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Sigma launches 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM superzoom for DSLRs

By dpreview staff on Jun 15, 2012 at 05:00 GMT
Buy on GearShopFrom $349.00

Sigma has announced a compact 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 'Macro' superzoom lens for APS-C DSLRs. The latest version is an entirely new design, smaller than the existing lens and incorporating 'Thermally Stable Composite' (TSC) construction. TSC is a material currently used exclusively by Sigma, designed to minimize barrel expansion or contraction with extreme temperature variation. The lens will be available from July, starting with the Canon-mount version, with Nikon, Sony, Pentax and Sigma to follow.

Press Release

Sigma Corporation of America announces new 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM lens

Ronkonkoma, NY, June 15, 2012  - Sigma Corporation of America, a leading researcher, developer, manufacturer and service provider of some of the world's most impressive lines of lenses, cameras and flashes, is pleased to announce the availability of its new Sigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM lens starting in July 2012. Pricing is still pending.

The addition of the 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM speaks to Sigma's versatile product lineup with this multipurpose zoom lens that offers Optical Stabilization (OS)* and covers wide angle to telephoto to macro photography. It differs from Sigma's current 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM lens with its even more compact size, its macro capability with a maximum magnification ratio of 1:2.9 and the use of Thermally Stable Composite (TSC) material currently used only by Sigma.

TSC, which is incorporated into the lens barrel and is often compared to polycarbonate, has a high degree of elasticity and exhibits little variation in its structure in extreme temperature conditions. This means that internal barrel expansion and contraction due to extreme temperature variations is less prevalent. TSC also contributes to the lens' size reduction. The non-macro 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 without TSC weighs 22.2 ounces and is 3.1 by 4 inches in diameter, whereas the new macro lens is 16.6 ounces and 2.9 by 3.5 inches in diameter.

"We're constantly trying to improve and expand our lens lineup, and this addition is no exception," said Mark Amir-Hamzeh, president of Sigma Corporation of America. "By redesigning the lens and adding TSC, we are able to offer this very compact, feature-rich lens that is flexible enough to tackle a range of photography, including landscape, sport and macro. This is key for the everyday photographer who wants to travel light but pack the punch of a complete camera bag."

Sigma optimized this lens' power arrangement by incorporating double-sided aspherical lenses and reexamining the design to achieve a more compact filter diameter. The lens has an approximate 13x high zoom ratio with a filter size of 2.8 inches in diameter. Sigma's unique OS system, as well as one Special Low Dispersion (SLD) glass and three aspherical lens glasses, compensate for camera shake and enable correction of color aberration, respectively.

The new 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM lens is also equipped with Super Multi-Layer Coating to reduce flare and ghosting, a Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM) to ensure fast and quiet auto-focusing, and a rounded, seven-blade diaphragm to create an attractive round blur to the out of focus areas. The lens features a brass-made bayonet mount applied on the surface to reinforce strength for long-term use and enable high accuracy and solidity.

This lens will be available in Sigma, Sony, Nikon, Canon and Pentax mounts, starting with Canon mounts coming in July, 2012. Pricing and all availability for other mounts have yet to be announced.

To locate an authorized Sigma dealer nearest to you, visit http://www.sigmaphoto.com/where-to-buy-sigma. For information about Sigma Corporation of America, visit www.sigmaphoto.com.

*Sony and Pentax mounts are not incorporated with OS function.

217
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16
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14
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Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 142
whyukon
By whyukon (Nov 8, 2012)

DXO Optics Pro has released their lens correction module for this lens.

0 upvotes
djsquare1827
By djsquare1827 (Sep 4, 2012)

Reviews & Comparisons

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1000&message=42407371

0 upvotes
thedude1980
By thedude1980 (Aug 29, 2012)

http://www.dxo.com/intl/photo/support/modules/availability/pb_availability

Just got this lens. I've only used it for a day but like it so far. Please go to the link and request that DXO opitcs pro add it to their database.

0 upvotes
emy21
By emy21 (Jul 12, 2012)

It worths swapping Sigma 17-70 OS with this one?

0 upvotes
wy2lam
By wy2lam (Jun 23, 2012)

funny its announcement is right at the same time as Nikons...

1 upvote
Andrew Higgins
By Andrew Higgins (Jun 21, 2012)

Looking forward to a comparison test of this lens against the new Nikkor 18-300mm, as Sigma lenses are usually excellent these days.

1 upvote
Karroly
By Karroly (Jun 19, 2012)

@Dave Oddie
"Macro starts at 1:1" means nothing as it does not take into account the sensor pixel size.
A macro 1:1 lens on, let's say, a 16MP FF sensor, gives the same picture and level of details than a macro 1:1.5 lens on a 16MP APS-C sensor due to the crop factor. And using a 24MP sensor rather than a 6MP sensor of the same size with the same lens will double the level of details and will turn a macro 1:1 lens into an equivalent 2:1 lens !
In other words, macro magnification is a combination of lens magnification AND picture enlargement capability.

