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Carl Zeiss launches CZ.2 70-200/T2.9 Compact Tele Zoom cine lens

By dpreview staff on Apr 16, 2012 at 19:44 GMT

Carl Zeiss has launched the CZ.2 70-200/T2.9 cine lens at the NAB show in Las Vegas. The company says it allows movie makers to only use one lens to cover the short to long tele range. With a weight of only 2.8kg the lens is also a good addition to smaller and lighter HD video and cine cameras and ideal for hand-held operation.  The Compact Zoom CZ.2 70-200/T2.9 will be available in the fourth quarter of 2012, for a recommended retail price of US$19,900/€14,900 (excluding VAT).

Press Release:

Carl Zeiss Launches Compact Tele Zoom Lens at NAB 2012

Carl Zeiss CZ.2 70-200/T2.9: Compact Tele Zoom Cine Lens

First full-frame cine zoom lens fitting all major camera types

OBERKOCHEN/Germany, 16.04.2012.
During the NAB Trade Show in Las Vegas from April 16-19, 2012, Carl Zeiss will show its first Compact Zoom CZ.2 lens to complement the Compact Prime CP.2 line of lenses. According to customer requests it is the first compact zoom lens of its kind with interchangeable mount and full frame capturing capability. The Compact Zoom CZ.2 70-200/T2.9 gives the filmmaker the choice of a single lens in the short-long telephoto range, perfect for separating the fore- and background areas or for situations when the subject is a distance from the camera.

“The Compact Zoom CZ.2 70-200/T2.9 is first in a line of zoom lenses designed for the owner- operator from Carl Zeiss that allows them to be used with a wide variety of current and future cameras, because of their compact design, full- frame coverage and interchangeable mounts”, notes Christian Bannert, Senior Director R&D, Carl Zeiss Camera Lens Division. “There has never been a zoom lens on the market with similar features."

The Compact Zoom CZ.2 lens is a perfect complement to the smaller, lighter HD video and cine cameras introduced in the last year. Especially when used with Steadicam systems, the weight of the lens and camera becomes a critical factor. Weighing only 2.8kg (6.2lbs), it opens up new creative opportunities for action sequences by allowing the camera to be used hand-held for a greater range of motion.

The Compact Zoom CZ.2 lenses feature an 18-blade aperture, which creates a round iris opening and a natural, out of focus rendition. As with the rest of the Compact Prime CP.2 family, the cine-style housing with gearing allows the attachment of any standard follow-focus system. By using the interchangeable mounts for PL, EF, F, MFT and E, the Compact Zoom CZ.2 lens can be easily adapted to numerous camera systems and ensures compatibility with future cameras as technology changes. The Carl Zeiss T* anti- reflection coating ensures the maximum contrast and color rendition by minimizing stray light and ghosting within the lens. The Compact Zoom CZ.2 delivers flare-free results and it has no focus shift over the whole zoom range.

More compact zoom lenses also made in Germany with additional focal lengths will be announced during the course of this year.

The Compact Zoom CZ.2 70-200/T2.9 will start shipping in the fourth quarter of 2012 at a recommended retail price of €14,900 or US$19,900 (excluding VAT)*.

* Status: 16 April, 2012

Comments

Total comments: 102
goodlucksdk
By goodlucksdk (Sep 1, 2012)

I wonder how it compares to my Canon EF 70-200 F2.8 IS II L. It is after all 8 times more expensive.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

Probably about the same for quality. Remember, in Germany the workers have much longer vacation times than in Japan, and have some fancy extra benefits as well, so hey, someone out there has to pay for all that, right?

0 upvotes
Leon Obers
By Leon Obers (Apr 21, 2012)

---

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 19, 2012)

http://blog.abelcine.com/2012/04/09/fujinons-new-19-90-t2-9-cabrio-35pl-zoom-lens/

http://blog.abelcine.com/2012/04/17/nab-12-coming-soon-fujinon-cabrio-85-300mm-t2-9-zoom/

The new Fujinon CABRIO zooms launched at NAB this week make this German import a non-event at any price, let alone at the crazy $20,000 price sticker they think they will get for it here in North America. Keep in mind that Zeiss Compact Zoom is covering FF 135 image circle, not Super 35 that the intended audience is likely using as their sensor.

