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Panasonic DMC-GF5 12MP mirrorless camera announced and previewed

By dpreview staff on Apr 5, 2012 at 05:00 GMT

Panasonic has formally announced the much-discussed DMC-GF5. We've had a pre-production GF5 for a couple of days, so we've had a look at what's changed and what the diminutive Micro Four Thirds camera offers to compact camera users looking for better image quality but still wanting the option to simply point and shoot. The 12MP camera is a subtle revision over the GF3, but a higher-res screen, refined user interface and the inclusion of Panasonic's retractable 14-42mm power zoom lens for a list price of $749.99/£579 makes it worth looking at.


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Press Release:

PANASONIC INTRODUCES THE LUMIX GF5, A NEW ULTRA COMPACT DIGITAL INTERCHANGEABLE LENS SYSTEM CAMERA

SECAUCUS, NJ (April 5, 2012) – Panasonic today announced a new digital interchangeable lens system camera, the LUMIX DMC-GF5, which joins Panasonic’s award-winning LUMIX G Series of digital cameras, which are acclaimed for their high image quality with small and compact body and lenses. The LUMIX GF5 features a newly developed 12.1-megapixel Live MOS sensor and redesigned Venus Engine, helping to ensure true-to-life images through exceptional resolution, image rendering and color reproduction. Even in low-light situations and at a maximum 12800 high ISO sensitivity, the LUMIX GF5 produces stunning photos and videos. The noise reduction system includes a combination 3DNR (3D Noise Reduction) and MNR (Multi-process Noise Reduction) allowing for both bright areas and dark areas to be faithfully reproduced with minimal noise in high sensitivity image recording.

Sporting a sophisticated and stylish design, the LUMIX GF5 features a compact, lightweight body with built-in flash. A rubberized grip makes it easier for users to comfortably hold the camera in one hand. Complying with Micro Four Thirds standard, a wide range of interchangeable lenses is offered to expand photographic experience even more broadly at higher level of photo quality.

“Panasonic expects the LUMIX GF5 to please photo enthusiasts and budding photographers that are looking for the next step from the traditional point-and-shoot camera,” said Christopher Rice, Senior Product Manager, Imaging, Panasonic Consumer Marketing Company of North America. “The camera’s host of shooting options makes photography even more artistic, yet easy for users of any experience level. The powerful Venus Engine and sensor allows the camera to achieve exceptional photo quality in a range of shooting environments.”

The LUMIX GF5, like all cameras in the LUMIX G Series, adopts Contrast AF (Auto Focus), so focusing is controlled by the image sensor. Compared with the Phase difference system AF, Contrast AF boasts higher accuracy, especially when shooting with a bright lens with small F value. To further advance the Contrast AF, the GF5 incorporates full-area focusing, making it possible to set focus on any point in the field of view.

Featuring an ultra high-speed Light Speed AF, the LUMIX GF5 can focus in approximately 0.09*1 seconds making it possible to capture even fast moving subjects clearly. Combined with Touch AF control and high-speed burst shooting at four frames per second in full resolution, it has never been easier to capture fast-moving objects clearly. Additionally, Pinpoint AF allows for even more precise focus by further enlarging the focus area, assisting, for example, to set focus directly on the pupil of an eye.

The LUMIX GF5’s large, 3.0-inch 920,000-dot high-precision touch display and Graphic User Interface (GUI) provide users with ease of use and simple operation. The touch-control system immediately allows users to set focus on a subject just by touching the screen and users can even release the shutter to snap a photo directly from the touch screen. Once a user locks onto a subject by a touch, the camera will track the subject with the AF tracking function, even if the subject moves. Touch Zoom is also available when the LUMIX Power Zoom Lens H-PS14042 lens or H-PS45175 is mounted.

Creative Control Mode has been upgraded from the LUMIX DMC-GF3 by increasing filter options available on the LUMIX GF5 from six options to 14, adding Soft Focus*2, Dynamic Monochrome, Impressive Art, One Point Color, Cross Process and Star Filter, in addition to the conventional Expressive, Retro, High Key, Sepia, Hi Dynamic, Miniature Effect*3 and recently introduced Low Key and Toy Effect modes. With the new GUI menu tab, switching filter effects is seamless. A preview of filter effects can be seen on the large LCD screen via Live View mode and the camera intuitively recommends filters depending on the scene that the camera detects in iA (Intelligent Auto) or iA Plus mode.

For beginner users of interchangeable lens system cameras, the GF5 features a new Scene Guide offering 23 sample pictures shot by professional photographers. Users can choose the photo closest to the situation that they are shooting and optimal parameters for shooting the scene will be set automatically*4. Additionally, procedures, technical advice and recommended interchangeable lens options for the scene can be shown to allow users to better understand and learn photography.

In addition to shooting still photography, the LUMIX GF5 can also record 1920x1080 60i* full-High Definition videos in AVCHD format which excels in both compression efficiency and compatibility with AV equipment for playback. In addition to practical full-time AF, the Touch AF in video recording also lets the user enjoy professional-like selective focusing which allows the focus to be changed while shooting video. The LUMIX GF5 features a dedicated video record button on the top of the body so users can instantly start recording videos while shooting photos without having to make setting adjustments. Along with full-HD video capabilities, the LUMIX GF5 also features high-quality sound, recorded with Dolby® Digital Stereo Creator. Videos can be recorded in MP4 format for playback on a PC or other portable electronic devices without having to convert the files.

Additional features of the LUMIX GF5 include:

  • iA mode to automatically activate a range of technologies to enhance photos without adjusting settings every time conditions change, including AF Tracking, Intelligent D-range Control, Intelligent Scene Selector, Face Recognition and Intelligent ISO Control.
  • iA Plus mode allows users to adjust defocusing area in the background, exposure compensation and white balance for more flexible control.
  • A dedicated sensor that automatically determines shooting angle, making it possible to tell whether a photo was taken horizontally or vertically no matter what lens was used.
  • The GUI interface allows users to choose an image and set it as wallpaper for the menu screen.

The LUMIX DMC-GF5 will be available in black, white and red later this year in the following kit options: Body with 14-42mm standard zoom lens will have a suggested retail price (SRP) of $599; body with 14-42mm power zoom lens will have an SRP of $749.

For more information about Panasonic LUMIX digital cameras, please visit www.panasonic.com/lumix.

