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Canon announces EOS-1D C 4K DSLR with 8-bit 4:2:2 1080p HDMI output

By dpreview staff on Apr 12, 2012 at 13:00 GMT

Canon has unveiled its promised 4K capable DSLR, the EOS-1D C, which can capture 4K (4096 x 2160 pixel) video at up to 24p without downscaling, from an APS-H crop of its 18MP full-frame sensor. The camera, which shares the majority of its specifications with the still-awaited EOS 1D X, can also capture 1080p60 or 50p or output it uncompressed over its HDMI connector. Full HD can be captured from a 16:9 crop from the whole sensor, or a smaller, APS-C-like Super 35mm sub-frame that allows the use of Canon's EF Cinema Zoom lenses. The camera will cost around €10,000 (exact price to be confirmed) and will be available from October.

The company says the camera has been developed in discussions with Hollywood and television broadcasters, to ensure it has the features they need. This includes the ability to capture 4k or 1080p footage in either intraframe (All-I) interframe (IPB) compression Motion JPEGs, and the ability to output a 1080p Y'CbCr 4:2:2 signal over its HDMI port.

While 4K-compatible monitors are just starting to appear and both Adobe Premier CS6 and Final Cut Pro X support 4K editing, Canon says it doesn't expect 4K to be a practical concern for many individuals in the short term. However, the ability to archive original footage at high resolution, in preparation for the market catching up could be a draw for the cinema and broadcast industry.

The 1D C gains a series of features from the C300 native Full HD camera launched last year. This includes Canon Log Gamma - a very flat, low contrast, high dynamic range response, allowing footage from both cameras to be mixed together and color-graded identically. It can also mirror its HDMI signal - including the option to show a 'View Assist' simulation of graded output over HDMI while still capturing log gamma footage.

Unlike the C300, the EOS-1D C does not offer zebra striping or peaking focus aids, which the company sees as being more important in single-person operated documentary settings, rather than the rig-and-crew situations it expects the 1D C to be used in.

How is it different to an EOS-1D X?

In many respects the EOS-1D C is a very close cousin of the 1D X, but Canon insists the circuitry and heat management of the camera has been re-worked to avoid overheating with the immense (and sustained) data rates required for 4K video recording. The 1D C also has headphone socket, and loses the flash sync port.

Canon won't be pinned down on the precise details of hardware differences but also says the 1D X might be subject to greater import duty into North America and the EU if an aftermarket firmware change would allow the recording of more than 29 minutes, 59 seconds of video, so this isn't a 1D X with extended video and 4K enabled in firmware.

However, the 1D C can still capture 18MP images at 12fps and its 4Kp24 footage means individual frames can be used at the same 8MP resolution as offered by the EOS-1D Mark II - a photojournalist tool widely used until fairly recently. And, while the portrait-orientation grip may seem redundant for video shooting, it does provide room for a large capacity battery, which is absolutely essential.

Jump to:


 Press Release

Canon expands Cinema EOS System with new EOS-1D C digital SLR supporting 4K video capture

London, UK, 12 April, 2012 – Canon today announces the introduction of the new EOS-1D C, a digital single-lens reflex (SLR) camera targeting the motion picture, television and high-resolution production industries. Delivering outstanding video quality, advanced low light performance and film-like dynamic range, the compact and lightweight EOS-1D C supports in-camera 4K (4,096 x 2,160) video recording with 4:2:2 colour sampling, offering greater creative freedom for video professionals.

The first SLR camera of its kind, the EOS-1D C offers a unique and highly portable package optimised for high-quality video recording. Advanced creative flexibility is provided with support for a range of resolutions and variable frame rates. 4K video is recorded using 8-bit Motion JPEG compression at 24p, and Full HD (1920 x 1080) video capture is available at frame rates up to 1080/60p. The camera supports internal recording to CF cards at all resolutions up to and including 4K, offering enhanced mobility. Video can also be output to external recorders1 via an integrated HDMI terminal using an uncompressed YCbCr 4:2:2 signal.

The EOS-1D C also features Canon Log Gamma, which facilitates the capture of high quality video rich in exposure latitude and dynamic range. Ideal for video professionals who want to retain the maximum amount of information without huge file sizes, Canon Log Gamma offers a dynamic range uniquely comparable to film, minimising shadowdetail loss and highlight-detail loss to provide greater grading freedom for colourists in post-production.

