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30 minute limit on video capture could end if WTO group gets its way

By dpreview staff on May 18, 2012 at 22:45 GMT

The restriction that limits video recording in digitial cameras to 30 minutes could be abolished if the World Trade Organization's Information Technology Agreement (ITA) is expanded. Several countries, including the USA, have begun informal talks to extend the scope of the ITA to include products that are currently subject to tariffs and duty. At present, digital cameras' video cuts off after 30 minutes to avoid them being classified as video cameras (which attract 5.4% duty because they are considered to be video recorders). If the video cameras are added to the ITA, this distinction would no longer matter. (via Nikkei)

Getting changes made at WTO can be a slow and highly politicized process, but a proposal to the ITA Committee to discuss the issue has been broadly welcomed.

Removing duty on video cameras would allow manufacturers to remove the 29 minute, 59 second limit currently applied to digital cameras. However other limitations, such as the 4Gb limit for single files imposed by the FAT 32 file system used by most cameras, or concerns about circuitry overheating will remain.

Comments

Total comments: 166
glitched
By glitched (May 28, 2012)

Good luck with your camcorder divisions. I can't even remember the last time i saw anybody actually use one. They even have smaller sensors than P&S too.

0 upvotes
trevmar
By trevmar (May 22, 2012)

I wonder why my Samsung Galaxy Note Cellphone can record FullHD for 50 minutes without any 30 minute limitation?

Frankly, I don't buy this WTO press-release. As far as I can see, the 30 minute limitation is being encouraged by the major manufacturers as it prevents the viability of their Camcorder products from being threatened by the newer P&S cameras.

Until 2012, Panasonic was only limiting European cameras, but now they are limiting camera models for countries which do not have the import tarif restrictions (USA, Hong Kong, Singapore)

1 upvote
spitfire31
By spitfire31 (May 21, 2012)

From the intro above: "digital cameras' video cuts off after 30 minutes to avoid them being classified as video cameras (which attract 5.4% duty)."

This is nonsensical and erroneous.

The reason that (non-professional!) video cameras (incl. still cameras w. video option) are limited to a continuous shooting time of 30 minutes is to avoid them being classified as VIDEO RECORDERS. Video reorders (be they tape, solid state or HD) carry an added EU levy to compensate for the perceived losses of income to copyright holders whose broadcast work is recorded for personal use.

2 upvotes
Lensjoy
By Lensjoy (May 21, 2012)

Government, get out of my camera bag!

5 upvotes
Mat Miller
By Mat Miller (May 21, 2012)

I would pay that 5.4% for longer video. especially if its 2k and above!

0 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 21, 2012)

A MODEST PROPOSAL TO DP REVIEW:
Re: The 30 minute video time limit
(and the over-heating limitations)

Attention: Richard Butler, Andy Westlake, Amadou Diallo et al.,

To quote (and give proper credit to) Robbster (from a reply to me below):

" . . . until we can get the manufacturers to do the right thing, I think we
should request THAT THE RECORD TIME BE A STANDARD SPECIFICATION ITEM FOR EACH VIDEO FORMAT SUPPORTED BY A CAMERA."

This would require only a few characters in a preview and review.

This is a video performance spec of precisely the same parallel importance as the battery charge shot capacity spec for still shots !

It is information ESSENTIAL in evaluating a piece of equipment for one's particular video performance requirements.

And I know that I do not have to remind you Noble Gentlemen of DP REVIEW how EVER INCREASINGLY important the video abilities of virtually all still cameras are --from the lowliest P&S (and cell phone !) to PRO !

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (May 21, 2012)

Not only continuous record time, but more important is the total record time on one full battery, with Live View on, at 80F to simulate the typical "touristy" conditions. Some cameras (coughNEXcough) will overheat much earlier that their 30 min limit...

1 upvote
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 21, 2012)

Maloy,

With all due respect, you're still living in the 20th century.

The VAST majority of people (and growing every minute in proportion to the video capabilities of every single still camera) are not going out like they used to and expending $$ for, and dragging around -- ANOTHER CAMERA just to take videos, when their own camera can take 1080p (of again, ever increasing quality), that THEY find is more than good enough.

The biggest growing overall sales and use trend, even in still cams, is SMALLER and LIGHTER, and easier to carry kit. People, and photo enthusiasts, increasingly find a simple DSLR is too big, for God's sake.

Sure a dedicated Video camera of high quality can do better -- but still cams are now capable of doing it well enough for most people, without them paying for, and lugging another piece of equipment around.

Your overall point is of course very well taken, and I agree with your witty analogy, but dear Maloy --
The Masses are speaking -- LESS IS MORE !

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
trevmar
By trevmar (May 21, 2012)

Maloy, my cellphone can take excellent 1080p video.

I wonder why that capability has been added to cellphones? Perhaps because there is a demand? Because not all of us have our heads in the sand, pretending video and stills are different? Both are intended to convey allusion and memories. It is best for both to be at your fingertips, to choose as appropriate for the occasion.

Oh wait - I have already used my cellphone instead of my ZS15 during our Madrid trip last week... It worked well..
No wonder Samsung is winding down production of P&S cameras...

2 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 21, 2012)

Well said, trevmar!!

1 upvote
Marcel Kuemmet
By Marcel Kuemmet (May 21, 2012)

I shoot long video recordings of legal interviews and testimony. A Panasonic AVCHD recording directly to 500 gb HDD recorder, as well as being rendered. The signals are split. Not in HD. A Canon HF 10 with a class 8 card will record (in HD) until the battery dies or the card is full. Have done it many times. I also use a Canon T2i, for special HD shots or footage. But I never shoot long clips or leave the shutter running for several minutes (I am told, but not sure) as that can apparently cause damage to the sensor? The T2i is running Magic Lantern on full manual.
So, needless to say, I'm a little confused here. I have been doing for years what is said cant be done. And I know I'm not that good.
I also blog ... here is one of my recent ones. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uM7lAx6HOF8

0 upvotes
Robbster
By Robbster (May 21, 2012)

Marcel, you say you are confused, this thread is about removing the record time limits on still cameras with video. You mention the HF 10, that is a camcorder, not a still camera with video. Should record until you hit stop, the battery dies, or you fill the card, no one disputes that or says it "can't be done" with a camcorder. It just can't be done with many modern still cameras, that have built in recording time limits for video.

