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Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography

By dpreview staff on Apr 3, 2012 at 07:04 GMT

Canon has launched the EOS 60Da, a variant of its 60D DSLR tuned for astrophotography. The camera features a re-worked infra-red filter leaving the camera more sensitive to a specific emission frequency (656nm) of hydrogen, key to capturing images of features such as nebulae (gas clouds) in space. The 18MP camera continues where 2005's 8MP EOS 20Da left off. It will be available from a limited number of authorized dealers at a price of around $1499.00/£1174.99.


Press Release:

NEW CANON EOS 60Da DSLR CAMERA FOR ASTRONOMY ENTHUSIASTS CAPTURES THE TRUE COLORS OF THE COSMOS

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., April 3, 2012 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today introduced the EOS 60Da Digital SLR Camera, a long-awaited successor to the EOS 20Da that is optimized for astrophotography. This DSLR caters to astronomers and hobbyists who enjoy capturing the beauty of the night sky by offering a modified infrared filter and a low-noise sensor with heightened hydrogen-alpha sensitivity. These modifications allow the camera to capture magnificent photographs of “red hydrogen emission” nebulae and other cosmic phenomena.

“The EOS 60Da is a testament to the constant desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A., “This new camera enables an accurate depiction of a part of our solar system which is hard to achieve with conventional cameras but should be enjoyed and celebrated.”

The Canon EOS 60Da camera packs a powerful 18-megapixel CMOS sensor (APS-C) that produces sharp and high-contrast images of astronomical objects, a major enhancement over the EOS 20Da model’s 8.2-megapixel sensor. The improved infrared-blocking filter is a modification suited specifically toward astronomy enthusiasts to achieve a hydrogen-alpha light sensitivity that is approximately three times higher than that of a normal Canon DSLR camera. This produces a 20-percent higher transmittance of Hydrogen Alpha line, or Hα wavelength, allowing astronomers to capture crisp, clear images of reddish, diffuse nebulae.

Enhanced Features

Crisp images of the stars and planets can be viewed on the EOS 60Da’s improved 3.0-inch Clear View LCD screen with 1,040,000 dots for detailed focusing. The flip-out Vari-angle screen allows photographers to adjust the screen for easy viewing without straining even while the camera is mounted to a telescope via a third-party T-ring adapter. Optimized for stargazing with friends or in an educational setting, astronomy enthusiasts can connect the camera to a TV with the provided AVC-DC400ST Stereo AV Video Cable and display the night sky on a TV monitor using the camera’s Live View mode. Moreover, the EOS 60Da’s Live View mode is equipped with a Silent Shooting feature that eliminates shutter-induced vibration for maximum camera stability when the camera is mounted to a telescope or super-telephoto EF lens.

Enhanced noise reduction on the EOS 60Da sensor offers photographers the ability to experiment with the wide array of ISO settings and increased ISO speeds up to 6400 expandable to 12800. Other features include an intelligent nine-point autofocus system, full manual controls, and RAW, JPEG, and RAW+JPEG image recording capabilities.

Accessories

The EOS 60Da helps capture the wonders of the night sky with its use of Canon’s award-winning EF and EF-S lenses along with other EOS accessories. Additionally, the EOS 60Da is packaged with Canon’s RA-E3 Remote Controller Adapter, providing the ability to connect a Canon Timer Remote Control such as the TC-80N3 (optional accessory). The TC-80N3 is ideal for controlling time exposures longer than 30 seconds as well as capturing a series of consecutive time exposures that can be composited during post-processing for improved image quality. This is especially useful when the camera body is connected to a telescope[i] or an EF super telephoto lens. 

Canon has also included an AC adapter kit with the EOS 60Da, allowing the camera to be powered through an AC wall outlet or a battery-powered inverter, ideal for long exposure image or video capture at home or in the field. 

Availability

As a specialized product, the EOS 60Da is only available to order from select authorized dealers. The estimated retail price is $1,499.00 and it is expected to be available this month.

13
I own it
10
I want it
0
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 227
12
brewstout
By brewstout (Nov 29, 2012)

Ok, going out on a limb here as it may not be anything people on this site have done. Does this camera capture orbs (of light) better than the usual DSLR?

0 upvotes
RobertLilly
By RobertLilly (Dec 8, 2012)

Greetings

I've pushed my 20Da (predecessor to this one) into service a few times and didn't really notice anything particularly 'better'. The IR enhancement is in the range of Hydrogen Alpha rather than full spectrum, so I'd be surprised if it helped much for that application. One hint - regardless of the camera you're using, use an external flash (I use the 580EX) and you'll dramatically reduce the number of false hits. Sort of like red-eye, having the flash close to the plane of the lens generates a lot of straight-back reflection. On a side-by-side test with clean optics, on-camera flash showed dozens of 'images', off-camera showed none. I have captured a few anomalies using off-plane flash, but usually only one or two per image. FWIW

0 upvotes
Zuzullo
By Zuzullo (Feb 28, 2013)

I shoot landscapes where 2/3 of the scene is night-sky.
Will I notice any difference in the night-skies when using my ultra-wide angle lens on this camera?
Or is this an exclusive feature for tele-photos right into the sky?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
MTNBYKR
By MTNBYKR (Nov 14, 2012)

Can the Canon 60Da still be used as a everydy camera,or is it only for Astrophotography?

1 upvote
RobertLilly
By RobertLilly (Dec 8, 2012)

Greetings

Yes, it can still be used as an everyday camera. In order to get true color reproduction, it is generally recommended that you use an external IR Filter. Without it, some IR-bright items will look a little off.

1 upvote
JohnKemp
By JohnKemp (Jun 11, 2012)

"This produces a 20-percent higher transmittance of Hydrogen Alpha line, or Hα wavelength, allowing astronomers to capture crisp, clear images of reddish, diffuse nebula" only makes sense if one assumes that "20-percent" is a misprint for "200-percent". Do others agree with me, or am I missing something?

0 upvotes
VisualUniverse
By VisualUniverse (Apr 16, 2012)

When the 20Da came out, a comparo was done between it and aftermarket modded 20Ds. Seemed the aftermarket models performed slightly better for astrophotography, and were more affordable. Look forward to seeing how this new 60Da performs in comparison to Hutech.com and Gary Honis versions.

0 upvotes
keekimaru
By keekimaru (Apr 12, 2012)

Fast shooting speed almost 6 fps is very good, and thought 3 fps was good. (I also like the 2 settings for shooting speed, normal and high speed)
Built in Wireless flash control. I also bought the 430EX II, and 3 button pushes later I had the speed light firing while it sat off camera behind the subject, and that is very cool
Great Canon Software (I use a Mac, and I love the USB interface software, you can completely control the camera from your computer
Custom Shooting mode - Exact what it sounds like, its nice touch
The flip out rotating screen is very sharp, probably one of the best I've seen on a DSLR. I don't shoot much live view though.
It uses SD, only because I had plenty of SD cards from my last two devices.

