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Intel contest seeks photos, time-lapse and slow-mo clips for future adverts

By dpreview staff on Jun 21, 2012 at 00:49 GMT

Intel has announced the 'A Momentary Lapse' competition, seeking entries that can then be used to advertise its products. Prizes include Dell XPS Ultrabooks and Canon DSLRs, with the chance to win an EOS 5D Mark III. To promote the competition, Vincent Laforet has made a 'How to make time-lapse photography' video tutorial. Both the stills and video (time-lapse or slow-motion) competitions require entries around the themes 'music, style, entertainment or sports,' and are open to residents of the USA and Canada. The competition offers $50,000 worth of prizes, spread across 18 weekly stills contests and three 40-day video contests.

Click here to read the full rules (which include granting Intel non-exclusive rights to use and modify all competition submissions).

Comments

Total comments: 94
XaviQube
By XaviQube (5 months ago)

Very good video, it makes me thinking on participate! For inspiration I leave here a Time Lapse collection

https://www.beqbe.com/c/22463-time-lapse

I think that to get this professional touch I have to keep on lot of practice and patience ;)

0 upvotes
1st-foto_cz
By 1st-foto_cz (Jan 11, 2013)

I also made a timelapse video. Here is my article and link to youtube video:

http://photoweb.1st-foto.cz/articles/02-timelapse.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7g4mSc70klc

0 upvotes
Picturesofview
By Picturesofview (Jul 26, 2012)

And here I thought this might be the one place where there might be no negativity. People please stop whining over things you have no control over. The greatest thing about being human is you have the power to choose how you feel. Choose to feel better. You will live a longer, happier life.

Shame this had to be my first post here.

0 upvotes
Paul Guba
By Paul Guba (Jun 28, 2012)

Yes open to everyone! That way every artist can work for nearly nothing and not get paid. We all can give up any rights to our work. Thank you Intel: multinational company with billions in capital for finding a way to encourage artist to work for nothing.

0 upvotes
longman
By longman (Jun 28, 2012)

And you can also forget about it and go about your own business.
Don't complain about things that you are not forced to do.

0 upvotes
Greg in London
By Greg in London (Jun 28, 2012)

Mr Longman, you are right one does not need to enter this harsh competition.
Complaints can also be seen as caution to those that do not realize their rights are being compromised by a wealthy multinational............

0 upvotes
Vivek Agarwal
By Vivek Agarwal (Jun 27, 2012)

Pls open it for all

0 upvotes
LiSkynden
By LiSkynden (Jun 26, 2012)

YAY for the USA and Canada >:(

If a contest is not open for everyone, please dont promote it on internet! Use your local newspaper or TV channel :P

1 upvote
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Jun 21, 2012)

There's a good chance the US/Canada restriction has to do with some legal or logistical issue, like regional distributor agreements or not wanting to insure shipping to some remote part of South America where the prize package would just get stolen, some obstacle that Intel simply did not want to pay to overcome.

It is probably not because of any regional bias.

1 upvote
photosen
By photosen (Jun 21, 2012)

Yeah, thanks Intel, I'll be sure to look up your competition when choosing a product - Non US here either.

0 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Jun 21, 2012)

Yea, Nikon DSLRs have built in time lapse. For Canon you have to buy that thing for 50 Euros. But the winner in time-lapse challange gets Canon!!!
It is like presenting a hair-dryer to a bald person.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Jun 21, 2012)

I don't want to sound catty, but Vince, lay off the pies. Eat them only on alternating days at first, then weekends.

0 upvotes
vhlemos
By vhlemos (Jun 21, 2012)

Boicot to Intel products.

(this is only for NON US residents or Canadians)

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Jun 21, 2012)

I'm sure there are plenty of contest that are only open to people in Europe, or Asia, etc. Not every contest needs to be open to every person on the face of the Earth.

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

On the one hand, people bellyache that the contest is unattractive because participants surrender works with low odds of winning anything. On the other, they complain they can't participate.

