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Nikon defends decision to stop supplying spares to independent repairers

By Richard Butler on Mar 12, 2012 at 23:16 GMT

Nikon USA has defended its decision to stop supplying spare parts to companies outside its authorized service network. Its intention is to deliver 'the best service experience to the customer,' says David Dentry, General Manager of Customer Relations at Nikon Inc, explaining that the complexity of modern cameras and the need for specialist analysis and calibration tools meant that repair attempts by ill-equipped retail or unauthorized repair shops could end up causing delays, increase the cost and risk voiding the camera's warranty. However, an independent service center we spoke to said its statements misrepresented the situation and is likely to mean small repairs take longer.

Nikon's Dentry says the move comes to ensure cameras are repaired properly with the right parts: 'Cameras are now far more technically advanced, and require testing equipment for a proper diagnosis and proper tools for adjustment and calibration. Years ago, you could look at a camera and diagnose a worn gear or some physical issue. Now cameras are advanced microcomputers and require skilled technicians and specialized tools to fix a camera and calibrate the focus of lenses to properly assure adherence specifications.'

Consumer benefits

'The benefits for the consumer were top of mind when implementing this policy. A consumer’s products are repaired properly in a timely fashion, often times with less waiting time and less cost to the consumer. Consumers can also have confidence in their cameras service, as authorized dealers receive factory training, tech bulletins for recent products, and possess proper tools for diagnostics and adjustments.'

Dentry suggests using independent servicing is something of a lottery: 'Often times, a retailer or unauthorized repair shop would attempt to repair a camera even though they were not able or equipped to make such repair and thereafter would have to send the camera to a Nikon authorized repair facility for proper repair, at the cost of increased wait times. Overall, this led to many delays and in the end increased the cost to the customer. Additionally, as with most consumer electronics, if there is evidence of improper repair, a camera warranty would likely be void.'

The mention of warranties is odd, an independent service center told us: 'most of our business is post-warranty work. Why should people be paying us for work if it's paid for under the warranty?'

He also dismissed the idea that damage during repair is commonplace: 'there are literally thousands of pieces of Nikon equipment being serviced by independent stores. We've been in business since the 1950's and there are plenty of businesses that have been here for 30, 40 years. 'They're lumping everyone together. Yes there are some places that are one guy working out of his house who thinks he can repair a camera, but that's not the all of us - we've had guys here working for 20 or more years. These are people who have trained at the Canon factory or the Nikon factory or the Sony factory.'

Modern DSLRs feature complex electronics as well as traditional precision engineering

'There are some tools and pieces of equipment that are too expensive for us to buy, or that we wouldn't use often enough to make it economic, and in those cases we send the cameras back to the factory. But this move means even small things will have to go back to the factory,' says the independent business.

Dentry points out that independent service shops can apply to join the 20 centers authorized to repair its DSLRs in the US, and says they can contact their local Nikon rep or the Nikon Inc. repair department for an application and Nikon tool requirement list and training information.

But the cost of becoming a Nikon authorized service center is prohibitive, the independent service center claims: 'There's an item on that list that costs $32,000. Overall you need to buy equipment costing over $160,000 and you sign a contract agreeing they could cut you out tomorrow. The cost of equipment, that only works with their products, is more than the cost of what every other manufacturer requires, put together.'

'We have a relationship with all the manufacturers - if it requires a specialist piece of equipment for the work, we send it back.'

'Independent servicing allows quicker repairs'

'It's odd to be someone's customer for 40 or 50 years and then be told 'we don't want your money anymore. The majority of businesses like ours are family owned. This takes business out of the local economy.' Ultimately, though, the option of turning to independent servicing is in the customers' interest, he says: 'Independent servicing allows small repairs to be done quickly'

'We're not sure what happens next - we haven't yet heard officially it they're completely cutting us out or if they'll allow their service centers to re-sell parts, or if some people will self-import components. We won't go down that route but I'm sure some will.'

Comments

Total comments: 302
1234
EddyKilowatt
By EddyKilowatt (Mar 14, 2012)

Hmmm... I recall the car companies got their knuckles rapped by the FTC for trying to do something similar. In fact I believe they not only have to make parts available, but also shop manuals and other service information. I wonder what the parallels might be with this situation.

Seems like a greedy grab on Nikon's part in any case, and the exact opposite of what professionals would want from their camera company. The shop in town might get your gear fixed today in time for tomorrow's shoot... the service depot two states away, not so likely.

6 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 14, 2012)

Don't worry.... Nikon USA's new policy here in the U.S. will keep many civil trial and anti-trust and class action attorneys pretty happy. Nikon will get what's coming to then, for sure. And yes, the Federal Trade Commission should be getting a good number of complaints on this, too.