More Detail :

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0040JHVCC/tipfla-20

0 upvotes
astrophotos
By astrophotos (Apr 8, 2012)

One of the best features of this camera compared to other DSLRs is the biggest source of heat can be moved away from the CMOS chip. LCD screens on DSLRs that are fixed behind the CMOS, after a very short period of time, heats the CMOS and induces much noise. This means the 60Da, if the LCD is opened, will not induce this heat and will provide longer exposures that are cleaner than DSLRs with LCDs having a fixed position. This camera can also be used for normal day time photos and you do not have to have a filter on every lens. You do not have to add a filter to any lens. Add one filter to your camera body for day time use to put the white balance back to normal. I have several Canon DSLRs modified and with this filter the daytime images are great: More info: http://www.astronomik.com/en/home. I think Canon may have a very nice camera with this one. I have not heard yet, but it would be great to also have 2x2 binning!

0 upvotes
Cameglio
By Cameglio (Apr 12, 2012)

I totally agree with you.
Regarding the Astronomik filter it is an easy way to use EF lenses for daytime photography, unfortunately an EF-S can't be used and since this is an EF-S body, well, the use of the filter would be very limited.

0 upvotes
astrophotos
By astrophotos (Apr 13, 2012)

Yes the EF-S lens are a problem. I like the EF lens better as being designed for the larger CMOS the edge sharpness I think is a little better. Glad you pointed that out. All my lenses are EF so I failed to remember that. Thanks.

1 upvote
brewstout
By brewstout (Nov 29, 2012)

I looked on the site but it's not clear what the filter would be for "normal" photography. They talk about night sky filters.
I shoot landscape photography but would like to add good night sky stuff and need a camera that can do both. What are your thoughts?

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (Apr 6, 2012)

I don't know much about astrophotography, but the samples on Canon's Japanese website do show a definite increase in red sensitivity. It would seem that the sensor bandpass filter change is the main improvement in the camera body. The rest seems to be bundled "essentials" allowing long exposure with mirror lock-up, easy astro-stacking protocol (I forget what this is called in astrophotography - immunofluorescence microscopy uses the same averaging technique to cut noise). Have fun folks! The closest that I have come to astrophotography is the ever-popular super-tele moon shot.

1 upvote
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 8, 2012)

In astrophotograpy the process of stacking photos together is called photo stacking......... my aren't we an imaginative bunch :-)

If you don't have a tracking mount you can shoot video of an object as it travels across your camera screen, take the video into your video editing software and do a pan of the video... after that you have a stationary object.... then feed that stabilized video into a photo stacker ( you may need an intermediate step to extract individual frames, depending on the software being used) It works suprisingly well and shows that you don't need thousands of dollars of specialized gear to get out there and have fun. I got hooked on astrophotography with a fixed tripod, star trails, and normal lenses.

P.S., I am no expert on astrophotography but I am really having a great time learning....

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
1 upvote
eroel
By eroel (May 11, 2012)

Donald:
Would like to know how can I change the movie produced by the 60Da to an avi stream, so i can use some astronomy stacking software such as RegiStax.
Regards,
Eric (México)

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (May 11, 2012)

Eroel:
I am using Adobe Premiere to convert my files. I think that just about any video editing software will work.

0 upvotes
Carl Fuehrer
By Carl Fuehrer (Apr 6, 2012)

As and astrophotographer that image of Orion Nebula isn't all that impressive. I've taken better shots with a XSi/350 thru an 80mm triplet refractor telescope.

0 upvotes
garyknrd
By garyknrd (Apr 6, 2012)

I'm no expert but don't they have Hydrogen Alpha filters that do the same thing?

0 upvotes
Silvarum
By Silvarum (Apr 7, 2012)

Hα-filter allows transmition of light only in that bandwidth.
Common infra-red filter in cameras blocks most of it.
So if you put that filter on common camera, you probably won't see much.

1 upvote
Alejandro del Pielago
By Alejandro del Pielago (Apr 5, 2012)

An EOS 60Da SLR Camera for astronomy.... COOOOOOL !!!!!!

1 upvote
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Canon has a few sample shots floating around. Note exposure times of six minutes...... To all those thinking of trying astrophotography may I suggest that this is a field where the tripod is more important than the camera, and a quality motorized equatorial mount may be a far better investment than a new camera.

Of course, for those with a good motorized tripod, drool away!

1 upvote
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Apr 4, 2012)

And it will take normal pictures also

0 upvotes
Nicolas Isaksson
By Nicolas Isaksson (Apr 4, 2012)

This is very interesting. I love taking sky photos but they always turn out blurry, the stars are always like long lines. I guess this camera can fix that.

Will I be able to use it also as a normal camera for portraits and such?

0 upvotes
DaveMarx
By DaveMarx (Apr 4, 2012)

Sorry, stars as streaks is not something this camera can fix. You need a motorized mount (either for camera or telescope) that can track the stars as the earth turns. Blurry may be due to autofocus issues - switching any camera to manual focus is a good start.

Yes, the idea is that you can also use it for other kinds of photography. The only issue is the camera's extra sensitivity to infrared light, but there are ways to deal with that if it proves to be a problem.

1 upvote
SDsc0rch
By SDsc0rch (Apr 4, 2012)

also, on the focusing issue...

you can also use the "LiveView" option to focus - it displays the current image the sensor is seeing on the back LCD - find one of the brighter stars, switch to manual focus, zoom in 5x and then 10x and find your focus on that bright object (sirius, jupiter, etc) - then move your camera where you want to take your image

yes, focusing is an issue in astrophotography

another tip... keep your exposures to about 8-10 seconds - anything past 13secs will result in elongated stars

1 upvote
tosvus
By tosvus (Apr 16, 2012)

I Imagine one could get a filter for the lens that stops IR, thus making it more usable for regular photography, though not sure if it is a 100% fix. I'm no expert on astrophotography, but imagine you do two things:
1. Manual focus set to infinity (no more blurries)
2. Shorter exposure frames, but take several. Then you can image-stack them, though I'm not sure if there is software that would also automatically adjust the pictures to take into account the movement. (In theory it should, but the more pictures you take, the smaller the area covered by ALL pictures - similar to image stabilization where you throw out some pixels around the edges).

1 upvote
brewstout
By brewstout (Nov 29, 2012)

to DaveMarx

"The only issue is the camera's extra sensitivity to infrared light, but there are ways to deal with that if it proves to be a problem."

What are the ways please?