1 upvote
vhlemos
By vhlemos (Jun 21, 2012)

What about the rest of the world?
Aren´t we not good enough for Intel?
Why only USA residents and Canadian people?
This is totally unfair.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jun 21, 2012)

Wow, what age are you, eight years old? "Mommy, this isn't fair! Waaah!"

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

The meek share inherit the earth. Some day.

0 upvotes
sagebrushfire
By sagebrushfire (Jun 22, 2012)

Why do people constantly complain about this? It's ridiculous! There are plenty of contests based in other countries that Americans are not eligible for too.

This is not, and has NEVER been, to discriminate against other countries. It would greatly benefit Intel if the entire world could enter and give them free work. This is a legal issue that cannot be avoided.

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Greg in London
By Greg in London (Jun 22, 2012)

Mr Brushfire, there are two issues here ...one is the geographical eligibility of entry which is the lesser issue and the more important being a rights grab !
This "legal issue" can be avoided as people are being warned in good faith by the photo community NOT to enter as the rules are draconian and do not benefit the entrant even for the experience of it.......that is not ridiculous

0 upvotes
MPA1
By MPA1 (Jun 25, 2012)

We as photographers should all be used to the inherent US bias in everything by now. They pay less for the same equipment, they pay less for the software (compare for example the price of PS in the US with the same thing in NZ - over 3 times cheaper in the US) and they usually get better warranties (5 years for Nikon in the US compared with 1 year in NZ for example).
Not much we can do about it really.

0 upvotes
Sactojim
By Sactojim (Jun 21, 2012)

I'm definitely in on this. Work to do and fingers crossed. Go Intel..a US company that employs many thousands with excellent pay/benefits.

0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Jun 21, 2012)

Intel?

Kinda odd..

Its nice, but since its US only, not for me. :)

1 upvote
EmmanuelStarchild
By EmmanuelStarchild (Jun 21, 2012)

My concerns:

First of all, it's sad that all countries can't participate in this contest. As an American I can appreciate the variety and diversity that comes with a competition that is open for all.

Second, I'm concerned that I will be giving up the rights to my hard work.

Having said that, I am still willing to enter the contest. They bring out the best of my efforts and I'm willing to give up a little to gain some experience in time-lapse photography.

3 upvotes
pdcm
By pdcm (Jun 21, 2012)

Another rights grab. Disgraceful. and shame on dpreview for putting this up.

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jun 21, 2012)

We made absolutely clear that Intel wants to use the entries for its adverts, which means it HAS to be a 'rights grab' as you slightly inaccurately call it (Intel doesn't claim ownership or exclusive rights, just what they need to be able to use the work for adverts).

We put it in the headline and flagged it up at the end of the story too. Ultimately, we thought the Vincent Laforet bit made it interesting even if you don't want to enter, and there are some nice prizes.

2 upvotes
Visualist
By Visualist (Jun 22, 2012)

@ R Butler.....Sounds cheap to me. This is all too common these days. Large Corporations taking advantage of & using amateur imaging enthusiasts who are naively looking for some sort of professional accreditation & happy to accept paltry returns for their effort.

Better all round if Intel & Canon were to contribute to the flagging US & World economy by being professional & placing their business in the hands of other professionals & the struggling US Ad industry.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Jun 21, 2012)

Any chance of flagging regional stories with their region? Not sure what it is, but there is something irritating in reading about competitions you aren't allowed to enter!

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jun 21, 2012)

We tried to flag it up by mentioning it in the story.

1 upvote
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Jun 21, 2012)

If it's part of the story it's not a flag. Never mind, all in your own time.

0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

Simon and DPR... as I wrote before, I feel this is the best photography site in the world and find unwarranted and insulting the questions raised in this comments thread about your editorial integrity.

I also believe that the helping hand you gave Intel imposing such bullying copyright dispositions for their promotion stems from the fact that you did not take due notice of the mentioned dispositions (...I had also not noticed it initially, myself).