*1 Time for focusing on the subject is measured with LUMIX G X VARIO PZ 14-42mm/F3.5-5.6 ASPH./POWER O.I.S (H-PS14042) (bundled lens in DMC-GF5X) to move lens position to “2m” from “infinity” position. The zoom position is in wide end. Panasonic measurement method.
*2 For photo only
*3 Sound will not be recorded with [MINIATURE EFFECT] in Creative Control Mode and approximately 1/10 of the time period is recorded. (If you record for 10 minutes, the resulting motion picture recording will be approximately 1 minute long)
-Maximum time to record motion pictures continuously with [AVCHD] is 29 minutes 59 seconds in European PAL areas.
-Maximum time to record motion pictures continuously with [MP4] is 29 minutes 59 seconds or up to 4 GB.
-You can check the recordable time on the screen. (For [FHD] in [MP4] format, the file size is large and so the recordable time will drop below 29 minutes 59 seconds.)
*4 Video Recording using scene guide is not possible in some scenes

Panasonic DMC-GF5 specifications

Price
MSRPWith 14-42mm power zoom: US $749, With 14-42mm standard zoom: US $599
Body type
Body typeRangefinder-style mirrorless
Sensor
Max resolution4000 x 3000
Other resolutions4000 x 2672, 4000 x 2248, 2992 x 2992, 2816 x 2112, 2816 x 1880, 2816 x 1584, 2112 x 2112, 2048 x 1536, 2048x1360, 1920 x 1080, 1600 x 1200, 1600 x 1200, 1600 x 1064, 1600 x 904, 1504 x 1504, 1440 x 1440
Image ratio w:h1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels12 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors13 megapixels
Sensor sizeFour Thirds (17.3 x 13 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorVenus Engine FHD
Color spacesRGB, Adobe RGB
Image
ISOAuto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
White balance presets5
Custom white balanceYes (2)
Image stabilizationOptical
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Standard
File format
  • RAW
  • RAW + Fine
  • RAW + Standard
  • Fine
  • Standard
  • MPO + Fine
  • MPO + Standard (with 3D lens in Micro Four Thirds System standard)
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampYes
Digital zoomYes (2x, 4x)
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points23
Lens mountMicro Four Thirds
Focal length multiplier2×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3
Screen dots920,000
Touch screenYes
Screen typeTFT Color LCD with wide-viewing angle
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeNone
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed60 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program
  • Aperture Priority
  • Shutter Priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Clear Portrait
  • Silky Skin
  • Backlit Softness
  • Clear in Backlight
  • Relaxing Tone
  • Sweet Child's Face
  • Distinct Scenery
  • Bright Blue Sky
  • Romantic Sunset Glow
  • Vivid Sunset Glow
  • Glistening Water
  • Clear Nightscape
  • Cool Night Sky
  • Warm Glowing Nightscape
  • Artistic Nightscape
  • Glittering Illuminations
  • Clear Night Portrait
  • Soft Image of a Flower
  • Appetizing Food
  • Cute Dessert
  • Freeze Animal Motion
  • Clear Sports Shot
  • Monochrome
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range6.30 m
External flashNo
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-Eye, Slow Sync
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive4 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec, 10 sec (3 images))
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±2 (3, 5 frames at 1/3 EV, 2/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (3 frames in either blue/amber or magenta/green axis)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (60, 50 fps), 1280 x 720p (60, 30 fps), 640 x 480 (30 fps), 320 x 240 (30 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, AVCHD
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Storage includedNone
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (mini HDMI TypeC)
Remote controlNo
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)360
Weight (inc. batteries)267 g (0.59 lb / 9.42 oz)
Dimensions108 x 67 x 37 mm (4.25 x 2.64 x 1.46)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingNo
GPSNone

Additional images

26
I own it
4
I want it
2
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 252
12
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Nov 5, 2012)

With superfast and supersmooth zoom, isn't this da body for my 20mm/1.7 lens? With body-only $300 street price its a go.

0 upvotes
porta s
By porta s (Jun 13, 2012)

did this camera had slow motion (seems like its easy to do because of the fast sensor) did it had time lapse drive mode?
if not, please panasonic, put this 2 in the gf6.
i want to sell my j1 for this one, the only that its holding me back its the slow motion (many low end cameras had it, dont think it will be to hard) and the time lapse (its like a ten line code, i will do it for you)

0 upvotes
chalky46
By chalky46 (May 10, 2012)

I'm new to these cameras but want one!
Would you wait or have a G3 with lens for £389 ?

0 upvotes
keekimaru
By keekimaru (Apr 12, 2012)

Pros:
- LCD has great color and viewing angles
- Light
- Stereo video
- Hotshoe
- Responsive touchscreen
- Snappy startup
- Dedicated movie button
- Automatic image rotate
- Flash is mechanically released; you can tilt it up for ceiling flash shots, which is nice
- Surprisingly easy to grip (not great, but better than expected for the slim body)

Cons:
- Menus a bit confusing
- Lens is huge (this is excusable)
- Thumbwheel is a bit stiff
- Flash does not extend high enough to avoid 14-42mm lens; ergo, some shadow appears from the lens
- Flash power is okay
- Camera strap is generic and uncomfortable; plan on getting a better one
- Some special color effects inhibit speed (only the really fancy ones, though)

More Detail : http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B004A8ZQJS/tipfla-20

0 upvotes
ponyman
By ponyman (Apr 13, 2012)

I don't see how these GF2 comments relate to the GF5.

1 upvote
bryanbrun
By bryanbrun (Apr 11, 2012)

The sensor on this camera is a step down from the GF3.

Maybe Panasonic could cut a deal with Olympus for the sensor that is in the new Olympus OMD?

Come on Olympus, Panasonic is falling behind, lend a helping hand!

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 11, 2012)

I don't think Olympus will agree on that. The deal you mention existed since the inception of 4/3 - it was a venture between Olympus, Panasonic, Kodak and Sigma - and seems to have been broken now. Until the OM-D was issued, Olympus were contractually bound to use previous gen Panasonic micro 4/3 sensors, so they were always one step behind Panasonic - at least in what concerned sensors. I don't see Olympus giving their advantage away.

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Apr 9, 2012)

I have seen a comparison between GF3 and GF5, and the new 12 megapixels sensor it is really improved, much cleaner at high ISO

0 upvotes
Parappaman
By Parappaman (Apr 11, 2012)

But much less detailed at low ISO. I just hope that won't be the case in the finished product as I was holding off buying a GF3 due to the lack of a stereo mic and a "proper" hand grip, and I really wouldn't like a loss of details in daylight photography.

0 upvotes
noss
By noss (Apr 8, 2012)

Body type: Point and shoot-style mirrorless

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (Apr 7, 2012)

You know Panasonic, if you could just get rid of that PowerShot 4-cross button dial, I would have considered one seriously as my street cam. But as it stands, I think I rather handle the Q. But I am interested. But a dial in front or something and get rid of that wheel.

2 upvotes
a hit of meth
By a hit of meth (Apr 7, 2012)

Manual flash controls would be nice...