0 upvotes
Gerard Hoffnung
By Gerard Hoffnung (Mar 14, 2012)

I'm pretty sure that previous case law has shown that Nikon is under no obligation to sell parts to ISOs. They will claim that the parts are patented and covered under intellectual property laws and that Nikon is not in a monopolistic position. There is plenty of precedence for this and it would be very expensive for anyone to pursue this legally with little chance of a positive outcome. If this turns out to be a big issue for consumer, they will vote with their wallets. I really have sympathy with the independents though as I have always tried to deal with local companies in most of my consumer purchases. I like to be more than just a voice on the telephone or a case number in a computer.

1 upvote
spbStan
By spbStan (Mar 15, 2012)

The trend in the last 15 years or so for all fields to have less support for independent shops, in my field of pro audio, surely that has been the case for years. I was surprised that Nikon still sold parts to independents, where they have no control over how the parts are used and how the the cameras are repaired. Independents just can't keep up with the test instruments required to service modern gear and customers really do suffer a loss, often that they do not even know about. After being in service for years in a technical field I have to agree with Nikon, if a shop does not have the proper gear there is no way to properly calibrate or align anything. How does the independent even know if they will not be able to fix it without calibration? If they get into it, and it needs any precision adjustments, they have to send it to Nikon shops now anyway. A shop is not very professional if not properly equipped for the task. If they want to work on Nikons, why not get certified?

0 upvotes
LX93
By LX93 (Mar 14, 2012)

Marketing Depts. in Canon, Sony, Pentax- you're noticing this, right?

2 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Mar 14, 2012)

Doubt it - they'll be too busy drinking Champagne in celebration!!!

Brian

0 upvotes
Max Jerrell
By Max Jerrell (Mar 14, 2012)

D800 looking a lot less appealing.

11 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Mar 14, 2012)

Gotta check the UK situation, but it looks like falling off my wannahave list with a resounding thump, as a result of this Nikon USA idiocy!

Brian

1 upvote
unotisto
By unotisto (Mar 14, 2012)

I'm thinking... Has the D800 "success" gotten to somebody's head?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 14, 2012)

Amazing, isn't it, how a camera that is not even out yet can already cause success to go to someone's head.

0 upvotes
MPA1
By MPA1 (Mar 13, 2012)

Meh. Lousy 12 month warranty on a NZ$9,000 camera - what use is that in any case?!

3 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Mar 13, 2012)

So it looks there isn't an overwhelming endorsement of Nikon USA's announcement in this forum ... I wonder who DOES support this?

Brian

2 upvotes
Peter White
By Peter White (Mar 13, 2012)

Remind me never to buy another Nikon product.

13 upvotes
robmanueb
By robmanueb (Mar 14, 2012)

Yep pretty much. I was looking at getting back into it after having to sell my D90. Looking at a second hand D40/60 but hearing this is a huge turn off. So Nikon will loose me as a customer for new lenses flashes and future upgrades. Dam we buy a system off you guys not just a camera, stop being so short sighted Nikon. If this is just Nikon USA then Nikon Japan needs to talk to junior and put him in his place.

4 upvotes
Greg M
By Greg M (Mar 13, 2012)

This, along with Nikon's refusal to repair gray market Nikon lenses and cameras, is why I'll always shoot Canon.

12 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 14, 2012)

Looks like that to Nikon, a Nikon customer is their worst mortal enemy. What a frightful mindset, OMG.

0 upvotes
fpapp
By fpapp (Mar 13, 2012)

I found an online petition to Nikon for anyone who wishes to sign.

https://www.change.org/petitions/nikon-inc-keep-selling-repair-parts-in-the-usa-as-they-have-always-done

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
akphot
By akphot (Mar 13, 2012)

As any independent shop of 37years I've had an open account with Nikon 36years. To all of a sudden decide I'm not capable to repair there broken battery doors is ludicrous. The nearest afs is more than 1000 miles from here.This policy will not help any of the 1000's of tourist that travel to Alaska.One side note the last of the film camera's had indepth electronic circuits & not alot different than today's camera's.This is restraint of trade.

16 upvotes
tsk1979
By tsk1979 (Mar 14, 2012)

Car companies tried this, and got rapped bad. Maybe you guys can get together, and put pressure. This is unfair trade practice, and will not stand up in court

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 14, 2012)

This will be a short lifespan policy, indeed. But the damage to the "Nikon name" will be everlasting.

Heck, they are already being ridiculed for having that Ashton Kutcher twerp as their "spokesperson." I don't think that messed-up guy could get off a decent shot with a camera if his life depended on it.