I have now an idea that would allow you to help the photographic community stand against such abuses ( I know people are free to participate or not to participate but it is a know fact that many people do not read the fine print and the marketeers and lawyers at Intel know that).

With your well-earned clout in the photo world why not take an active editorial role and ask Intel why they feel they have to plunder the rights of ALL entries and not just retain the justifiable rights over the winning ones?

PK

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
For a few clicks more
By For a few clicks more (Jun 21, 2012)

Get a cold drink and relax a bit!

1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

The contest terms and conditions are little different than most. Few will win. Most haven't anything to lose, either, other than pride. You are free to submit your work to Southeby's for auction. If that does not fly, you can peddle them on a street stand, only to discover that the market may not care, or that it prefer the $15 copy of a famous iconic picture over your own work, even if priced less. No different than any other winner take all race.

1 upvote
kb2zuz
By kb2zuz (Jun 21, 2012)

Cy Cheze,
The rules basically say if you submit they can use your content pretty much however they want. You don't loose a submission fee, but you could win nothing and Intel could then use your work in Ads, as product packaging, heck they could make it the new Intel logo if they wanted... so some people might feel they're loosing the money they could have made by selling them the work. From the contest rules:
By uploading your Videos and Photos, you irrevocably grant us a worldwide non-exclusive, royalty free license (where relevant, by way of present license of present and future copyright) to: (i) copy, reproduce, adapt, translate, alter, rearrange, edit, cut, dub or subtitle in any language, and add to or delete from your Video (including without limitation the right to extract audio only or picture only content from your Video) and Photo, in any way whatsoever...

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jun 21, 2012)

We mention in the headline that Intel wants the material for future adverts - we very carefully read the terms and conditions and then flagged up these points in the story

You can't really be surprised that they claim the right to use your work and modify it, since they say that the competition is to gain material for adverts.

0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

Richard,

What is written is "Intel has announced the 'A Momentary Lapse' competition, seeking entries that can then be used to advertise its products."

To any good faith promoter, reader or journalist it should be logical and, as such, also implied, that the "seeking" refers to the final chosen, prized entries.

The small (large, actually) print in the competition conditions has to be read to understand that it is not so.

For a fistfull of dollars, Intel intends to constitute a collection of video and photography material laying out ironclad, abusive dispositions in what regards to non-prized material.

I find it shameful but I see I might not be the editorial position of DPR. It's OK.

PK

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
1 upvote
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

err...had not seen this (From the official rules):

"ALL PARTICIPANTS ACKNOWLEDGE AND AGREE THAT ALL ENTRIES SUBMITTED
IN CONNECTION WITH THIS PROMOTION ARE SUBMITTED ON A NONCONFIDENTIAL
AND NON-PROPRIETARY BASIS AND MAY BE USED BY SPONSOR, ITS AGENTS AND
SUBSIDIARIES, FOR ANY AND ALL ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONAL PURPOSES
INCLUDING (BUT NOT LIMITED TO) IN CONNECTION WITH THE PROMOTION, IN
PERPETUITY, WORLDWIDE, IN ANY MEDIA NOW KNOWN OR HEREAFTER DEVELOPED."

(their own caps mind you, which is a bit of a giveaway about what their real aim is)

(continued)

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

Anything wrong with casting a wide net for advertising material? As with any sweepstakes, however, the vast majority of contestants win nothing, and most of the winners take small prizes, but all end up on the company mailing list for future promotions. Meanwhile, if you have photos that you think are worth more, no one will stop you from asking whatever price you like. Good luck, though, if you manage to reap it.

0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

Wow...!..."all entries", not the winner..."including (but not limited to) in connection with the promotion"..."in perpetuity, worldwide, in any media now known or hereafter developed"...I can't believe they left out "in the known and to be discovered cosmic space and for all eternity"

Although I maintain my previous comments on TV publicity vs. Direct Action, I would like to alter the initial phrase.