0 upvotes
wayne131
By wayne131 (Apr 6, 2012)

Personally I think Panasonic bring out to many "upgrades" to there existing range with very little improvement/difference over the previous model.
However it is good for the customer, IF you are prepared to wait a while before you upgrade your existing camera.
During the last 2 weeks I have purchased a new GF2 with 14mm lens and a G2 with 14-42mm lens for a total price of £480 :-)

1 upvote
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Apr 7, 2012)

I am also looking for some down movement on GF2 w/14mm kit but do not see it here in Prague so far. GF2/14 is sitting at $500 (incl VAT). Ditto for LX5

0 upvotes
pc168
By pc168 (Apr 8, 2012)

Yes, too many updates. You get one today, it will then be obsoleted in 6 to 9 months. For instance, my FZ-35 is a 'very' old prosumer.

1 upvote
Neodp
By Neodp (Feb 28, 2013)

No that's not it. If you feel a new model obsoletes yours; which is not the case, and I understand, that only indicates the manufactures are actually improving cameras. Don't encourage them to go any slower than they already are. It usually takes years to see significant improvements, and that’s a shame. We certainly should not promote first adopter, cry babies, who are only concerned with bragging rights. We need camera improvements.

The biggest problem I see, is not enough of putting all the goodness(es) in together! Yet, I am respecting preference model splits, such as with, and without flip screen.

I darn sure do not want many non-photography add-on, and I do not mean video. Leave the Pink, the GPS, the Wifi, and all the other superfluous, cost rising poo, OUT of it. I am respecting a camera phone, or camera tablet, would be exceptions.

0 upvotes
Valentinian
By Valentinian (Apr 6, 2012)

This camera makes sense with a fixed lens only like the 20mm. But that's me. At Panasonic they must know better, because they offer the camera as a kit with a zoom... strange.

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

a lot of people are not comfortable with not having a zoom, mostly casual shooters

0 upvotes
Valentinian
By Valentinian (Apr 7, 2012)

I was referring to portability of a quality P & S

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 7, 2012)

FYI the X 14-42 power zoom lens is the same size as the 20mm.

0 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Apr 7, 2012)

Pancakes and other (Zuiko) fixed focal length lenses have great quality and greater speeds -- and higher cost. So I agree with Mtsuoka that it's the knowledgeable user reaching out for IQ in a pancake kit. The X 14-42 PZ may be the same size as the 20mm pancake but is not fast (3.5 vs 1.7) and I hear the IQ ain't there.

0 upvotes
smileblog
By smileblog (Apr 8, 2012)

A lot of casual shooter who just use a compact camera never know a fixed lens and they usually wanna have zoom lens. As for GF5, We are NOT main targets :p

0 upvotes
spencerberus
By spencerberus (Apr 10, 2012)

I agree 100% with smileblog. I remember when the GF2 first came out, the most negative review on Amazon was from a guy who bought it for his girlfriend with 14mm pancake lens and was ranting about how he had to go through a ton of menus just to zoom the lens (he was referring to digital zoom). That's the intended market for the GF5.

0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (Feb 28, 2013)

The problem is, even stupid people will look at the pictures. Opps.

Panasonic is missing profits; by not offering the cameras, with that 20mm, and on that (now worth $150, not really $300) they need to improve its (The P20) AF speed (new model?).

0 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 6, 2012)

Why not GF4? They've had GF3, now GF5. Is the 4 unlucky number?
Panasonic also issued GX1. All basically same, little cameras. Or they are not that same?
What Panasonc actually tries to do with their lineup, if there's such thing at all? Or they've simply decided to stop worrying about actual sense of their offer and plague the market, every month, with anything they can think of.

0 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Apr 6, 2012)

Yes, 4 means death in japanese when pronounced a certain way.

1 upvote
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Apr 6, 2012)

But nikon is brave :-) they have the nikon D4 :-)

1 upvote
SDPharm
By SDPharm (Apr 6, 2012)

4 also sounds like death in Chinese. I'm not sure about China, but in Taiwan, most buildings don't have a 4th floor (no buttons to go to a 4th floor in the elevator).

1 upvote
Vlad S
By Vlad S (Apr 6, 2012)

GF cameras are entry level, with minimal controls; GX is advanced with lots of hardware controls, hot shoe and accessory port. Totally different target markets.

1 upvote
takashie
By takashie (Apr 6, 2012)

canon 1D mark 4

0 upvotes
NZ Scott
By NZ Scott (Apr 7, 2012)

Four sounds like death in Korean ("sa") and Chinese, but I don't think it does in Japanese.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 7, 2012)

Maybe they don't underestimate chinese and korean markets.
By the way, there also was the Olympus OM-4, and the inclusion of that figure didn't seem to affect its sales - though it's true that all their owners will die one day...

0 upvotes
Boris F
By Boris F (Apr 7, 2012)

Sony also skipped Nex-4

0 upvotes
Ysper
By Ysper (Apr 6, 2012)

Great times, where people who call themselves photographers share endless opinions about cameras they never held in their own hands - instead of taking pictures. "A picture says more than a thousand words". Seems to be the other way around these days.

3 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 6, 2012)

Yes, we have millions of cameras, but we don't have much choice, really. All Panasonic does, for example, is endless iteration of the same, just in slightly different housing every month.
There are still very little mirrorless APS-C cameras, no 35mm mirrorless cameras at all (not even a single lens model), we are very much obscured in OVF area apart from top end DSLR market.
Some really crucial things we've taken for granted in the age of film are missing, and that's not because we now have a choice.
It took film some 50-60 years to make all these wonderful choices, and it seems digital will need about that same time.

4 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Apr 6, 2012)

Yes, Zvonimir, i would kill for a digital Olympus XA with full-frame sensor, and just the one 35mm Zuiko. But i have to accept that technology is not yet ready, not even Sony. Tho if anyone is going to do it, a NEX-9 is not unimaginable.

2 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

@ Ysper
then why are you here anyway? this is a gear comments section

it's like saying that the 3 presenters of Top gear are not good at racing..

BTW don't waste your time trying to look superior, please. I have seen too many folks like you in this site.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Apr 6, 2012)

Why are there so many complaints. This is an entry level camera, the person who walks into BB looking for a camera isnt going to care about half the stuff people are talking about. T

he only issue i see is the price, which is not competitive in 2012.

1 upvote
kapanak
By kapanak (Apr 7, 2012)

Yes, but the price is quite high for a minor update that is supposed to be for consumers and entry level photographers.

1 upvote
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

when will Pana include wireless flash function in their m43 cam?