0 upvotes
Peanut88
By Peanut88 (Mar 13, 2012)

Nikon STINKS !
They just want to protect their own interest and making much more money than consider the plight and interest of her customers' camera.
Independent repairers are cheaper than them and gave faster turn-round than them.
So it is quite obvious they want to monopolize the business.
SHAME ! SHAME !
I will switch to Canon as a protest ! ! !

5 upvotes
OSAM
By OSAM (Mar 13, 2012)

Have fun.

*eyeroll*

3 upvotes
xtralight
By xtralight (Mar 13, 2012)

Bye!

1 upvote
TorontoJim
By TorontoJim (Mar 13, 2012)

When I complained about focusing in Canon SLRs, they accused me of being a Nikon Troll (whatever that is, eh?). So, with reluctance, I comment on this move by Nikon. By a fluke, we own no Nikon cameras, but it was very close on many decisions. A very good (and technical genius) friend went with the P7000 (?) and is happy with it, especially after the firmware upgrade that sped it up a bit.
to the point:
Make someone at Nikon point out the absolute dollar (or yen) value of this decision (to reduce outsourcing of parts). Make them tell us why they need this extra money.
To stay alive? some (Nikon) users might voluntarily pay a premium for this. (I might, but not for Nikon and also not for Canon, eh?)
If owners are willing to pay a small premium, and the manufacturer demands it, OK.
And, if not, well. Nikon may have signed its own death certificate. Knowing that I canNot get spare parts at, say, www.torontocameraservice.com/
which is my place of last resort, says: this is wrong.

2 upvotes
chrismmmm
By chrismmmm (Mar 13, 2012)

Outrageous; They refuse to offer international warranties so when you change countries like a lot of business professionals do these days, you're supposed to send the camera back to the country of origin?

5 upvotes
Kiwichas
By Kiwichas (Mar 13, 2012)

In NZ Nikon will not service any gear not bought through an authorized dealer in NZ, to buy through an authorized dealer often costs 50% more
In Australia they will service any Nikon still AFAIK
Canon will service anything
However the service bill will often be on a par with a newer digital body!!,which would apply to Canon also I suspect.
So maybe stick to non-AFS(second hand) lenses which are more reliable than AFS, and cut Nikon out of the loop and save money
Basically a rort though

2 upvotes
sorinx
By sorinx (Mar 13, 2012)

It was not enough that we have complete Japanese monopoly in camera market, now they want to extend this.

2 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Mar 13, 2012)

Japanese monopoly? If you feel that way, get a Kodak or Leica or Hassleblad or iPhone...

0 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Mar 13, 2012)

Not to mention that most cameras are made in Taiwan, Korea, China, Thailand and elsewhere - even if they carry a Japanese name badge. Like the aforementioned iPhone - one of China's best consumer products.

Brian

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 14, 2012)

I am getting sick and tired of this dumb@ss Japanese mindset.

0 upvotes
sorinx
By sorinx (Mar 13, 2012)

Is this legal? it is a kind of monopoly. It is like for example Ford refuses to make spare parts available to everybody.

What if M$ refuses to sell Windows to all PC manufacturers?

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 13, 2012)

Apple doesn't make their OS available to HP or Dell, despite using similar Intel hardware. It's a perfectly legitimate and legal decision. As consumers, we get to decide if we want to do business with Nikon or MS or Apple. If we don't like their decisions, then we can stop buying their products.

1 upvote
markie_jan61
By markie_jan61 (Mar 13, 2012)

Not a good comparison - Nikon versus Apple.

I don't have to have my out-of-warranty Apple products serviced by an Apple dealer (or even by an Apple certified technician).
--

0 upvotes
nikonjohn
By nikonjohn (Mar 14, 2012)

Not valid period. You have already bought their products. Nikon's decision affects your past purchases regardless of what you do in the future.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 14, 2012)

You bought a Nikon product and it came with a warranty. Nikon is obligated to service your camera under warranty, but at the place of their choosing. Beyond the warranty, they have no obligation whatsoever. They don't even have to provide spare parts, period. I think a lot of you are confusing legal obligation vs convenient customer service and supply/demand.

There are a lot of products out there with NO parts or service available from anyone. A company agrees to sell you a product and that it will work for a period of time. THey don't guarantee you can get it fixed wherever you want (or even at all) forever.

1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Mar 13, 2012)

If Nikon truly were providing the 'best' service offer then they would not need to take this action - the competition would have withered under their heat.