Intel is not intelligent. They are the biggest (given their size) free-ride con artists ever seen.

Basically, they want to set up their own, private photos and time-lapse/slow motion stock agency almost for free!

I really hope people realize what is imposed and leave this scam empty of entries as it should be (...fat chance, I know...it's like glitter to fools...)

(...and, I am so sorry to say, yes, DPR, you should scan for the legal bullying trying to be imposed in promotions like this one before you give them a hand...)

PK

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

Sour grapes? Or sweet ones you simply can't reach?

Perhaps you prefer the Facebook business model. Don't we all wish we could be as clever and make millions?

0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

Yes, sour grapes...actually, unrelated for unrelated, let's throw an homage to Steinbeck here and call it the grapes of wrath.

(Good grief...)

PK

0 upvotes
Blaise06a
By Blaise06a (Jun 21, 2012)

Hello,

I had a quick look at the terms and conditions here:
https://d1ncmqs035wa42.cloudfront.net/other/1340157276-1281.pdf

It's a 17-page document but I was unable to find where Intel writes that it had rights to use competition submissions. Chapter 21 - release does not concern image rights, and Chapter 17- contest prize - does not mean that the photographer is signing off his rights to his photography.

I did not read every single paragraph, but can you point me towards the right paragraph?

0 upvotes
pdcm
By pdcm (Jun 21, 2012)

You must be blind. IT'S IN CAPITAL LETTERS

0 upvotes
Central Fla
By Central Fla (Jun 21, 2012)

A trillion dollar company wants to give away a couple of thousand dollars worth of prizes so they can select a few peoples hard work out of millions of entries to use as their advertising. Please intel get off your cheap *** and give these poor people a decent prize.

That is an insult.

3 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

It's worse than that...see my post, above.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

No different than the world of music recording, publishing, or movies: oceans of people aspire to stardom and grovel at the doors of large companies for auditions or tests. Or a company will post a juicy want ad and get thousands of applicants it can't possibly interview, much less hire. Some firms demand work samples, free of charge. Intel is simply playing the same game as the rest.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jun 21, 2012)

No need to participate if you don't want to! Geez. Some people just like the recognition and exposure their work will get!

0 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Jun 22, 2012)

T3....Intel is a HUGE company that can afford a BIG advertising budget. People like you who 'just want recognition and exposure' are the problem with photography (as a business) these days.

There is a value to producing good work...and that value is a lot more than a laptop or a 5D3. Put it this way, to produce one of the winning timelapse videos could take you months...all for a $3500 camera???

1 upvote
Greg in London
By Greg in London (Jun 21, 2012)

Eyeort...you need to get out more, this competition is nothing but an image grab by a multinational company.

It will get joe and mary normal to enter and steal their creative rights !

shame on you DP review for promoting such flagrant theft and exploitation of the photographic community.

As for Intel...........well I would expect such lowbrow ethics !

2 upvotes
Suntan
By Suntan (Jun 21, 2012)

You guys need to lighten up.

If you're worried about giving away your rights, you know, don't submit any pictures.

If you want to trade the rights to a couple of timelaspe videos for a chance to win a new camera or laptop, have at it.

It really is that simple.

2 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

Intel is intelligent.

This kind of "producers-to-peers" communication/advertising is ultra effective, certainly more than the never ending recurrence to TV ads, something that, at the moment, must be one of the biggest scams going on earth.

In spite of every single study that has come out in recent years clearly demonstrating how TV audiences demographics are shrinking at a very fast rate, especially in the youngest segments, advertising agencies and media planner ones keep conjuring to inflate TV ads prices and convince the marketing/communications of every single corporation that they simply can not afford not spending the traditional historic millions in this particular marketing channel.

(continued)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

The probable true hard fact ...(...the one I've been suspecting and would love to be seen proved by independent studies...) is that, with the exception of major sports/entertainment events (Superbowl, The Oscars, etc) where the relation air-minute-price/audience is a solid one, all other TV advertising is money thrown to air (pun intended).