0 upvotes
paul13walnut5
By paul13walnut5 (Apr 4, 2012)

I had a wee shot of Canons mirrorless EF mount camera at the weekend.

It was called the c300.

Only 8MP, and a bit bulky, but the guy in the shop said it had a good video mode.

Congrats on the 60Da launch. The folk who get it, will get it. The folk who don't, won't.

Keep up the good work. Maybe make the mirrorless range a little more compact and a little cheaper?

0 upvotes
jackisdacrac
By jackisdacrac (Apr 4, 2012)

PLEASE READ AND HELP ME OUT :) !!!
Does anyone know if this camera will be capable of shooting within our little blue planet to a reasonable to good outcome of quality, or whether it will be strictly limited to interstellar or astrophotography.
I've literally been sitting in the centre of a metaphorical seesaw with the 600d on one end and the d5100 on the other, i definitely want to give astrophotography ago and this being one of the main reasons for me purchasing a DSL, but i dont want to be limited to just that specific field, as this being my first D SLR i will be using it for general use as well as astrophotography ( although more wide angle as apposed to deep space and planetary) ... hence the question above will the new 60da be a good all around camera or will it be limited to its field of respectable profession?

Cheers Guys
Jack

0 upvotes
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Apr 4, 2012)

Jack, I have a 350Da (post retail modified) DSLR and I use a Custom White Balance for almost all every day shooting. It took a while to find the right combination but most people recommend using a 14% gray card to set the CWB. Personally, I found the MacBeth card to be most beneficial in telling the camera what 'white' is.

(this may sound odd) but a 30s image of the night sky from my dark location became my go-to CWB setting since it seemed to not only set a good white point but it also restored the blackpoint as well.

Modded DSLRs tend to image in the red spectrum even during daylight shooting. It can be frustrating dealing with post editing to restore color balance, but not impossible with research and experimentation.

I could see it being ultimately helpful to new (and veteran) users of IR/UV modded systems if Canon would include a couple of built-in pre-set CWB options for the every day shooter.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

It will be very easy to blow the red channel when shooting indoors in incandescent or "warm" CFL light. Very difficult to use for weddings, candles will play hob with it. You can get around this by using BG-34 filters on all your lenses, but that's a pain.

The BG-34 will also help with skin tones and "blotchy" skin. No matter what you do with the CWB, you can't address that with software, it's a "hardware problem".

1 upvote
wutsurstyle
By wutsurstyle (Apr 4, 2012)

Genuine question here.. what adapter is used to attach telescopes to EOS mounts such as this camera?

1 upvote
FarzinPhoto
By FarzinPhoto (Apr 4, 2012)

go to b&h website and search for "CETAC5" and "CETRCAF" you will need both in order to attach your telescope to your camera.

1 upvote
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Telescope optics are 2 inch and 1.25 inch. You can get adapters to go from EOS ( or any other mount) to T mount, and an adapter from T mount to either 2 or 1.25 inch optics.

Most telescopes use 1.25 inch optics so a 1.25 mount will fit everything. Almost all telescopes have the capacity to handle 2 inch, and if you can, that's the way to go as it blocks less light than 1.25 and is a far sturdier mount.

Many telescopes come with 1.25 but you can purchase options to allow 2 inch, for example the celestron Schmidt-cassigrains are sold with 1.25, but $25 gets you a 2 inch mount.

I'd go look in my local telescope store and ask them about mounts.

1 upvote
shutterdragon
By shutterdragon (Apr 4, 2012)

I hope Nikon makes an astro camera like this one.

2 upvotes
Vegasus
By Vegasus (Apr 3, 2012)

I am not a pro photographer, and every time there is a new SLR, i am only interest in low lights capability, dual memory cards, large screen with million dots and face detection for focusing.

and every time i visit this website i expect new product, but after 5 years knowing about this website,... i think those top manufactures making cameras is like buying a car... same car with lotsa variants. 4 cyl, v6 or v8 engine wif same body.

0 upvotes
ahoeflak
By ahoeflak (Apr 4, 2012)

We all hope you'll never bother with this website again and take your pointless complaining elsewhere.

12 upvotes
Eric Hensel
By Eric Hensel (Apr 4, 2012)

is that the royal "We" ahoeflak?

1 upvote
jpeterg
By jpeterg (Apr 4, 2012)

I see. You want dpreview to read your mind and then publish only content that you are interested in. Well, I'm afraid that's not going to happen.

This camera may be of no interest to you, but it is for others. Deal with it.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Vegasus
By Vegasus (Apr 4, 2012)

wow.. calm down everyone... its oke if u guys are not happy of what i thought. I will deal with it!. I've got it!

1 upvote
Individual1
By Individual1 (Apr 4, 2012)

To your interest, at DP review you can in one location follow the improvements in each area - low light sensitivity, features such as dual memory cards, etc. They are the same in the same way as you can now get 200hp out of a 2.0 litre car, when 10 years ago the horse power was far less. The interesting thing is to see the technology advance. You purchase at a point where you need the technology AND the technology meets your needs. I think of it as a great window on the advances (and limitation) of current technology.

0 upvotes
Joshlovesphotos
By Joshlovesphotos (Apr 3, 2012)

And.....here we go again DPReview. You basically copy and pasted the advertising from Canon's press release onto your "Review" site. Only problem is, when you "review" something, isn't the point of the site to take another, more objective view of a product? You should call yourselves, DPAdvertisers.

Problem? Well, besides apparently being the only person here with an iq over 100, how about the fact that hydrogen-alpha light is NOT the true color of the cosmos. You know those galaxy and nebulae that you see on science shows in awe striking color? Yeah. Thats false color. That's not TRUE color, I don't care how subjective it is. The human eye does not see colors that way. This article's main title should read "CANON ANNOUNCES MODIFIED 60D (60DA) WITH STRONGER INFRARED SENSOR THAT PRODUCES FALSE COLOR IN ORDER TO MORE EASILY PHOTOGRAPH THE COSMOS".

So basically you just pasted NEWS and FALSE ADVERTISING onto your "review" site, that is just chock full of adverts really.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Apr 3, 2012)

Wiki: H-alpha (Hα) is a specific red visible spectral line created by hydrogen with a wavelength of 656.28 nm, which occurs when a hydrogen electron falls from its third to second lowest energy level. It is difficult for humans to see H-alpha at night, but due to the abundance of hydrogen in space, H-alpha is often the brightest wavelength of visible light in stellar astronomy.