4 upvotes
cheddargav
By cheddargav (Jun 18, 2012)

Zzzzzzzzz.....

1 upvote
solarider
By solarider (Jun 17, 2012)

Curious, since Sigma has been working with Hoya Corp, past owner of Pentax Imaging (in an unrelated announcement) ... they now use a slightly modified wording for SMC - Super Multi Layer Coating. I'm wondering if Hoya has exchanged info with Sigma and gotten something in return? Sounds possible.

0 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Jun 17, 2012)

Will this be shorter(collapsed) than the tamron PZD 18-270 lens?

1 upvote
Thsoft
By Thsoft (Jun 16, 2012)

Is it silent motor ?

0 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Jun 17, 2012)

Should be it has HSM

0 upvotes
jennajenna
By jennajenna (Jun 16, 2012)

would this work on full frame?

0 upvotes
JordanAT
By JordanAT (Jun 16, 2012)

Nice goin' there, slick. How about "It says for APS-C DSLR" which would imply that, no, this will not work acceptably on full frame DSLRs.

Here's your sign.

11 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Jun 17, 2012)

No, Sigma uses "DG" for those usable on full-frame DSLRs, and "DC" for crop sensor (C for "crop").

Tamron is a bit more confusing with "Di" for full frame, "Di II" for crop - and lately, "Di III" for mFT and other compact mirrorless systems.

2 upvotes
photohounds
By photohounds (Jun 18, 2012)

You mean 6x7cm?

0 upvotes
doctorxring
By doctorxring (Jun 16, 2012)

This thing sure looks a lot like my Sony SAL 18-250. Has an HSM motor though.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
brendon1000
By brendon1000 (Jun 17, 2012)

Nope, the Sony 18-250mm is a rebadged Tamron 18-250mm. Also the Tamron/Sony 18-250mm has a max aperture of f5.6 at 250mm while this Sigma has only f6.3.

0 upvotes
urix
By urix (Jun 17, 2012)

You're wrong. Tamron and Sony 18-250 ultrazooms both have maximum aperture of f/6.3 at the long end.

http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&productId=8198552921665233511

P.S. How can I add a link to my post?

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
iHedo
By iHedo (Jun 17, 2012)

Is this better than Sony's 18-250 for having HSM? I'm thinking of buying this kind of zoom lens within this year. Thanks.

0 upvotes
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

I can't speak to Sony's offering, but I have the older version of this lens for my Canon. Focusing seems to be fast and accurate, and I taken some great shots with this. I purchased this after having originally tried the Tamron 18 - 270 lens. Without the HSM motor, the Tamron lens was slow to focus and often did not focus accurately. I decided that it doesn't matter how good the optical quality might be, if you can't get properly focused shots. If the Sony does not have a similar motor and follows this pattern, you would likely be much happier with the Sigma offering. I just ordered this new version of the Sigma lens. Spec-wise, this should be an upgrade. They've added a special low dispersion element and a few other improvements, and shaved nearly half a pound off the weight. For a basic walking around lens, especially if you are just beginning to branch out in your shooting, it's really hard to beat this for the price.

2 upvotes
36hike
By 36hike (Jun 15, 2012)

Do us all a favor: If you don't know what the pricing is going to be, hold the press release.

4 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Jun 16, 2012)

Maybe they are using the response to the press release to gauge what the price should be

1 upvote
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Jun 17, 2012)

I want it for $299 or less... There... Bow this will sell like hot cakes :-)

0 upvotes
iHedo
By iHedo (Jun 17, 2012)

their old 18 - 250 was about $450+++

0 upvotes
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

B&H photo has it in stock for 499. Just ordered it.

0 upvotes
toomanycanons
By toomanycanons (Jun 15, 2012)

I have two Sigma lenses and they're both great (10-20 f/4-5.6 and an 18-50 f/2.8-4.5). If this new 18-250 is as sharp as my two lenses I'm gonna get one.

1 upvote
memo90061
By memo90061 (Jun 15, 2012)

I want the super wide Sigma 10-20mm.

0 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (Jun 16, 2012)

The older 18-250 was kind of soft - I doubt this will be close to your current lenses.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (Jun 16, 2012)

"I want the super wide Sigma 10-20mm."

No you don't! Save your money and follow the collage tutorial. Or maybe try the Tamron alternative...

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
memo90061
By memo90061 (Jun 16, 2012)

What Tamron alternative? :O

0 upvotes
robmanueb
By robmanueb (Jun 17, 2012)

Sigy 10-20 is a fine lens.

2 upvotes
brendon1000
By brendon1000 (Jun 17, 2012)

@ChrisKramer1 - The Sigma 10-20mm (or any UWA for that matter) is not about getting everything in the frame. Its about perspective distortion and using that creatively.

