camera. Even with a pancake lens, which I doubt would be anyone's only lens, it's not an S100.

1 upvote
Ubilam
By Ubilam (Jul 23, 2012)

I don't get it. Canon has lost their minds. "The quality of a Canon DSLR". Its like, why spend a fortune on a new DSLR Canon camera when they will create a bogus body to slap that expensive 'retro' glass onto?! I was about to buy a 7D. Not now. Just nuts what is going on, and I am fed up!

2 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (Jul 23, 2012)

One of the least understandable posts ever.

What doEs a new body have to do with purchasing a 7D? What does the IQ of a mirrorless option have to do with the speed, manual controls, weather proofing or other advantages of a full DSLR?

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
Ubilam
By Ubilam (Jul 23, 2012)

Why do they promote the M as a DSLR alternative???

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jul 23, 2012)

NetMage, one thing that most people don't notice about Canon is they are concerned with image quality and hand it out like free candy to spoiled children. The extras and the features that differentiate the lines is less about image quality and more about flexibility. Other manufacturers make you choose, like Nikon with their 1 line or with other ILC cameras that offer lousy glass for their APS-C sensors. Here Canon is giving you access to DSLR image quality, DSLR glass and accessories, and puting it in a small body. They do love their customers.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jul 23, 2012)

You know $800 with the 22mm f2 isn't bad. You'd pay that much for any of the other mirrorless systems with an equivalent prime.

The killer is the 18-55 kit price. That's going to be a hard sell next to the $500-700 competition.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 1229
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