Previous news story    Next news story

Nikon tells PDN it is looking for a fix for D800 and D4 lock-up bug

By dpreview staff on May 4, 2012 at 17:35 GMT

Nikon has confirmed to PDN that it is investigating a problem that can cause the D800 and D4 to lock-up while shooting. The company says that the issue - identified while PDN was reviewing the camera - can be avoided by disabling Highlights and RGB Histogram on the display. At present the lock-ups require the battery to be removed to restart the camera but PDN thinks it likely that Nikon will be able to come up with a permanent fix.

The issue isn't one we've encountered while working towards our reviews of both cameras, but we'll stay in touch with Nikon and report on any updates.

Comments

Total comments: 163
12
openskyline
By openskyline (May 4, 2012)

who has a last laugh now . HOHOHOHOHOHOHOHO

4 upvotes
AnHund
By AnHund (May 4, 2012)

Ridiculous Canon fanboy comment. This can be fixed in software unlike the light leak in the 5D III.

1 upvote
EssexAsh
By EssexAsh (May 4, 2012)

the person who has to repair theirs with sticky tape?

5 upvotes
Pastynator
By Pastynator (May 4, 2012)

Well i just had a good laugh at how ridiculous you and your post are. Does that count? :P

4 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (May 5, 2012)

The only ones getting the last laugh are Nikon and Canon who got YOU to pay THEM to do the final testing on their cameras.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (May 4, 2012)

It is totally unfair that for the long weekend entertainment DPR has chosen a Nikon bashing programme. We only had one day to do Canon bashing with the ridiculous light leak.

Why not introduce a timing system that gives equal time to both sides? Like chess games.

Time out.

4 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (May 4, 2012)

Unfortunately this is not the only problem. Seems that the D800 is plagued from quite a few issues.
Fix them and I'll buy it.

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (May 4, 2012)

Maybe some, not all. Mine is perfect, not a single issue.

3 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (May 4, 2012)

How about this: New products are not perfect, especially with rushed schedules. Consumers need to understand this and have some patience with the manufacturers (from what I have seen Nikon and Canon have been responsive to fixes).

Consumers need to realize this and not buy a camera 1 week before an important event so they have adequate time to learn the new equipment.

When I buy a new model car, I expect it to get recalled. I don't whine and complain when it does or try to make others feel worse about their purchase by rubbing it in when someone elses car gets recalled.

Eric

4 upvotes
KonstantinosK
By KonstantinosK (May 4, 2012)

Indeed, Eric, there's no need to go and pre-order a new product just to "have the newest and latest"... It's better to wait for all the teething problems to surface and to be taken care of by the manufacturers.
Because all the electro/mechanical products are built within tolerances, there's always the possibility of problems to appear at the first production runs. This has always been the case. Fortunately, nowadays, manufacturers usually have the decency to acknowledge the problems and make recalls and offer fixes, under the pressure of easily spread news via the internet and the media, of course...
As a conclusion, I'd say that unless is absolutely necessary, one should always wait a little instead of rushing to spend big money on a new model of whatever product.

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (May 4, 2012)

Well, you're dealing with very childish people here who think they are rooting for a sports team or that one brand is both flawless and dramatically superior to the others. I'm amazed that digital cameras are anywhere near as good as they are and there are so many other things to consider like lenses (pretty important), what the company is like to deal with, etc.

8 upvotes
Tom Goodman
By Tom Goodman (May 4, 2012)

Give some examples of "quite a few issues" please.

3 upvotes
dominikov
By dominikov (May 4, 2012)

No one cares whether you buy it or not because a lot of us who pre-ordered in the first few days still haven't got one yet.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (May 4, 2012)

battery issues, viewfinder issues, focus issues, freezing issues.

google it fanboy!

1 upvote
Tom Goodman
By Tom Goodman (May 5, 2012)

Mr Hertz: That would be "Google it, fanboy!" You need to work on your grammar. Also, sentences begin with capital letters unless one is simply lazy when posting insults.

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (May 4, 2012)

Frankly this sounds 100x more significant than the 5D mk III light leak which only significantly affects a few specialized photo situations and can be compensated for somewhat in post when you are aware of it.