4 upvotes
customminds
By customminds (May 20, 2012)

why don't they just make the cameras identical to security cams. they keep capturing video, but will save in 15 or 30 minute segments. that way they never record longer than 30 minute captures -- yet continuously record to the SD/CF limit. problem solved. someone give me my 10% of the solution idea money. (ie: a 2 hour long video cuts into 4 x 30 minute SEAMLESS segments)

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
richg101
By richg101 (May 20, 2012)

the 30 minute limit affects not one of the complainers here at DP. Most dont even use their cameras -for spending time talking about them is a lot easier than actually using them. rubbish topic of debate.

1 upvote
trevmar
By trevmar (May 21, 2012)

I have only posted here 1647 times.In your eyes I don't count? Open your eyes. Every few weeks I record a conference session of around two hours, then extract the interesting stuff from it. I mainly use my LX5, as it records for over 2 hours from one battery.

This new limitation is a critical problem for me...

4 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (May 21, 2012)

I want to record longer but my D7k will become to hot to handle after a couple of minutes.

But this change is welcome.

1 upvote
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 20, 2012)

So let me get this straight,

Because some people MIGHT video a movie with a STILL camera, the REST OF THE POPULATION OF PLANET EARTH are now considered convicted co-conspirators. And without due process, must be assessed a penalty AND have our right to video ANYTHING for longer than 30 minutes straight revoked.
Oh, and did I mention that this outrage is being imposed by a for-profit industry in conjunction with vulture camera manufacturers opportunistically using this pathetic excuse to attempt to squeeze more $$$$ out of their customers' pockets !!

One more important technical note--A quality HD video camera, unfettered by this limit, is capable of higher quality than the average still camera, and would be the obvious choice for intellectual property rights thieves.

Also, since more and more people are watching Blu-Ray level movies, the call for inferior video and wretched non-surround sound
(with coughs) knockoffs is diminishing.

And we're supposed to be alright with this ?!?

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
zapatista
By zapatista (May 20, 2012)

Wow, you really have nothing better to do?

0 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 20, 2012)

Well it's a dirty job and somebody's gotta do it.

Arbitrary restrictions on my and other's freedom, even technological and artistic freedom affects me, and I speak out about it in this most appropriate venu

At least I'm using my mind and doing it, you're just sittin' around reading it and complaining, and not even about the subject at hand, but about somebody else actually doing some thinking.

I am frankly surprised at this, zapatista, as I have noticed a few of your posts on other subjects in the past and have always found them on target, interesting, and at least on one occasion, laced with commendable sarcastic wit.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
trevmar
By trevmar (May 21, 2012)

China only allows one camera of each type for each visitor. I have to use the camcorder for A-roll, and my LX5 for B-roll (you do understand that nomenclature, I guess?)

But since you are obviously a technically expert and experienced videographer, I am sure you could do a much better job than I...

I could give many other examples of why I feel betrayed by Panasonic over this new 30 minute crippling, but you obviously aren't listening, so I will save my breath...

1 upvote
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 21, 2012)

trevmar,

I assume this was a miss-placed followup to your heartfelt reply (above) directed to the insensitive,uninformed, and dismissive comment of rchg101.

For my part, I am TOTALLY with you about Panasonic getting onboard with the crippling, and your well-justified feeling of being betrayed by them as a customer.

I was also completely unaware of that Chinese restriction, but as we all know of China's repression of artistic and other freedoms, including the internet, I am unfortunately not surprised. Thank you trevmar, for letting us all know about it.

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
trevmar
By trevmar (May 21, 2012)

Ben, thanks for your response.
China also only allows 2 batteries, per camera.
Oppressive? Well, you certainly won't get an ENG camcorder through customs unless your visa says "journalist" -- and there are few of those visas issued.

But it is a wonderful country, with a wonderful people who have given me many hours of joy :) This footage, for example, was shot (a long time ago) with my Panasonic LX5:
https://vimeo.com/12292094

No extended recordings in that clip! But I have been waiting for a Panasonic MOS sensor camera to stop those vertical lines from the light bulbs in the butcher shop... Now I will have to wait, I guess, or carry two P&S cameras instead of one...

I did carry both the LX5 and the ZS15 to Granada, Spain, last week, but ended up using my new cellphone camera for the quick-reaction candid shots, rather than the ZS15. The phone is a Samsung Galaxy Note, which incidentally records 50 minutes of FullHD video nonstop :)

1 upvote
Robbster
By Robbster (May 21, 2012)

Ben, you, I and Tevmar seem to be on the same page! I went to start looking up video recording limits here on DPR and they are kinda hard to find, they are not a standard item in the specs list or database unfortunately.

So, until we can get the manufacturers to do the right thing, I think we should request that record time be a standard specification item for each video format supported by a camera.

1 upvote
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 21, 2012)

trevmar,

They even restrict the no. of batteries ?! Ay yay yay (not Chinese, I know)

Just returned from a brief wonderful trip behind the scenes in Shanghai (I'll take one of each of the eggs, please) courtesy of you -- thanks muchly !!

Let's hope the WTO does get these absurd and artificial limits lifted !

In the meantime, don't let the jerks get you down and . . .
VIDEO ON MY FRIEND, VIDEO ON !

1 upvote
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 21, 2012)

Robbster,

Re: Recording time limits as a standard spec to be listed.

A most excellent and LEGITIMATE idea !!