Comment edited 9 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Ropo16
By Ropo16 (Apr 6, 2012)

This is a great camera if you think about it.
Incredibly tiny with 14mm
Superfast reliable focussing
Instant IA technology
One handed control
You can keep this with you all the time, instantly pull it out and shoot knowing the AI will probably capture the moment before the subject even sees you. There are no levers or dials to check just capture the moment in RAW with a sharp prime rather than lurching around with a giant bag and 'extension' bouncing off your stomach!

2 upvotes
David Hurt
By David Hurt (Apr 6, 2012)

Yes, but NO IS???

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

Panasonic IS is lens based, no in body IS.
Where did you read that this GF5 has no IS?

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Apr 6, 2012)

And the GF3, presumably this one, also, has great manual focus system.

0 upvotes
Master Yoda
By Master Yoda (Apr 6, 2012)

i guess stabilization isn't possible in these kinds of cameras.

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

why? even with IS lens? can you tell us more?

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 6, 2012)

Why do you say so? Panasonic makes stabilized lenses and Olympus cameras have built-in stabilization.

1 upvote
Master Yoda
By Master Yoda (Apr 7, 2012)

Actually, I'm with both of you. Since it strangely was not provided, I was thinking stabilization might not be possible for some reason. I really couldn't think of why or why they didn't include it. It seems strange.

1 upvote
Button Pusher
By Button Pusher (Apr 7, 2012)

The kit zoom lens is optically stabilized. Hence the letters OIS printed on the lens.

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 8, 2012)

I think it's more like canikon, all depend on the lens

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (Feb 28, 2013)

Yeah; but all the fast primes have no stabilization. What about video, with them? Can't we have low light (with bokeh) video, that is stable, on the primes?

We need high clean ISO, *and* IS*, and wide aperture. These things should no longer be one, or two; but all three; working together.

...and that’s the reason for primes, BTW. Education never stops you; but ignorance does.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
stephenmelvin
By stephenmelvin (Apr 5, 2012)

Are the Japanese averse to viewfinders? This is getting absurd.

3 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Apr 6, 2012)

The concept is fairly simple: a point-n-shoot camera with a larger sensor that has a removable lens. Given that there are tens of millions of point-n-shoot cameras with no viewfinders that have been sold throughout the world, including some that are geared towards more enthusiast shooters such as the Canon S100 or LX5, it wouldn't be so unusual for a camera like the GF5 to also have no viewfinder.

The reality is that there is a huge segment of the population that is quite comfortable with framing and composing with an LCD screen. They've grown up with P&S cameras and iPhone cameras that all lack viewfinders and all rely on large LCD screens. This is a camera that caters to that large segment of the consumer market, but with the added benefit of a removable lens and larger sensor.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
12 upvotes
WalterPaisley
By WalterPaisley (Apr 6, 2012)

I agree with T3 & I'll throw in a twister: Those of us who worked with medium & large format cameras that used ground glass viewfinders on the back - where the image was not only upside down but required a dark cloth to view in daylight!

I look forward to a 4x5 equivalent, large-sensor, large-lcd, flat, rectangular digicam.

8 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 6, 2012)

The GF5 misses the mark in not one, but two markets: it seems not to distinguish itself from the u4/3 pack, and it's surpassed by the enthusiast compacts segment's new Canon G1X.
At $800, in today's market, it's perfectly OK to be a discriminating consumer!
It seems like some manufacturers are just changing model numbers to give the illusion of "new" in an attempt to obsolete last year's products sooner, when sadly, they are offering nothing new.
I'd much rather deal with a manufacturer who creates something, and sticks by it, until they actually innovate again.
That to me, is something that keeps it's value longer.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Apr 6, 2012)

@Timmbits - as for being "surpassed by the enthusiast compacts segment's new Canon G1X"...does the G1X have the option of interchangeable lenses? You'll never be able to put a fast prime on the G1X. You'll never be able to truly expand the capabilities of a G1X by swapping lenses. Believe it or not, a lot of people in the enthusiast market like the potential and flexibility that interchangeable lenses offer.

In today's market, $800 is a lot to spend for a camera where you're forever going to be stuck with a lens that is only f/5.8 at the long end, and is f/2.8 only at the short end as you have with the G1X. None of these aperture speeds can compare to having an f/1.8 prime, not to mention the constant f/2.8 zooms that Panny is developing.

Also, the G1X is a big chunk of a camera! Much larger than the GF5. It's barely a "compact" anymore! With the GF5, you can go big with larger zooms, or go compact with m4/3's tiny primes. Lots of flexibility-- that, to me, spells true value.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Carlos C
By Carlos C (Apr 6, 2012)

T3. It is all about what you are looking for. The Canon G1X works for me because I do not want to interchange lenses, I have others systems that do that. Each camera seems to have something the other one does not or does not do as well. The trick is finding the best compromise for you. That is what I did, plain and simple.

2 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Apr 6, 2012)

Don't bring canon g1x here, it really doesn't make much sense. Especially it's like a turtle crawling on sand compared to a sport bike on track. Once you get used to m4/3 focusing and operation speed, you can never go back. Only big and chunky dslr's still above and only on moving targets

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

@Timmbits be careful when you mention the word Canon!
btw I think it's good to see Pana putting a 900k dot LCD in the GF5, hope a GX2 with better screen will come out soon

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

@stephenmelvin
what a comment...I think they made most of the SLR in the world..

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 56 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Apr 6, 2012)

The truth is that most P&S upgraders tend not to buy extra lenses much. It's the enthusiast who does this and they have cameras with interchangeable lenses already that are better designed for that use. Now we wonder if either type would purchase this model and actually consider making it a systems camera, purchasing extra lenses and accessories? Personally, the S100 or G1X makes more sense to me.

If I want a systems level type M4/3, I'd be looking up the food chain considerably, at models designed and marketed towards my experience level.

1 upvote
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Apr 6, 2012)

@guidenet
True. I'm always looking for a large sensor compact non interchangeable but not as expensive as the x100. The G1X seems too big.
I have a Sigma DP2 but it is terribly slow and doesn't perform on higher ISOs. I wonder if Canon can make an S with the G1X sensor.

0 upvotes
Vlad S
By Vlad S (Apr 6, 2012)

@ Timmbits:
"The GF5 misses the mark in not one, but two markets: it seems not to distinguish itself from the u4/3 pack, and it's surpassed by the enthusiast compacts segment's new Canon G1X."

1. GF3 had a sensor from 2008, and it was one of the major complaints. The noise performance of the new sensor is significantly better.

2. How would you get a 14mm equiv. angle of view, or 600mm equiv. with your Canon G1X?

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Apr 6, 2012)

The thing people don't understand is that most consumers don't say to themselves, "I don't want to change lenses EVER, I have other systems for that." Most people will say, "I like the OPTION to change the lens (whether or not I actually change the lens). The OPTION to change lenses is an added value. After all, this may be the only camera I own (aside from my phone camera)."