I would love for company marketing departments to finally realize this and tilt the advertising/marketing expenditure balance in favor of more innovative "direct targeting" strategies in detriment of this continued TV ads scam.

(continued)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

Photography related brands, especially, should realize that their target customers love their hobby, that this demographics base is growing exponentially and that it is of the medium own nature that photographs are taken to be seen and (most) photographers love to show them.

As such, brands should realize that brand sponsored "producer-to-peers" direct marketing actions under the guise of valuable prizes contests are one of the most effective ways to promote long-lasting, effective brand awareness.

PK

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Photozopia
By Photozopia (Jun 21, 2012)

Granting Intel 'exclusive rights' usage would probably mean it is unable to offer entry to European based photographers under copyright law. Retention of copyright is taken far more seriously in the UK and most other European countries than - as is apparent here - in the USA/Canada.

1 upvote
sirkhann
By sirkhann (Jun 21, 2012)

Why a Canon camera is used as an image instead of Intel's logo anyway?

6 upvotes
ehliysehr
By ehliysehr (Jun 21, 2012)

with this tactic they can save millions of $$$$, creating a competition is a cheap way to make an Advert, imagine how much will it cost for Intel to hire an advert company probably millions of $$$$$ not including the airtime on networks.

2 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Jun 21, 2012)

Disgusting to see how large companies kill-off the market for professional photography.

It all the trend and this is another example that there is no future for the professional photographer to make a descent living.

In future you must be well known or die.

Intel marketing department must be laughing out loud.
Amateurs don't get paid, but their photo's will be used for cheap.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
DesmondD
By DesmondD (Jun 21, 2012)

It's simply change and we all have to adapt to it or be left behind. When you went digital did you worry about the people who made a living making film?
Some say digital has made photography cheap - our children will look back and think that film made photography expensive - it's all relative to the observer and you need an open mind in today's changing world.

3 upvotes
For a few clicks more
By For a few clicks more (Jun 21, 2012)

Mr Openmind, bring me coffee and I won't pay you anything !!! Serve me openmind !!! Serve me !!!!

0 upvotes
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (Jun 21, 2012)

Is it the large companies at fault?, or is it the amateur photographers hungry for their 15 minutes of fame?

If your business model is good enough & you work hard enough as a professional, you'll get paid...complaining about reality is rather pointless (IMHO).

1 upvote
ScottieC
By ScottieC (Jun 21, 2012)

Would Intel even considered you if Vincent was not around? Do you complain to all those people that work at "Walmart" in the "Photo-studio" about how they are killing off all the "Mom and Pop" photo-studios?

0 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Jun 21, 2012)

Once, driving a car was a profession, but since then cars become easy to drive, so everybody drive them. same to digital era in photography. Nowadays if you have "photographic" eyes you can make very good and talanted videos/photos just as hobby. Why should someone pay $$$ for "professionals" if he can get it for $ from virtually everyone?

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

What "market for professional photography"? Where is the photographic equivalent of a NASDAQ or Ebay? Weddings, anniversaries, graduations, team portraits, merchandize imaging, and ID badges are the only bread and butter, and Intel isn't threatening those fields.

0 upvotes
nofumble
By nofumble (Jun 21, 2012)

Intel suggests that you buy an Orange phone and shoot 15 fps.

0 upvotes
lukx
By lukx (Jun 21, 2012)

Why again only residents of the USA and Canada?! To show that USA is the best in the world ?! Or they think they think that rest of the world is totally unworthy of grate intel !

7 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Jun 21, 2012)

I would think so yes.
Nobody wants a Windows based 'dell' computer anyway. :)

0 upvotes
For a few clicks more
By For a few clicks more (Jun 21, 2012)

Good morning LUKX !! So, until this advertisement, weren't you aware of that fact ? For sure, US is the best, burden is the rest !