"The EOS-1D C is a fantastic addition to the Cinema EOS System," said Kieran Magee, Marketing Director, Professional Imaging, Canon Europe. "Since the introduction of Cinema EOS we've had an excellent response from professionals who are hugely excited by the image quality and creative freedom the system offers. The new EOS-1D C will expand those creative options further – it's a unique camera, supporting 4K video recording in a highly compact body that can be used in a number of different ways. We're very excited to see what the professional community can achieve with it."

Advanced performance meets creative flexibility

Based on the core specifications of the EOS-1D X, the EOS-1D C provides exceptional image quality and versatility, with an 18.1-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor. Optimised for high quality video capture, the sensor provides video professionals with the freedom to adjust image resolution to suit a subject or desired output. During 4K shooting pixels are cropped to an area equivalent to an APS-H sensor, preventing the need to resize or scale the image, ensuring maximum image quality. Additionally, a Super 35mm crop in Full HD recording caters for cinematographers who typically work in the Super 35mm field of view.

The sensor provides high quality performance in all conditions, delivering advanced creative blurring and light capturing abilities when used in combination with Canon's EF Cinema prime lenses. Its size enables professionals to achieve an extremely shallow depth of field with beautiful background blur, and sensitivity up to ISO 25,600 provides excellent quality and reduced noise in low-light situations.

In addition, support for 24, 25, 30, 50 and 60p frame rates in Full HD resolution shooting provides additional flexibility, satisfying the shooting needs of professionals across the industry. Industry-standard timecode and codec support and a choice of compression methods provides compatibility with established workflow processes, facilitating easy editing and grading immediately after shooting.

The EOS-1D C ships with an exclusive software package, including a suite that allows 4K/Motion JPEG and Full HD/60p video shot on the camera to be output on an external monitor2 with no loss of image quality. It also enables video shot with Canon Log Gamma to be output on a monitor with standard video gamma applied.

Additional advanced applications, including Picture Style Editor and EOS Utility, also enable adjustments to various camera settings to be conducted from a PC. Real-time procedures, such as the editing and registration of picture styles or checking results on a monitor, can be conveniently performed on-set using a PC or Mac – allowing users to promptly carry out adjustments, and ensuring efficient shooting and post-production procedures.

EF lenses and EF Cinema Lenses – freedom to explore

As part of the EOS system, the EOS-1D C is compatible with more than 60 EF lenses, all of which offer high resolutions to support 4K image capture. The EF lens series offers exceptional creative freedom, with focal length options ranging from 8mm to 800mm. Over 70 million EF lenses have been manufactured since the EOS system launched in 1987 – a measure of its unparalleled quality and popularity. As part of the Cinema EOS System, Canon has also introduced a range of 4K EF Cinema Lenses, utilising the company's unique optical heritage to produce leading-quality lenses optimised for high-quality video capture.

Canon EOS-1D C – key features:

  • 4k movies
  • 1080p at 50/60fps; Canon Log Gamma
  • Uncompressed HDMI output
  • 18 MP Full Frame CMOS
  • Up to 12fps stills; 14fps mode
  • 61 point AF system
  • ISO range 100-25600
  • Dual DIGIC 5+ processors
  • Clear View II 8.1cm (3.2") LCD
  • EF lens compatible