0 upvotes
memo90061
By memo90061 (Jun 15, 2012)

I'm looking for an all in one lens. I'm not sure which one would be better? I had the 55-250mm lens, and didn't use it much because I don't like switching lenses often.

I've been thinking about the Sigma 17-70mm, and now I'm considering this one. Which one do you recommend? I know this lens is not out yet, so there isn't much to say. Would you recommend waiting or get the Sigma 17-70mm now?

0 upvotes
bmadau
By bmadau (Jun 15, 2012)

Lipstick on a pig...

To each his own, I guess.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jun 15, 2012)

Yes, believe it or not, people do have different needs in a lens. Not everyone is just like you. I'm sure there will be plenty of casual shooters who will love a superzoom like this. Consumer superzoom have been around for a long, long time. There is obviously a market for them.

6 upvotes
Nate21
By Nate21 (Jun 15, 2012)

I agree with poster T3 i have both a superzoom (fujifilm hs-10) and a olympus DSLR a general purpose lens is always welcome addition.

1 upvote
jsis
By jsis (Jun 18, 2012)

do you think a typical consumer superzoom would care if the lens body expands or contracts at 120 or -60 degrees C? This lens is a lipstick on a pig, so he is right...

0 upvotes
AlphaOmega
By AlphaOmega (Jun 15, 2012)

I am with The Lotus Eater.
When I saw this announcement I immediately thought of buying this lens for my Sony NEX system and fitting to my Converter LA-EA2 to get Vibration Reduction. Then I read this in lens function was disabled on Sony and Pentax models so the idea was dropped as fast as it occurred.
I went through the same thought process when I read about the recent Tamron upgraded 18-270mm model. Shame on both Tamron and Sigma.
Surely, here was an opportunity to market this lens to NEX users who also have a Sony DSLR such as myself. Presumably Tamron thinks that NEX users will be happy with their E-mount 18-200 but Sigma have no such offering - at least not yet.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jun 15, 2012)

There are 3 versions of 18-200mm lenses for NEX, all with optical stabilization. That's like 25% of total NEX offerings. You want another one?

2 upvotes
brendon1000
By brendon1000 (Jun 15, 2012)

+1, the Sony and Tamron versions don't require any adapter and are more compact than this lens. Also the difference in FOV between 200mm and 250mm is minimal at best.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jun 15, 2012)

Everyone keeps whining about f5.6 vs f6.3. That's not even quite a third of a stop. It would mean the difference between shooting ISO 800 and ISO 966. You'd likely need a microscope to spot the DOF differences.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Sakura Sakura
By Sakura Sakura (Jun 15, 2012)

Not about DOF, expect more focus hunting at lower light levels

3 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jun 15, 2012)

@Sakura Sakura- slower zoom lenses have been around for decades, on cameras with far inferior AF than most of today's DSLRs. Besides, not everyone wants or needs a superzoom for high speed action, sports, or widelife photography. People who do more demanding photography like that aren't going to be buying a consumer superzoom like this anyway. So stop complaining. There are plenty of casual shooters who will love this lens. It's also as if people seek out things on the internet to complain about! LOL.

3 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (Jun 16, 2012)

If it is parfocal, it wouldn't be as much of a problem.

0 upvotes
Sakura Sakura
By Sakura Sakura (Jun 16, 2012)

@T3 It's remarkable that you seem to infer & find so much amusement from the single self evident statement that a slower lens may not be so quick to focus.

0 upvotes
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (Jun 15, 2012)

Truth in advertising fail: A maximum magnification ratio of 1:2.9 is NOT a macro.

4 upvotes
X Faktor Photo
By X Faktor Photo (Jun 15, 2012)

Woah there cowboy. MACRO is not only classified by a 1:1 magnification ratio. 2.9 is close too. I have a 17-70 that's around 1:2.3 or so and got me into the macro world...then I went to the Sigma 180 Mac, and today I'll have the MP-E with a max of 5:1, so I know what macro is, give em slack.

1 upvote
John De Bord Photography
By John De Bord Photography (Jun 15, 2012)

Quite true, more like a lens with close focusing ability rather than a macro

0 upvotes
Roman Korcek
By Roman Korcek (Jun 15, 2012)

Anything above 0.25x magnification is considered a macro lens, AFAIK. Usefulness aside.

0 upvotes
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (Jun 15, 2012)

X Faktor Photo

" MACRO is not only classified by a 1:1 magnification ratio"

Yes it is. Always have been and always will be. Please do not perpetuate the marketing myth of Sigma (and Tamron).

DPR know this isn't macro lens in any shape or form hence the inverted commas in their write up: 'Macro'.

Macro STARTS at 1:1. The term was abused by the likes of Sigma and Tamron when they came out with close focusing zoom lenses decades ago. It's marketing ploy that may con the inexperienced but anyone who has been into photography for a while knows Macro starts at 1:1 and such lenses as this are just close focusing. 1:2.9 isn't even close to Macro.

