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Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography

By dpreview staff on Apr 3, 2012 at 07:04 GMT

Canon has launched the EOS 60Da, a variant of its 60D DSLR tuned for astrophotography. The camera features a re-worked infra-red filter leaving the camera more sensitive to a specific emission frequency (656nm) of hydrogen, key to capturing images of features such as nebulae (gas clouds) in space. The 18MP camera continues where 2005's 8MP EOS 20Da left off. It will be available from a limited number of authorized dealers at a price of around $1499.00/£1174.99.


Press Release:

NEW CANON EOS 60Da DSLR CAMERA FOR ASTRONOMY ENTHUSIASTS CAPTURES THE TRUE COLORS OF THE COSMOS

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., April 3, 2012 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today introduced the EOS 60Da Digital SLR Camera, a long-awaited successor to the EOS 20Da that is optimized for astrophotography. This DSLR caters to astronomers and hobbyists who enjoy capturing the beauty of the night sky by offering a modified infrared filter and a low-noise sensor with heightened hydrogen-alpha sensitivity. These modifications allow the camera to capture magnificent photographs of “red hydrogen emission” nebulae and other cosmic phenomena.

“The EOS 60Da is a testament to the constant desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A., “This new camera enables an accurate depiction of a part of our solar system which is hard to achieve with conventional cameras but should be enjoyed and celebrated.”

The Canon EOS 60Da camera packs a powerful 18-megapixel CMOS sensor (APS-C) that produces sharp and high-contrast images of astronomical objects, a major enhancement over the EOS 20Da model’s 8.2-megapixel sensor. The improved infrared-blocking filter is a modification suited specifically toward astronomy enthusiasts to achieve a hydrogen-alpha light sensitivity that is approximately three times higher than that of a normal Canon DSLR camera. This produces a 20-percent higher transmittance of Hydrogen Alpha line, or Hα wavelength, allowing astronomers to capture crisp, clear images of reddish, diffuse nebulae.

Enhanced Features

Crisp images of the stars and planets can be viewed on the EOS 60Da’s improved 3.0-inch Clear View LCD screen with 1,040,000 dots for detailed focusing. The flip-out Vari-angle screen allows photographers to adjust the screen for easy viewing without straining even while the camera is mounted to a telescope via a third-party T-ring adapter. Optimized for stargazing with friends or in an educational setting, astronomy enthusiasts can connect the camera to a TV with the provided AVC-DC400ST Stereo AV Video Cable and display the night sky on a TV monitor using the camera’s Live View mode. Moreover, the EOS 60Da’s Live View mode is equipped with a Silent Shooting feature that eliminates shutter-induced vibration for maximum camera stability when the camera is mounted to a telescope or super-telephoto EF lens.

Enhanced noise reduction on the EOS 60Da sensor offers photographers the ability to experiment with the wide array of ISO settings and increased ISO speeds up to 6400 expandable to 12800. Other features include an intelligent nine-point autofocus system, full manual controls, and RAW, JPEG, and RAW+JPEG image recording capabilities.

Accessories

The EOS 60Da helps capture the wonders of the night sky with its use of Canon’s award-winning EF and EF-S lenses along with other EOS accessories. Additionally, the EOS 60Da is packaged with Canon’s RA-E3 Remote Controller Adapter, providing the ability to connect a Canon Timer Remote Control such as the TC-80N3 (optional accessory). The TC-80N3 is ideal for controlling time exposures longer than 30 seconds as well as capturing a series of consecutive time exposures that can be composited during post-processing for improved image quality. This is especially useful when the camera body is connected to a telescope[i] or an EF super telephoto lens. 

Canon has also included an AC adapter kit with the EOS 60Da, allowing the camera to be powered through an AC wall outlet or a battery-powered inverter, ideal for long exposure image or video capture at home or in the field. 

Availability

As a specialized product, the EOS 60Da is only available to order from select authorized dealers. The estimated retail price is $1,499.00 and it is expected to be available this month.