1 Excluding 4K video
2 Requires the use of a PC equipped with an SDI port

Canon EOS-1D C specifications

Body type
Body typeLarge SLR"
Sensor
Max resolution5184 x 3456
Other resolutions4608 x 3072, 3456 x 2304, 2592 x 1728
Image ratio w:h3:2
Effective pixels18 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors19 megapixels
Sensor sizeFull frame (36 x 24 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorDual Digic 5+
Image
ISO100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25600, 51200 (50, 102400 and 204800 with boost)
White balance presets6
Custom white balanceYes (5)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Digital zoomNo
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points61
Lens mountCanon EF
Focal length multiplier1×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3.2
Screen dots1,040,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeClear View II TFT LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage100%
Viewfinder magnification0.76×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/8000 sec
Built-in flashNo
External flashYes (Hot-shoe)
Flash modesE-TTL II Auto Flash, Metered Manual
Continuous drive14 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec, remote)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±3 (2, 3, 5, 7 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (3 frames in either blue/amber or magenta/green axis)
Videography features
Resolutions4096 x 2160 (24 fps), 1920 x 1080 (60, 50, 30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (60, 50 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
Videography notesintra or inter frame
MicrophoneMono
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesCompact Flash (Type I or II), UDMA compatible
Storage includedNone
Connectivity
HDMIYes (Mini)
WirelessOptional
Wireless notesLC-5
Remote controlYes (N3 connector)
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes (Water and dust resistant)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion LP-E4N rechargeable battery & charger
Dimensions158 x 164 x 83 mm (6.22 x 6.46 x 3.27)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingYes (by cable and PC)
GPSOptional
GPS notesGP-E1, GPE2

Additional images

5
I own it
33
I want it
0
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 428
123
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 12, 2012)

ok.. so after that video stuff is announced.

please canon can you focus on innovations for still photographer... thanks!!

11 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

Uh, they just announced two full frame bodies in the last 6 months as well as a unique upgrade to the G-series. What makes you think they are not focusing on stills?

2 upvotes
Naksone
By Naksone (Apr 12, 2012)

I'm sorry Canon I think you got it wrong on this one, it was indie film makers who could afford such cameras as the 5d mark ii and 7d that needed a new video dslr not Hollywood!

7 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 12, 2012)

As long as your budget allows for renting one of these cameras, what's the problem?

2 upvotes
Naksone
By Naksone (Apr 13, 2012)

I thought Canon were making cameras for the average consumer not for rental companies, guess they have other ideas. I don't want something to rent i want a nice cheap hobby camera to own. I don't need 4k, just a dslr which doesn't shoot such compressed video. Thought they would have sorted that out after 3 years of feedback from the 5dmark ii.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (Apr 12, 2012)

So is this the dawning of the age where photographers from Sports Illustrated, ESPN mag, et al will just pluck 8mp stills out of the 4K video? Seems like that wouldn't be a very satisfying way of shooting. I like getting credit for the timing of my shots. It's like hunting with a gun.

I guess similarly, Leica shooters enjoy getting credit for focusing their shots. Hmm... guess I'm soon to be a relic.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Karl Burke
By Karl Burke (Apr 12, 2012)

Got it in one. That's the real significance of this camera long-term. Many thought that this Olympics' 100m sprint final and so forth would be shot this way, but the technology's only getting there now and these cameras won't be on the market in time. The 2016 Olympics ? Definitely will be shot that way - I predict Lightroom by then (and probably even sooner) will have a scrollable timeline where you pick your framegrab from. No, it's not the way I like to take photos either, but the whole mindset of what a still image capture is, is soon to be as obsolete as bringing a Speed Graphic to shoot a boxing match.

1 upvote
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Apr 12, 2012)

If the choice if between getting the shot and not, a professional tasked with getting the shot gets paid for getting the shot, not getting the shot with inadequate gear.

A person being a "relic" is a personal choice, which you are free to make. Much like the film days, which is when I was in school, I'm working on my skills at video, even though I don't offer it to clients yet. One either adapts or perishes. (although having a unique still product is a perfectly valid way to survive too--not everyone has to "move up" to video)

0 upvotes
PicOne
By PicOne (Apr 12, 2012)

Right, but fairly soon, sport venues will just hire a high-school kid to turn on the video on strategically placed cameras, and come back when the game/event is over. You don't need lots of photographers with skills to 'get the shot' when you know they would all be capturing the same frames/shots with video.

1 upvote
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Apr 12, 2012)

Exactly. Anything that takes skill will still be done by skilled people. Everything else can be done by machines. This isn't a new concept. It's just dissonant with capitalism.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

24p video is usually shot at 1/50th or 1/60th of a second shutter speeds, so good luck cutting out all of your tack-sharp stills when they are running the 100 meter finals at 10 meters per second.