Don't underestimate the "just in case" factor. Given the choice between a G1X which will NEVER allow you to change the lens, vs the more compact GF5 which allows you the OPTION to change the lens (the "just in case" option), I think a lot of enthusiast shooters like that "just in case" option.

Besides, how many enthusiast photographers would turn their nose up at the option to slap on a fast prime?! Especially when it makes the camera even more compact than the *not-so-compact* G1X?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 7, 2012)

What do you think the GX1 is for? This camera isn't aimed at people who are likely to want a viewfinder or flash hotshoe.

1 upvote
Sabatia
By Sabatia (Apr 5, 2012)

Almost a perfect transition camera for people moving up one step from a compact point and shoot. These folks will be quite pleased with the results on all auto/ia. They don't want a separate flash. They don't even know what an evf is and are not spoiled by DSLR viewfinders. They will like the size and the styling. Definitely not a camera for the enthusiast crowd. I say kudos to Panasonic for getting these people in to m4/3s door and investing in the system. This will help the system grow which will also help those of us at the more serious end of the range.

5 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Apr 6, 2012)

The more sales m4/3 will have, the better it is for other m4/3 users. Which can make prices on lenses drop, more money for developing better sensors etc. And GF5 can be nice for second body, when need something small, yet with good performance.

2 upvotes
toomanycanons
By toomanycanons (Apr 5, 2012)

One of these days Panasonic is going to announce some "new" camera like this and it will have a built-in viewfinder and I'll put it on my "I gotta check this out" list instead of my "what, no viewfinder? Fuggetaboutit!" list.

1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 7, 2012)

That would be the G3 then.

3 upvotes
backayonder
By backayonder (Apr 5, 2012)

So I scroll down to the bit where it says no viewfinder and point my browser elsewhere.

8 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 7, 2012)

Like the page for the G3? :)

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 5, 2012)

Paying $150 extra for a retractable f3.5-f5.6 is a MAJOR disappointment. I will not be a buyer.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Apr 6, 2012)

It's also a powered zoom, which is good for video shooting.

0 upvotes
jmmgarza
By jmmgarza (Apr 5, 2012)

A very nice looking camera for travel. Love the lens and body combo.

0 upvotes
Andrew Higgins
By Andrew Higgins (Apr 5, 2012)

Still waiting for Panasonic to bring out new Lumix to make me want to upgrade from my GF1 and G2. The G3 nearly did, but overall, not tempting enough....like all the newer Lumix. Panasonic really need to make a big step, not tweaks.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
9 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 6, 2012)

What's wrong with the GX1? The better IQ and the improved grip make it much more than just a tweak.

0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (Feb 28, 2013)

Shutter Ka-thunk, for one.

0 upvotes
MikeNeufeld30
By MikeNeufeld30 (Apr 5, 2012)

My Gawd, I thought the Pentax K0-1 was ugly but no, Panasonic takes the cake.. This is absolutely the most atrocious looking camera...

1 upvote
fuego6
By fuego6 (Apr 5, 2012)

What do you want..? Its a camera.. not an art piece to hang in your house... looks great to me!

5 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 5, 2012)

A kind of Camerastein?

0 upvotes
grumpyolderman
By grumpyolderman (Apr 5, 2012)

It looks very slick from the front, like maybe digital cameras should, that has no film and needs to concentrate on big lens/mount/sensor? The K01 is very ugly....but both share the lack of an articulated screen, I think if you depend on it the least they can do is use it to the best of its potential, flexible.

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 5, 2012)

It's a matter of taste. At least the Panasonic is kinda dinky, while the Pentax is clumsy. But what do I know about ugly cameras? I have an E-P1!

0 upvotes
Vlad S
By Vlad S (Apr 5, 2012)

I think K-01 has a very bold design, and GF5 is futuristic. Both are pretty cool in my book, immediately recognizable and with clear aesthetic paradigms. Unlike Canikons, which look like a village populated by the b@stard children of the same sire.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Apr 8, 2012)

GF3 became a much nicer cam once I though of it as the she cam.

GF1 is tough to part with, EVFs or tilt screen or ... notwithstanding. It's the proportions and the quality of the 20mm lens. Instead of going to GX1, Panasonic should have updated the GF1 to GF1a with a faster AF and higher res display. One has to be very kind to a true original the likes of GF1-20.

0 upvotes
D200_4me
By D200_4me (Apr 5, 2012)

Panasonic baffles me sometimes. (I've had the LX3, LX5, G2 and GH2). They offer great features and controls, but they seem to keep skimping on the sensors....or maybe better sensors just aren't available?

0 upvotes
Sabatia
By Sabatia (Apr 5, 2012)

Looking at your camera list, I could possibly see you complaining about sensors until you get to the GH2, which has the first sensor that might make a serious photographer give up his or her DSLR.

0 upvotes
D200_4me
By D200_4me (Apr 5, 2012)

The GH2 was really nice....but I already had a large camera (D700) so I decided to try something even smaller and ended up with the Nikon V1 (and love it). I had no meaningful complaints about the GH2. Just preferred something a little smaller.

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 7, 2012)

The GF5 is also purposefully skimping on controls too, it's an entry level camera. For better controls and sensor on a compact body we have the GX1.

0 upvotes
pedroboe100
By pedroboe100 (Apr 5, 2012)

Yawn. Bring us the GH3!

0 upvotes
AlanJones
By AlanJones (Apr 5, 2012)

I am thinking the GH3 is coming soon. The GH2 is $599 this month with my corporate discount on panasonic's website. That's $150 cheaper than it has ever been.

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Apr 5, 2012)

I paid $630 on Dec 1st 2010 for the GH2 at Panasonic Direct with EPP account.
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4128/5225197588_01c73e0958_o.jpg

0 upvotes
AlanJones
By AlanJones (Apr 7, 2012)

You got a good deal. I have been looking at the camera the past 6 months but know as soon as I buy they will announce a newer version.

0 upvotes
Morgifier
By Morgifier (Apr 5, 2012)

Looking at the sample photos at a number of sites as well as the controlled ISO test at Fotopolis I would have to say that this looks like a redesigned sensor. Particularly the reds in my GF2 (and the GF1 and GF3 and even my old LX3) seem to lose their punch once the ISO is pushed beyond 800, the GF5 samples at Fotopolis look good to 1600 or even 3200.

Personally, I would say the 3rd generation of Panasonic cameras was unnecessary and that they should have waited for this sensor upgrade before flooding the market like they did. I guess I should be thankful however, as I managed to snag a perfectly capable GF2 with control dial, tiltable flash, hotshoe and 460k screen all for the list price of the accompanying 14mm f/2.5 lens! :)

0 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Apr 5, 2012)

So what are the differences with the GF3 ? New sensor ?