7 upvotes
Victor Melicson
By Victor Melicson (Mar 13, 2012)

I am a Nikon user and I pledge never to buy another Nikon product and to inform as many people as possible to boycot Nikon untill they reverse their decision. This is one more money grab scheme, they are trying to illegally protect local suppliers. The customer can very well decide on his own where to repair his camera and the free market will eliminate the bad shops.
There can be only one reaction to this and is to start a campaign against Nikon: send emails to all Nikon contact points and let them know how much you hate this decision and how much it will hurt Nikon if it tries to wage war against it's own customer base.

6 upvotes
sorinx
By sorinx (Mar 13, 2012)

I have decided to buy new camera only if I really need it. A 5 years old camera can make a picture as good as new one.
Just use the money for few trips and you have more pictures than if you buy a new camera and stay at home.

3 upvotes
lock
By lock (Mar 13, 2012)

This has nothing to do with quality of repair. It's all about money. Your money.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
flappleton
By flappleton (Mar 13, 2012)

This goes with Nikon's refusal to service in Canada a D80 bought in the US. This was shortly after the D80 was released. Not only would they not honour the warrantee in Canada (which I kinda understand), they refused to fix the camera for payment (this I could not understand and I still do not). With this latest Nikon announcement, you may have a broken Nikon and no way to get it repaired. Bah

5 upvotes
N13L5
By N13L5 (Mar 14, 2012)

This would mean the end even for the second hand Nikon market across country borders.

Thats the way Software makers are trying to go, with all that direct download software, that has no media and can't be resold, when you're done with it.

I haven't been impressed with any of Nikon's recent moves. Company becoming too dishonest.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 14, 2012)

Exactly right. The Japanese parent companies have invented corporate dishonesty -- just look at Olympus. But don't worry -- our dedicated civil case and anti-trust attorneys here in the U.S. will take real good care of Nikon USA, he-he-he.

0 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Mar 13, 2012)

I think my imminent order for a D800 and 24-70mm F2.8 has just been canceled, to be replaced by one for an E-5 with 12-60mm lens ...

... and I get in-camera pixel mapping as standard with the Olympus - something else for which Nikon requires you to send your camera in.

Brian

3 upvotes
xtralight
By xtralight (Mar 13, 2012)

Go with Canon instead, 5DIII?

0 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Mar 13, 2012)

Don't know why, but the EOS-5 series (including the new III) doesn't do it for me. I prefer the Nikon bodies. But I also like my Olympus DSLR - just wish it had a larger sensor.

Brian

0 upvotes
six34sigma
By six34sigma (Mar 13, 2012)

I can afford to buy whatever I want. Any stupidity by Nikon service will result in me switching to something else. Seems like a ridiculous move, not convinced based on some of the comments posted that Nikon service is an excellent organization, far from it.

4 upvotes
SantaFeBill
By SantaFeBill (Mar 13, 2012)

This policy also means no more sales of 3rd-party warranties, since you wouldn't be able to get repairs under one. So Nikon gets a monopoly on extended warranties as well.
Since I don't like Canon ergonomics, and in any case can't afford a complete change of systems, perhaps it's just as well that I'll shortly be stopping doing photography.

2 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Mar 13, 2012)

There are currently 24 Nikon authorized centers that receive parts, equipment, training, etc.

http://www.nikonusa.com/Service-And-Support/Nikon-Authorized-Repair-List.page

If a third-party warranty company has managed to alienate every last one of those (and, judging from the third-party warranty horror story threads we see so often on dpReview, that is a very real possibility) then shame on them.

1 upvote
Victor Melicson
By Victor Melicson (Mar 13, 2012)

It's not up to Nikon to pick and choose to whom they sell parts. This is probably illegal under monopoly laws, and for sure it has nothign to do with "quality" but with control and money squeeze.

5 upvotes
Biggs23
By Biggs23 (Mar 13, 2012)

Actually Victor, it is. That's not to say that it's right but it IS a business's decision to choose how they run their business, including who they sell parts to.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 14, 2012)

Our dedicated attorneys well versed in anti-trust litigation and class actions will be taking Nikon USA to the cleaners on this.

0 upvotes
GMack
By GMack (Mar 13, 2012)

This is Nikon USA stupidity to its finest.

Why not close all independent auto shops too? Bust a radiator hose? No more car parts places either as "They are unqualified and lack the knowledge." Really? Put your car on a flatbed and haul or ship it off to the factory in whatever country it was made for a busted radiator hose? Genius thinking, and how many would stop buying that brand of auto?

Really 'smart' move by Nikon USA and I would hope Nikon Japan intervenes as it will hurt the brand. Pro gear and no support for some measly part that an independent or retail dealer cannot get or order while you can still use your gear instead of shipping it off for a month. I can tape a battery door shut and wait for one to appear and keep using the equipment. No more with their idiotic policy.