Continued: H-alpha has a wavelength of 656.281 nm,[1] is visible in the red part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and is the easiest way for astronomers to trace the ionized hydrogen content of gas clouds.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
rallyfan
By rallyfan (Apr 3, 2012)

You've proclaimed yourself the most intelligent person here and are carrying on about the true colour of the cosmos, false advertising, and news in capital letters. It is my hope some site and/or some camera, be it modified for astronomy or not, allows you to find the inner peace you seem to have lost due to Canon's and DPR's misstatements.

6 upvotes
Swagon
By Swagon (Apr 3, 2012)

The Canon Press Release is posted in the News section. Press releases are news; that's why they are called press releases. The DP reveiw section has reviews that are very thorough. This camera has not yet been "reviewed". When or if it gets reviewed, it will be a full-fledged review like their other reviews. I think there is a fair chance, however, that they will not review this particular model because I don't think they are qualified "astrophotograpers".
I am an astrophotographer, and H-alpha is definitely not false color. It is a deep red that is visible. Unfortunately, most digital cameras have IR blocking filters that cut off too early and severly attenuate the visible Ha wavelength. True, many astrophotos do use false color to map INVISIBLE wavelegths into other colors that are visible, or we couldn't see the image. These have both scientific value and aesthetic value. But most astrophotos are true-color and keep H-alpha as red and sun-like stars as white.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Apr 4, 2012)

One would think that someone with your superior intelligence would know what a press release is, and also understand that something posted in the news section of this site isn't intended to be a review.

"The human eye does not see colors that way."
No, but isn't that the whole point? Would you question your doctor's diagnosis because your eyes don't see what the X-ray machine sees? That's not a perfect analogy, I know, but I hope you get my point.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Apr 4, 2012)

I will never be one to make a guest appearance on Big Bang Theory but the folks I talk to that do have a feel for the physics in this area tell me this camera will indeed make astrophotography easier.

Your condescension is unwarranted and Canon should be applauded for reaching out to a sector that is looking to do more with their cameras.

2 upvotes
jpeterg
By jpeterg (Apr 4, 2012)

...

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Branko Dimitrijevic
By Branko Dimitrijevic (Apr 4, 2012)

Anyone aware of the breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum knows how limited our human "vision" truly is. Are infra-red images less "true" just because your eyes can't see them? Are radio-images less true, or X-ray?

All these images are true because they convey the accurate information about what is really out there. We have just "shifted" this information somewhat so our limited eyes can see it.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
gbsailing
By gbsailing (Apr 4, 2012)

i wish...you would all just get over yourselves a bit. Those that do the business know what they want and what they need. Sure it may not have everything. But it has to be a good start. I applaud Canon for taking the big step and making the thing. Now if they would just answer my email, and make a similar unit for us archaeologists so we can photograph Near Infra-red emissions at sites to reveal water absorption in the ground and surrounding structures. Or perhaps those better in the know can tell me...would this camera suffice for the purpose described above???

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

@gbsailing, I'm going to assume you're serious...

No, Canon will never market a camera with enhanced near IR sensitivity. There was a problem years ago with Sony "nite shot" IR cameras coming under fire from parents groups because near IR cameras can occasionally get a glimpse of women's undies.

That's why, when Fuji made such a camera a few years ago, they did not release it through their regular distribution channel, but only through a distributor of forensics equipment for the LEA and fire department markets.

The 60Da actually has a filter that insures that it can do 656nm h-Alpha without picking up near IR.

The archaeology market is just too small to attract Canon for something that politically dangerous. I recommend looking into having a third party do an "IR conversion" for you.

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

The use of white balance is to distort colors.... The act of aiming the camera is to edit out the rest of the sphere... and don't even get me started on post processing... False colour is not a "bug", it's a feature that many strive for. There is always a strong creative component in photography and astrophotography is no different.

0 upvotes
rocsen
By rocsen (Apr 5, 2012)

removed

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
DaveMarx
By DaveMarx (Apr 3, 2012)

Why does a camera strapped to a telescope, that's being pitched on the benefits of the camera's LCD display for viewing (hard to use an OVF when the mirror's locked up)... why does it need a mirror, OVF, and focal plane shutter (besides dust control)?

It's not sensor size any more. If I was Sony, and I was interested in making a splash in the scientific community, why not in astrophotography, with all its passionate amateurs? Save those budget-strapped folks a small bundle by ditching unnecessary mechanical systems, and it reduces weight-related stress on the telescope to boot. AND, it'll still do fine as a general-purpose camera.

Sure, for someone who owns a pile of Canon glass, and is using that camera for a whole lot more than astrophotography... it's another set of tools on the Swiss Army Knife. But this would have been a really cool way for Canon to introduce its mirrorless camera. It's not like they don't know how to make 'em. They're called pro video cameras.

0 upvotes
chaking
By chaking (Apr 3, 2012)

The Sony Nex5n or 7 would probably be perfect (I'd imagine) as they are basically what you're asking for (no mirror or OVF and a really good live view). But no, they aren't `optimized` for astrophotography.

1 upvote
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Apr 3, 2012)

Personally speaking, regardless of live view capability, I still chose to focus TTL using the mirrored prism assembly of my 350Da. If, when I feel the need, to shoot every day images with it, I still use the same method of TTL focusing.

I can see Live View being helpful for centering and framing objects (as RO3rds does not apply to core AP). But, as my rule goes, I focus until I see diffraction coming through the OVF. Once I know I'm there, I take a few sample images to test for focus. If it's off one way or the other, back to the OVF I go.

Every one keeps telling every one they need mirrorless and I couldn't disagree more. If you like it use it, but it's not acceptable to tell every one it's WHAT THEY NEED. Some of those same people with piles of Canon glass cringe at the idea of mirroless projected image view finders. It makes my eyes hurt. If I'm to save my eyes for fine focus in AP, mirrorless isn't going to be my personal choice ... ever.

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Swagon
By Swagon (Apr 4, 2012)

True, a flip mirror has limited value in astroimaging. The live-veiw with 7x or 10x zoom-in window is a blessing for focusing. Without that, it would usually take me 30min just to focus. With liveview and 10x, I'm focused in just a couple minutes. Modifying the IR blocking filter to prevent it attenuating at visible deep red of H-alpha is a very significant improvement for astroimaging. A shutter is important because we want to easily take dark-frames without covering the front of the telescope. I usually take 8 to 32 dark frames and average them to remove all the random noise. That becomes my master dark frame, and it has to be redone periodically. Ideally, an astrocamera should also have a peltier cooler behind the sensor to lower the noise during long exposures. This is a huge benefit. And it should have a regulation loop to keep the sensor temp very stable so that the darks are the "right" dark frames. And it should provide 48-bit RAW files and USB remote control.