As for the rest - while it would be total madness to cough $500+ bucks for a camera with no falsh hotshoe (and with the worst onboard flash ever), I just received my shiny new GF3 from Ebay. $249 with a kit lens - I have to say at this price, I absolutely love it.

If prices go the same way for the GF5 in six months - this thing creates a niche on itself, a Holga like follow up where the fact it's gelded becomes part of its cuteness.

So it's all a matter of price. For $500+, I'll take an Olympus (In body image stabilization, flash hot shoe, EVF port, wireless flash control for external flashes) any time.

For prices south of $300, this little thingie might be a good bet. Wait and see (for at least six months).

2 upvotes
Malcolm Hopkinson
By Malcolm Hopkinson (Apr 5, 2012)

Rather than produce a new model every 6-9 months, most photographers would prefer to see a new camera in 15-18 months but with real progress and innovation. For example, the GX1 is just a step up from G2 and G3 and core Panasonic supporters are likely to feel shortchanged. With the mirrorless market on a roll and Canon's effort probably appearing this Summer/Fall, our observations are that Panasonic need to pay attention to the camera using public. Incidentally, for first hand experience, have used/ traded GF1 and currently have GF2, G2, G3 and Olympus E620 in the immediate family's camera assortment. How much longer we have to virtually give away one camera to purchase another of the latest upgrades?

1 upvote
SDPharm
By SDPharm (Apr 5, 2012)

> most photographers would prefer to see a new camera in 15-18 months but with real progress and innovation.

3 years or longer is more reasonable for me. I still have the Canon 40D from 2007. My prints don't look worse than the latest prints from my friends. For me, quantitative measurements have to at least double to be worth it at today's technology level. For example, doubling the pixel count, LCD screen resolution, etc. The more elusive, but arguably more meaningful, changes should be in user interface/usability as features increase. Steve Jobs, where are you when we need you?

0 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (Apr 5, 2012)

I think the challenge for the companies is that there are masses of people jumping into photography these days and the competition is so tough that waiting 15-18 months between releases would be excruciatingly long for them. These incremental releases, while somewhat annoying for us more serious photogs, means the stores constantly have "new" products to display and the companies continue to grab incremental sales too.

0 upvotes
Sabatia
By Sabatia (Apr 5, 2012)

Got rid of my Canon 40D and 7D and a passel of L glass when I bought my G3. The five year old 40D sensor makes sharper pics than any m4/3 sensor. On the other hand, I now have a camera that I carry 300% more. Like so many things, there are trade-offs and compromises.

3 upvotes
W Sanders
By W Sanders (Apr 5, 2012)

Are the masses really jumping into photography? I heard something to the effect that 80% of the photos on flickr are taken by smartphones. Not sure about the market for idiot proof mini cameras in 4/3 format. I've got my GF1 and GF2 "poor man's Leica" since I used to use an M4 back in the film days and I need a viewfinder since I'm farsighted, but if I got really serious about photography I'd upgrade to something with better image quality.

At some point it will just be easier to put a phone in a camera instead of the other way around.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (Apr 5, 2012)

Smartphone photography was included in my thought process when posting my original comment about the masses jumping on board. The lines are being blurred more and more with every passing day. I'm too cheap to pay a $50+ monthly cell bill (Canada) so I can have a decent camera on board, but I'm looking forward to the day when a quality 8MP+ camera appears on a prepaid phone. Then I will truly have my camera with me 90-100% of the time.

1 upvote
SDPharm
By SDPharm (Apr 5, 2012)

Sabatia, same here. Left my 40D at home and brought my GX1 to Chicago for a meeting. I definitely take more pictures with GX1. I have the EVF on, which is great for candid street shots (shoots like a Hasselblad, but handled like a Leica). GX1 is fast and very usable at ISO800.

0 upvotes
Button Pusher
By Button Pusher (Apr 5, 2012)

Just check on models every 15-18 months and then you will see a greater change rather than complaining about more incremental models being released more often. No one is forcing you to consider a new camera every 6-9 months.

0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (Feb 28, 2013)

That's like telling a fish to stay out of the water.

The problem is, even after 18 months, the advancements are relatively small.

0 upvotes
George Sears
By George Sears (Apr 5, 2012)

Panasonic has had some very confusing (aggressive) pricing on the GF3. It was offered around Christmas with the kit zoom for $300, with a two lens system under $500. Panasonic seems to get minimal credit for iA, though Jeff Keller calls it the best auto system around. It's a camera to use on iA, basically, even if you use raw to touch things up a bit. This series seems to attract a lot of criticism, but if you buy these cameras at the right price, they are pretty impressive. Panasonic came out with the 1080 P60 Camcorders a couple of years back. The first year, the models (differentiated by memory mostly) blew reviewers away. The second year was a minor refresh, and the reviewers turned against Panasonic. Now, the third year, Panasonic does another minor refresh. But, it's a value camcorder like this is a value camera. I completely respect what Panasonic does, and own their cameras. They do a lot of good things and they can be cutting edge. It's your money.

6 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (Apr 5, 2012)

We recently returned from a holiday in AZ and NV on which I did not bring my Canon DSLR kit. Instead we opted to bring the FZ28 I had bought for my son a few years ago. He is a 16 y.o. budding photographer and we both had fun trying out all the manual and auto modes of this camera. It was really my first time using it. Bracketing for HDR was so easy. I must say that I was VERY impressed with the images that the iA setting put out. I was a joy to have such a light weight camera to carry around too. I am seriously looking at something like this or the GH2 (or similar) as my main camera in the near future.

2 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Apr 5, 2012)

Was impressed with the manual focus system on the GF3. You do see it at Target and Best Buy.

0 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Apr 5, 2012)

Is Panasonic serious about selling Lumix mirrorless cameras in the USA? I have never seen ad ad for them.

0 upvotes
zkz5
By zkz5 (Apr 5, 2012)

Yes. I've seen them at stores in Cleveland a few times.

0 upvotes
Nate21
By Nate21 (Apr 5, 2012)

In a San Diego Bestbuy has the Panasonic and so does Target

0 upvotes
Geekapoo
By Geekapoo (Apr 5, 2012)

the three Boston area Bestbuy stores I've been to have the GF3

0 upvotes
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Apr 5, 2012)

Good they made a revised 12 megapixel sensor

The GF3, is a good camera this one is good replacement for those who are new to Micro Four Thirds, or for those who want to upgrade

Hope soon we will see the G5 and the GH3

1 upvote
Geekapoo
By Geekapoo (Apr 5, 2012)

....and you can pick up a GF3 body for ~$220! Huge bargin!!!!