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Comments

Total comments: 227
12
Suat Ateslier
By Suat Ateslier (Apr 3, 2012)

What are the differences from my 60D ??

0 upvotes
Thorbard
By Thorbard (Apr 3, 2012)

How it performs in the red and infra-red spectrums. If you don't understand what that means, you don't need the featrues!

8 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

I guess that means you, Thorbard. Canon "a" cameras, like 20Da actually block more infrared than conventional Canons. They omit the blue green (BG-34 type) filter, and add an second dichroic IR cut. This is done specifically to keep the camera from working as an IR camera, because of the negative press from the Sony "x-ray" camera incident.

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 4, 2012)

And, to give sharper shots with refractors, which aren't well corrected into the IR.

0 upvotes
Thorbard
By Thorbard (May 3, 2012)

What part of my comment are you saying was untrue?

And for the record, no, I don't have much use for the camera, so yes, I am in that category. But still, which bit was incorrect?

0 upvotes
MisoL
By MisoL (Apr 3, 2012)

Besides astro-photography, this camera is suitable also for infrared photography and underwater photo/video, where red channel is very weak and correcting white ballance introduce lot of red noise. I'm using CSC camera with removed ir-cut filter for underwater and infrared photography.

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

Agree about the underwater shooting, but it's not at all suitable for IR work.

The Canon "a" filter pack lets more visible red (like H-alpha) through, but blocks IR. Several years ago, people discovered you could use Sony's "nite shot" camcorders as infrared cameras, and, under just the right conditions, this would enhance your ability to see a woman's undies through her clothes. Next thing you know, people have overblown this near useless ability into the "x-ray" camera scare. Crowds of angry mothers actually burnt and smashed Sony products in "protect our precious children from perverts with Sonys" rallies.

0 upvotes
guyl
By guyl (Apr 3, 2012)

how's the GN of the built in flash in this one? :)

3 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Apr 3, 2012)

It's not a regular flash anymore. It's some kind of death ray. Just point it at the moon and voilá, a new asteroid belt is born.

14 upvotes
Prestidigitator
By Prestidigitator (Apr 3, 2012)

It's so strong it can fully illuminate the dark side of the moon and reveal the subterranean alien base hiding there for eons. On Earth grounds, you can also use it like a flash-bang grenade to stun and dazzle chasing rabid, frothing-at-the-mouth Noink fanb0is...

2 upvotes
dopravopat
By dopravopat (Apr 3, 2012)

Revenant:
So that was on the Death Star! :-) A Bunch of pre-production Canon EOS 60Da´s.

0 upvotes
Suat Ateslier
By Suat Ateslier (Apr 3, 2012)

Astro-Bust !!! I will use Sony anymore !!!

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Apr 3, 2012)

Huh?

6 upvotes
Prestidigitator
By Prestidigitator (Apr 3, 2012)

Double huh. I don't never ever understand you no anymore no more!

1 upvote
mahonj
By mahonj (Apr 3, 2012)

Why don't camera companies make the occasional monochrome camera - no bayer filter, no quarter wave plate, just very sensitive, very sharp images.

It would be very specialist and would sell in small-medium numbers, but if you can build an astro version, you should be able to build a mono version.

Apart from the different software/firmware, can anyone think of a reason ?

Canon sell so many 60Ds and 600Ds, they should be able to run a few mono versions.

4 upvotes
Rupert Bottomsworth
By Rupert Bottomsworth (Apr 3, 2012)

Probably because it wouldn't be profitable.

5 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Apr 3, 2012)

There is one but is very, very expensive, pricier than MF cameras.

1 upvote
rare wolf
By rare wolf (Apr 3, 2012)

... Because. You'd still want to occasionally modify the response to color, which still requires RGB, which would still moire, which would still require the filters you want to exclude ...

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
1 upvote
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Apr 3, 2012)

@rare wolf
That's what coloured filters are for :P remember those?

You want to know the real reason? because the ISO performance would absolutely demolish their pro cameras so people would feel compelled to buy them. Then after they bought them they would start complaining that it was specialized.