0 upvotes
Karl Burke
By Karl Burke (Apr 13, 2012)

Maybe with a 1950s Bolex. Actually you can shoot video on a camera like the 5D Mark III with a shutter speed of up to 1/4000sec. What you can't do in 24p is shoot with a shutter speed of *less than* 1/30 sec. What's holding the technology back at present for the sports application is the AF technology - it's not required for this particular camera's market as the pro film industry is MF only. When they're able to have a future version of the camera with motion picture AF on a par with the stills AF, that's when it'll be ready for PJ prime time.

0 upvotes
sean sebastian
By sean sebastian (Apr 12, 2012)

Why would you buy this over a RED camera? They are in the same price range and how many cinema lenses does Canon have? I seriously don't see Hollywood using this camera to film movies. Maybe commercials but not movies.
I think it will be another year or two before 4k TVs are affordable and in peoples homes and therefore I don't see this camera making sense until then.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
David Hull
By David Hull (Apr 12, 2012)

Assuming we have 4K TV's how will the content be distributed? All the broadcast and distribution standards revolve around 2K. It seems that there is a lot that needs to be developed to make 4K really viable. Of course, it will be but when?

4 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Apr 12, 2012)

It wouldnt be a main camera (you would have a bunch of REDs for that), but, for shots that benefit from a FF look... you cant get this with RED.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 12, 2012)

have you worked with a RED?

i dont know .. but im told they are buggy as hell.

0 upvotes
mgrum
By mgrum (Apr 12, 2012)

I have never worked with a RED but Peter Jackson is using 48 of them to film The Hobbit!

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 12, 2012)

You can get plenty shallow DOF with a RED. I think when portability is a concern. For example the movie Act of Valor used 10 5D Mk IIs mounted on all kinds of car mounts, jibs, etc.

RED buggy as hell? No, RED is one of the finest video camera ever made. What people say is working with RED RAW files is slow and requires tons of processing power.

The RED One, Epic and Scarlet-X along with the Arri Alexa are THE professional standard against which everything else is measured.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

"All the broadcast and distribution standards revolve around 2K."

None of the broadcasters use 2K at all, only 720p or 1080i, and nothing else in high-def.

"RED is one of the finest video camera ever made."

You mean the absolutely worst ever made, right? Of course, anybody considering a Red might also consider the dubious value Arri Alexa, so I see your point.

0 upvotes
Jon Lewis
By Jon Lewis (Apr 12, 2012)

Hi All
Now all this video is out of the way .

Can we please have a stills cam with more megapixels than the 1DX but in a rugged D body how difficult can that be anon, don't want video high frame rates or ISO.

Jon

4 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Apr 12, 2012)

I'm thrilled for all six people in the world who have a means of displaying 4k video and absolutely need this camera.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
17 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

Half the new movie theaters in the world are owned by just 6 people? Wow!

1 upvote
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Apr 12, 2012)

And what exactly is a movie theater going to do with a DSLR?

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

Display movies shot with a 4k camera?

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Apr 12, 2012)

LOL big budget movies that show up in theaters are not shot on DSLRs.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

Alright, fair point. :)

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

Yeah, this is a well-heeled house of worship camera, most likely. :-))

0 upvotes
MP Burke
By MP Burke (Apr 12, 2012)

Well done Canon. For a while I was becoming complacent, thinking my newish computer with 1080p monitor was powerful enough for anything I would want to do.
Now 4k video comes along. 4k is likely to become the next big feature used to sell new cameras, computers and TVs.
Though many people will initially be sceptical, it will gradually start to trickle down to less expensive equipment and exert an influence on what we expect from cameras and the computer equipment we use.
A good example of how expectations can shift quite rapidly is the inclusion of video in Dslrs: ten years ago no-one seemed to complain that dslrs couldn't do video: now it seems they are expected to have high quality 1080p output. 4k may be part of the normal feature set 10 years from now.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Apr 12, 2012)

What a shame its going to cost that much. Canon has always delivered more for less with video, not more for more.

2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

You are comparing to the wrong gear if you think it costs more. This is not a DSLR, it is designed to be part of a high res cinema rig. Those can run into the 6-figures.

1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Apr 12, 2012)

IF it's not meant to be a DSLR why does it even have an optical VF and why didn't they make it in a form factor more suited to video?