1 upvote
gbsailing
By gbsailing (Apr 4, 2012)

Canon do have a mirror less camera. Have had for many years. The EOS 1V-RT (film camera) which uses a pelicle mirror and therefore does not need to move at all...It must only be a matter of time before they amalgamate the two technologies (digital and Pelicle mirrors) to drive the frame per second rate into orbit (please accuse the pun everyone) of digital cameras. Perhaps they are already working down this path. I find it difficult to believe, with all Canon's might in specialist imaging products and technologies, that they can't seem to produce a camera body like a Ford or Holden car, and then have various design or technology options when you buy it. Like when you want your Ford with Blue paint, 18" rims, Bull-bar, etc. Surely it can't be that hard to set up the production line, make 350,000 of these, then 600K of those with this in it. etc. They re-invest 8% of their GDP in R&D and have 70% of the world market. Why can't they make more options available to consumers.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

Dave, three things...

First, electronic shutters have not "arrived" yet, and almost all EVIL cameras have focal plane shutters. The one exception is the Nikon J1, which shows the limits of a "shutterless" design:
* 1/60 sec x-sync
* fairly low 10mp resolution
Second, this is a very limited market camera, and the cost of removing mirror and prism from the existing 60D is prohibitive, and cuts its usefulness for "regular" photography.

Third, technology flows the other way in Canon: the dying video camera division trying to get new tech from the thriving still camera division.

"But this would have been a really cool way for Canon to introduce its mirrorless camera."

Yeah, but that's a $100M effort. 60Da is not much more than an engineering change order.

0 upvotes
DaveMarx
By DaveMarx (Apr 4, 2012)

Joseph, all good points. FP shutter is just on my list as it's a mechanical system, and the fewer moving parts, in general, the better. The mirror and prism are my real issue, because they're totally unnecessary to the task.

Digital cameras are essentially video cameras, as video has always been electronic photography - the "monitor" can show you exactly what the sensor and processing is doing to the image. We want our familiar still camera user interface, but I have a problem when the guts of the thing make no engineering sense.

Yes, it's Canon's $100M effort, and this wouldn't be the feature set to drive that kind of investment. However, it would be a great way to drive additional interest in a brand-new model that was already in the pipeline.

gbsailing, the only issue with a pelicle-based camera is that it doesn't allow as much light to reach the sensor. Astrophotographers need all the photons their telescopes can gather. Almost any other technology is a better choice.

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

As a 60D user, when hand-holding the camera with lenses I probably shoot 95 percent "through the lens". Put it on a tripod and it becomes 75 percent "live view". Mount it to the telescope and it's 100 percent "live view". For a multipurpose camera that's the way to go, and despite the tweaks for astrophotography, the 60Da remains a multipurpose camera.

1 upvote
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

I should also mention an included piece of software "EOS UTILITY" that comes with the 60D and allows you to hook up a laptop to the camera.... If you think "live view" is great on a 3" screen, just wait till you see it on a 14" screen.....

0 upvotes
Anastigmat
By Anastigmat (Apr 3, 2012)

I wonder if the 5DMKIII is a better camera for astrophotography. It has lower noise, larger pixels to collect the dim light, and a larger brighter pentaprism.

1 upvote
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Apr 3, 2012)

at the $3500 level, you are going to be better suited looking to FLI or QSI to answer your imaging needs, perhaps even SBIG upper end. Not that Canon doesn't have a very viable choice with the 60Da for the job, but if you have that kind of budget to work with, get a dedicated CCD with built-in Thermo Electric Cooling. For me, Since I already have a 50D, and would like to upgrade my 350Da (post retail modified) this would be a perfect option for a person with a smaller budget like myself.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

No, it's not "better". As people have theorized for years, and D800 finally proved, "larger pixels" are meaningless.

What's better in astrophotography is typically reduced weight. One has to wonder if 600D would have been a better choice than 60D.

0 upvotes
tosvus
By tosvus (Apr 16, 2012)

Hi Joseph, interesting response. You may very well be right, but can you point me to where those conclusions were made with the D800? Logic just seems to dictate that a bigger sensor can capture a better picture, or is optics/atmosphere a limitation for Astro photography vs normal photography? I have been thinking about getting into Astro, and for me, it doesn't seem the weight difference between the two would be all that bad. Thanks!

0 upvotes
Rakesh Nagar
By Rakesh Nagar (Apr 3, 2012)

Please someone let me know can this cam do Normal IR Black and White also
like we use to do with B&W IR with film if yes I will be the first Indian to buy.
THx

0 upvotes
Swagon
By Swagon (Apr 4, 2012)

It will work much better than most cameras if you are using an R72 IR pass filter. I use an R72 on my unmodified DSLR. My optical finder is basically black, but live view works and I can still use it handheld outdoors with the image stabilization. The 60Da camera would probably work much better and need shorter exposures. But it still has a modified IR block filter, so it will not be better than an SLR modified in the aftermarket that has no IR blocking at all.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

No, it's not likely to be able to do IR in any meaningful way.

Canon's press release sounds like 60Da works exactly like 20Da, which can't do IR photography. Most cameras have two IR blocking filters, a blue-green absorption filter and a dichroic "hot mirror" filter. 20Da replaced the blue-green one (which absorbs h-Alpha, and equalizes the camera's response to keep the red channel from blowing) with a second hot mirror.

So, 20Da did worse IR , less sensitivity and more ghosting, than a plain-old 20D. Poor results with a "false color" IR filter like Wratten 89b or R72, and pretty much dead to the B&W filters like Wratten 87 or RM90.

There's two reasons for that. One is political (the backlash from parents against IR capable Sonys) and the other scientific (refractor telescopes are not corrected for IR, and it makes color shots softer).

0 upvotes
DataPlumber
By DataPlumber (Apr 3, 2012)

It takes a bit more than a change in IR sensitivity to make a great astro camera and Canon has done their homework.

Astro objects are usually incredibly faint, difficult to focus on, have a potentially large dynamic range and require mating the camera to a telescope instead of a regular lens.

This usually means very long exposure times to slowly gather the ancient photons tricking in from the distant target subject. This means there are a lot of areas where a dSLR can be optimized for this kind of photography. Minimizing mirror vibrations, mirror-lockup or delay features, low heat generation, multiple noise reduction features and functions, high ISO abilities, specialized focusing tools (no autofocus capabilities here!), external wired shutter control, intervalometer capabilities, swivel screen, extended PC control capabilities, Live View to external monitor, potentially-optimized RAW modes and more.

To serious astrophotographers, this camera announcement is very exciting!

1 upvote
dopravopat
By dopravopat (Apr 3, 2012)

ML has intervalometer. Hopefully it will run on the 60Da too.