Does sound more like greed by Nikon USA against the gray market though and them wanting 100% control of it - meaning "No Support." Follow the money.

2 upvotes
plantdoc
By plantdoc (Mar 13, 2012)

Perhaps, another step in promoting replacement. For example, "Yes, your XX hundreds or thousands of dollars camera or lens is only 3 years old, but no replacement part is available for a fix, you need to buy new".

1 upvote
hdprobrasil
By hdprobrasil (Mar 13, 2012)

'the best service experience to the customer'??? Sorry Nikon guys, this ship has sailed long time ago. After a repair, my Nikonos V needed another repair which lasted 2 months and lead to me losing an once in a lifetime oportunity, I switched to Canon. My 2 years old 5D had a mirror problem and was solved in 3 days, with no cost by a contracter. Thats how it works. Happy ever since!

6 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (Mar 13, 2012)

Canon should buy out Nkon......well, not Canon's CS is better but at least we can enjoy some of Nikon's technology. LOL~~~ better than falling into Sony's hands.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
codycollectibles
By codycollectibles (Mar 13, 2012)

much has already been said in regard to Nikon's new repair policy. what hasn't been said is the replacement issue with cameras under warranty. what's often replaced is a different same model camera which has been "refurbished" by Nikon. this would be acceptable if we were dealing with film cameras. however the warranty camera may have only relatively few actuations and what the owner receives back is a camera with an unknown number of actuations. my response to all of the comments is my selling of all my (fairly extensive, as i've used nikon for the last 50 years) nikon equipment on ebay.
this way i won't have to bother with Nikon's new policy. and i also will be able to obtain continued excellent repair work, on my new cameras, from my local photo technician. i'm sorry to be having to take this step, but really, Nikon have left me no alternative.

3 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Mar 13, 2012)

UGH, it's true! I got three crap refurb D700s from Nikon before they sent me a working one! One of them looks like it had be rolled down a flight of concrete stairs.

When I last talked to customer service they said "we don't send out refurbished cameras as replacements"!!! I said "well, you sent me three before you sent a working one". I was put on hold for a second and my issue was elevated immediately without further discussion of the issue.

The repair department is out of control.

2 upvotes
robmanueb
By robmanueb (Mar 14, 2012)

What happened Nikon? I remember hearing stories of legendary Nikon service, the guy that sent his 30 year old Nikon binoculars in for service and they do it for free because they are cool old binoculars. How do they know what is grey market? If I send in a 40 year old lens do they check their data base first to make sure it was genuinely sold in USA before repair?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
The Andy G
By The Andy G (Mar 13, 2012)

Let the consumer decide. No, seriously.

Yes, there are many, many technical repairs that should require OEM servicing but other repairs that do not. The shutter module replacement is, in fact, a module. Repairing a shutter, well, that's another matter. Let me choose, however.

0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Mar 13, 2012)

As someone who worked repairing quite complex electromechanical devices in a former life, I have to insist that there is very little that can't be fixed by the average person with simple tools and training or experience.

The "complex" bits are units. That is why things that often sound like simple repairs are expensive. You often can't (or shouldn't) just solder a socket back on for a USB port, and an entire main control board may need to be replaced.

Expensive? Sure. Complex or difficult? Hardly? Equipment required? A screwdriver. Does Nikon do it any different? No, and their QA is not very advanced (it may not even exist!).

1 upvote
Just Hobbyist
By Just Hobbyist (Mar 14, 2012)

90% cottect. Nearly everything these days is just parts swaps.

But then there's the 10%, where special tools or programs are needed.

Btw. Not sure if european Nikon supplies parts to independent repair shops. EU laws are a lot consumer friendly and may force Nikon to do so. A remedy might be to source the Nikon parts from EU middleman.

1 upvote
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Mar 13, 2012)

And then they shot themselves with arrow in the knee..

Thats a lot of bullsh*t in one article.

3 upvotes
Suave
By Suave (Mar 13, 2012)

If it were a good decision they would not have had to defend it.

4 upvotes
Frank C.
By Frank C. (Mar 13, 2012)

shot themselves in the foot they did

1 upvote
paddleleps
By paddleleps (Mar 13, 2012)

In recent years I shifted back to Nikon because I so loved the nikon D3x and the D7000. But the new policy means that simple repairs will mean I will have to wait weeks for nikon to fix a camera. And if past experience is any guide odds are it wil NOT be fixed properly thus requiring another trip back to Nikon.

Nikon should no it is never wise to insult the intelligence of their users. This new policy is so ill advised I can scarcely believe they are defending its implementation. It would be nice to hear from the upper management fools/bean counters who came up with this pathetic policy. Instead we get speciously worded statements from the likes of Mr. Dentry who clearly has no idea what it is like to be a photographer who cares about his craft. And the desire to have minor out of warranty repair issues address locally.