1 upvote
Greynerd
By Greynerd (May 20, 2012)

Looking at the feedback over time on some cameras it might be an idea to carry a compact fire extinguisher with you when taking extended videos on a camera designed for stills, just in case the heat cutout fails to trip. Just a little tip.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 20, 2012)

Never had that trouble with my GH1, maybe it's an issue with other cameras ;)

0 upvotes
trevmar
By trevmar (May 20, 2012)

Never had that trouble with my LX5. I run it until the battery dies some times, 2 hours and 30 minutes. Never overheated.

I wish people here would post based on personal experience, not hearsay...

0 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 21, 2012)

trevmar and Andy,

I do not at the moment own any Panasonic cams, but . . .

Since the 30 minute limitation appears to be newer, it seems perhaps your two cams, both of which came out some time ago,
pre-date it.

I might be a little leery, however, of any firmware updates from now on, and would check to see if they affect said video issue.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 40 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 21, 2012)

@Ben Raven Actually the PAL version of the GH1 has the 30 min limit, however the NTSC version doesn't and you can install a hack to remove the limit in the PAL version very easily.

0 upvotes
Daryl Cheshire
By Daryl Cheshire (May 20, 2012)

The Canon 5D Mk III will start a new file on reaching 4GB. But the 30 min limit remains. What I want to do is record car journeys which can exceed 30 mins.
I don't know if this limit exists in Australia and I'd like to pay the extra tax if there is a firmware option. But it seems to be a European tax which affects the whole world.
This is similar to the (no longer applied) tethering restrictions placed on the iPhone because of an agreement with AT&T which affected the world distribution and encouraged jailbreaking.

1 upvote
trevmar
By trevmar (May 20, 2012)

Tethering is a perfect analogy.. it is up to the user to decide how to use the camera they have bought

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (May 20, 2012)

How did it affect the world distribution? Tethering on iPhone worked from day one from countries/operators that included it in their plans: The restriction was on a per-operator/contract basis in the OS.

0 upvotes
Daryl Cheshire
By Daryl Cheshire (May 20, 2012)

the iphone 4 was blocked from tethering by Apple until iOS 4.3 was introduced with personal hotspot. It only worked on the IPhone 4 or later. Jailbroken devices had no restriction.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 20, 2012)

Robbster, et al.,

WILL THE REAL VILLAINS STEP UP !

Who then are the culprit Manufacturers crippling their still cameras' video capacity out of opportunistic greed, and thus obstructing our creative control.

Let's make the list !

2 upvotes
trevmar
By trevmar (May 20, 2012)

At the moment it is ALL OF THEM.
Panasonic, up until 2012, allowed unlimited AVCHD recording. The FZ-150 can record beyond 30 minutes, for example.

But all the Panasonic 2012 models, worldwide, have been crippled. I can't even buy an un-crippled one from Hong Kong :(

1 upvote
Wolfgang Fieger
By Wolfgang Fieger (May 20, 2012)

Sorry, but...

The average take in a cinema movie is a mere 15 seconds. The longest takes you could watch are in some nature documentation videos, where you could find single takes with a few minutes. I really never ever saw a movie containing takes longer than 5-6 minutes.

So what is this discussion about? This topic has no matter for movie making.

2 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (May 20, 2012)

Just because a 'cut' is 15 seconds doesn't mean the actual 'take' was 15 seconds. You think that 15 sec shot in a movie started and stopped exactly on those frames? You think the stuff you find on the discovery channel or bbc nature was shot exactly when the animal jumped into action? You need long takes sometimes when you're shooting stuff that isn't under your control. You can't yell 'action' at animals or plants or nature.

6 upvotes
PeterK70
By PeterK70 (May 20, 2012)

I share the same opinion with Wolfgang Fieger. I think 30 minutes is more than enough even for interviews because how can one talk nonstop for 30 minutes.
This is the same thing as the light leak problem on Canon 5D Mk III which didn’t hurt any serious photographer except a few snapshooters who have no idea how to take photos.
I once read that longer captures are just for real beginners. And the problem is that most people who find time to comment every topic here are just like that and nothing more.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Benjamin Franzmayr
By Benjamin Franzmayr (May 20, 2012)

I'd like to be able to record (or have recorded for me) public talks or lectures that I or others can't attend. I don't want to buy a video camera, I want my digital camera to be able to do that. I'm sure there are other applications.

2 upvotes
koolbreez
By koolbreez (May 20, 2012)

The average take in a movie has nothing to do with the intent of the 30 minute limit, it has to do with the illegal copying of movies inside a theater. Those run a few hours, and that is the recording threat. The average camcorder is low quality for pirating of movies, but the quality of still camera/video recording is superior, to the point of reaching DVD quality, and thus a huge threat to the movie industry. It has nothing to do with the length of a take in making a movie, it is all about recording that movie during its premier showing.

0 upvotes
Delacosta
By Delacosta (May 20, 2012)

@ Wolfgang Fieger,
Google the movie 'Russian Ark', it was filmed in one single take. Brilliantly done.

0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (May 21, 2012)

So the entire film was filmed in one 96 minutes take? That must speed up film production process.

0 upvotes
atlynch
By atlynch (4 months ago)

I wanted to use my new 70d to record my wife's choral concerts. Each half is usually over 30 minutes, and there are not always good stopping points. I will have to go back to my dedicated video camera for this purpose. I wish I knew this before I spent over $1500.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
T. L. Rutter
By T. L. Rutter (May 20, 2012)

I am proposing a 100% Reverse Tax until camera manufacturers use common sense. We DO want to record unlimited footage. We DO want to use our p&s or DSLR as a video camera. Why do you have on your website "Take awesome cinema video ato 1080p?" Why? And then put a limit. So I propose that everybody join me and NOT buy a camera until all of these limitations are removed and the heat issue is resolved. Sony, charge me an extra $100, fine... as long as you don't cripple your hardware to save yourself some money so you can be competitive. Yikes!

2 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 20, 2012)

Robbster (you've obviously been on this for awhile),

What your reference has clarified for me, directly and simply, and which the ambiguous DP item above did not -- and please correct this previously uninformed soul if I am not getting this straight --
is that apparently it is the MANUFACTURERS THEMSELVES (and not the WTO as I initially thought) that are imposing the actual equipment level limits.