Looking at this truly unique CABRIO convertible design, and then looking at the other cinema lenses makes one can appreciate the genius of Fujinon over these other old-school type players. You can use these two new Fujinon CABRIO zoom optics w/o the servo handler as regular cine-lenses, or convert them to totally all-power controlled servo zooms, truly amazing. Fresh ideas from Fujinon -- nothing much new or exciting from the other players in this niche, unfortunately.

0 upvotes
maico
By maico (Apr 21, 2012)

I don't understand what you mean. Super 35 coverage is 24.9 x 18.7. FF 135 is 36x24mm

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
maico
By maico (Apr 21, 2012)

So.. Despite the wider image circle the Zeiss is cheaper by $18000.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 21, 2012)

Yeah... I get it. You don't get these optics at all.

0 upvotes
maico
By maico (Apr 23, 2012)

Actually I do. I worked for Panavision for 6 years and I'm a focus puller working in the film industry.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

If you work in the industry, you probably know that VistaVision style film cameras have been retired from service in the late 1960s / early 1970s. So, nobody is using them or any high-end cameras with 36 x 24mm frames/imagers. You've got your 65/70mm cameras (film and digital sensor as well), and then from there you drop down all the way to Super 35, which is once again anything but 36 x 24mm in film frame or sensor size.

I suspect Carl Zeiss is really going after the deep-pocketed full-frame DSLR shooters with these 2 lenses. Their idea being -- buy a FF 135 digital camera for around $2,000 -- then spend $20,000 each for these Zeiss zooms. Oh well, I dunno....

0 upvotes
Petka
By Petka (Apr 19, 2012)

Dpreview could just as well introduce CNC routers which cost $50000 and up, and people could complain how they cost more than a Civic and how their Black&Decker is capable of just the same thing. These lenses have nothing to do with home & amateur photography or videography, not even much of professional video done on DSLR camera (even though they might be nice to have sometimes). This kind of lenses have been available for decades but people have not been subscribing to American Cinematographer magazine. What's wrong if there are professional tools which you do not understand, need, and can not afford? No need to feel insulted about it.

4 upvotes
mugupo
By mugupo (Apr 19, 2012)

u can buy a civic for that price.

0 upvotes
Eric Sorensen
By Eric Sorensen (Apr 19, 2012)

At that price, their 70-200 must have a 5-stop image stabilizer, right?

0 upvotes
zoom878
By zoom878 (Apr 18, 2012)

Of course Carl Zeiss can make satisfied the hungry photographers ...but this coast is really heavier than the lens weight ..

0 upvotes
ryansholl
By ryansholl (Apr 18, 2012)

Jesus H Tapdancin Christ, $20,000?! And 6 pounds? That's twice the equivalent stills lens weight.

What is going on with this lens that I'm missing that makes this not a joke? I'm dead serious, I just don't understand.

2 upvotes
soundman1024
By soundman1024 (Apr 19, 2012)

This is a cinema lens - which means there are different expectations placed upon it.

The lens will holds its focus point as you change the focal length - which is critical. Imagine trying to hold an in focus close-up and zoom in with the focus point shifting as you zoom.

In addition all of the rings are geared and have hard stops. This makes the lens much easier to use, focusing rigs easier to attach, and makes repeatable moves possible. Focusing in cinema is done with a tape measure and by a second person who uses predetermined marks. If the focus ring keeps spinning past infinity you can't repeat moves for multiple takes, because your marks are wrong.

The lens also won't have focus breathing. With photography lenses the frame may shift when you focus, apparently zooming in or out. With a cinema lens the framing will remain consistent as you focus.