1 upvote
AngryCorgi
By AngryCorgi (Jun 15, 2012)

This lens announcement is sponsored by Bad Idea Jeans, Inc.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jun 15, 2012)

Did they sponsor your comment, too? :)

9 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Jun 15, 2012)

13 Elements in 16 Groups according to Sigma's spec. I wonder how that's possible.

6 upvotes
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (Jun 15, 2012)

+1 to that. Sigma has achieved the impossible.

0 upvotes
Takahashi
By Takahashi (Jun 16, 2012)

lol... elements so transparent that even the Sigma techs missed them in the count. Must be some kick-ass glass. :)

2 upvotes
Sakura Sakura
By Sakura Sakura (Jun 15, 2012)

Sigma's pushing of a thermally stable composite sounds to me like a solution to a problem that does not exist & smacks of marketing desperation. Not to mention an f6.3 aperture at the long end. Nothing new to see here, move along.

2 upvotes
X Faktor Photo
By X Faktor Photo (Jun 15, 2012)

For sure. If physics limits us from making an 18-250 with a max aperture of... f/4 (let's say), then I understand. But honestly, I wouldn't mind carrying a bigger lens if it meant the telephoto end was no darker than f/4.

An 18-270 f/4 would be ideal for me.

1 upvote
brendon1000
By brendon1000 (Jun 15, 2012)

The whole reason people buy such superzooms is for portability and ease of use. The Nikon 18-300mm weighs 2 pounds and is quite large to boot. And that is only f5.6 at 300mm. If we were to have a 270mm f4 you can bet your that such a lens would look a lot like a 70-200mm f2.8 type lens weighing 1.5 kgs and selling for at least $1500 or more. Not too many people would be interested in such a big walkaround lens.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Jun 15, 2012)

Well, they made 18-200/5.6, which scales to 250 by simple prolonging of some mechanical parts without losing much quality. Why not to add those 50mm?

0 upvotes
waxwaine
By waxwaine (Jun 15, 2012)

I have the old 18mm-200mm DC for Pentax and it performance it´s better than average from f8 to f13 on both extremes focal lenght. A ATV or ATLens.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
R Thornton
By R Thornton (Jun 15, 2012)

US$ 500 in the States and GBP 500 in the UK?
Really, 60% more!
What did the UK ever do to you, Sigma?

1 upvote
HDF2
By HDF2 (Jun 15, 2012)

You are not comparing things equally. In the US you would typically have to add sales tax (0-8% depending) while in the UK you have to account for VAT (20%) which is included in the quoted UK price (and which you can't get around, unless it's a corporate purchase).

Take out the VAT and you are only looking at a 30% price difference, which of course still doesn't change your original sentiment, just tones it down a bit, so I'll ask it too...

..."What did the UK ever do to you Sigma?"

3 upvotes
Northgrove
By Northgrove (Jun 15, 2012)

The remaining 30% could be due to toll rates / import costs? I keep seeing similar differences in other areas of tech anyway, and I doubt it 's a big conspiracy to cheat people worldwide.

2 upvotes
antares103
By antares103 (Jun 15, 2012)

US sales tax is more like 0-10%. Also, there is a natural larger market in the US vs the UK plus the non US residents buying from there. I would say import fees and company tax rates to be the remainder.

0 upvotes
SulfurousBeast
By SulfurousBeast (Jun 15, 2012)

Folks - Simple, In UK Government pays 100% Health Coverage, Hospitalization, expenses. In US everyone knows Insurance is a scam. Somewhere the Govt. had to make up for what they offer their citizens.

0 upvotes
A200Eric
By A200Eric (Jun 16, 2012)

It's not provided by the gov't, it's provided by the citizens through insane taxes such as a VAT. It's a pretty good model which has been shown to work well over time i.e. Greece& Spain.

2 upvotes
Delacosta
By Delacosta (Jun 16, 2012)

@A200Eric
As someone who lives in Spain I can assure you that the current economic difficulties do not come from the fact that we pay VAT. Also having free access to excellent healthcare when my family and I need it is not something I would trade for paying less taxes.

On another note, any economic difficulties we may be suffering are aggravated by the fact that we still, for inexplicable reasons, let American credit rating firms such as S&P decide what interest rates our goverments should pay in Europe. Considering their track record of reliable credit rating anyway (Lehman Brothers, anyone?) why do we still accept their hegemony?

Just an observation; the world is a very complex place and simplification can be useful - but oversimplification is not.

2 upvotes
kevin_r
By kevin_r (Jun 15, 2012)

Same old f/6.3 at the long end - I suppose it's to keep the size small and the costs down, but it's really so boring. Nikon has already shown the way as others have mentioned already.