1 upvote
ScottieC
By ScottieC (Jun 21, 2012)

Intel is from the USA, and the USA is it's biggest market, so they started something here. What do you expect Intel to do, a competition for the 193~196 countries in the world and spend $9,650,000~9,800,000 on prizes? Who knows, maybe Intel has something for the rest of the world, but they are starting here... Maybe Intel wants to see how the competition will do here and then determine if it is feasible for other countries.

1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jun 21, 2012)

The USA is simply the largest aglomeration of lottery addicts who will find this sort of contest irresistable.

1 upvote
lukx
By lukx (Jun 21, 2012)

After a bit of thinking I would say it's better for the rest of the world... at least we save shutter mechanism in our DSLRs :)

0 upvotes
jj74e
By jj74e (Jun 21, 2012)

Cause there's never photographic events for London only or other areas outside North America.

Oh wait...

0 upvotes
forpetessake
By forpetessake (Jun 23, 2012)

I wouldn't read too much conspiracy or ill will into this fact. It likely has some legal underlying requirements, like copyright laws, and enforcement, taxes, etc., which can make implementation more complex and more expensive.

1 upvote
Boiler_Jack
By Boiler_Jack (Jun 21, 2012)

Petey Match- Chust!

0 upvotes
Sam Carriere
By Sam Carriere (Jun 21, 2012)

Does anyone else think this is beyond ridiculous? Is anyone else wondering more and more how DPreview choses articles? Does anyone know a good photography site that is not dependent on advertising from the industry?

0 upvotes
ivan1973
By ivan1973 (Jun 21, 2012)

Why are you so bothered? Or do you have problems taking time-lapse?

4 upvotes
forpetessake
By forpetessake (Jun 21, 2012)

First of all, advisement makes this site vast resources free; secondly, DPR should lauded for making advertisement non-intrusive and even interesting.

3 upvotes
Sam Carriere
By Sam Carriere (Jun 21, 2012)

It also makes the site's reviews less than reliable.

5 upvotes
Simon Joinson
By Simon Joinson (Jun 21, 2012)

to my knowledge we've never carried advertising from Intel. Oh, and in answer to your question. No. We carry advertising because, like you I guess, our staff needs to be paid every month.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
7 upvotes
kb2zuz
By kb2zuz (Jun 21, 2012)

I am unclear if this is advertising or just a repost of a press release that DPReview received. Lately I feel there have been several posts listed as news stories or articles (such as this listed as Misc. News) where I question if DPReview received compensation for posting it. It is clear that the banners and side ads are just that, ads that I assume were purchased. But if (and again, I'm not certain this is the case) companies are paying to have news stories written about them and the site doesn't clearly state that that is the case, it's a reduction of journalistic integrity and raises ethics questions.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jun 21, 2012)

@Sam Carriere - magazines take advertising revenue, too. So does that mean magazine reviews of products aren't reliable either? LOL. Completely ridiculous. So I guess by your judgement, camera magazines, car magazines, stereo magazines, etc. which all review products pertaining to their magazine subject matter are all unreliable because they have advertisements inside the magazines!

0 upvotes
Simon Joinson
By Simon Joinson (Jun 21, 2012)

"if..companies are paying to have news stories written about them and the site doesn't clearly state that that is the case, it's a reduction of journalistic integrity and raises ethics questions."

Let me make this crystal clear. We do not, will not, have never, nor will ever accept payment to write editorial content of any type on dpreview. Yes, if we did those things without the full disclosure that we'd be legally and ethically obliged to make, it would be bad. But we don't. So your totally speculative and baseless comment is simply redundant.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
For a few clicks more
By For a few clicks more (Jun 21, 2012)

Well, if you don't want, what forces you to enter the competition?
I like to see the news and changes at dpreview !!

0 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Jun 21, 2012)

People really should get a grip...DPR is relaying information with potential interest to its users: A photo/image competition, with prizes.