Without a bayer filter you would collect 3 times as much light at every photosite(a bayer blocks 2/3 colors every pixel). This would triple the relative ISO settings, this would lead to complications like a high minimum ISO(near ISO 300 equiv).

And obviously raw files wouldn't really work with any available software since they assume a bayer arrangement. although a raw file is already just a 14bit black and white tiff file in a container so they could just give you that.

1 upvote
deniz erdem
By deniz erdem (Apr 3, 2012)

there is a rumor that leica will make a monochrome M camera. i would definetely be interested in something like that.

1 upvote
MaikeruN
By MaikeruN (Apr 3, 2012)

True B/W is available if you can afford it. It's called Achromatic+, by PhaseOne

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

@bradleyg5, actually, because the filter responses overlap, and because the green is the widest response of all and accounts for half the pixels, the filter loss for Bayer pattern cameras is under 50%. So, there's no "demolish" issue, and nothing "real" about your "real reason". Sorry.

"And obviously raw files wouldn't really work with any available software"

Actually, they do. Several Bayer demosaic algorithms, such as VNG (variable number of gradients) treat the image as "locally monochromatic" to begin with, and perform quite well when fed from a pure monochrome camera. Been there, done that. Raw Therapee has VNG as one of its available algorithms, and I believe Lightroom 4 does, just not by name.

And, of course, mImage has native monochrome support, but that's a subject for another day.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
pntbll248
By pntbll248 (Apr 3, 2012)

You could try a Sigma SD1/Merrill with white balance set to monochrome. No bayer array, no anti-aliasing filter, and high ISOs are usable in monochrome (no color banding or color noise that foveon produces). Without the need for color filter array interpolation, per-pixel sharpness is outstanding.

Other than new software/firmware, you would want to remove the RGB color filters from the individual photodiodes on the sensor. I mean, it's not like you're building a whole new sensor, so it shouldn't be too hard to do (but again, I'm no sensor engineer). By removing the filters, you get full luminance information at each pixel, leaving you with an extremely sharp image with slightly better ISO performance. Kodak tried it back in the day with one of their DSLRs, the few that they sold are still sought after today.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

"if you can build an astro version, you should be able to build a mono version."

Actually, you can't, because the filters they change for the astro version are in front of the sensor, and the color filters are inside the sensor. Astro means making a change on the assembly line, put in this filter instead of that one. No extra QA, EMC, etc. testing. It can even be a repair-shop level modification. On the production line, you can make any quantity you want. 10, 100, 1000? Just give the assembly people the right number of filters.

The color filters are placed on the chip surface during IC fabrication. Changes to them require you to set up new fab steps, and make a new chip run. You have to get the quantity right, because the quantities are large (on a like like Canon's) and can't be changed quickly. Then you have to QA the new chips, and the cameras with the new chips, and do the EMC tests, because you've "changed" a chip.

That's why the monochrome Phase One cost an extra $12,000.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

@pntbll248, you probably don't want to bother with an SD-1 in monochrome mode, for three reasons.
* It has no liveview. The original 20Da had one of the first, rather rough and experimental, liveview systems, something they didn't put on the original 20D.
* It's monochrome. Look at the picture on the 60Da screen in the press release. Astrophotography is a colorful field.
* It's not as good as the Canon in very long exposures, and monochrome mode doesn't address that.

0 upvotes
pntbll248
By pntbll248 (Apr 3, 2012)

@Joseph: I was replying to Mahonj's comment regarding dedicated monochrome cameras ("if you can build an astro version, you should be able to build a mono version"). I'd hate to use the SD1/M for any kind of astrophotography, photos turn purple after about 8 seconds of long exposure :P But for what it's worth, the SD1/M makes a wonderful B/W dedicated camera for less exotic subjects.

0 upvotes
rare wolf
By rare wolf (Apr 3, 2012)

"That's what coloured filters are for :P remember those?"