Problem might be with the single SLD element - unless they've performed miracles, the image quality will suffer at the telephoto end, no matter how one tries to stop down. If they really wanted to improve image quality, 3 SLD elements would have been much better.

I suppose the lens is aimed at a market segment that doesn't care THAT much about IQ.

Then there's the shortchanging of Sony and Pentax customers - they don't get to have an alternative to their in-built stabilization system, yet have to pay the same money. This is just greedy on Sigma's part.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
dara2
By dara2 (Jun 15, 2012)

Sorry the one who is greedy is Tamron. They disable all their Vibration Compensation function on Sony mount and yet the lens in Sony mount cost the same price as those of canikon mount. Sigma at least leave it to the user choice, having the benefit of a stabilized viewfinder and maybe better IS because the stabilisation is specific to this lens.

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (Jun 15, 2012)

dara2 - not on this lens it isn't. Sony and Pentax mounts will not have OS. It's a step backwards.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Jun 15, 2012)

It is a toll. If you buy a camera in States and take it to Germany, then after all tolls&taxes you get same price as "official german" price.
As far as I remember you pay 19% VAT and 13% toll for lenses.
And VAT is applied to the (price + toll) not just price alone.
So that's your difference.
Un UK it is probably simiilar. Anyway, this has nothing to do with "Sigma/Canon/Tamron/... hates my country".

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
D1N0
By D1N0 (Jun 15, 2012)

you might as well get a point and shoot, when you are going to use lenses like this one

4 upvotes
Greg VdB
By Greg VdB (Jun 15, 2012)

which point-and-shoot do you suggest for ~300$ that has the same low-light qualities and manual settings as your dSLR body?

Even IF the lens isn't very sharp, there's many valid reasons why people might choose this over a p&s... (and let's wait with slacking the optical performance till some tests come out to see in which zoom and aperture range this lense actually performs pretty decently).

3 upvotes
grafli
By grafli (Jun 15, 2012)

300$ for a DSLR with THIS lens, I belive *Greg VdB3* is dreaming...
But you asked for an alternative:
Fujifilm FinePix X-S1.
It only lacks the optical viewfinder and a little low light capabilities...

http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/x/fujifilm_x_s1/

0 upvotes
dara2
By dara2 (Jun 15, 2012)

G1x don't focus as fast as a dslr, other p&s are even slower.

0 upvotes
Greg VdB
By Greg VdB (Jun 15, 2012)

@grafli: Oh my, should I really have specified that my comment about the 300$ p&s was sarcastic?

Anyway, what I wanted to say is that different people and different occasions give rise to different needs, and to say this or that is better than that or this is just silly. Even professionals using only the best quality money can buy might find themselves in occasions where they don't want to change lenses and a lense like this could be the solution. If people find dSLR responsiveness and low-light performance more important than absolute sharpness of the lens, who are you to say that they are wrong?

I say let's just have as many camera systems and lenses as possible from as many manufacterers as possible so that there's a choice for everyone for every occasion!!

1 upvote
Northgrove
By Northgrove (Jun 15, 2012)

It's funny to hear the low-light argument brought up regarding a lens with a maximum f/6.3 aperture on the long end...

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jun 15, 2012)

For photographers, some of you don't have very creative minds. If you literally can't think of any way to use a lens that has focal lengths ranging from 28-400mm equivalent, then you need to go back to square one.

@Northgrove: It is true f6.3 is not very bright, but most long zoom compacts (and short, really) have similar apertures with several stops worse noise handling. So the argument is indeed valid.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jun 15, 2012)

What an incredibly lame, ignorant comment.

1 upvote
JordanAT
By JordanAT (Jun 16, 2012)

Low light with f/6.3? Depends on whether you're shooting with a P&S that has a maximum ISO of 1600 or a DSLR with a maximum ISO of 204,000.

7 stops makes quite a difference in low light photography.

1 upvote
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

Not to mention the MUCH larger sensor, even the APS-C, which is what results in the exceptional low-light performance, higher dynamic range, higher ISO options, RAW, stellar autofocus performance, functionally zero shutter lag, burst frame rates...need I go on? There will be shooters and situations where a P&S is the better or easier choice, but to say they are identical to DSLRs is puzzling at best. I've used many of both. Loved this lens, use it all the time for a casual "walking-around" lens. The large apertures on the P&S cams are only possible because of the tiny sensors - and coincidentally, are necessary because of the tiny sensors' poor lowlight performance.

0 upvotes
The A-Team
By The A-Team (Jun 15, 2012)

Looks like a fun lens! Would be a nice upgrade from my old 18-200OS mk1!

4 upvotes
George Veltchev
By George Veltchev (Jun 15, 2012)

Fun???? Fun ....you call this a Fun Lens ...let's rather call it Funny lens or most certainly boringly funny lens ;)))

2 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jun 15, 2012)

Some people, like George Veltchev, lack all sense of creativity and go through life just hating everything, or finding things to hate, because that's the only thing that gets them up. LOL.