0 upvotes
PicOne
By PicOne (Apr 3, 2012)

Nonsense... look at the image provided in the News Release.. you can get these captures with the 18-135 Kit zoom. Though maybe they used a tripod too? :-)

0 upvotes
wutsurstyle
By wutsurstyle (Apr 3, 2012)

A new target for the Magic Lantern project.

0 upvotes
chn_andy
By chn_andy (Apr 3, 2012)

Actually if you do the modification yourself by just removing inner IR absorption glass (Color correction Filter) while preserving the Dust reduction filter, you will have at least 4~5 fold gain in sensitivity at H-Alpha. The ICF in 20Da has only 80% transmittance instead of 99% for an dedicated astrophotographical modification.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

If you do what you suggest, and your telescope is not well corrected for IR, you'll get a soft red channel. Hot mirrors serve a purpose in astrophotography.

Oddly enough, it's typically the folks with the most expensive scopes who have the most trouble. The Takahashi refractors are not known for good IR correction, while any old Dobby is going to do just fine.

0 upvotes
Boomanbb
By Boomanbb (Apr 3, 2012)

Here, I think the articulated screen can really be taken advantage of by removing the mirror diagonal from a short refractor and simply tilting the screen up and manual focusing at 10X.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 3, 2012)

Please refrain from commenting if you know nothing about astrophotography. You will only make yourself look foolish.

2 upvotes
Lee Jay
By Lee Jay (Apr 3, 2012)

This is a really ideal astro dSLR!

1 upvote
Octane
By Octane (Apr 3, 2012)

I applaud Canon for coming out with such a camera. Yes it's a product for a small group of people, but that's exactly why it's great to see that Canon makes it. They are not going to make a lot of money on those, but it creates a level of trust in a brand.

6 upvotes
Xon_Fedaa
By Xon_Fedaa (Apr 3, 2012)

"“The EOS 60Da is a testament to the constant desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A."

Really, Mr. Ishizuka? Please point out to me Canon's offerings that have user removable IR filters to enable the sizable constituency of photography enthusiasts and artisans to take infrared photos.

Indeed, it would seem Canon's "desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields" isn't being fully realized.

Sigma SD1, here I come.

Regards,

Xon

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
Scott Eaton
By Scott Eaton (Apr 3, 2012)

Good riddence. Nobody cares about Sigma anyways.

0 upvotes
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Apr 3, 2012)

You must have missed the 20Da from 7/1/2005

0 upvotes
Xon_Fedaa
By Xon_Fedaa (Apr 3, 2012)

Mark,

If your comment was to me, you may not be aware that both dpreview and Canon are on record stating the 20Da is NOT optimized for infrared photography use.

Regards,

Xon

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

"Please point out to me Canon's offerings that have user removable IR filters to enable the sizable constituency of photography enthusiasts and artisans to take infrared photos."

There won't ever be such a camera form Nikon, Canon, or Sony. Major camera companies remember the "Sony lesson". Sony used to have a camcorder feature called "nite shot" that slid the IR blocker out of the optic path. Some adventurous people discovered that, combined with a common Wratten 89b or 87 filter, you had a decent IR camera, and did typical IR art.

Some other folks discovered that, occasionally, this also let you see a woman's undies through certain clothing, and the legend of the "x-ray camera" was born. Next thing you know, angry mothers are burning or smashing piles of Sony equipment and demanding that the government "protect the children from pedophile photographers".

That's why Fuji only marketed their S5-UVIR through LEA equipment distributors, as a "forensics" camera.

0 upvotes
Xon_Fedaa
By Xon_Fedaa (Apr 4, 2012)

Joseph,

Yes, I know that history. So, that leaves us with the following:

1) Despite the history, Sigma makes (some) IR capable cameras, and
2) If Canon will never make such a camera, their executive vice president and general manager of Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A, needs to stop making erroneous claims to the contrary.

Which is what my point was in my OP.

Regards,

Xon

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

Xon, you're dealing with execs who have to run the press releases by marketing and legal and then have them translated.

Now, I see from your posting history that you're a Sigma or Foveon fan, so you really, really don't want to get in any sort of shouting match about some other company's "needs to stop making erroneous claims", because a lot of us have got the stones to shatter your glass house.

0 upvotes
Xon_Fedaa
By Xon_Fedaa (Apr 4, 2012)

"Xon, you're dealing with execs who have to run the press releases by marketing and legal and then have them translated."

That's no excuse.

"Now, I see from your posting history that you're a Sigma or Foveon fan . . ."

Wrong.

. . . so you really, really don't want to get in any sort of shouting match . . ."

I am not in a shouting match. I'm simply stating the facts. Sorry if they offend you. Plus, do you really feel the need to use forums to threaten people?

Regards,

Xon

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 5, 2012)

Facts do not offend me.

You offend me, but you have no facts, so that just proves that facts do not offend me.

I have not threatened you, except by stating facts, so it appears that facts not only offend you, but you actually feel threatened by them.

Do you really feel the need to use forums to belittle people?

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Gentlemen... step back...

Press releases are passed through the marketing people and they get edited away from what the technical people are saying. Then they pass through translators and a statement changes from "nebulas AND the solar system" in Japanese, to "nebulas IN the solar system" in english. Are we really anal enough to nitpick over things like that? We should laugh at those things, not fight over them.... I still smile when I think of Sony and the "exploding view" of thier camera, when it is obvious that they meant "exploded view".....

A press release means that something new is coming. We have seen a few samples and they look interesting but remember that those are PROCESSED images that have been vetted by the marketing people. Most people realize this and can't wait to see an independent review.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 5, 2012)

Donald, that's pretty much what I said about the execs, marketing folk, and translators. ;)

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

@Joeseph... agreed! Translating technical documents is a minefield... Translaters are language experts and usually have very little technical knowledge. I see this all the time at work. Another favourite translation involved the definition of equipment failure and somehow got translated to "ejection of parts".. I hope that radio never fails.....

0 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Apr 3, 2012)

LOL what a ripoff. Canon is getting utterly destroyed with every new half-baked product they try to turn out. Just make another Rebel that's identical to the previous one already.

3 upvotes
Faintandfuzzy
By Faintandfuzzy (Apr 3, 2012)

The ripoff is from unknowledgeable people like you who do not understand the benefits for astrophotography posting like an expert

20 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

F&F, imagine how Icy would be praising the thing, if Sony had made it. ;)

1 upvote
rusticus
By rusticus (Apr 3, 2012)

what is this cheese for $ 1,500?

0 upvotes
roblarosa
By roblarosa (Apr 3, 2012)

So it's a camera specifically for taking photos of the Jetson's dog? Ruh-roh!

1 upvote
Tom McKee
By Tom McKee (Apr 3, 2012)

Thank you Canan. Many astrophotographers will be pleased to have a raplacement for their old 20Da cameras.