And that this is a profit based decision to BOTH avoid the tariffs and/or duties of many countries and the European Union on video cameras,

AND IMPORTANTLY:
in an additional case of classic cynical Corporate greed and opportunism:

The said manufacturers, in order to maximize profits at the expense and cheating of their customers, are intentionally crippling the tech performance of their cameras, to in effect try and force people to have to buy video cameras in addition to their still cams, JUST IN ORDER TO VIDEO LONGER THAN A MERE 30 MINUTES.

Villains:
Tariff countries
Manufacturers

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Robbster
By Robbster (May 20, 2012)

Ben,

As I see it, basically Yes and Yes.

The manufacturers /choose/ to limit video to under that required by tariff conditions to lower their costs, which with enough competition, lowers our costs.

Further, however, some manufacturers are exporting these limits around the world to countries where the same tariff conditions do /not/ exist. This is also a choice, and we can surmise that this choice would have two main drivers 1) to increase sales of video cameras for those manufacturers for whom this is a profitable business with similar or better margins and 2) to further reduce costs by not having to differentiate the cameras based on regional differences.

Here is where our voice to the manufacturers is important. Those who give us what we want will be rewarded in the market place with our spending and with greater loyalty in future purchases.

So, speaking up for what we want is key, to both the tariff authorities, and the manufacturers: no artificial limits on video!

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Robbster
By Robbster (May 20, 2012)

Hurray! If you don't personally need this fine, BUT, please stop trying to talk for the rest of us who DO need this!

See past posts on this very topic for the various real world scenarios where 30+ minutes recording is needed...

Here is one such thread, I started this in Open Talk...

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1018&message=41384752

Go WTO!

6 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 20, 2012)

STOP THE MUSIC !
Just wait a cotton pickin' minute !
And excuuuuse me, and my uninformed naiveté.

But do you mean to tell me, that all this time:
it WASN'T a technological obstacle ?
it WASN'T the fabled over-heating problem ?
it WASN'T a manufacturing cost issue ?

That right from the get-go, the 30 minute still camera video time limitation has been an artificial non-tech intrusion on our simple "we hold these truths to be self-evident" freedom to video whatever the hell we choose to video, for as long as we darn well want to ?!

Imposed by an international body of bureaucratic farts -- because of some
European tariff ????
As far as I'm concerned they're all full of, er, "duty" !

What's next, are we about to learn that all along there's been a tariff limit imposed on high ISO performance ?

Well, dear readers, pardon my PG rated profane outrage, but:

SCREW THE WTO AND THE TARIFF THEY RODE IN ON !

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
Robbster
By Robbster (May 20, 2012)

Yeah, Ben, I find it outrageous as well, BUT, I also want it CHANGED for the whole world! See the related thread in Open Talk that I referenced above...

1 upvote
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (May 20, 2012)

You and Me both, Robbster,

I read your reference (thank you) and your well-spoken points and, as you could tell from my "mild" comments above, I could literally not agree with you more !

FREEEEEEEDOM ! NOW !

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
trevmar
By trevmar (May 19, 2012)

* Rubbish - the limitation that Panny put on FullHD for their 2012 US models is solely to protect Panny's camcorder product range *

WTO has nothing to do with this, outside of Europe. Here in the USA the Panny P&S cameras have had unlimited AVCHD until now.

This new limitation is purely Panny marketing. And, as a result, I will never again consider a Panny camcorder. I have been using the Canon HF100 and MF41 series up until now, in any case. They are better than the Panny camcorders at low light...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

There are several cameras that seamlessly start new files every time a 4 gig file fills. That "concern" is a non-issue.

There really aren't any concerns about cameras overheating, either. Build it for liveview, and the heat producing display and processor pretty much run full time anyway.

0 upvotes
Mattia Marchi
By Mattia Marchi (May 19, 2012)

Which cameras do this? I need a DSLR for filming sit-down interviews.

0 upvotes
szlevi
By szlevi (May 19, 2012)

Last part is unfortunately not true: Sony's NEX-5 and NEX-7 cameras both automatically shut down after 15-20 minutes of recording due to overheating. If you try to power up and continue recording it will shut down again immediately - you have to wait until it cools down.
Bad design, that is.

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

Mattia, it's mostly P&S that are acquiring this feature, but it is in the later model Panasonics EVILS. Unfortunately, the Canon 1D X is the only DSLR that comes immediately to mind.

Now, I'm normally on the DSLR side of the "you don't need a DSLR, get a camcorder" arguments, but just out of curiosity, why do you "need a DSLR for filming sit-down interviews"?

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

@szlevi, thanks for the warning. NEX7 was on my short list for a "lightweight" interchangeable. I really like the little thing. But if Sony has screwed up the liveview system to the point where sustained use of the camera is difficult, I'll go back to looking at Panasonic.

I did say "build it for liveview", and if Sony didn't do this, well, that's Sony's fault, not any limit of the technology.

0 upvotes
Alexei G
By Alexei G (May 19, 2012)

@Joseph -- Isn't compression the most "costly" operation in video recording, in terms of power used? If so, that would be the difference between liveview and video recording that could be of concern. Not a 30 minute concern though. Any overheating would be evident within a minute or two.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (May 20, 2012)

@joseph just out of curiosity why are you more intrested in the panasonic rather olympus 4/3rds. I want a compact camera that i can match with some pocket sized lenses and iquite like the olympuses but panasonic was on my list too. definitley 4/3rds for the medium sized sensor

0 upvotes
ExNewt
By ExNewt (May 20, 2012)

As far as NEX (5n anyway) overheat; if you are shooting continuously (say, a speech) - on a tripod - you probably don't need autofocus, image stabilization, auto-lens distortion correction and auto lens chromic aberration correction: shut these off, move the screen away from the body, and you will never have an overheat.

It also helps if you lower video resolution, most speeches (for example) do not need 1080 60 fps.