7 upvotes
paddleleps
By paddleleps (Mar 13, 2012)

I still can't believe nikon is taking such a short sighted position. Mr. Dentry's words ring hollow based on m experiences as a working pro. Just prior to the digital age I puchased one of nikon's 500mm F4 lenses for MANY thousands of dollars. The lens had focus shift when stopped down. This was NOT a focus issue. The lens focus shifted forward approx. 12-14 inches when stopped down to F8. Making the lens unuseable. This was a NEW NIKON LENS with USA warranty. Nikon's Professional services repair (EXTREME sarcasm warning as there was NOTHING professional about the way I was treated) told me the solution to my problem was to never stop the lens down or to just remember to focus forward of the subject. I kid you not!! This was what I was told was the solution to my problem. They refused to repair of replace the lens. This incident combined with NUMEROUS others caused my shift to Canon.

3 upvotes
Jule
By Jule (Mar 13, 2012)

Booo to you Nikon US!
Most likely wont go here in Europe thank God.

Kind Regards

0 upvotes
RCicala
By RCicala (Mar 13, 2012)

OK, let me condense this:
We are establishing a monopoly in order to serve you better.

Right.

5 upvotes
OSAM
By OSAM (Mar 13, 2012)

Does Apple have a monopoly on their OS and software because they don't let everybody else use it? No?

Argument invalid. Go away troll.

0 upvotes
JensR
By JensR (Mar 13, 2012)

Osam, how do you get from "repairing broken parts" to "sharing an operating system"?

0 upvotes
Paul Guba
By Paul Guba (Mar 13, 2012)

Having just got off the phone with Nikon I will testify that their service is terrible. Had my lens now for a month. I call and no one knows nothing. Can they check? No. We have to email that department and we will get back to you in 3-4 days.

2 upvotes
paddleleps
By paddleleps (Mar 13, 2012)

Mr. Dentry's fails to recognize that independent repair facilities offer a very beneficial service that was very beneficial to Nikon. One of the reasons I was a nikon shooter for many years was I had access to a good independent repair facility. Because in my experience NIKON'S OWN REPAIR FACILITIES OFFER HORRIFICALLY BAD SERVICE. As a working pro I just want things fixed. If a camera or lens has a major issue or is under warranty I will send it back to Nikon. But many (IN FACT MOST) repairs do not fall under that category. So now I will be subjected to nikon's glacial and inept repair service for repairs that would be better and MORE EFFICIENTLY handled by an independent repair guy. If it were not for independent repair facilities I would have migrated back to Canon long ago. If nikon does prevent independent repair access to parts I guess it is time to buy Canon. At least Canon has respect for their customers. Nikon does not.

2 upvotes
paddleleps
By paddleleps (Mar 13, 2012)

Woww!! Nikon is so brilliant (sarcasm). So when I buy a new nikon D4 for umpteen thousand dollars and I accidentally break the flash card door instead of going to my trusted independent repair guy I will have to send my camera back to nikon? That makes no sense. Does anyone at nikon possess critical thinking skills?

1 upvote
toughluck
By toughluck (Mar 13, 2012)

Congratulations to Nikon for driving one nail in their coffin.

So, the cameras require calibration, etc., and yet when Nikon 'repairs' them, they never come back calibrated, there's nothing different about that.

I'd have to wager a guess that even if the folks in the service depots were told to calibrate the cameras as they are returned to customers, they would have no idea how to do that.

0 upvotes
camerashopminion
By camerashopminion (Mar 13, 2012)

I have to say, my feelings about Nikon are always rather mixed.

We don't do repairs, we just send them to the relevant repairer and charge a handling fee on top of the basic repair cost in exchange for shipping and shouting at the manufacturer to get things done.

Sometimes Nikon amaze me with their goodwill gestures - fixing cameras under warranty that were obviously accidental damage, because the customer is some old dear that didn't realise pulling the battery door off was bad for the camera. Repairing a camera that's outside of warranty by a few weeks (believe me, the other manufacturers are never this nice), or chucking in new eyecups or screen covers without charging extra.

Other times, they drive me to despair - taking forever to fix simple things, giving rubbish excuses, supplying horribly vague estimates... I think I'm chasing three different repairs at the moment, and have three angry customers.

Certainly a mixed bag.