3 upvotes
iHedo
By iHedo (Jun 17, 2012)

Why would this be boring? It's good to have this lens when traveling light.

2 upvotes
Greg VdB
By Greg VdB (Jun 15, 2012)

I really like my Sigma 17-70 for the high-quality materials used, and I never actually noticed any 'barrel expansion and contraction' in extreme temperatures in any of my lenses, so I'm kinda sceptic about this TSC. I just hope that all this isn't a cheap marketing tactic by Sigma to introduce lenses with a lower quality finish (lighter and smaller??). There's already enough wobbly plasticky Nikon and Canon lenses out there in the entry level segment!

0 upvotes
X Faktor Photo
By X Faktor Photo (Jun 15, 2012)

+1 for the 17-70. Definitely a favorite. I could focus up to the glass with that baby. Never had a lens like it. Zoom lock, decent macro, good aperture, good focal range, solid construction, great price.

0 upvotes
StyleZ7
By StyleZ7 (Jun 18, 2012)

Totaly agree about 17-70. Great bang for the buck.

0 upvotes
TheSummerYears
By TheSummerYears (Jun 15, 2012)

No Image Stabilization for Sony on such a long lens? Pft.

2 upvotes
RobertJohn
By RobertJohn (Jun 15, 2012)

Sony has internal "SteadyShot"

0 upvotes
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (Jun 15, 2012)

TheSummerYears has a point. I was considering getting a Sigma 18-250mm for my NEX/LA-EA2 A-mount adapter combo so that I could benefit from OS. I have a Sony 18-250mm, but lack of OS is a pain when mounting to NEX.

I better get the old version before stocks dry up. I won't even consider the new one.

0 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Jun 15, 2012)

to RobertJohn

I say it straight: InBody IS is crap. It barely gives 1 stop advantage. I have Oly Pen1 and there is no difference at all.

0 upvotes
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (Jun 15, 2012)

That doesn't mean SSS is crap. I can't comments on Oly, but Sony easily achieves 2 stops.

1 upvote
Esa Tuunanen
By Esa Tuunanen (Jun 15, 2012)

ZAnton, with that logic every review including Dpreview's are crap just because there are crappy reviews in net.

For starters that rear display P&S shooting style of PENS is definitely camera destabilizer increasing amplitude of shake.
Lowest Oly DSLRs with IBIS had it specced for lower efficiency than in E-3(0)/5 and it's possible that small size of PENs forced to compromise even from that.
Again E-M5's new IBIS is far more capable.
http://www.pekkapotka.com/journal/2012/2/24/olympus-e-m5-5-axis-image-stabilization.html

I used routinely two stops longer exposures over the rule already with KonicaMinolta Dimage A2 which was one of the first cameras with sensor shift based stabilization.
And no doubt Sony has kept tweaking Minolta's stabilization mechanism since then. NEX just probably doesn't have any space for it.

0 upvotes
Roman Korcek
By Roman Korcek (Jun 15, 2012)

The current version has in-lens optical stabilization. What a crappy move to remove it in the new version.

0 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Jun 15, 2012)

for U$D299... I will buy it even if I do not really need it :-) I am looking for a smaller package all around lens :-) ...
although I wish it was an FX/Full frame lens..not a DX(nikon term) or EFS (canon term)..

0 upvotes
GuardianFlash
By GuardianFlash (Jun 15, 2012)

At ephotozine.com it says the new Sigma 18-250mm Macro OS is going to cost 499 EUR. Comes to about $650 CAN. I might sell my Sigma 17-50mm OS and get this.

0 upvotes
jgardia
By jgardia (Jun 15, 2012)

Hi!
I understand that DPReview is a US centric site, but do you think you can also put the dimensions and weight in metric values? You know, for the other 95% of the world...

31 upvotes
theoschela
By theoschela (Jun 15, 2012)

back in the 'old days' when dpreview was in the U.K. there was more metric - but then Amazon.com purchased them and, well, there you go - they moved to the US.

Oh, just a random thought... anyone else ever ponder that there might be a, oh I don't know, maybe a HUGE Conflict of Interest that dpreview - formerly the foremost authority on photography unbiased reviews is owned by a HUGE phototgraphy retailer?!?

11 upvotes
Shogi
By Shogi (Jun 15, 2012)

Where is the conflict of interest? Margins on this gear for similar products are close, and Amazon sells all of them. If anything, they were under greater pressure from manufacturers before.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Jun 15, 2012)

I think thats just the press release. But, yea.. why people are not using metric in 2012 is beyond belief.

18 upvotes
b534202
By b534202 (Jun 15, 2012)

I couldn't find 2.8 inch filters on amazon though ...