The differences may seem minor, but they're essential for serious cinema work.

4 upvotes
chromnd
By chromnd (Apr 18, 2012)

Can someone please explain me how this lens is used? I know aperture and focal distance. But I see 4 rings on that lens which seem to be somehow adjustable. The first one (left to right) looks like aperture, the second one like focal distance. So what are the other two rings good for?

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Apr 18, 2012)

Well hopefully there's at least one on there for focusing the thing. Could well come in handy.

0 upvotes
chromnd
By chromnd (Apr 18, 2012)

(Facepalm)... now I feel pretty stupid... :D okay, sure one for focus, but still there is one left :-)

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 18, 2012)

The three "ridged" rings (actually, milled into gear teeth) are the only things you can adjust. To the right of each gear is a moveable barrel section that it's attached to, and the scale for that gear. From left to right: aperture, zoom, and focus. The extra scale near the front of the lens is a duplicate of the focus distance scale, placed for someone looking down on the lens, instead of looking at it from camera left (the conventional scale orientation for these things).

1 upvote
chromnd
By chromnd (Apr 18, 2012)

Thanks for the explanation!

0 upvotes
erik6
By erik6 (Apr 18, 2012)

Is it made of GOLD ?

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 17, 2012)

Wow, a real brute of a "Compact" lens -- large & heavy. With only a really modest 2.85x zoom factor and an 'almost bright' T2.9 max open aperture.

FOR HOW MUCH???? TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS!!??

"designed for the owner- operator"

"There has never been a zoom lens on the market with similar features."

Oh yeah, whatever. I just knew that our German friends were always good for a good crack-up, he-he-he.

One good thing with these CP.2s is the interchangeable lens mount... and that is the major part of it.

0 upvotes
Piet Maartens
By Piet Maartens (Apr 18, 2012)

Francis Carver, we Krauts all feel so sorry for you, du armer Mensch ;-)

5 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 18, 2012)

Such hatred and bigotry, Mr. Carver.

How can you hope to produce beautiful art when you are so filled with such ugly emotions?

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 18, 2012)

In the US, this lens should be in the $6,000 to $7,000 price range, and maybe then some of these so-called "owner-operators" might be saving up their hard earned dough to buy it. But at this crazy and unrealistic price, it is going strictly only to the equipment rental house shelves.

Keep in mind that this is still only a CP-series lens -- the lowest quality "cinema" lens that Carl Zeiss even makes.

Any of the Angenieux Digital Zooms beat this one handily in price and performance, and they are already out and about... not "coming for Christmas," like this one supposedly is.

0 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (Apr 17, 2012)

These lenses are not really meant to be owned unless you're a successful cardiologist/frustrated film director. My question is whether local camera stores are going to start renting out these sorts of film-quality lenses or if we'll only be able to get them from the big rental houses...

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 17, 2012)

Since the lens will cost US$19,900, you should be able to rent it for the day for say $750, right?

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 17, 2012)

Price wise, this really is not as expensive as it sounds. Canon's new 30-300 t2.95-3.7 is $45,000. It's got more range, but it is also variable aperture. Fujinon's 75-400 is $99,000. A Cooke 135mm T2.8 prime is $9500. So this priced at $20,000 is actually a a bargain depending on what you compare it to.

"Full frame" Super35 Video lenses are just really expensive.

8 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 17, 2012)

This Zeiss Compact Zoom is horridly priced. Why is this a "bargain?"

You have been comparing it to the wrong types of lenses, anyhow. Compare it to the Angenieux Digital Zooms instead, will you?

0 upvotes
MaikeruN
By MaikeruN (Apr 18, 2012)

I also believe the price for this lens is reasonable. No big news there.

2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 18, 2012)

I compared it to Cinema lenses designed to cover a 35mm sized sensor. Not sure which Angenieux lenses you were talking about, but those aren't cheap, either. Optimo 16-42 is $20,000, too, as is the 30-80mm.