0 upvotes
SHood
By SHood (Apr 5, 2012)

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/panasonic-gf5/panasonic-gf5A.HTM

"Compared to that in the GF3, size and resolution are unchanged, but the frontside circuitry now has a lower profile and is better located, so it doesn't block as much light. That should translate to better sensitivity / noise characteristics. "

1 upvote
Tech Talk Tony
By Tech Talk Tony (Apr 5, 2012)

Panasonic has but three cameras for advanced enthusiasts and this would not be one of them.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Apr 5, 2012)

How many of these horrible little viewfinder-less lumps does the market need?

8 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Apr 5, 2012)

I have wondered why no mention has been made of the uselessness of cameras without viewfinders.
The very first P&S cameras without viewfinders were conceptually identical to cameras as "advanced" as the Sony NEX-5N.
I can only surmise that they succeeded because an entire generation came to photography without viewfinders.

That makes the inclusion of them a Eureka moment.

6 upvotes
Geekapoo
By Geekapoo (Apr 5, 2012)

I have been into photography for ~40 years and can live with/without viewfinders....and have taken MANY pictures I thoroughly enjoy using cameras without viewfinders (though do love my panny G3). So......uselessness? Get a clue...

4 upvotes
SDPharm
By SDPharm (Apr 5, 2012)

None of the cameras Ansel Adam used had a viewfinder.

7 upvotes
VJVIS
By VJVIS (Apr 5, 2012)

I bought my wife a panasonic G2. Nice EVF, but guess what she used 99% of the time, the LCD. The GF3 is aimed at people who do not use viewfinders. Would I buy a GF3/GF5 for myself, hell no, but that doesn't mean leaving the EVF out of a camera like this is a bad idea.

3 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Apr 6, 2012)

What's better, an entry-level, dim optical mirror-prism DSLR viewfinder with 90% coverage, or a big, bright rear LCD with 100% coverage, live exposure preview, focus magnification and live histogram? Each has its pros and cons.

1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 7, 2012)

Just this one. The other /current / Panasonic models (G3, GH2, GX1) all have viewfinders (built in or add-on)

0 upvotes
Octav1an
By Octav1an (Apr 5, 2012)

I love its looks.

Comment edited 8 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

good to know at least some people like the design..

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 6, 2012)

As they say, 'somebody loves even the ugliest baby'.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Apr 5, 2012)

The preview narrative mentions that the GF5 offers video in both AVCHD and MP4 formats, but that the GF3 offered only AVCHD. Meanwhile, the spec list reports that the GF5 offers AVCHD and MJPEG, which was in fact the case with the GF3 and other G-series Lumix cameras.

Concerning the relative simplicity of file structure, it's easier to find the AVCHD mts files than it is to learn any camera's menu structure. They are in a STREAM sub-folder, of a PRIVATE subfolder, of a BDMV folder. That structure exists simply to be compatible with burning to Blu-ray, but quickly figured out with Windows Explorer, if one simply wants to find the files. The real divide is that AVCHD is tough to edit natively with less than an i-7 grade computer.

The various filter modes get listed without any testing or clarification. How does "Appetizing Food" compared to "Cute Dessert"? Sugar content? How does "Freeze Animal Motion" compare to "Clear Sports Shot"? Quadrupedal versus bipedal AF tracing?

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Apr 5, 2012)

"The real divide is that AVCHD is tough to edit natively with less than an i-7 grade computer."

That is a completely incorrect statement. It can be easily edited with even an I3. The problem is that some editor programs require much more resources than others. AVS video editor can easily edit the GH2's 1080p @ 30 FPS footage on virtually any computer made in the last 2 years.

5 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (Apr 5, 2012)

so ugly

1 upvote
MP Burke
By MP Burke (Apr 5, 2012)

There is an inconsistency in the above article: in one place it mentions
"A dedicated sensor that automatically determines shooting angle, making it possible to tell whether a photo was taken horizontally or vertically no matter what lens was used." which sounds like an orientation sensor built in to the body to me.
However, in the specification table it says there is no orientation sensor. This looks like an error from cutting and pasting the GF3 specification.

You can now get the GX1 with the 14-42mm power zoom lens for less than £600 in the UK. The prices of Panasonic cameras always drop a few months after release, and I would expect the GF5 price to end up significantly lower than that of the GX1. In the meantime, the GF3 will be available at a lower price.

0 upvotes
plasnu
By plasnu (Apr 5, 2012)

Why no more 20mm kit?

2 upvotes
Geekapoo
By Geekapoo (Apr 5, 2012)

so they can sell it seperately..

3 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Apr 5, 2012)

True.

0 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (Apr 5, 2012)

It's too much...

0 upvotes
Mohammad Javad Haddadnia
By Mohammad Javad Haddadnia (Apr 5, 2012)

waiting for gh3 :D

3 upvotes
snake_b
By snake_b (Apr 5, 2012)

Rather get a GX1.

1 upvote
Janitors
By Janitors (Apr 5, 2012)

GPS: None. So, at least another year till they realize that geotags are a must?

1 upvote
Button Pusher
By Button Pusher (Apr 5, 2012)

Maybe because they aren't a must. I've amazingly been able to take pictures for decades without it.

18 upvotes
Janitors
By Janitors (Apr 5, 2012)

Taking pictures is fine, but managing big library is much much easier with geotags. I don't care for maps or such crap on camera itself, but with managing and searching geotags help hugely.

Panasonic already has GPS on simpler cameras, i wish they would add it to 4/3 cameras too.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Apr 5, 2012)

GPS is slow to refresh. It uses the battery and delivers a stale reading. If a picture is not memorable enough for one to recall where it was shot, the GPS coordinates won't make it any more meritorious. "Not a swell party that one, but what would one expect at the Smith's? Oh, but wait, the GPS shows it was at OUR house. Aargh."

8 upvotes
Janitors
By Janitors (Apr 6, 2012)

Its not that i want to see where THIS photo was taken, its that i want to FIND a photo taken THERE. For example, i want to find ALL my travel photos from London. Now my only option is to remember when i was there, search those albums, and look for the pics. (or, of course, manually tag each and every photo, which is ridiculous with nowadays technology and amount). If i have all photos geotagged, i can just search "london" or open map and easily see them all.

And yes, i know the drawbacks, draining battery and so. But i can live with that, just as i can live with any other device that runs on batteries.

And its not like GPS is something new or exclusive. Panasonic already uses it in other Lumix cameras and i see no reason why they couldn't add it in 4/3.