1 upvote
NorthwestF
By NorthwestF (Apr 12, 2012)

FS700 released last week is cheaper. It does 240 fps at 1080p resolution. It has peaking, zebra, XLR, 3G-SDI, and HDMI connection. FS700's e-mount can use PL lenses via adapter. It can also use Canon lenses with a metabone adapter.

Who would want to buy this? If they are still photographers, 1Dx is cheaper. If they are into video, there are other cheaper and better options.

7 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Apr 12, 2012)

This is the full 36mmx24mm frame (VistaVision) compared to the APSc of the FS700 (S35). If you are going for that look, the FS700 isnt going to get you there no matter what.

0 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Apr 12, 2012)

Because the 1DC uses a 18 MP, 24 x 36 mm sensor and the FS700 uses a 11.6 MP, 13.3 x 23.6 mm sensor. Also, no word on the high ISO capability and still capture frame rates of the FS700.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

FS700 is APS-C sensor, NEX mount and only 1080p today. It's 4K "ready" and you will have to wait for the upgrade to become available. Will the upgrade be free? I kinda doubt it.

0 upvotes
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Apr 12, 2012)

But there's atleast 6 months to go before the Canon will be for sale. Maybe more if recent delays are a hint.

1 upvote
NorthwestF
By NorthwestF (Apr 12, 2012)

Well, jogger and photo nut, the standard Hollywood look for the video is super 35 sensor, as in FS700. All movies historically have been shoot with a film of that size. So as far as the looks go, that is the preferred standard, not the larger still camera FF sensor size.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

VistaVision cameras went out of style by the early 1970s. Quick, somebody tell Canon. They still think apparently that "Hollywood insiders" are shooting at 36x24mm frame size configured in the 1.5:1 aspect ration, phew....

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Apr 12, 2012)

I wish they would just take the stills functions out of my video camera. Nobody cares about stills anymore.

Said tongue in cheek. Just a couple of years ago nobody thought video would last in a DSLR body.

This looks like a fantastic camera that I will never be able to afford. Hopefully this technology will trickle down to the Ti line in about a decade.

4 upvotes
nexslomo
By nexslomo (Apr 12, 2012)

Exactly. But 2 years is the new decade!

1 upvote
NorthwestF
By NorthwestF (Apr 12, 2012)

1DX was announced 7 months ago, but yet it's not available anywhere (and looks like it won't be for a couple of more months). This camera would come several months after 1Dx is on the market.

2 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Apr 12, 2012)

They've announced the EOS-1D X will be available in 'Mid-June,' rather than the March 2012 date originally given.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

Wait for the mid-June announcement from Canon, then.

0 upvotes
BobYIL
By BobYIL (Apr 12, 2012)

Holy Stromboli! Will we now work to adapt to the 4K technology?!

0 upvotes
olakiril2
By olakiril2 (Apr 12, 2012)

"Unlike the C300, the EOS-1D C does not offer zebra stiping or peaking focus aids, which the company sees as being more important in single-person operated documentary settings, rather than the rig-and-crew situations it expects the 1D C to be used in"

From the design 1DC looks more single person operated than the C300

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Apr 12, 2012)

That's the worst justification I've ever heard to not include features on a 10,000 euro plus camera. How could it possibly have less functionality than magic lantern firmware on the 5dII. They must not expect to sell very many of these.

3 upvotes
Ald_2k
By Ald_2k (Apr 12, 2012)

100% AGREE.

That's pure bulls**t, only business convenience... It seems Canon "loves" to cripple cameras.

Canon suffers from some kind of phobia of giving even essential features to avoid any "micro" chance of jeopardizing sales of more expensive cameras...

At this point Canon IS REACHING THE INSANITY LINE...

A $12-15K camera WITHOUT Peaking and Zebras??? Such essential features!! You're kidding!?

It's TRAGIC. I would choose a fully featured Sony FS700 instead, and save money for lenses!!

3 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Apr 12, 2012)

This is what I have been saying about canon all the long. Not including a couple of essential features on such expensive gear seems like an underhanded ploy to force people to buy the more expensive camera. I wonder why they even bother with cheaper ones if the don't really want to sell them.

1 upvote
ShutterSteve
By ShutterSteve (Apr 12, 2012)

...

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

Buy the Sony SLT Alpha 57 instead, please. 1080p60 video and focus peaking in the electronic viewfinder.