$20,000 is expensive to me, a hobby photographer with a $3000 camera kit. But for this kind of lens, it's a fair price and maybe even less than expected. I think $25,000 for a car is a lot of money, but that doesn't make a $60,000 sports car overpriced in terms of sports cars.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 18, 2012)

You are probably looking at here at the absolutely highest an $8,000 optic. The rest of the listed price is German taxes and employee benefits, customs, profit margins, and € to $ exchange rate conversion/manipulation.

0 upvotes
djmm
By djmm (Apr 17, 2012)

The HUGE "70-200 Compact Zoom" Wording is real tacky....

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 17, 2012)

The manual focus Nikon 80-200mm f2.8 Ai-S weighed in at 1.9kg. Add in the optical design to make this thing parfocal and (hopefully) eliminate focus breathing, and add integrated metal focus, aperture, and zoom gears, and yeah, 2.8kg really is "compact", by cine standards.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (May 4, 2012)

No low-end lens with such minuscule zoom range should weigh in at anywhere near that much. "Cine-style" or otherwise.

0 upvotes
pfzt
By pfzt (Apr 17, 2012)

besides the specifications, which i don't care about, that lens looks very good in terms of product design. much more beautiful than the Canikon lenses. a true beauty!

3 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Apr 17, 2012)

The only reason of putting such an expensive lenses here is to impel people to think, that "ordinary" Canon/Nikon lenses with red/gold ring for over 1000 Euro are "cheap". And are the only option to buy.

5 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Apr 17, 2012)

Maybe Canon and Nikon should pay Zeiss for making their expensive "pro" zoom lenses seem like real bargains

1 upvote
LukeDuciel
By LukeDuciel (Apr 17, 2012)

This lens is actually irrelevant to most of the amateur photographer / pro gear-head on this site.

Cine lenses are of a different league.

CP.2 and CZ.2 lenses are at lower end of Zeiss cine offerings.

And in terms of pricing, Zeiss cine lens line is practically among the less expensive ones.

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 17, 2012)

Low-end lens from Germany --for US$19,900. But of course, and why didn't I think of that great concept!

0 upvotes
egorkaraban
By egorkaraban (Apr 17, 2012)

Pretty LOL (especially price)

0 upvotes
TheAe
By TheAe (Apr 17, 2012)

Hmm did Zeiss make this an interchangable? to lower it's price? lol, nice lol

This lens could be the perfect concert lens. Would love to see samples now lol

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 17, 2012)

You folks have no idea how much "wow" is in a T2.9 zoom like that.

70-200 parfocal (no focus shift when zooming) and hopefully no breathing (coverage shift when focusing). It's got to be at least as complex as any Nikon or Canon 70-200 f2.8. You're taking 20-something elements, and a light loss of 0.1 stops (weird coincidence, log2((2.8/2.8)^2) = 0.10)

Most elements in a modern lens aren't cemented, but let's do worst-case and guess that some are, so there's 30 air-glass interfaces (surfaces, LOL). That's 0.0033 stops per surface. Or under 0.8% reflection per surface.

That's some serious coating.

6 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Apr 17, 2012)

Canon's 70-200 f2.8 non-IS is also parfocal. So what does this lens give me that's worth 15 times the price? Not meaning to troll BTW - this is a genuine question from someone who knows nothing about cinema lenses.

2 upvotes
Alec
By Alec (Apr 17, 2012)

No play and no breathing - when you touch a barrel or use any control, it does not shift even 0.01mm - irrelevant for photo but needed for vid

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 17, 2012)

In addition to what Alec said (which is a valid point, btw) what's the T stop of the Canon? Probably comparable to my Nikon 70-200mm f2.8 AF-S VR, which I measured at T 3.05. Normally, I wouldn't quibble about 0.15 stops, but you figure that the light that doesn't reach the sensor has to go somewhere, like into flare (blobby or veiling) or ghosting.