Though if it is just a firmware upgrade that's needed it will be fixed more easily...

3 upvotes
tocar
By tocar (May 5, 2012)

Hopefully a firmware update is enough to solve the problem otherwise they might have to replace the motherboard if multiple processors are involved. Nikon doesn't guarantee a firmware solution. Lastly I hope it doesn't happen when you're getting that 'one in a million' shot!

0 upvotes
Lehik
By Lehik (May 4, 2012)

Not a problem, they'll fix it with black tape.

0 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (May 4, 2012)

Probably a firmware fix. So it is like black tape, in the non physical sense.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
DFPanno
By DFPanno (May 4, 2012)

If we could get a camera that could lock up all the light leaks we would all be in great shape.

0 upvotes
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (May 4, 2012)

Just another example of how stupid it is to actually buy first batch of cameras from ANY brand today. One becomes a paying beta tester for manufacturers. It is a truly sad and unfortunate development.

5 upvotes
Scrozzy
By Scrozzy (May 4, 2012)

Seriously, do you know anything about development? And "truly" sad? Is anyone shedding tears of unfathomable sadness? A cup of reality for table 2, please.

Let's take the alternative and double the development cycle and double the cost of the product. No one will buy it, Nikon will go to the wall, but there's no more easily-correctable wee buggies for you to cry into your milk over.

And in answer to your next question: No, I use a Canon.

3 upvotes
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (May 4, 2012)

I guess I know a bit more about "development" then you do. My work is developing DSP processors for a telecom company here in Sweden.
And why would anyone want to "double the development cycle and double the cost of the product" ?
Where did you get that from? Are you even on a correct site son?

2 upvotes
MichaelEchos
By MichaelEchos (May 5, 2012)

The problem is, no manufacturers wanna be late in the game, so they'll have to rush schedules.

0 upvotes
Scrozzy
By Scrozzy (May 5, 2012)

@Der, yes I think this is the right site.

My point is to eliminate all the bugs, costs and development time have to increase, and there's still no guarantee you'll get all the bugs.

I think in a nutshell, your expectations are too high, but nevertheless, welcome to the digital age. It's a little more complex than the age of cogs and levers, but it has its advantages.

However I agree with you about the early adopters. Suckers.

0 upvotes
astralux
By astralux (May 4, 2012)

For me the news in the post is not the subject but the words "while working towards our reviews". The Nikons as wel as the new Canon has been extensively tested elsewhere and users here have written so much about the models that any test now from DPR will just be too little too late and old news. Come on guys, it only takes 2 to 3 days to do the test if you knuckle down. The D4, D800 and 5D Mk III has been the biggest news on the new body front in the last month or so. All we get from DPR is previews and tests on less important models and fiddling with the web site software. Get on with it!

3 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (May 4, 2012)

Until you've tried writing one of our reviews, I'd appreciate it if you didn't make glib statements about how long it takes. Especially when it comes to a camera as complex at the D800, everything takes time.

The D800 review is nearly finished but it's taken several people working hard for weeks to get to that point.

27 upvotes
altenae
By altenae (May 4, 2012)

I am looking forward to the D800 review.
Also any progress on the 5D Mark III review ?

Thanks and Ignore.....you know what I mean

0 upvotes
ajamess
By ajamess (May 4, 2012)

Do you have any idea how long it takes to do the analysis DPR does behind these reviews? I didn't think so. Go outside and take some pictures or something.

6 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (May 4, 2012)

So demanding and you don't pay a dime to be a member here.

10 upvotes
Khizer
By Khizer (May 4, 2012)

@ Mr. Butler, with ref to "The D800 review is nearly finished..."
I have read pros and cons of both the D800 and 5D Mark III, and am confused. I have been procrastinating the purchase just for the reviews, so please issue both simultaneously, or within short space of each other. Am also interested in the indepth review of 1D-X. If I am not imposing, could you indicate by when DPR will publish it? Kind regards, Khizer

2 upvotes
mathew crow
By mathew crow (May 4, 2012)

" All we get from DPR is previews and tests on less important models "
-less important to you maybe. Not so for the people who are interested in those other cameras.