Of course, the Sony costs only $700 instead of $15,00 that this Canon beast is rumored to be at, he-he-he.

0 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 12, 2012)

Canon said this Camera will be available as from October.

My Question to Canon.... Of what year?
1D X still not available....

1 upvote
Ald_2k
By Ald_2k (Apr 12, 2012)

"Of what year?" LOL! :)

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Apr 12, 2012)

Are you complaining that floods, earthquakes and tsunamis have consequences?

0 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 12, 2012)

I think that is not an argument anymore.

Nikon can produce 30.000 D800 units in Japan and another 7000 D4's. They use Sony sensors produced in Thailand as you might know.

And Canon can not even introduce the 1D X on time while they have announced that camera over 7 month ago.

So yes all reasons to complain!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
FastFisher
By FastFisher (Apr 12, 2012)

Similar spec to 1Dx, why twice the price ?

1 upvote
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 12, 2012)

Twice the video :)

Its a 8,8 megapixel camera with 25 frames a second.
1D X can do 11 at 18 megapixel....

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

4096x2160 video

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

Half the megapixels... twice the price, get it?

0 upvotes
K_Photo_Teach
By K_Photo_Teach (Apr 12, 2012)

EPIC!

wish i could afford one :D

0 upvotes
Ald_2k
By Ald_2k (Apr 12, 2012)

If you really need 4K, save your money and go for another brand...

Canon is fooling us too much...

This camera doesn't even have Peaking and Zebras. Canon is crippling it insanely. No way for someone who really need 4K to buy a $12-15K camera without such essential feature. You can get LOT more for less money on other cameras.

1 upvote
KAllen
By KAllen (Apr 12, 2012)

If I was going to use for 4k video I would add a decent monitor, that would be another £1k + but I would then have a larger hi-res colour accurate screen with all those missing functions and more.
Not a lot in the grand scheme of video.
At las the Canon I have been waiting for.

0 upvotes
mforbes
By mforbes (Apr 12, 2012)

What most people do not realize is that a monitor capable of viewing the 4k resolution is going to set you back about $34,000.00 on the low end, about $70k for a 56 inch model.

0 upvotes
TrojMacReady
By TrojMacReady (Apr 12, 2012)

Toshiba has one for $11k, Sony one for less than $25k.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
NDT0001
By NDT0001 (Apr 12, 2012)

If you think film makers shoot 4k primarily so they can watch in 4k on a tv, well you've probably never shot 4k

0 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Apr 12, 2012)

4K is a long way off hitting the home. 4k is at this moment for the big screen.
Shooting 4k will eat Hard drives faster than you can plug them in.
I would like it for HD knowing I can give 4K if someone wants to pay for it. Looks a good package for me.

0 upvotes
mgrum
By mgrum (Apr 12, 2012)

What some people realize is that's it's better to shoot and edit in 4K and then downsample than it is to shoot in 1080p.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

"it's better to shoot and edit in 4K and then downsample than it is to shoot in 1080p."

True, but at the same time if you shoot at 8K and downscale it to standard definition, chances are that you will be even more pleased with the downsampled results, right?

0 upvotes
zzapamiga
By zzapamiga (Apr 12, 2012)

Finally 1080/60p! Hopefully it produces much sharper 1080p video than the Canon 5D Mark III.

0 upvotes
oscarvdvelde
By oscarvdvelde (Apr 12, 2012)

I was recently surprised a Canon 5D II/III gives such fuzzy 1080p video compared to a Panasonic GH2 (EOSHD website shows examples). Why don't they fix that?!

0 upvotes
nexslomo
By nexslomo (Apr 12, 2012)

They fixed it by making 4K!

0 upvotes
Ald_2k
By Ald_2k (Apr 12, 2012)

Canon is making too much money at our expenses in a wrong way.

They are CRIPPLING CAMERAS SO MUCH that are reaching the insanity line.

Sony and Panasonic are offering much better solutions for less price.

Canon started well and (unexpectedly) successful in the video/indie-filmmaking world with the 5D Mark 2, but now they're going out of road.

This is called a "Cinema" specific line, yet it doesn't have Peaking and Zebras which are BASIC features in cinema world....