The other thing that the Zeiss buys you is absolutely repeatable focus. Yes, you can bolt a focus gear onto the focus rings of a Nikon or Canon lens, but their focusing mechanisms "freeewheel" at the limits of their focusing range. which means, suddenly your follow focus is set to an entirely different value than when you marked it.

5 upvotes
stephenmelvin
By stephenmelvin (Apr 17, 2012)

Do we know that it's an f/2.8 and not, say, f/2.5? A .10 stop light loss with 20 or so elements seems insanely low.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 17, 2012)

Angenieux had parfocal cine zooms with much larger zoom factors and similar brightness some 50 years ago. Thanks for inventing the wheel here in the year 2012, Carl Zeiss.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 18, 2012)

Africa is city in Siberia someplace, Du Dummkopf!

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 18, 2012)

@stephen, that is possible, and I had considered it.

My gut instinct was to discount the possibility, since all the other lenses in that series are "cinematized" versions of existing ZF.2 lenses. I can't picture them designing an entirely new lens for this line, just converting an existing design, and there are precious few 70-200mm f2.5 designs floating around.

But it is possible.

1 upvote
Michael Knight
By Michael Knight (Sep 4, 2012)

@Francis, do you work for Angenieux?

0 upvotes
Stanislav Stoklas
By Stanislav Stoklas (Apr 17, 2012)

Great performance as usual at Zeiss. Price also the usual

0 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 17, 2012)

Zeiss is priced 2 to 3 times over any brand in any product from lens to microscope till lens cleaning microfiber. Zeiss utilize kriptonite cristals to make its lens.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
lxstorm
By lxstorm (Apr 17, 2012)

Incorrect, not kriptonite crystals but fluorite crystals.

"Optical elements made of calcium fluoride, namely of fluorite crystals, are used in some telephoto lenses, to correct color aberration. Some fluoride glasses are difficult to produce on Earth due to their fast crystallization. The crystallization is slower in microgravity conditions."

Google Zeiss superachromat, most advanced lenses manufactured ever, very expensive though.

0 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 17, 2012)

I know I was kidding with Superman kriptonite.

5 upvotes
Michael Gunawan
By Michael Gunawan (Apr 17, 2012)

i remembered decades ago, when Nikon and Canon starts using FLOURITE elements in their ED and L lenses, somebody asked LEITZ, why they don't follow suite. An d LEITZ answered that they do use FLOURITE in their lenses for a long time even before Nikon/Canon, only they thought it's not something to boast around as FL elements is a must in certain lenses

2 upvotes
Petka
By Petka (Apr 17, 2012)

No, we do not use flourite, our lenses have FLUORITE elements...

:-)

1 upvote
CFynn
By CFynn (Apr 17, 2012)

If it came from Leica it might easily cost 2 or 3x as much.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Apr 17, 2012)

Nikon, as one of the world's premier microscope makers, has been melting their own fluorite glass formulas for decades. Their customers for certain exotic glasses include Canon.

Most people don't appreciate that Nikon and Canon have been cross-pollinating each other for decades. First time I read about it was back in the 70s, how Canon farmed out rangefinder lenses to Nikon, and Nikon used Canon shutters and pellical mirrors in one of their high speed F body variations.

I think fluorite glass lost its "marketing halo" two years ago when Sigma started using it. ;)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
felipe-m
By felipe-m (Apr 17, 2012)

Ruy, sorry, but not entirely true, at least not for high end microscopes.
Confocals, 2-photons and others down the line from Zeiss and Leica are at comparable prices.
German-made is probably the term you were looking for... but then those two brands are usually alternating as the top 2 high-end scopes lines, and rightly so.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 18, 2012)

Henry, you must be a truly tormented soul, Friend. Does any nation claim you as her own, I wonder?

0 upvotes
felipe-m
By felipe-m (Apr 18, 2012)

yeah, such a woeful society where everybody gets medical attention, food and all those crazy communists things, not to mention a society with an industry that exports more that the 5 times more populated and 25 times larger mighty US. Those "poor german employers", make me so sad, sniff...
So yeah, I understand your frustration.