0 upvotes
Daryl Cheshire
By Daryl Cheshire (May 20, 2012)

is the heat from the backlit screen? If I was recording a car journey or something that doesn't require the camera to be moved then could I not dim the backlighting?

0 upvotes
ExNewt
By ExNewt (May 21, 2012)

Good point - forgot that one but most of the hear is generated internally in the NEX series, both actual sensor as well as CPU. But dimming the backlight on the screen is more related to battery power.

0 upvotes
LaFonte
By LaFonte (May 19, 2012)

Ok rhetoric aside, one thing I don't understand, why there is actually a higher duty tax for video cameras? What is the purpose of this?

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

It comes from taxing "home video recorders" to make up for the money that movie companies are "losing" from people recording movies off broadcast or cable, or copying video tapes or DVDs. There's only two things wrong with that logic...

1) There is no meaningful way to use a DSLR, P&S camera, camera phone, or even a modern camcorder to pirate movies.

2) Study after study proves that the movie companies are not suffering losses due to end-user piracy, which is a lot different from distribution channel piracy.

5 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (May 19, 2012)

You forgot number three,

Why the @*&$ should the movie makers get to just steal money from people though taxation just because a small percentage of people MIGHT record copyrighted materiel.

Even if it was true that they were losing millions to end user piracy carried out in this manor, it still doesn't give them the right to make uninvolved parties pay for it through taxation. I guess this is what happens when an industry has enough money to buy the laws they want.

6 upvotes
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

josh, ... "An industry"? In this corporatocracy, most of our tax dollars go toward supporting the wishes of industry. And they don't need to buy laws any more - they already own all the lawmakers. Just saying...

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
ExNewt
By ExNewt (May 20, 2012)

No industry is really "losing millions from piracy" - if they were it would be (US anyway) listed in their SEC filings. No one does, so the "loss" is either imagined or good businessspeak.

1 upvote
Daryl Cheshire
By Daryl Cheshire (May 20, 2012)

It wouldn't be subtle to take a DSLR like the Canon 5D mkII into a cinema to record the movie.
Would I sell enough to make up the cost?
In the past, colour reproduction devices had to pass treasury regulations about copying money, but it doesn't seem to be a problem now.
My thought is that there is a different tax regime for video cameras and it is not a money grab by all manufacturers.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (May 19, 2012)

This is what you get with specific custom rules and specific tax rules. You got a bizarre and surrealistic world. If you have extra tax on movie cameras, then you have to define a movie camera. And then this 30 minute rule is there. At first ir seems a non issue as the small flash cards could not contain 30 minutes anyhow. But now you can buy 64 GB flash cards.

0 upvotes
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul
By Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul (May 19, 2012)

Who care about the timing, look how 1D X managed it.

If file is too big you will be pain a lot, small file is better.

0 upvotes
boothrp
By boothrp (May 19, 2012)

So why doesn't my Olympus C770uz cut out after 30 minutes ??

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (May 19, 2012)

That camera was marketed as a stills/camcorder cross-over, and without the 30 minute limit it probably were classified as a video camera. In other words, you did pay the import duty for video cameras, at least if you live in Europe.

0 upvotes
keysmith
By keysmith (May 19, 2012)

I think because C770 does not optically zoom while videoing (when sound is on, It only zooms when sound is off). So it is NOT considered videocamera. Another reason i think is the resolution. To be considered videocamera it has to has resolution biger than.. something (biger than VGA) and to optically ZOOM while videoing. Only then tax is applied. Ridiculous.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

keysmith, actually, neither of those criteria apply. Revenant got it right, it "is" a video recorder.

The tax folk don't care if it zooms, because the tariff was passed originally to make people pay for copying movies and TV shows.

2 upvotes
Ben O Connor
By Ben O Connor (May 19, 2012)

Interesting, seems like there won´t be any cathegory for "family camcorders - intermediate camcorders" anymore ! Camcorders would remain at tv studios and in pro´s hands on field. Some wedding foto/videographers also should invest more for their video equipments in future...

Exciting also, Existing sensors on the micro fourthird cam´s are bigger than camcorders between 200-1500 dollaras/euros ! So for consumer base its just good news !

1 upvote
itsastickup
By itsastickup (May 19, 2012)

In the long run I would expect the duty to be applied to cameras also. This is a naive view of taxman behaviour. This is a bad move that is likely to cost us.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

They would need a "new" tax. The tax on video recording equipment was a "reverse Robin Hood" tax, it was to take money from people who recorded movies off broadcast or cable, or copied video tapes or DVDs, and give that money to the "wronged" movie production and distribution companies.

Since you can't do this with a DSLR, P&S, Flip style recorder, cell phone, etc. they'd need a new reason for the tax. Actually, you can't really do it with a modern camcorder, either.

So, if you happen to have any idea for a good justification as to why DSLRs, P&S cameras, and cell phones are costing "innocent" European corporations billions of dollars of honest profits, I'm sure that there's people high up in the EU who would love to hear. That new French guy, for example...

I know, a tax to recover the money that municipalities are going to lose in police misconduct cases because there happened to be someone there with a camera...

I scare myself, sometimes.

1 upvote
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

Don't worry Joseph, you'll never be able to come up with anything as bizarre as those dedicated corporate controlled tax bean-counters. More likely cameras will eventually be counted as 'terrorist weapons' or something, 'for official use only'.

0 upvotes
Daryl Cheshire
By Daryl Cheshire (May 20, 2012)

strange that it's a European tax which affects me in Australia. And it's based on an assumption that we will record movies in cinemas.
Last I heard, original movies are leaked days before release and would be a better quality than a crude cinema recording with the heads of cinema patrons on the bottom.

0 upvotes
mick232
By mick232 (May 19, 2012)

The solution would be easy, even without WTO doing anything.

Sell the camera with a 30-minute limit and make available an updated firmware that removes the limit.

"Making available" can be anything from an official download to accidentally "leaking" the firmware.

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

Not "easy", at all.