Do you remember film? Was the panchromatic response of Tri-X the same as Pan-X ... Ilford?? ... Agfa?? Just what panchromatic response would you care to have in your BW camera?? Are you going to leave it to filters and need to jump from ISO100 to ISO400?? Jeez Louise what a bad idea!!

0 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Apr 3, 2012)

Does it have GPS ?
No ???

Oh no. I don't want to go Sony but I need that bloody GPS "integrated"

1 upvote
MaikeruN
By MaikeruN (Apr 3, 2012)

why do you "need" it?

0 upvotes
Dheorl
By Dheorl (Apr 3, 2012)

Hmm, now to see if I can talk my physics department into buying one =), sounds like it could be some fun.

1 upvote
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Apr 3, 2012)

Maxmax offers more flavors than this, if it's science ye be aftar.

High ISO astrophotography? Next they'll be suggesting flash astrophotography...

0 upvotes
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Apr 3, 2012)

because everybody has a motorized tripod...

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

@michamedia, you're talking about a field you don't understand, at all. Astrophotographers have been pushing the limits of ISO for over a century. They have various techniques for "hypering" film, such as soaking it in different chemical baths, "baking" it to achieve different silver grain geometries, and gassing it in tanks of pressurized hydrogen nitrogen mixtures. There's "preflashing", to tip more grains to near activation potential, then "latensification", to trip grains that were exposed "almost enough".

Where do you think the "back illuminated" sensors that are so popular now in small cameras came from? That's an astro technique, except they did it by hand, etching away sensors. There's also cooled sensors, with either big Peltier (solid state) coolers, refrigeration pumps, or liquid gas coolers.

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

@bradleyg5, in astrophotography, EVERYBODY does have a motorized tripod.

0 upvotes
Faintandfuzzy
By Faintandfuzzy (Apr 3, 2012)

True Joseph. I was hypering Kodak Tech Pan and the 103a series of films back in the early 80's. Had a home built hypering chamber and the forming gas tanks. I've still got my old hypering tank. I also did a fair bit with a cold camera and dry ice...which I found locked in color balance better than hypering.

1 upvote
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Canon's sample images are ISO1600 for 480 seconds. I have been playing with a regular 60D and seem to like the 1600 to 3200 range with good results. I used a different make of camera and found that going beyond 800 was unusable.

Yeah, I would say that high ISO performance is important.

0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Apr 11, 2012)

@Joseph S Wisniewski: your first paragraph is by amateurs, for amateurs, and your second is described like something your read once in a book--either you're trying to dumb it down, or you don't know what you think you know.

I'm not sure how to address the impropriety with which you've addressed me except with this: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/kathryn_schulz_on_being_wrong.html

0 upvotes
PeterZOOM
By PeterZOOM (Apr 3, 2012)

Nice to see some new Canon stuff, interesting, a camera for astrophotography with hotshoe and build-in flash ... okay then.

0 upvotes
gonzalu
By gonzalu (Apr 3, 2012)

It's "built-in" not build-in... Anyway, I guess it could be used asa regular camera too with a hot mirror filter on the lens! For $1500, most people would like it to also be a regular camera!

3 upvotes
melgaard
By melgaard (Apr 3, 2012)

Well I suppose it is not completely useless at regular photography, and hence those features remains, but y it does make one stop up and...

"that seems... hey... Wait... What?... o.O"... :D

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
misolo
By misolo (Apr 3, 2012)

It would surely cost more money to make changes to the body design than they would save by keeping those components out. By restricting the changes to the color filter and firmware they can keep the price down due to otherwise exploiting the economies of scale from the manufacture of the regular 60D.

3 upvotes
Narcosynthesis
By Narcosynthesis (Apr 3, 2012)

Sure a built in flash may be useless for astrophotography,but from Canon's end, given the relatively small amount of these that they will produce, it probably costs them less overall to just leave the parts in place than it would to retool the production lines more extensively that would be needed to replace the flash and related mechanics with nothing.

2 upvotes
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Apr 3, 2012)

You never seen a portrait of someone with the milky way behind them? Use the flash for fill light and then longer exposure for the sky.