0 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Mar 13, 2012)

i think thats a good decision, and it would also be good to rethink their current repair partners

in Austria, Nikon only has one repair station, and all pro photographers know if you bring a camera to them you get it back in worse condition then you brought it in, so they send their gear to germany

please nikon, let another shop take repairs for nikon, last time i was there the shop assistant told me i should buy canon if iam not happy wi their (the shop) work

this is NOT ok when you bring in two d3

and it got to this point BECAUSE there is no second shop in austria, and this shop knows that every mikon send in to a camera shop will end on their work bench, and thats why they behave like that

0 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Mar 13, 2012)

Nikon should design their cameras so they don't require expensive custom repair tools to service or change parts. I suspect it is the other way round though - they may be deliberately designing cameras so they they require expensive custom tools from Nikon to service.

The Japanese motorcycle industry did the same thing.

Nikon and Canon have a virtual duopoly on full frame DSLRs - and almost as strong a position in the DSLR market as a whole. Regulators should keep an eye on both companies to make sure they are not abusing their dominant positions. Nikon denying parts to independent repair shops smacks of that.

Of course they always claim what they are doing for their own benefit is for the benefit of the consumer.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Mar 13, 2012)

No other camera company designs cameras that way.

Actually, no company designs much modern anything that way.Try fixing an iPhone yourself. ;)

That doesn't mean I agree with the Nikon policy. There are an awful lot of parts that you can change without needing all the setvice tools.

4 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Mar 13, 2012)

for an iphone, you need a screwdriver, open both screws on the bottom side, slide the screen out, thats it

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Mar 13, 2012)

"thats it"

Well, you left out the part about figuring out why it won't power up, ordering the appropriate replacement parts, and soldering the surface mount components, but sure, "thats it".

3 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (Mar 13, 2012)

Sure, iPhone just needs a screwdriver. A unique star-shaped Pentalobe screwdriver.

0 upvotes
Todd Ka
By Todd Ka (Mar 13, 2012)

I love capitalism. Dumb corporations screw up and the market creates an opportunity for somebody willing to take a chance.

Start a gray market parts import business selling parts to service centers.

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
1 upvote
purchase
By purchase (Mar 13, 2012)

So what we've got ?

- we're living in an era where there's a tremendous absence of "full format" sensors, and this makes Nikon's and Canon's living FOR NOW
- they cling to their mirror systems LIKE MAD, instead of offering alternative good mirrorless bodies, together with their "mirror" body sensors
- interesting here, Leica once decided it must also offer a mirror camera system... which they then dumped
- (ok, "mirrorless" is their core technology, when for Nikon and Canon, it's the other way round)
- price tags for Nikon/Canon approach medium format cameras, which for most uses is ridiculous :
- buy a low-end medium camera, with fewer glass, for the same overall price (!), and get Nikon/Canon quality for your "telephoto" cut-outs, but much better quality for your wide- and medium-angle shots

- or buy something like the Fuji X1 if you don't have time to wait for 24x36 arrival in "mirrorless"

- and SPARE TEN GRAND :

Nikon/Canon/mirror is for special use only. Time's over, boys.

0 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Mar 13, 2012)

@purchase

And just what does your post have to do with the topic Nikon stops supplying spares to independent repairers?

You are only blathering another idiotic diatribe against traditional DSLRs

BTW Leica still offer a "mirror camera system" - the S2

Comment edited 60 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Mar 13, 2012)

I'm not sure what most of this means. It appears to be some sort of strange machine translation, there's lots of English words, strung together in ways that don't say much.

But, this statement is totally incorrect. "price tags for Nikon/Canon approach medium format cameras". The only Nikon and Canon cameras with prices that high are the D4 and 1DX, cameras that do things no medium format camera does, such as exceed 1.2 frames/sec (the Nikon and Canon are 6-10 times faster than MF cameras) with state-of-the-art autofocus and weather sealing.

The $3000 (yes, less than 1/3 the price of the cheapest medium format) matches a medium format in resolution, shoots at 2-3x the speed, has better AF, a broader lens line.

2 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Mar 13, 2012)

and so what ?

you where just bored, or is there a second post that actually tells us what this has to do with the newsline ?

and btw 5k for a pro camera is perfectly fine, i can buy 2 of them with one job ^^

the problem is that hobby consumers get attracted to pro cameras, and they want pro companies to sell pro hardware to consumers for 300€ and then they complain why it has no face recognition like the sony cybershots

if youre a hobby photographer PLEASE stop commenting on pro cameras, this is NOT your kind of camera, those are meant to serve people that actually earn money with them

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Mar 13, 2012)

Wow, he got something right, characterizing yourself as "Idiotic"

But beyond that, totally off in the weeds. This is a specially choice gem "My analysis here is top-notch,"

Your analysis, coming form someone who sells analyses, is both technically without merit and essentially illiterate.