Official downloads that negate customs and tariff restrictions have been proved illegal in several cases, including cases pertaining to scanners and cell phones.

Even charges that the "leak" was "too convenient" could endanger a company.

3 upvotes
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

'The devil made me do it'. That would be the answer from the corporation that leaked the ability to enable functionality that should be there by design, leaked by them only to bring proof that it is 'illegal', thus 'tying their hands' so they can never release iit again.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (May 20, 2012)

Do you mean just like Panasonic does with some Russian hackers "hacking" their m43 cameras? ;)

0 upvotes
Daryl Cheshire
By Daryl Cheshire (May 20, 2012)

Does the law affect me in Australia? There's probably some agreement somewhere.
Could I elect to pay this tax and get an authorised firmware update?
Might affect resale possibilities.

0 upvotes
Archiver
By Archiver (May 22, 2012)

@Daryl Cheshire - we have no such tax on 'video recorders' in Australia, AFAIK. The tax is for the EU, and for a number of years digital cameras bound for non-EU countries had unlimited recording time, whereas those same cameras in the EU were limited to 29m59s.

Now this is a self-imposed restriction to avoid hitting their camcorder lines. There is no way to pay some tax and get a firmware update, unless you consider the price of a new dedicated camcorder 'tax'.

0 upvotes
Klipsen
By Klipsen (May 19, 2012)

Just add the duty and tell customers it's the price they must pay to have video in their SLRs - whether they want it or not.

In any case, how often do you really record more than 30 minutes in one take?

And if you do, wouldn't a dedicated camcorder be a better choice?

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 19, 2012)

Recording a concert or live performance? Film-making isn't the only use for video DSLRs.

3 upvotes
Klipsen
By Klipsen (May 19, 2012)

For a concert or a live performance, don't you think a camcorder is a better choice?

0 upvotes
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

And if it were to be used for pirating commercial video, this 30 minute limit would certainly baffle anyone who wanted to press the pause button while they restarted the next 30 minute segment, right?

0 upvotes
th0rmj
By th0rmj (May 28, 2012)

No, I have interchangeble lenses and filters for the u4/3 Olympus camera. You don't get ND compensation or interchangeable lenses until you get high $ camcorders, and until you get over $2k, you don't get the large sensor of DSLR's, which enable shallow-dof-shots (singer in focus, others out).

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (May 19, 2012)

I can look at my photos as long as I want.
I never looked at a picture for more than 5 minutes in a row, however... :)))

0 upvotes
Donald Lam
By Donald Lam (May 19, 2012)

Digicams are not designed to be a dedicated camcorder. The small battery will be hard pressed to record for more than 30 minutes. Heat sinking of the sensor and electronics is another issue.

0 upvotes
oysso
By oysso (May 19, 2012)

regardless of that . The limit is artificial. As technology progresses the ability to record long videos will only be more widespread.

2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 19, 2012)

Rubbish, I've recorded continuously on my hacked GH1 for hours with no problems.

1 upvote
bluelemmy
By bluelemmy (May 19, 2012)

>Rubbish, I've recorded continuously on my hacked GH1 for hours with no problems.

Ditto with my hacked GH2. I can also plug mine into the mains and get over 5hrs continuous AVCHD with a 32gb card.
The hack is simplicity itself to apply and can be removed any time.

1 upvote
trevmar
By trevmar (May 19, 2012)

My LX5 records AVCHD for over two hours. I use it to record sessions at conferences and lectures. Currently limited to 720p, of course.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it in summer school.

The reason digital cameras have such unusual shapes, including the common "clamp onto" the charger design, instead of sliding into it, is that they ARE camcorder batteries.

"Heat sinking" [sic] of the sensor is not an issue, at all. P&S cameras, cell phones, etc. run their electronics hard, providing full time liveview. DSLRs get bigger surface areas to dissipate even more heat.

2 upvotes
LeonTheremin
By LeonTheremin (May 19, 2012)

Lectures and Interviews. I film lectures that are consistently longer than 30 minutes. But I got an XA10 because it has no time limit and has XLR inputs to hook up to a sound board or lav mics.

It would be so awesome if Canon came out with a Mark IV that shot AVCHD, had balanced 3.5mm mic jacks with phantom that would plug into mics with a 3.5mm balanced male to female XLR wire.

The only problem with AVCHD is that all the DSLR movie people don't realize you have to import it in your system with a utility, similar to logging and transferring a tape. They always say "what are all these .mts files?"

Archiving AVCHD is awesome too, just make a fat 32 .dmg the same size as the "private" folder on your card, drop the "private" folder in there and mount it whenever you want to log and transfer footage off of it.

0 upvotes
Daniel from Bavaria
By Daniel from Bavaria (May 19, 2012)

Ha! They will do it the other way arround. 5,4 Percent Tax on every Still/Movie device.
Problem solved and more money to ripp off.

;) my bed

3 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (May 19, 2012)

30 Minutes and above in one shot is only required if you record any Concert Performance otherwise very few people need more then 30 minutes in one shot....

2 upvotes
th0rmj
By th0rmj (May 28, 2012)

Or any other live performance. Yelling "Hold" during a Kid's play will make you hunted. I solved it by using 6 cameras (www.pointsofvideo.com), but it's annoying running around and making sure the cameras are all recording.

0 upvotes
wlad
By wlad (May 19, 2012)

If you need to record more than 30 minutes in one shot, you're probably doing something wrong :P

3 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (May 19, 2012)

Yes, people are taking too long getting married these days.

0 upvotes
wlad
By wlad (May 19, 2012)

so the take a 30 minutes long shot from the same boring angle...

0 upvotes
Roberto Mettifogo
By Roberto Mettifogo (May 19, 2012)

no guys, event videography with multicams requires no limits in rec time. People who go and film a ballet for 2 hours with 4/5 dslr always need to walk around the teathre to restart the recording, and they choose to use dslr instead of videocameras because of the better results.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (May 19, 2012)

"If you need to record more than 30 minutes in one shot, you're probably doing something wrong :P"

Ever heard of filming lectures? If you are the lecturer himself (just like me, who also film my lectures), it's a nuisance to always check and restart recorrding...