1 upvote
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Apr 3, 2012)

Please stand still for 30 minutes in front of the milky way. Otherwise you will get thousands of stars shining through you in the photo.

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

@gonzalu, it's "as a", not "asa". Muphry strikes!

More seriously, the "a" cameras have a better "hot mirror" (sharp cutoff IR blocker) than a regular camera. The filter you need for regular color photography is a "BG-34" type, like a B+W 489.

0 upvotes
Parsek
By Parsek (Apr 3, 2012)

Great news, very interesting camera. Can not wait to see results.

PS: Canon needs to outfit all future dSLR's with swivel screens.

2 upvotes
dresner
By dresner (Apr 3, 2012)

Just get a Sony DSLT, we have amazing articulated screens :D

4 upvotes
h2k
By h2k (Apr 3, 2012)

As for Sony swivel screens, they only swivel vertically. Side-hinging à la Canon is much more flexible, and i don't mean only for self-portraits.

1 upvote
labe
By labe (Apr 3, 2012)

take a look at the A77 screen. It raises above the camera and rotates forward as well.

2 upvotes
dresner
By dresner (Apr 3, 2012)

I have the A77, screen twists in every direction, its amazing... just like the camera!

0 upvotes
MaikeruN
By MaikeruN (Apr 3, 2012)

...And when it breaks, everybody cries.

1 upvote
Andew
By Andew (Apr 4, 2012)

Can the 70D be far behind?

If I'm not mistaken when the 10D/20D? astro came out, the ''normal'' version appeared a few weeks later. It has been quite awhile for the 60D.

0 upvotes
Andew
By Andew (Apr 5, 2012)

If I'm not mistaken, after the introduction of the 20Da, a few weeks later another model came out. Could this mean a 70D soon?

0 upvotes
healer81
By healer81 (Apr 3, 2012)

Very smart of them. Although I wont be getting it, I am sure a lot of people will. And people were bitching and complaining about Canon. They never lost their mojo peoples

1 upvote
Greg VdB
By Greg VdB (Apr 3, 2012)

Hats off to Canon for bringing this on the market! (if I was into astronomy I'd be psyched out right now) Since 2005 so many improvements have been made to all facets of digital cameras that the difference with the 20Da will be much much more than just the jump from 8 to 18MP. Can't wait to see the results in the fora here ;)

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
garyknrd
By garyknrd (Apr 3, 2012)

A plus for me. VERRRRRY good Canon. I will buy one for sure. :) I am an old amateur astronomer. So right down my alley.

1 upvote
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Apr 3, 2012)

http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/slr_cameras/eos_60da

1 upvote
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Apr 3, 2012)

Interesting... this is the second XXDa model since 20Da was first to offer ExpSim LV for optimal preview of DR of luminous cosmic bodies... and selection of exposure-ISO-sensitivity parameters 'live'
But now with VASS (Vari-Angle Swivel Screen of 60D and PowerShots)
I wonder if the EV range for ExpSim LV is extended to much longer exposures.
I wonder if the Da spec IR filter also improves Solar spectrum IR photography as well (video along with stills).
I hope the multiple exposure composite feature is allowed in JPEG mode, not just RAW mode.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 3, 2012)

No. It actually cuts more IR than a conventional filter. If you want to do near IR astronomy, your best choice is having the camera's IR blocking filter removed entirely. That's not a "politically correct" option for Canon to offer, but it's a superior solution for most astro needs.

0 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Apr 3, 2012)

anyways nikon is up there in the sky aboard the ISS.

4 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Apr 3, 2012)

Are you sure Nikons are good for astronomic shots ??

This is genuine question, cause I don't know.

I've been told that the Nikon clips shadows that is not very good for astrophotography. Whether it is still the case for their recent cameras, I don't know

1 upvote
misolo
By misolo (Apr 3, 2012)

In reply to rondhamalam: astrophotography (other than the big-budget stuff) is almost exclusively done with Canon cameras. You should confirm this with an actual astronomer, but I believe the reason is that Nikon's RAW files are not quite as "raw" as Canon's (noise reduction, I think).