Canon is telling us bulls**t and overpricing their cameras too much.

If Canon keeps going this way, they will loose more than they expect.

4 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Apr 12, 2012)

Ald_2k

Why would you expect them to do any different? They have been crippling or not including essential features on their high end crop and range FF DSLRs for years.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

"Finally 1080/60p!"

True. At $15,000, you forgot to add.

Meanwhile, the new Sony SLT Alpha 57 priced at $700 also has 1080p60 video, wow!!! How do you figure?

0 upvotes
NDT0001
By NDT0001 (Apr 12, 2012)

Que the "I dont need video so its garbage" comments
......and
GO!

4 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

Why would someone say that on a VIDEO camera announcement?

0 upvotes
JadedGamer
By JadedGamer (Apr 12, 2012)

Because of the assumption that resources spent on the video camera division otherwise could have been spent on cameras for the "stills or death" crowd. :)

0 upvotes
rttew
By rttew (Apr 12, 2012)

4k is it folks, our eyes really can't resolve more than that. what's the point of pushing our limits this fast?? we hopefully have many centuries left on this planet of ours...

0 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 12, 2012)

We can perceive more then 200 megapixels....
4K video is only 8,8 megapixels.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Ald_2k
By Ald_2k (Apr 12, 2012)

200 MP? With how many eyes? :) You're an alien!

1 upvote
Ibida Bab
By Ibida Bab (Apr 12, 2012)

And now to the brand new dilemma: car or camera?

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 12, 2012)

I don't even spend that much on cars. :)

0 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Apr 12, 2012)

Canon doing video with stills cameras is just yuck.

2 upvotes
badloop
By badloop (Apr 12, 2012)

You might want to tell that to the crew of House MD, since they filmed an entire episode using the 5D Mark II. Oh, also call the DOP on "The Avengers" and tell him...

2 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Apr 12, 2012)

See, the "C" stands for Cinema because this isn't intended to be a stills camera. Did you catch that part?

You people...

1 upvote
ck3
By ck3 (Apr 12, 2012)

You people, indeed. A camera that - according to you - isn't intended as a stills camera but has the ergonomics of a stills camera.

5 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Apr 12, 2012)

The ergonomics of a stills camera? Indeed. Remember the 5D Mk2?... remember how wildly successful that camera was?... video and still...

1 upvote
ck3
By ck3 (Apr 12, 2012)

1. that doesn't counter the fact that the poster's argument that the camera wasn't intended as a stills camera is ridiculous. 2. the success of the 5D was mainly due to the fact that a the time of its release it had no competitors in the "affordable large sensor video" market. I doubt anyone who used it for shooting video was happy with the ergonomics.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Apr 12, 2012)

Well that really isn't fair is it? For whatever reason, there is a market for the DSLR form factor on video sets. Canon had made a camera based on that idea that is a video powerhouse. Personally, I have no interested in it but why would I stick my nose up at the idea? It's simply not for me. People have been whining about video in DSLRs for a long time and finally Canon releases a video HDSLR just for video people, and stills people are still complaining about it.

0 upvotes
ck3
By ck3 (Apr 12, 2012)

"For whatever reason, there is a market for the DSLR form factor on video sets." - No, there isn't. The 1D-C is a stills camera that also shoots video. Not the other way around.

1 upvote
KAllen
By KAllen (Apr 12, 2012)

Yes it's a stills camera that can be a video camera or it's a video camera that can be a stills camera... so what's the problem?
If you are not to bothered about the video get the X.
I still think the X will have clean hdmi when it gets here.

0 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Apr 12, 2012)

I think you misunderstood what I said. Because I'm saying that Black Swan, IronMan 2, The Avengers, House MD and who knows what others film crews used a DSLR for a reason. Whatever reason that may be, sometimes people seem to need or want a DSLR form factor video camera on set. This is what that is for. If you are a stills photographer just buy something else.

0 upvotes
ck3
By ck3 (Apr 12, 2012)

"I think you misunderstood what I said. Because I'm saying that Black Swan, IronMan 2, The Avengers, House MD and who knows what others film crews used a DSLR for a reason." The reason was that they wanted the FF video-look the 5D offers. Certainly not the DSLR-ergonomics (did you ever take a look at one of the rigs the 5D is used wth in order to make it work as a video camera?). It's not an accident that video cameras and still cameras look differently.