1 upvote
K_Photo_Teach
By K_Photo_Teach (May 19, 2012)

Could existin camera record more with a firmware patch ?

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (May 19, 2012)

Yes, if they do a patch for this. But then there is the question of sensor temperature limit. But I believe that many cameras can go to more of 30 minutes after patch.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (May 19, 2012)

Unfortunately, not always. For example, you can't just flash a US firmware to European Panasonic cameras. (A camera manufacturr that does diffeerentiate based upon the target country.) Other manufaturers (Nikon, Canon, Oly etc.) are even worse as they, in general, don't allow for longer recordings in their US models either and this restriction can't b removed by simply hacking the camera, reflashng the firmware etc.

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 19, 2012)

Usually only through hacking (like the "GH13" hack for the GH1)

0 upvotes
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

Speaking of hacks, are there any useful hacks for my G3? There's already no video time limit on mine, but other issues?

0 upvotes
Bernard909
By Bernard909 (May 19, 2012)

This limitation apply in Europe (maybe not only) where some local companies (now dead ?) thought it was clever to protect their product lines from the asiatic ones (that was long time ago)
It's good news for those who want to capture long events (sports, theater, dance etc.) and use multicam in editing (now affordable).

0 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (May 19, 2012)

which European companies???

long time ago what you mean???

DSLR have video only since 3/4 years ago...

0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (May 19, 2012)

...but stills cameras have had video for quite a while. See: P&S cams

0 upvotes
Atlas Junior
By Atlas Junior (May 19, 2012)

Yes, that's true! But it wasn't for DSLR or digital compacts that did not even exist... It was simply for "video recorders", that means every device that is able to record a video. At that time (1988 I think) mainly VCR and cassette camcorders

0 upvotes
Bernard909
By Bernard909 (May 19, 2012)

Thomson and Phillips lobby....

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (May 19, 2012)

"DSLR have video only since 3/4 years ago..."

Wrong. Most DSLR models since 2009 have had video recording.

1 upvote
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

Messelsyys, what year is it now that's more than 3 years later than 2009? :)

0 upvotes
jon404
By jon404 (May 19, 2012)

WTO?

WTF!

6 upvotes
lancespring
By lancespring (May 19, 2012)

It is time for the discrimination against video to end! Free the Camcorders!!

1 upvote
Biowizard
By Biowizard (May 19, 2012)

Wow - at last we will be able to do feature films where each shot lasts more than 40% of the overall film, rather than the more normal 5-30 seconds per shot that any decent film uses. Woop. And without paying a special tax. Double Woop.

Maybe now, some day, I'll actually try shooting my first video fragment. Or, maybe, not. I still prefer decent stills.

Brian

2 upvotes
ENicolas
By ENicolas (May 19, 2012)

Not everyone uses video to make feature films. I've attended meetings that were recorded, and the person running the camera would have to keep re-starting the camera.

Still the file-size limit is going to keep the time down.

3 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (May 19, 2012)

"Still the file-size limit is going to keep the time down."

Not necessarily. You can always use file spanning, as do or example Panasonic.

1 upvote
Biowizard
By Biowizard (May 20, 2012)

I can't imagine that recording a "meeting" requires a full=frame DSLR in 1080p video mode. Surely a simple tethered 2Mpx webcam is all you'd need for that?

Brian

0 upvotes
dholl
By dholl (May 19, 2012)

I personally need more than 30 minutes continuous filming because i record myself demoing synthesizers....previously i've had to use cheapo camcorders...

but then again, like the article reminded us, we still have the issue of FAT32 and hot sensors.

0 upvotes
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

Oops. Did that 1.5 hour video I took of a hummingbird feeder the other day with my Panasonic DMC-G3 burn up my sensor? Never thought of it. Still seems to work ok, but I did notice the camera was quite warm when I came back and turned it off. What I got wasn't worth it if it damaged the camera.

0 upvotes
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (May 19, 2012)

Wait, still using FAT32 ??

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (May 19, 2012)

"Wait, still using FAT32 ??"

Yup, memory cars still use FAT32.

Nevertheless, it's not a problem. Just use file spanning, as is done by several sports cameras and all Panasonic cameras.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (May 19, 2012)

@CC, your camera is fine. It's smart enough to shut down if the camera overheats.

The heat doesn't actually come from the sensor, anyway: it's mostly produced by the display and the processor.

1 upvote
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 19, 2012)

Whew! And thanks for the assurance. (Not that I care all that much - it's a lot of fun, but it's just a few hundred grams of plastic, after all).

0 upvotes
CanadianCoolpix
By CanadianCoolpix (May 18, 2012)

I guess it doesn't apply to Canada.

Anyhow, I have taken lots of videos longer than 30 minutes. How about filming a talk or presentation that lasts longer than 30 min? Or how about filming an event that 'might' happen, like a bird coming to nest, etc.?

You can find the few minutes or seconds that you want, and discard the rest. But it would be a nuisance if you couldn't even film it from a tripod, without being there to restart the camera.

0 upvotes
Patco
By Patco (May 19, 2012)

"I guess it doesn't apply to Canada."
I don't know about other makers, but from DMC-G3 review, it appears at least Panasonic applies this limitation only in Europe:
"Running time - Up to 2GB for Motion JPEG, up to capacity of card for AVCHD (Limited to 29 minutes on models sold in Europe)."

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (May 18, 2012)

ive never had to, or wanted to record anything longer than 30mins

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (May 18, 2012)

I can't think of any famous Hollywood movie having a 30 minute single raw take...

... or any digital DSLR movie for that matter.

(unless you're filming growing grass...)

There may be, out there... possible.

5 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (May 19, 2012)

i think this would be more useful for filming a presentation or something not that you would want to use a dslr for that anyway

0 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (May 19, 2012)

Try recording an event, a meeting or anything that might take place beyond a time span of 30 minutes.