It just so happens that a major processors brand is the sponsor. It's how it works, people: The brand announces the competition, it is freely divulged through media channels (because IT IS of general or particular interest) and the brand gets the intended exposure return. If it is a legitimate competition, this is perfectly OK.

(PS:...And, Simon, what are you doing here replying/stating what should be obvious to any non ill-intended, intelligent user?...Go, go...get those reviews coming and congrats on the best photography site on the planet.)

PK

1 upvote
kb2zuz
By kb2zuz (Jun 21, 2012)

Thank you Simon for the clarity. As I said in my comment "I am unclear" and "again, I am uncertain if this is the case." As I said there have been several news stories that could simply just be repostings of press releases. DPreview has more recently been publishing a wider range articles and news stories beyond the traditional reviews lately, which is fine, but for those used to one type of content the change simply raises questions as to why. I doubted that this was the case, but uncertainty is unsettling and it's comforting to "hear it from the horses mouth" that it is not the case. Yes it was speculative, but it was a speculative inquiry, not meant as speculative accusation. The wider range of stories covered could be construed by some to be a change in tone, so I would not say my request for clarity had no use. If you have a mission statement or list of ethical guidelines posted on this site providing such clarity that I was unaware of, then I apologies for being redundant.

0 upvotes
cercis
By cercis (Jun 21, 2012)

Sure, at $50000 less a discount it costs Intel less than hiring real photogs with an investment in the business.

2 upvotes
forpetessake
By forpetessake (Jun 21, 2012)

I suspect Intel wouldn't rely on a contest to produce the greatest ad material, that would be a reckless way to do business, and they already paying professional agencies to do the job. This is not "instead of", but "in addition to."

3 upvotes
ScarletVarlet
By ScarletVarlet (Jun 21, 2012)

One never knows. There may be the creative spark still existing in people who do not take pictures to fit the formula. Cut some slack - play or don't, don't be a quick critic. Geez.

2 upvotes
Maay
By Maay (Jun 21, 2012)

It's part of what they call viral marketing. To get the attention, and if possible the active participation, of a large fanbase, is quite efficient for the amount of money you'll pour into the project. The more we talk about them, the better. So I'll shut up before I attract too much attention and try to thwart their devilish plans :-)

2 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Jun 21, 2012)

That's the beauty of it...it doesn't cost Intel close to $50,000. It might if it was $50,000 in cash, but when it's "$50,000 worth of prizes" you know those are all products that are donated by sponsors, who in turn write them off their marketing budgets. All in all, a contest is a much cheaper way to get a bunch of suckers to send in content for a worldwide campaign, granting Intel a relatively unrestricted usage license, and far (*FAR*) lower compensation that if that same photographer had been hired to do the campaign at the going rate.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Alan Brown
By Alan Brown (Jun 21, 2012)

i doubt very much 'saving' some of the $50,000 had any more effect on their balance sheet than a butterfly landing on your hand would... it's not even peanuts to them...

they got our attention already.. some might respond and they could benefit personally more than anything Intel might get out of this.. in a relative sense.

as regards DPR's reason for including this story here; It's photography based isn't it?

If we were all paying for the privelege of using this site.. we just might have reason to knock them..but we don't. Talk about 'looking a gift horse in the mouth'!

Geez

2 upvotes
eyeport
By eyeport (Jun 21, 2012)

How exciting! Would be wonderful if this was for the whole world. ^^

3 upvotes
Sergeg
By Sergeg (Jun 21, 2012)

A global photographic community has just been relegated to an elitist few.

0 upvotes
ScarletVarlet
By ScarletVarlet (Jun 22, 2012)

The few.

The proud.

The few ...

0 upvotes
lmtfa
By lmtfa (Jun 25, 2012)

You mean, all I have to do is mount my semi pro camera on a semi pro tripod and I could win. With only two countries participating it's doable. I could play mega millions as a back up that's only one country.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 94