1 upvote
jquagga
By jquagga (Apr 6, 2012)

I geotag almost every photo with my GF3. I use an external GPS which creates a track log and then I use GPSPhotoLinker to match up times with places and burn it into the RAW file. I think it is more economical than having the GPS in camera since it uses its own battery. However I agree, Geotagging is mandatory these days. If I wasn't able to do it, the camera would be worthless. Fortunately, most RAW files can have the GPS data added after shooting.

1 upvote
urcindalo
By urcindalo (Apr 10, 2012)

When I got my DMC-ZS7 two years ago I thought GPS was only a useless feature, like many others I have never used in so many devices.
Now, however, I can't live without it. In fact, the mere lack of a built-in GPS in the mirrorless market is preventing me from upgrading. And please, believe me when I say I can't wait to do it! :)

0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (Feb 28, 2013)

Ever heard of folder naming, and/or tagging; when you save (off load) your pictures?

20130228 GF5 London Christmas lights

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 5, 2012)

How can Panasonic be taken seriously when they launch a camera without hotshoe?

2 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (Apr 5, 2012)

Target market wouldn't use a hotshoe.

15 upvotes
Catalin Stavaru
By Catalin Stavaru (Apr 5, 2012)

Until now, of all the cameras I have owned, the hotshoe was good at only one thing: to accumulate dirt.

2 upvotes
martyvis
By martyvis (Apr 5, 2012)

Huh? If you want a hotshoe you buy the G3, GH2 or GX1. That's why manufacturers make a range of cameras so you can choose the features you must have, and those you can live without.

10 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 5, 2012)

This camera's flash must be as powerful as an ailing firefly; some might find an external flash useful, even with a camera like this one. The Olympus E-PM1, which is targeted at the same buyers and roughly the same price, has a hotshoe - plus a port to connect an external viewfinder. Said hotshoe even has a cover, in order to prevent dust from gathering. I fail to see why some people had to react so viscerally to my remark.
I agree with deep7, though: this is not a camera for people who take photography seriously.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Apr 5, 2012)

A hot shoe? External flash?

Wait, don't people upgrade to m4/3 so they don't need to use flash as much? Who says the pop-up isn't enough for occacional need? Amateurs who think flash will help them take pictures of the moon won't be any better off if they use a barrel of flash powder.

2 upvotes
SBoudreault
By SBoudreault (Apr 5, 2012)

"I agree with deep7, though: this is not a camera for people who take photography seriously." Not really what he said, then again I agree with you;
The only mirroless camera for "people who take photography seriously" is the M9/M9P ! No useless functions, no AF performance issues and top quality glass and a prized hotshot !
S.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 5, 2012)

Cy Cheze, what do you mean? People who upgrade to micro 4/3 come from compact (P&S) cameras, which have a built-in flash as powerful as a dying - not just ailing - firefly. (And it can be turned off anyway.)
You misunderstand the use of flash if you think it only serves to provide more light to the scene, and that high ISO can replace it. No, a flash won't do much if you want to take pictures of the moon (if that was meant to be a personal sarcasm, you completely missed the mark), but it is useful as a fill-in light source.
Also, are photojournalists wrong when they take those pictures at press conferences? You see, they all use flashes! Maybe those ignorant fools had better trade their Canon 1Ds and Nikon D3s for these little Panasonics...
One thing seems sure: this camera is for people who don't know anything about photography.

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Apr 6, 2012)

I really want Pana to include wireless flash function with their m43 offering.. maybe start by GH3 then Gx2..

0 upvotes
FRANCISCO ARAGAO
By FRANCISCO ARAGAO (Apr 6, 2012)

the potential buyer dont know what is a hotshoe, 99% of them always shoot IA

2 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Apr 6, 2012)

So we're all reaching the conclusion that this camera is not for photographers...

0 upvotes
RickPick
By RickPick (Apr 5, 2012)

In spite of all the negative comments here, the price of the 14-42 X lens on amazon.co.uk today is £340.66. If the camera with X lens comes in at £579, that makes it a rather cheap combo. You may think the lens is over-priced, but it is the smallest kit zoom lens on the market when collapsed and makes the camera one of the smallest CSC's available - and it has a large sensor. If it has the same image quality as the GX1 for example, or near, that makes it very useful even to "serious" photogs, maybe as a second (3rd or 4th) camera.

This is the low-end model in the whole G range and as such it has a place.

The red dot on the lens, by the way, is on all micro four-thirds lenses and bodies and is used for lining them up for fitting (bayonet mount). The red X is just a marketing symbol and is a bit silly, I agree.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Xellz
By Xellz (Apr 5, 2012)

Too bad, still no iso 100 in sight. Still hope m4/3 will think about increasing DR at base iso and add iso 100. But 12mp is already a good move in right direction.

2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 5, 2012)

Higher base ISO is to improve highlight range, the actual sensor setting is the same between ISO100 and 160, just the tone curve is different.

If you miss ISO 100 then just shoot at RAW ISO160 +2/3 ev, it's the same :)

0 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Apr 5, 2012)

Isn't your method closer to "extended" iso that we can see on canon/nikon dslr? Which i would not call same. Though i can live with base iso of 160, but would like to see one stop better dr at it. GH2 is rather close already.

0 upvotes
Greynerd
By Greynerd (Apr 5, 2012)

The red cross on the lens is a bit worrying. A green tick would make me more confident that these were not the factory rejects. It is a strange way to mark the product. Possibly like many recent camera releases for all makes they have failed quaility control but they have to get them on the market whatever.

0 upvotes
cheenachatze
By cheenachatze (Apr 5, 2012)

Why do they charge so much for this "Power Zoom" lens? Every $100 camera has "Power Zoom" lens. These small lenses require less material to make, and it's not like Panasonic has amazing manufacturing technologies that are light years ahead of Canon, Nikon etc., so why are they charging such prices for their lenses? Panasonic 20mm F1.7 retails as much as Canon 50mm F1.4. How do they justify that?

0 upvotes
digifan
By digifan (Apr 5, 2012)

So why do Nikon and Canon NOT have those and cheaper.

0 upvotes
Tariag
By Tariag (Apr 5, 2012)

Development costs.
Exclusivity
These lenses have whole new optical formulas, while Canon's 50mm have at least 50 years...
The "power zoom" is the only one on the market.
Panasonic is a real, serious lens manufacturer, don't understimate them.

1 upvote
Michael_13
By Michael_13 (Apr 5, 2012)

Try the Canon at F1.4 and F1.8 and you'll see why Pana's lens is worth its money.

Many of the (µ)4/3 lenses can compete with the "L" league from Canon - often at a better price.

0 upvotes
Winston Loo
By Winston Loo (Apr 5, 2012)

@cheenachatze There isnt an equivalent of the Panny 14-42 PZ X lens. There is NO pancake zoom lens in the whole industry for Interchangable lens cameras. FOAK.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 252
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