I do this all the time and the 30 minute limit is an issue for me. Fortunately, the Panasonic micro43 cameras do not have this limit (except maybe in the EU).

So just because you do not need a featute, does not mean no one needs it.

9 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (May 19, 2012)

What GodSpeaks says... the number of people who come on here and complain because they don't personally want some feature is incredible.

Anyway, to answer CameraLab Tester - it's not a "famous Hollywood" movie, but: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Ark.

2 upvotes
zhir
By zhir (May 19, 2012)

And this famous hollywood movie, too :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rope_(film)

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (May 19, 2012)

"i think this would be more useful for filming a presentation or something not that you would want to use a dslr for that anyway"

Absolutely wrong. DSLR's have, in general, better resolution and MUCH wider FoV than similarly-priced (that is, strictly con/prosumer - we're talking sub-$2000 here!) camcorders and are, consequently, much better at recording lectures where resolution really counts. This is why I, for example, strictly use DSLR's and P&S cameras to video my lectures and not camcorders.

0 upvotes
bluelemmy
By bluelemmy (May 19, 2012)

The lack of imagination of some people is astonishing. There are many, many reasons why people would require >30min recording times.
I have just cycled part of the the Olympic cycle race route, for example. I film from a chest bracket mounted camera. Such a video requires continuous shooting for more than 30 mins.

0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (May 18, 2012)

too bad the 4gb file size cap on fat 32 is a bigger problem for my camera. It only takes about 5 minutes to fill that

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 18, 2012)

Not always a problem, for example AVCHD automatically spans across multiple files

2 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (May 19, 2012)

Exactly.

0 upvotes
zhir
By zhir (May 19, 2012)

Also, the fat64 format exists.
It's called "exFAT" now.

1 upvote
JaFO
By JaFO (May 19, 2012)

There are plenty of alternate filesystems (like NTFS as used by Windows) that have solved that bit ages ago.
The real question is why companies are still using FAT32 for a device that can store more than a few gigabytes ...

1 upvote
ybizzle
By ybizzle (May 18, 2012)

While nice to hear, pros just shoot hundreds of tiny clips and join them together in post. This is great news though for those 2hr long, single clip family vacation videos... ;)

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 18, 2012)

Or if you're recording a live performance or event for example, there are more types of professional video shooting than just film making

4 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (May 19, 2012)

Ah, forgot about those!

0 upvotes
lancespring
By lancespring (May 19, 2012)

"This is great news though for those 2hr long, single clip family vacation videos"

Actually, this is great news for folks who buy camcorders, as it would remove the 5.4% tariff that is currently put on them. Those are the people that will benefit the most.

1 upvote
abortabort
By abortabort (May 19, 2012)

Hahaha I love how everyone likes to infer what 'Pros' do. Try recording an interview with this stupid 30 minute limit, or worse the 12minute limit on a lot of Canons (not a tax issues though).

2 upvotes
Timmie
By Timmie (May 18, 2012)

Though I agree the limitation and the reason behind it is somewhat silly, I was wondering if there are actually people who run into this as a practical limitation?

I prefer stills but whenever I do shoot video I get nowhere near 30 mins a shot. I can't remember any feature films that have 30 min scenes in them either. Anybody out there want more than 30 mins?

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (May 18, 2012)

I've shot a friend's hour long play on a GH1, so yes it's easy to hit that limit. It's a good thing the GH13 hack exists or I wouldn't have been able to shoot for them.

3 upvotes
chris_j_l
By chris_j_l (May 19, 2012)

Only Russian Ark comes to mind. A feature film of 99 mins in one take.

1 upvote
Kirigoi
By Kirigoi (May 19, 2012)

Or Mike Figgis's Timecode; 4 separate interweaving 97 minute takes in each corner of the screen.

Or any play, wedding, concert or corporate event...

1 upvote
abortabort
By abortabort (May 19, 2012)

Filming interviews or events. It can be really annoying to say in an interview: 'sorry just hold that thought while I restart recording'.

1 upvote
John W  Hall
By John W Hall (May 19, 2012)

"Just a moment, please, while the Operator changes reels".

0 upvotes
tinternaut
By tinternaut (May 18, 2012)

Well, you really do learn something new every day. It never occurred to me to consider the remotest possibility that the vagueries of international trade were behind this limitation......

4 upvotes
JaFO
By JaFO (May 19, 2012)

yeah, I never knew that was the reason for this limit.
It seems really silly to have a limit at all to be honest.

0 upvotes
bunfoolio
By bunfoolio (May 18, 2012)

Goverment shoud just not be involved in issues such as this. What a waste of time, money, and ultimetly innovation in the industry.

6 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (May 18, 2012)

While I agree in principle, in this particular case the US and other governments' involvement with ITA may help end this silly limitation.

6 upvotes
Lenny L
By Lenny L (May 19, 2012)

@onlooker: but it was a limitation created by governments in the first place.

1 upvote
lancespring
By lancespring (May 19, 2012)

Governments everywhere are desperate for more taxes. And who better to tax than photographers? Taking photos is an idle luxury, and not a necessity of life for anyone.

All photo gear should receive an additional 10% tax. That would be a boon to the world economy, and help redistribute resources among all people.

0 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (May 19, 2012)

> That would be a boon to the world economy, and help redistribute resources among all people.

Income redistribution and boon to the economy are oxymorons.

2 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (May 19, 2012)

> it was a limitation created by governments in the first place

Of course, so we should be happy it will (hopefully) be lifted.

1 upvote
Peet Venter
By Peet Venter (May 19, 2012)

Video? On my 7d? WOW! I must check it out; thought I am a photographer, never knew myself to be a cinematographic player too.

0 upvotes
bluelemmy
By bluelemmy (May 28, 2012)

I have applied a small hack to my GH2 which enables you to record for as long as you like within card space limitations.

It takes a couple of minutes and can be reversed at any time. It is freely available.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 166