8 upvotes
Barbu
By Barbu (Jun 15, 2012)

While the „X ounces this, Y ounces that” was just mildly annoying, the pure stupidity was when they converted even the filter size:
„with a filter size of 2.8 inches in diameter.”

No. This. Does. NOT. Happen!

20 upvotes
Stefan Stuart Fletcher
By Stefan Stuart Fletcher (Jun 15, 2012)

I'm sure it can, but not when posting a third-party press release intended for the 5%.

So can you: convert ounces to grams by multiplying by 28.35. Convert inches to centimetres by multiplying by 2.54.

0 upvotes
ilovemountains
By ilovemountains (Jun 15, 2012)

I did it: it comes out a filter size of 71.15 mm. Never seen this size before.

2 upvotes
danichtfuer
By danichtfuer (Jun 15, 2012)

Exactly, why not convert the focal length, too?
Let's call it a 0.71-9.84 inch zoom

11 upvotes
PatMann
By PatMann (Jun 15, 2012)

It's the familiar 71mm filter size - what's the problem?

0 upvotes
mike051051
By mike051051 (Jun 15, 2012)

Yep, that's what happens when you use a piece of cheap software to do the conversions and a copy editor who is not familiar with photography.
And yes, dimensions should always be given in both measurement standards, regardless of the intended audience.
And btw, that's 2.83465" = 72.00011mm sheesh...8^P

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
theoschela
By theoschela (Jun 15, 2012)

The Tamron 18-270 VC II gets some real competition now

admittedly does sound like a good compact vacation lens

but f/6.3.... hmmm...

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jun 15, 2012)

The Tamron is f6.3, too.

0 upvotes
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

Compact vacation lens is exactly what this is. And for that, it's great. According to some reviews, the Tamron had slightly better optical quality then the old version of this lens, but I found it to be slow and inexact when autofocusing compared to the Sigma. Potential quality mattered little to me when 9/10 shots were unusable. With the Sigma, 9/10 are usable. Not pro-quality, perhaps, but usable. Just ordered the new 50-150 F2.8 - can't wait to compare. Different lens for different reasons.

0 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Jun 15, 2012)

Also, this shows why Canikon are so useless to anyone with a clue; THIS is the kind of lens Nikon should have made, smaller size and including macro instead of a useless extra 50mm of range and making it huge.

4 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jun 15, 2012)

Wait for the optical performance first, before calling that :) If it performs well, I'll agree it puts pressure on the majors if not, its another dust collector for me.

C

3 upvotes
RobertJohn
By RobertJohn (Jun 15, 2012)

Maybe you feel it that way, but the 18-200 from Nikon is optical better than it's peers and that might be the same case with the 18-250vs18-300. And with 5,6 vs 6.3 it is faster also. My opinion is waiting for any review on both :)

0 upvotes
Karl Gnter Wnsch
By Karl Gnter Wnsch (Jun 15, 2012)

It's a useless f/6.3 at the long end - that's again outside the working range of the autofocus of any camera it will fit on. Normally this should be labeled "not fit for sale" and rejected by any dealer!

0 upvotes
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (Jun 15, 2012)

Karl, that's strange, because I was able to sucessfully focus on BIF at 250mm/f6.3 the other day.

5 upvotes
Takahashi
By Takahashi (Jun 16, 2012)

Agreed, Lotus Eater... Karl, a few years back, I strolled around with a Tammy 18-270 permanently bolted to the front of a 500D for over two years until I went all sharpness-whorey with L lenses. Point being, I had very little to no issues with its f/6.3 long-end, unless I was pushing it by shooting in unrealistically low light. These make great lightweight walkaround lenses.

2 upvotes
Bart Hickman
By Bart Hickman (Jun 15, 2012)

Interesting--size and weight are approaching the m43 super zoom lenses, even though it gathers more light and has a wider zoom range.

1 upvote
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Jun 15, 2012)

That is the most compact superzoom lens I have ever seen...AND it has macro!

0 upvotes
theoschela
By theoschela (Jun 15, 2012)

did we catch what the min. focus distance is?

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jun 15, 2012)

Not true macro of course, but basically 1:3 magnification is decent enough for some close up work- very similar to most kit lenses nowadays which is above average magnification. I want to see the optical performance though at wide and full telephoto (where it matters most).

Carl

0 upvotes
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

Min. Focus distance just over 13", I think. Compared to almost 18" for current model. Not a "true" macro, but those extra 4-5 inches will be handy.

0 upvotes
tabloid
By tabloid (Jun 15, 2012)

f3.5-f6.3...lol

For me personally that would be unusable.

Jack of all trades lens.

1 upvote
RobertJohn
By RobertJohn (Jun 15, 2012)

you always shoot wide open? With most superzooms you have to go up to f8 to get a bit more sharpness, so yes it is somewhat slow, but unusable?