10 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Apr 3, 2012)

The question that comes to mind from an ignorant person about astrophotography.. Can one use this as a regular camera?

1 upvote
kimvette
By kimvette (Apr 3, 2012)

Yes, if you are willing to invest in a "hot mirror"/IR filter to put on the front of your lenses.

One like this:
http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-52mm-Hot-Mirror-Filter/dp/B00004ZCKQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1333475220&sr=8-1

This camera should also be very good for IR photography in general, of landscapes and cityscapes.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

If the 60Da is anything like the 20Da, it already has two hot mirrors, and doesn't need another.

"Regular" cameras have two IR blocking filters, a hot mirror and a blue-green "Schott BG-34" style absorption filter. Canon replaced the blue-green filter in the 20D with a second hot mirror to make the 20Da. This boosts the h-Alpha sensitivity 3-4 times, but cuts IR even more than a "stock" camera, for sharper images with expensive refractor scopes (and to avoid the Sony "x-ray camera" debacle).

The filter you need for regular color photography is a "BG-34" type, like a B+W 489.

Oh, and sorry, kimvette, but it sounds like 60Da isn't going to work for "general" IR photography.

0 upvotes
Richie Beans
By Richie Beans (Apr 3, 2012)

20 cent filter and software tweak + old camera = new niche product.

Well done, Canon!

8 upvotes
Prestidigitator
By Prestidigitator (Apr 3, 2012)

N0ink troll is trolling. Ghey.

6 upvotes
Alizarine
By Alizarine (Apr 4, 2012)

He's got a point, actually.

0 upvotes
oscarvdvelde
By oscarvdvelde (Apr 3, 2012)

"hydrogen-alpha light sensitivity that is approximately three times higher than that of a normal Canon DSLR camera. This produces a 20-percent higher transmittance ..."

Confusing at first, but it seems to mean that the quantum efficiency at 656 nm is 10% in standard Canon cameras, and 30% in this camera.
That would make it more sensitive than 5D and 5D II, or a modified 40D, see these graphs: http://www.astrosurf.com/buil/50d/test.htm

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

I think you nailed it. I don't know the transmission of Canon's particular blue-green balancing filter, but the Schott BG-34 that is the grandfather of them all is just 8% transmission at 656nm. Pulling that got us a 3 stop boost for h-Alpha.

2 upvotes
oscarvdvelde
By oscarvdvelde (Apr 3, 2012)

It would be interesting to see where they cut the spectrum. It used to be at about 700 nm. For my own purposes (not quite astro, nor IR) I'd be very happy if it stretches to 760 nm, but I'm not holding my breath.

0 upvotes
pntbll248
By pntbll248 (Apr 3, 2012)

Glad to see Canon making a niche product.

2 upvotes
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Apr 3, 2012)

This is a prime example of how Canon captures and keeps core customers. They did it with the 20Da and people still swear by that machine.

I would like to see the flip screen go away and eventually see an out-of-box ThermoElectric Cooling system added at some point for those who don't feel like tearing their camera apart to do so.

Why? Because some of us don't want to drop every thing and go CCD. Canon is comfortable to use and if you've been using their gear to do the job for years, why change every thing in mid-stride?

Well done, Canon. I knew they would answer the call again but didn't know with what model.

1 upvote
treepop
By treepop (Apr 3, 2012)

wha!? Of all things...Don't most people mod their cameras on their own? I dunno.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

A lot of people send them in to places like LifePixel or MadMax, but a lot of other people, especially purchasing people, like the simplicity of ordering what you want, and they like warranties.

2 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (Apr 3, 2012)

THANK YOU, JOSEPH !

I'm posting this reply here near the top, but it is such a relief to see ALL your precise and astutely informative responses.

Also, to be honest, it has saved me huge keyboard response time as you have allowed me to sit back and enjoy the banter, and be confident that you are out there, ready, willing, and more than able to most knowledgeably clarify, inform, and keep things straight !

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

You're quite welcome, Ben.

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Likewise, thank you Joseph. I have learned much from your postings.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Apr 3, 2012)

Thank you, Canon.

1 upvote
Donny_B
By Donny_B (Apr 3, 2012)

Is this an April fools joke

3 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Apr 3, 2012)

It's easy to think so, but actually Canon had an EOS 20Da which was specifically designed for astro. So why not a replacement? I think it is a good idea if they can sell a so special model. Good luck to Canon.

2 upvotes
MYKC
By MYKC (Apr 3, 2012)

Well done Canon (from a micro 4/3 user) for releasing a camera aimed at a small niche market! It is two cameras in one, a normal DSLR, and a camera suitable for astroimaging. However, I'm confused as to how large the increase in red sensitivity will actually be. The press release states that "hydrogen-alpha light sensitivity that is approximately three times higher than that of a normal Canon DSLR camera. This produces a 20-percent higher transmittance of Hydrogen Alpha line".
The "silent shooting" feature is also interesting; I wonder how it is implemented? The fully articulated LCD is great for use with telescopes (as is the case with the Panasonic GH2).
Can the 60D produce video using just the small central portion of the sensor? That would make it a great camera for imaging the planets too.
Most astrophotographers who use DSLRs favour Canon, and many astroimaging software packages have features for PC control of Canon cameras, so this will generate a lot of interest.

2 upvotes
MaikeruN
By MaikeruN (Apr 3, 2012)

"silent shooting" is available to all canon dlsrs capable of liveview

1 upvote
Pedagydusz
By Pedagydusz (Apr 3, 2012)

Yes, if I am not mistaken, the 60D can produce video like the "Extended Tele Converter" or whatever it is called in the GH2 and G3. Very useful for a number of things.

0 upvotes
CNY_AP
By CNY_AP (Apr 3, 2012)

I do not think my XSI can do silent shooting. Can the T3i?

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

One of the 60D video modes is "CROP 640", whic h is a 640 x 400 video cropped from the center portion of the sensor, sort of like an 8 or 9 times digital zoom. I have been playing with it to shoot jupiter and Saturn and usinf photo-stacking to get far better quality results than any individual frame.

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Yes, the 60D does silent shooting and mirror lockup.... a remote shutter is a WONDERFUL option to get as pressing the shutter release means camera shake.

The quick solution is to use the timer to take pictures, but set it for 10 seconds as 2 seconds is not long enough for things to settle down.

0 upvotes
K_Photo_Teach
By K_Photo_Teach (Apr 3, 2012)

Pentax could compete with this if they did a special astrophotography DSLR because of the GPS adjusting the sensor using the sensor stabilizer to prevent start trailing.