Good thing we photographers and scientists don't have to rely on US made cameras, microscopes and other things, because, well, there ain't much...

Researchers who want the best microscopes and can afford them buy Zeiss or Leica. Those with less funds buy the slightly inferior, but still very good Olympus or Nikon.

And btw, you're off topic, this thread is about Zeiss optics.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 18, 2012)

German made products are always crazily expensive, and if the quality of their exported automobiles is any indication, rather awful. Just because something is crazily expensive, it does no necessarily follow that it is any good, or better than something a bit less expensive sourced from elsewhere.

Which is why Europe is left behind and all the 'action" is now in Asia.

0 upvotes
felipe-m
By felipe-m (Apr 19, 2012)

LOL! Yeah, you're so right! All the action is in Asia (I guess you mean mostly China, since Japan is not doing so flash recently).
Let's all congratulate China on it's economic boom, solidly built on good working practices, research, innovation, respect for the intellectual property of others, the environment, good wages, benefits and the high respect for the lives and human rights of it's workers and citizens in general... Let's all join the party!

Seeing who you admire, I now understand your posts much better, thanks.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 19, 2012)

Europe is too busy bailing out Greece every other week. If you want technical innovation today, you will not find it there. They are still making cars like this was the 1970s, for cripe's sake. This stripped-down zoom lens here is a shining example. Its specifications are lame vis-a-vis the competition, especially to those brand new design cinema lenses from Fujinon (Cabrio series), to say the least.

0 upvotes
felipe-m
By felipe-m (Apr 19, 2012)

Oh, I see, the finance guys busy with Greece are responsible for technical innovation. Somebody must have forgotten to tell them and the thriving German industrial sector...

"They are still making cars like this was the 1970s" LOL! I think you mean the US makers there, with their gas gulping cars.

And yeah, those poor German car makers do make me sad, they just can't keep up... with demand that is!
http://www.dw.de/dw/article/0,,15873878,00.html

The Fujinons are indeed interesting. You like them better already without any serious testing and comparisons? Well, good for you I guess... so go and buy them.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 20, 2012)

Fujinon zooms are high-end. This Zeiss zoom is is low-end as they come -- it is Zeiss' "entry level tier" at $20,000, ha-ha-ha-ha. Heck, you can get a REAL GLASS for that much dough, one would think. This one does not even cover the Super 35mm sensor size properly, since it is supped to cover the FF 135 instead.

Re. German cars -- maybe they can dump them in the East Bloc or somewhere, but here in the States, people are staying away from German automobile showrooms in droves. The European brands consistently rank bottom in value for money spent, reliability, and especially quality. They come with the shortest warranties being offered -- only 4 years for the engine and transmission, phew... Even the American cars today are much better put together as the Krautwagons. We have two in the family, and let me tell you... well, I better not.

0 upvotes
felipe-m
By felipe-m (Apr 20, 2012)

Wow! You have this incredible talent of saying the exact opposite of the verified reality, pretty cool!

So I guess the US must be "the East Block" to you? Because as the news report it, German car sales in the US have been record-high since last year. Here from the Wall Street Journal, if you didn't "like" the previous DW link I sent you, LOL!!
http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20120411-704428.html

Meanwhile the german industrials as a whole have, in fact, noticed that their ongoing success, despite whatever crisis, is making a lot of people uncomfortable and jealous, so hey, smile, you're not alone!
http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,814294,00.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-16941142

And again, go buy the Fujinons and be happy. That's what people with a shorter budget have always done, buy the slightly inferior but still good product and save some money, duh...

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 25, 2012)

German cars in America? Almost NOBODY is buying them any more, Friend. They are rated below the Indian made motor cars here, he-he-he. Overpriced and under-performing, and full of bugs,just like the German cameras and lenses in general are. Resale values of German made automobiles? Down in the toilet, I'm rather afraid.
This CP-series from Carl Zeiss, it is probably intended for folks who think they are really getting a "real cinematic" lens for their twenty thousand dollars, hmmm? 70-200mm for $US20,000. What, do they really think that everyone else is a fool?