1 upvote
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Apr 12, 2012)

I don't know why I keep posting. I don't care.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
richg101
By richg101 (Apr 12, 2012)

renders the c300 pretty pointless...

2 upvotes
JohnMatrix
By JohnMatrix (Apr 12, 2012)

yeah, I don't get it. The C300 "cinema" camera has a camcorder formfactor (sort of) and does 1080p. This new 1D C has the ergonomics of a stills camera, yet does 4K video. Why would someone choose the C300 over the 1DC to shoot a movie, or vice versa?

0 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Apr 12, 2012)

Canon is just flooding the cinema and video-journalist market with choices. :)

0 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Apr 12, 2012)

The C300 still has it's place, 4k for most will not be practical.
The 300 needs a real big price drop now with the new Sony and this new Canon. I would go for a 300c at about a third of the price.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

"The C300 still has it's place."

Yeah, in the dust bin, you mean?

"The 300 needs a real big price drop now with the new Sony and this new Canon. I would go for a 300c at about a third of the price."

The day after it came out (i.e. was announced) last November, I posted that it should not go for anything over $6,000. Now it is at $16,000. If the price drops to under $8,000 w/in the next 4-6 months, Canon will move some C300s. Not otherwise.

Actually, they should just withdraw it as a "failed experiment" and come up with something else if/when they can, if ever.

0 upvotes
Carsten Pauer 2
By Carsten Pauer 2 (Apr 12, 2012)

Time for 8K UHDTV !

0 upvotes
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (Apr 12, 2012)

Why does a video camera have an optical viewfinder?

5 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 12, 2012)

You can also use it as a stills camera if you wanted :)

0 upvotes
zzapamiga
By zzapamiga (Apr 12, 2012)

It is not a video camera, it is a stills camera that will be used for video.

1 upvote
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 12, 2012)

Nope its a video camera that will be used as a stills camera.
Only you record the video and you'll pick the stills afterwards.

each frame is 8,8 megapixels folks.
Thats more then enough for the average photojournalist and wedding photographer to fill a sheet of paper....

And there are 25 of those photo's in each second with this camera.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 55 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Ilkka Nissilä
By Ilkka Nissilä (Apr 12, 2012)

Stills and video in practice need to be shot separately for them to be any good. For video of a moving subject you want a slow shutter speed so that it looks smooth. For stills of a moving subject often you want to stop the movement using a fast shutter speed. Also, for optimal angles the still photographer can zoom and change vantage point discretely between every shot, whereas a video shooter will have to move in a continuously smooth manner to maintain watchable video. Finally, stills photographers predominantly use flash for lighting and this cannot be used with video. So they're separate modalities and the camera is operated very differently when the aim is to capture video and when it is used to capture stills.

1 upvote
JimmyTwoShoes
By JimmyTwoShoes (Apr 12, 2012)

You do realise the 1/50 sec shutter speed (assuming 24p with a shutter angle of 180 degrees) won't really give you great stills. There'll be toms of aesthetically pleasing motion blur in most frames.

0 upvotes
cinemascope
By cinemascope (Apr 12, 2012)

Hmmm... things are starting to get better...

0 upvotes
MikeNeufeld30
By MikeNeufeld30 (Apr 12, 2012)

Isn't that the TRUTH...

0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Apr 12, 2012)

While early for 4K video (most PCs can't cope yet w/ such streams), the new Canons confirms the shift at the hi-end toward 4K. The biggest pro here being not 4x the resolution, but mainly the increased color depth and dynamic range.

And render some justice (aka input streams) to the 4k projectors from Sony (25K$) and JVC (150K$), whose home versions I hope to see dropping under 10K$... Looking forward to great slideshows in 8Mpix deep color ;-)

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Apr 12, 2012)

"The biggest pro here being not 4x the resolution, but mainly the increased color depth and dynamic range."

Considering that this $15,000 Canon camera has the same low-quality 8-bit color fidelity than your run-of-the-mill $125 point & shoot digital cameras have, that was perhaps not what you had intended to say here, right?

0 upvotes
Total comments: 428
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