Would LOVE for other manufacturers to bring out similiar tech

3 upvotes
Don Glenn
By Don Glenn (Apr 3, 2012)

I like how you are thinking, but you need an accurate digital compass and of course tilt data in 3d. Got me thinking about other options, it is a fun subject, but i think it would end up being too expensive to build for the number that would sell.

Maybe firmware that assumes a stable tripod, it takes a few pictures over 2-3 minutes, calculates the star movement, then correct based on that data. That could be done. But the camera would have to remain stationary, and the focal length would have to be fixed.

0 upvotes
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (Apr 3, 2012)

@Don Glenn
From your reply it seems that you're not aware that Pentax already makes a GPS attachment for its K-5 camera that does exactly what K_Photo_Teach indicated - it detects the camera's location and orientation and uses the sensor-shift capabilities of its IS system to compensate for star movement. If this were combined with a astrophoto-optimized sensor it would be a terrific combination.

See, for example: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1036&thread=39284452

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Astrophotography means LONG exposures. We are not talking ten or twenty seconds here.... we are talking half hour range...

Cameras that "track motion" need enough light to be able to detect that motion and for a lot of astrophography there may not be enough.

0 upvotes
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 3, 2012)

An expensive and ineffective way to discover the sky.

2 upvotes
Prestidigitator
By Prestidigitator (Apr 3, 2012)

Lol. You must be new to DSLRs. The 20Da was significantly more expensive than this one. And it's not for you equipment-measurebating gadget collectors. Stick to your camphones and overpriced tablets.

8 upvotes
openskyline
By openskyline (Apr 3, 2012)

Consider the knowledge gain from this camera, the price is a bargain.

4 upvotes
Faintandfuzzy
By Faintandfuzzy (Apr 3, 2012)

Ineffective? You obviously know nothing about photographing nebulas, etc.

2 upvotes
rgibbons
By rgibbons (Apr 3, 2012)

Seems like I don't know much about astronomy as I thought I did, I never knew there were nebula in our solar system to be celebrated, as Cannon is quoted as saying in this article. I've only seen Hydrogen Alpha line photographs of nebula outside of our solar system.

“This new camera enables an accurate depiction of a part of our solar system which is hard to achieve with conventional cameras but should be enjoyed and celebrated.”

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 3, 2012)

It is so funny that someone think this camera is able to capture the image in the outer space like the imaging systems in Mount Graham International Observatories or Roque de los Muchachos Observatories...
Guys, a $1,400 camera is not able to do that. To learn the outer space, you need to spend billion of dollars.

0 upvotes
Iskender
By Iskender (Apr 4, 2012)

rgibbons: You are right about not knowing that much. Your quote says nothing about nebulae - they're actually talking about the sun. Being a big ball of mostly hydrogen, it emits plenty of h-alpha. The sun is hard to capture with conventional equipment, as the quote says.

Edmond Leung: I don't think anyone thinks this camera will be able to capture anything but a blur without a lens. If we are allowed to mount it on the other hand we can use any telescope with an adapter. Even with amateur scopes and stacking you can see hundreds of milions of light years out.

This camera can easily produce stunning images of extragalactic objects like M31 and M33. Many other deep sky objects are even easier. You should do some searches, billions are certainly *not* needed for the deep sky.

0 upvotes
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 4, 2012)

Iskender,
I don't know whether you are fully understand the technologies of astronomical photography and the theories behind that.
It seems your requirements in astronomical photography is fairly easy be satisfied.

0 upvotes
Iskender
By Iskender (Apr 4, 2012)

Edmond Leung: So what specifically do you think this camera can't do when mounted on a telescope? Angular resolution isn't generally about the sensor, but the telescope, so this camera isn't the limiting factor there. Noise, sensitivity and artifacting are concerns, but they can be alleviated by stacking.

More importantly, what exactly do you think should be captured? What's the limit for making this good enough? This camera is good for at least millions of light years. People do hours of exposure for a single image with these cameras.

Basically, if this is expensive and ineffective, then what's the cheap and efficient option?

0 upvotes
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 5, 2012)

Iskender,
The problem of this camera is you don’t know the range of its sensitivity in the whole electromagnetic wave spectrum.
We all know the galaxy involves extremely wide range of electromagnetic waves, and that’s the reason why do we need different types of telescopes for different kinds of observations.
A single general purpose sensor (like this camera) is not able to achieve in obtaining a specific wave length for space observation purpose.
Remember, the range of electromagnetic wave spectrum for space observation is so wide… from radio wave to gamma ray. That’s the reason why do you need to invest billion of dollars in space observation. It is not as simple as such a camera can do it.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Faintandfuzzy
By Faintandfuzzy (Apr 11, 2012)

Edmund, you clearly have no idea what you're talking about. The spectral response of the 60Da, like the 20Da, is known. The important part is the extended sensitivity to the Hydrogen Alpha part of the spectrum...which is where a lot of the light from emission nebula is emitted. You don't need billions of dollars for this. With a small 8" or 12" scope, and a 60Da, you can easily get deeper than 20th magnitude. Please stop posting on this...you're making a complete fool of yourself by trying to sound like an authority on the topic....when you obviously don't understand the first thing about astrophotography.

1 upvote
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 13, 2012)

You know more if you study more.

0 upvotes
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 13, 2012)

Faintandfuzzy,

You need to learn more about the science of electromagnetic wave, then your vision will be broader and your thinking about astrophotography will be in the right track.

Don't too focus on the toys that you are now using, there are so many knowledge that you need to acquire.

0 upvotes
itchhh
By itchhh (Apr 3, 2012)

This is interesting.... Adorama is selling it!

http://www.adorama.com/ICA60DA.html?emailprice=t&j=Email040312Canon&utm_term=Other&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Email040312Canon&utm_source=ET

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
H Ryan
By H Ryan (Apr 3, 2012)

B&H has it listed now, too.

0 upvotes
tralalax
By tralalax (Apr 3, 2012)

hey...Nikon was NASA's brand of choice

1 upvote
Ryan_Valiente
By Ryan_Valiente (Apr 4, 2012)

Canon shoots the Outer Space.

Nikon shoots from the Outer Space.

Huge difference there.

:)

0 upvotes
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (Apr 3, 2012)

April Fools.

2 upvotes
f64Craft
By f64Craft (Apr 3, 2012)

They did it lol yeah canon listens to their customers. YaY, feedback :o)

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 3, 2012)

No built-in astrotracer like Pentax DSLRs have?

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

The Pentax astrotracer capability isn't for this sort of photography. It can only track for a few minutes with "regular" lenses, and for a few seconds with a telescope.

Scopes are pretty much always used with motorized tracking mounts, so they can go for hours.

0 upvotes
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Apr 3, 2012)

Fun fact, the Canon 20Da was the first canon DSLR with liveview.

3 upvotes
Total comments: 227
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