0 upvotes
aris14
By aris14 (Apr 17, 2012)

Please Dpreview make sections asap. We still need you...

0 upvotes
Joesiv
By Joesiv (Apr 16, 2012)

While it's pretty, I'm not sure what this has to do with Digital Photography.

:)

I also wonder if they're parafocal... Seems too compact really...

0 upvotes
Rickard Hansson
By Rickard Hansson (Apr 16, 2012)

"The Compact Zoom CZ.2 delivers flare-free results and it has no focus shift over the whole zoom range."

3 upvotes
magus424
By magus424 (Apr 17, 2012)

Cinema lenses have to be parfocal, no?

0 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 17, 2012)

Certainly parfocal- and par-priced-odal

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Apr 16, 2012)

Beautiful, its a work of art.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (May 4, 2012)

Your wallet will think this is butt-ugly for what you are actually getting in return by way of usable optics, brightness, and zoom range, quite frankly.

0 upvotes
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Apr 16, 2012)

Wow. Good thing this is the "compact" zoom.
I'd hate to see the non-compact zoom.
:)

6 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 17, 2012)

You will buy one or only admire it?

0 upvotes
M Irwin
By M Irwin (Apr 16, 2012)

The extensive use of bacon in its construction accounts for the high price.

9 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 17, 2012)

Bacon or sausage?

0 upvotes
KitHB
By KitHB (Apr 16, 2012)

Typically T numbers show a little less light gets through compared to f number, so I'm guessing the Zeiss zoom here has some family resemblance to their SA mount 35mm format 70-200 f2.8 zoom. The Compact Primes are cine mounting of the stills photography lenses - which is a good thing.

Cine zooms are a special case, they mustn't "breathe" - change focal length (and framing) as you pull focus from near to far, or focus shift when you zoom. This makes the lens design more complicated - with more floating elements moving around inside, hence a lot more expensive than the stills version.

0 upvotes
Petka
By Petka (Apr 17, 2012)

Actually the lens MUST change focal length when pulling focus, otherwise the framing would not stay constant. In a normal focusing the lens distance is varied and thus the framing angle has to change. To make a non-breathing lens the lens distance from the sensor/film must be kept constant, and the focus is changed by varying the focal length. This keeps the framing fixed.

1 upvote
KitHB
By KitHB (Apr 16, 2012)

Practical answer... because T indicates the amount of light that actually makes it through the lens and onto the film/sensor, irrespective of lens design, different coatings and amount of glass, rather than f ratio, which is a mathematical construct based on the apparent size of a virtual hole inside the lens.

Necessary because a movie can use many different lenses of various designs and it's important to get the exposure and colour grading the same between shots or else you're into a world of pain in post-production because of variation in your multi-camera scenes.

Why the price? a) smaller production runs b) tighter tolerances and calibration, when it says focal length 75mm and 1.9 metres it actually means it. c) colour consistency so you get whole sets of matched prime lenses from Fujinon, Zeiss or Cooke and soon Leica, where they all have the same "look". They have same outside dimensions so gadgets for filters, hoods and for pulling focus all work the same way too.

29 upvotes
KieranGee
By KieranGee (Apr 16, 2012)

Goodness me, a helpful, concise, non condescending answer from a commenter. I thought everyone like that was dead.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
17 upvotes
eyrieowl
By eyrieowl (Apr 16, 2012)

They are, KitHB is a descendant of KITT: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KITT

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 17, 2012)

This here is a promising looking $7,000 to $8,000 street price zoom lens priced by Carl Zeiss at US$19,000. That's about the just of it, right?

0 upvotes
Salib
By Salib (Apr 16, 2012)

that is great lens but for which type of cin-cameras??