3 upvotes
astralux
By astralux (May 4, 2012)

With respect Mr Butler, I stand by my point that the tests could very easily have been done by now and the results posted. I also stand by my point that 1 or 2 people working 8 hour days could very easily have tested and written the reports in 3 days. The first 5 to 7 points in the test are just regurgitation of printed facts as supplied by the manufacturers. The rest should be pretty much routine by now. No sir, you are late to market and have been made irrelevant by your competitors. It was not so in the past. I know howls of protest will follow, but if you are honest you will know that I am correct. And no, this site is not free, it is paid for in advertising which we pay for by downloading it every tome we open the page. Too little, too late.

2 upvotes
tonywong
By tonywong (May 4, 2012)

I'm waiting for astralux's review of the D800. Should have been ready for weeks by now.

If you want a fast and shallow review, there's plenty of other sites out there but if you want a comprehensive review, it does take time. Sometimes it feels like it takes too long, but that's what you get for a free access site.

3 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (May 4, 2012)

You can stand by your point all you wish. You're wrong.

I've worked here for nearly five years and have written more reviews than I can remember. Many of these have involved a lot more than 8 hour days at the end of weeks of work, so I think I've got a clearer idea of what's involved.

Our reviews take around the same amount of time as when I started, but they're more in-depth than they used to be. In the good old days, dpreview would tend to publish a review about a month after a camera's launch but could only publish one review at a time. We now have several reviews being worked-on in parallel - so you actually get more reviews, with a similar lag as before.

However, back in 2008 it was not common for cameras such as D4, D800, 5D III, X-Pro1 and E-M5 to be announced in the space of a month. I'm afraid your nostalgia is as rose-tinted as it is misinformed.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
12 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (May 4, 2012)

D800 and 5D Mark III are both coming along well, so should both be published within the next two weeks.

We've not yet seen or been offered a production EOS-1D X, so that's not even on the radar at present, I'm afraid.

5 upvotes
dholl
By dholl (May 4, 2012)

It must be tiring to always feel you have to respond to the same old criticisms, Richard.

The majority still judge DPR reviews to be the best out there, with many of us deciding which camera to buy based on them. It's easy to be impatient in this internet age, but most of us would still rather wait for quality then settle for mediocrity.

Like that ketchup advert from a few years ago: the best things come to those who wait...

The only thing I would like to ask is if you could publish both the 5DIII & D800 reviews relatively simultaneously...but I understand if you stagger them a week or two apart (makes sense from a 'hits 'n clicks' perspective).

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Denis of Whidbey Island
By Denis of Whidbey Island (May 4, 2012)

Anyone who thinks DPReview takes too long on the reviews should simply read the equally informative reviews he finds on other sites. Oh, wait ... there are none!

2 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (May 4, 2012)

I would think a review doesn't just involve shooting test charts in the studio, but also extended real life use of the camera to get a feel for its handling and ergonomics, test all the key features, and get a chance to discover any quirks or problems the camera may have.

1 upvote
facedodge
By facedodge (May 4, 2012)

How many stops of dynamic range do I have when my D800 locks up? Can someone post a 100% Crop with shadows pulled?

There, it was said... Now let's move on.

1 upvote
Alfonso Bresciani
By Alfonso Bresciani (May 4, 2012)

let me grab some popcorn first...

5 upvotes
Jahled
By Jahled (May 4, 2012)

Hahaha!

0 upvotes
KonstantinosK
By KonstantinosK (May 4, 2012)

Lol... Let the hate mail begin... Hopefully, we have more interesting things to do in our weekends...

2 upvotes
Gradybaby
By Gradybaby (May 4, 2012)

I'm waiting to hear what they say about the AF issues.

1 upvote
fotolopithecus
By fotolopithecus (May 15, 2012)

I had a D7000 that had lock up issues where I had to remove the battery to even turn the camera off. I sent the camera back to the store, and finally got one without any apparent issues. I don't know what the cause of the lock ups were, but it makes me wonder if it was the same problem as with the D800. Although, wouldn't it happen with all D7000s then. These modern dslrs are just too complex, and problem prone. The camera makers need to start stripping the cameras down, of all these useless bells, and whistles so many are addicted too. Too many gadget freaks, not enough photographers.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Total comments: 163
12