1 upvote
Thorbard
By Thorbard (Apr 3, 2012)

He is refering to the fact that Nikon supply all the DSLRs that are used by all nations on the ISS. From there, they're not really looking for astrophotography abilities.

1 upvote
kubrik111
By kubrik111 (Apr 3, 2012)

For your information... (french and english)

http://www.astrosurf.com/~buil/nikon_test/test.htm

1 upvote
robert1955
By robert1955 (Apr 4, 2012)

"anyways nikon is up there in the sky aboard the ISS"
but I'm not

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Timbukto
By Timbukto (Apr 3, 2012)

Releasing a 60Da sort of implies that the 60D has plenty of shelf life still? Which in turn sort of puts a cap as to how much you can really expect out of a 650D...

0 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (Apr 3, 2012)

Well thats cool....I had never even heard of the 20Da. Im Impressed by Canon for releasing this.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Apr 3, 2012)

20Da was first Canon EOS dSLR with ExpSim LV but the ExpSim LV at the time was restricted to astrophotography only.
And primarily available to 'Japan Only' markets although a few who wanted it, did get it outside.
At the time, I was quite pleased, as I mentioned it in the forums that 'live-view' was finally coming to dSLRs, and it was a prelude of things to come.

(unfortunately back then, i got a lot of flak on DPR forums for suggesting even having it, or that it was 'difficult' or 'impractical' to have 'live-view' on a dSLR)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
Jim in AZ
By Jim in AZ (Apr 3, 2012)

The 20a was impressive but this should be even more so with the higher resolution.

2 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Apr 3, 2012)

18-55mm lens is perfect for ASTRONOMY...right?

5 upvotes
guillealv
By guillealv (Apr 3, 2012)

only when attached to the supplied x100 TC :)

1 upvote
Barbu
By Barbu (Apr 3, 2012)

18-135mm, actually. Hell yeah, much better :)

1 upvote
goshigoo
By goshigoo (Apr 3, 2012)

You need a 1200 f/5.8 paired with 2xTC
2400mm would be awesome

2 upvotes
Synchronium
By Synchronium (Apr 3, 2012)

With a 600d, 500mm + 2x teleconverter = 1600mm efl, you can see colour bands on jupiter. Eff Why Eye.

1 upvote
LoganVii
By LoganVii (Apr 3, 2012)

I use a Celestron C-8 as a lens, no need for a 2x or 3x TC.

2 upvotes
Prestidigitator
By Prestidigitator (Apr 3, 2012)

Just goes to show that this product is not for ignorant equipment-measurebating gadget collectors. :P

1 upvote
star shooter
By star shooter (Apr 3, 2012)

I'm getting one. Can't wait to use it on a Celestron 14 inch @ F1.9 scope or my 12 inch F7 Classical Cass or with the F2.8 L series lenses.... Eta Carina Nebula aka NGC 3372 is going to bloody awesome!

1 upvote
astroBob
By astroBob (Apr 4, 2012)

I suggest every naysayer should take their camera outside (whatever camera that is), put it on a table pointing up at the clear night sky and snap a 20 second time exposure. You will be astounded by what your camera picks up. You just might be turned on enough to want to explore longer exposures of even more beautiful night sky objects. You will then begin to appreciate the features offered by this 60D"a" camera.
I look forward to when I can try one of these.
Oh... I've been imaging with a 20Da since '06. I also image with an SBIG ST-4000XCM, ST-2000 XCM, Genesis16 and a variety of other smaller ccd guide cameras. Astrophotography is tough. This sounds like a great, low cost entry into that world.

0 upvotes
DonaldHaines
By DonaldHaines (Apr 5, 2012)

Yes, I use my 60D on a telescope..... but I also use it with regular lenses.... including a 10-20mm zoom. (ever try to take a picture of the milky way with a telescope??????) Not all astrophotograpy is through 20 inch telescopes.....

0 upvotes
Total comments: 227
12