0 upvotes
Karl Gnter Wnsch
By Karl Gnter Wnsch (Jun 15, 2012)

@RobertJohn: f/5.6 is the (physical) limit for a working autofocus on any camera that this POS will fit on!

0 upvotes
RobertJohn
By RobertJohn (Jun 15, 2012)

@Karl Gnter Wnsch: I know, but it's the same as the sigma 18-200: autofocus should work (just worse) according to a review:
http://www.dpreview.com/lensreviews/sigma_18-200_3p5-6p3_os_n15/2

0 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Jun 15, 2012)

I'm still trying to figure out why this is. My Olympus E-510, with a rather primitive AF system, will happily AF up to f/7 or f/8, and will AF at f/11 in good light (but will complain about it).

Why does everyone else cut off at f/5.6?

0 upvotes
undutchable
By undutchable (Jun 15, 2012)

If you dial in f/11, but the lens has a f/6.3, it will AF at f/6.3, then close down to f/11, then open and close the shutter... Officially most cameras will need at least f/5.6, but sometimes they will operate at f/6.3

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
benixau
By benixau (Jun 16, 2012)

And yet Sony's (formerly Minolta's) 500f8 still autofocus' with no issues. Yes, I know it's a one of a kind but it works on all a-mount cameras. So clearly, they can AF at f/8 ...

0 upvotes
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

Perhaps I don't understand the technical limitations, because I've used the older version of this lens for two years now and never had a problem. The focus is a little slower, especially at the long end and in poor light, but rarely does it fail entirely. And then I can manual focus...

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jun 15, 2012)

Does sound decent afterall. I'll be honest, my first thought was "sheesh, really Sigma, yet another redeux of this lens???", but after reading the specs etc. it seems like a legit replacement/update and a decent performer.

I'd need to see its optical improvements (if any) and AF speed, build, before coming to a final conclusion, but on paper it seems pretty legit. Bit slow on the long end though, especially with Nikons recently announced 18-300mm f/3.5-f/5.6.

-Carl

6 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (Jun 15, 2012)

.6 will cost you 500 dollars more. Better to get a 70-200 f2.8 for the money.

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jun 15, 2012)

Haha.

Then you lack wide end coverage. The point of a superzoom is to cover "all" normal ranges. Silly.

C

2 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (Jun 15, 2012)

Commandment No. 4: Thou shalt not want a superzoom.

1 upvote
benixau
By benixau (Jun 16, 2012)

Commandment No. 5: Thou shalt realise that consumers buying superzooms and other low end gear by the pallet-full pays the R&D for the awesome gear we like to buy

1 upvote
marbo uk
By marbo uk (Jun 16, 2012)

Commandment No. 6: Thou shalt not believe you have to have expensive f2.8 zooms to get great photos.

www.markbondphotos.com all with cheap zooms

3 upvotes
iHedo
By iHedo (Jun 17, 2012)

Commandment No. 7: Thou shalt let other have more options to choose from or update their old travel lens.

0 upvotes
setite
By setite (Jun 17, 2012)

I want a superzoom damnit!!! I just read every comment and each one made me sink further and further into the abyss of despair after my elation at reading this release. I might just have to shun you all and get one anyway.

Ii am a new DSLR user and I probably wouldn't recognize CA, lens distortion, or any of that stuff if it bit me on my sensitive bits. I have a T3i, a 18-55 kit lens, and a nifty fifty. Is the superzoom range really so evil.

I would love an L lense, but I'm new to this hobby and can't justify the cost. Tell me this, will the pictures I get from this not be far better than I got from my Sony DSC-HX5V P&S?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

YES! They will be better. I've shot SLRs since 198mumble. Only now am I investing in pro-level glass, because I'm finally at a point where I can. Invest in your knowledge and creativity first, they are THE most important pieces of your kit. Learning to see creatively and understanding light and composition will help more than fancy glass.

That said, of all the "stuff" people are discussing here (oh, the joy of being a lens snob), what you'll notice first when you do start to see these details are sharpness, contrast, and focusing issues. Especially if you take any action shots, invest first in lenses with HSM, USM, or equivalent fast, nearly silent focus motors. None of the rest matters if you can't get a properly focused shot. You can fix, or at least improve, most things (CA, distortion, etc.) in post-processing. You can even increase apparent sharpness by increasing contrast (sharpen tools in software). You can't fix focus after the fact.

0 upvotes
Rsczepan
By Rsczepan (Jul 5, 2012)

You'll first notice sharpness issues as an ever so slight softening of the fine details. At small photo sizes, not a problem. The bigger the photo size, and/or the tighter the crap, the more you'll notice that. But, make no mistake, I have the older version of this Sigma, and it is a fabulous walking around Lens with which to polish your craft. Have fun, and happy shooting!

0 upvotes
D7000newbie
By D7000newbie (Jun 15, 2012)

Sounds like a great all around lens.

1 upvote
Total comments: 142