0 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Apr 16, 2012)

Why are cine lenses measured in T stops and regular lenses in f stops?

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 16, 2012)

T stops are consistent across different lenses and focal lenghts so you can match the exposure for the entire scene. It's a lot harder to brighten 10,000 frames in post so they match the last 10,000, so you try to get it to match perfect when shot.

0 upvotes
FreeRadical009
By FreeRadical009 (Apr 16, 2012)

The difference between an F and T stop is that F stop does not take in account the light that will be absorbed by the glass itself. Despite having the same F stop, a big zoom lens will not transmit the same light as a small prime lens that doesn't have a lot of glass elements in it, like a zoom lens does.

In cinema lenses, the T stop is the actual value of how much light will reach the film or sensor. These are consistent between lenses regardless of the focal length. They avoid the differences in exposure values when filming, whereas a photography lens can transmit less light despite having a big F stop number.

2 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Apr 16, 2012)

The t-stop includes the light transmission of the lens. On a camera that measures light through the lens, you don't have to worry about light transmission, as the internal light meter will always see through the lens.

Traditional movie camera did not have a light meter built in, or if they had it was hardly used. The light was measured using a hand held light meter which obviously did not know of light loss inside any lens. In order to set the right aperture the lenses for movie cameras all combined f-stop and light transmission in what they call t-stop.

With today's digital movie cameras the t-stop becomes unimportant again as you adjust the exposure from the signal/image coming directly from the sensor, so the light transmission is automatically accounted for again.

But the t-stop has become such a standard in the movie industry that they still label lenses that way.

0 upvotes
FocusPuller
By FocusPuller (Apr 16, 2012)

To which I would add depth of field is still a function of the F/stop, and would be somewhat less than the T/stop.

0 upvotes
Amateur Hour
By Amateur Hour (Apr 16, 2012)

Funny how the t-stops for these new lenses are 'off' just a tad from the common f-stops of still lenses. Makes me wonder if they simply take their existing still lens formula (parfocal?), measure it, and stamp the resulting t-stops on the barrel...

1 upvote
Almeida
By Almeida (Apr 17, 2012)

They change the coatings, otherwise the T-stops would be even worse, but yeah basically it's the same design just a bit more refined and built with tighter tolerances.

1 upvote
Jeff Moghadam
By Jeff Moghadam (May 17, 2012)

The fact that a lens is measured with a T-stop as opposed to an F-stop doesn't imply a different design. A T-stop is just a more accurate measurement. An F-stop is theoretical and simply represents the size of the aperture where a T-stop is a measurement that takes the F-stop and factors in the amount of light loss due to reflections. This is why T-stops are slightly less than F-stops; because the transmission of modern lenses lens (Transmission stops hence T-stops) is about 95-98% of incoming light.. meaning generally 2-5% of light is lost due to reflections. In older lenses this would be more like 20-50% lost, however coatings have significantly improved the figure.

This all means that a T2.9 lens would be *approximately* the same as a f/2.8 lens. I say approximately as the transmission of the f/2.8 lens might differ.

Also, it's necessary as it allows you to match exposures among multiple lenses with differing transmissions.

Again, transmision is % of incoming light that hits cmos

0 upvotes
chyll2
By chyll2 (Apr 16, 2012)

videography porn

4 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 16, 2012)

I want to be the first to complain about the lack of Pentax mount.

8 upvotes
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Apr 16, 2012)

I'm the target market for this lens and I have to admit that I laughed out loud at this!

4 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Apr 16, 2012)

Looks nice.....

Wow that is expensive!

0 upvotes
feraudy
By feraudy (Apr 16, 2012)

It's probably only made in small quantities, so they have to recoup on the development costs somehow.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 16, 2012)

The price is in line with other high grade cinema zooms.

0 upvotes
FeliciaCorrine
By FeliciaCorrine (Jun 1, 2012)

Carl Zeiss lenses are in a separate range when it comes to quality.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 102