Oh, and I see you joined today. Welcome to dpReview. May your stay be short.

0 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Mar 14, 2012)

It's all very well offering strident opinions: unfortunately these are almost incomprehensible strident opinions. They might carry more weight if expressed coherently and with some regard to the conventions of written English. As it is they reveal the author, "purchase" to be a nitwit.

0 upvotes
midstate
By midstate (Mar 13, 2012)

Our shop has been repairing Nikon Products for over 30 yrs. I have many satisfied customers from California to Florida to Maine. See my feedback at
www.sportshooter.com as well as many other sites. I have always been able to determine what repairs require factory service. Similar to auto repairs , often it makes sense to go to the dealer. I cannot believe I will now need to send my customers camera in to Nikon for the simplest of repairs.
Can you imagine Nikon's price for a Battery door repalcement $$$. Not to mention how long it will take and how much money my pro photographer
will lose when his camera is gone for 2 months. This is anti trade and anti buisness practices. Sign our Petition at Change.org search Nikon. Thank You.

7 upvotes
purchase
By purchase (Mar 13, 2012)

again

0 upvotes
zanypoet
By zanypoet (Mar 13, 2012)

The wide angle deflector broke on my SB-800 and Nikon wanted to charge me over $100 to repair it. It may not be a big deal but the WA deflector prevents flash head from zooming when activated. Local guy wanted a lot less but I went on eBay and got the part myself for $15 and repaired it without electrocuting myself.

At least I had the option to go with a local guy for cheaper repairs; now, I'd be lucky to get even simple part for simple repairs.

2 upvotes
purchase
By purchase (Mar 13, 2012)

- and they sell Leica lens adaptors for that new Fuji X1 goodie, but which hasn't got the sensor format I long for (btw, isn't it ridiculous that there is such a mountain of Leica lens adaption possibility everywhere, for sensor formats multiplying most of these into tele lensesn when in fact you'd need wide and medium angles, mostly, in Leica quality, with your xyz body ?

- see what we've got now : D4, with a resolution I don't need (and not needed by many a customer, doing shots for web use)
- but the D4 (age difference 3 years) is more than 6,000 euro, and again, with a mirror system I don't need and don't want (but would have accepted for "full format" in a 3,000 euro body)

- for my use, and for most uses, the mirror system is useless, expensive, prone to fail, it's "old technology"
- I will certainly NOT accept that in a 6,000 / 7,000 euro body, and many other people won't either
(to be continued)

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Mar 13, 2012)

Fascinating.

The words all look like English, but it reads like some alien language.

4 upvotes
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Mar 13, 2012)

whats your point man??

slrs are not for hobby shooters like you

every pro knows why he wants an ovf/slr system, its ok that those cameras are too heavy when you visit the zoo with your grand children, but thats why you are no pro

you just dont understand photography, its like me complaining about the milage of formula one cars ^^

1 upvote
purchase
By purchase (Mar 13, 2012)

(continued)
to cut costs for THEM, not for the customer, not for the environment
- many people switch to Canon or elsewhere
- but they will not necessarily be better of then.

And here's my personal view of Nikon :
- I'll need a good camera for professional use, soon
- photos are for web use only, hence no need for big resolution, and I need wide angle
- thus, Nikon D3 would have been perfect, together with the 14-24 lens, and the body was, at a time, below 3,000 euro incl. VAT
- unfortunately, I was too dumb to buy 2 or 3 bodies then, for future usage, but then, is it smart to be stuck with old Nikons, in some years ? with old Leicas, yes, but old Nikons ?
- I wouldn't need the mirror (and all the unnecessary complications going along with it) in a camera, but I cherish the "full" format sensor
- thus, I "accept" the "Nikon way", in order to have such a 24x36 mm sensor
- since Leica doesn't have got a good sensor living up to its renown
(to be continued)

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
purchase
By purchase (Mar 13, 2012)

I've read 100 comments here. My consolidated view is :
- Nikon tries to impair the "grey market" by whatever means possible
- - incl. illegal means (cf. their European Union proceedings, cf. their behavior in Australia)
- on top of that, they don't even do the repairs in any professional way :
- - cf. the Spanish experience, systematically, smear on the sensor, and billing of a useless "cleansing" on top of that
- - extreme delays, repairs not done, repair done but new defects done in the repair process (a lot of people report these)
- they are lying, 95 % (or so) of repairs do NOT involve any need for (or use, even by their "authorized" dealers / repair shops, of) their specialized repair gear (cf. components, if a little thing is broken, the repair shop has to replace (and bill) it along with many other things, within the whole component : it's like in the car, and in the electronics, industry, and as it is there, they do it to cut costs for THEM... to be continued

1 upvote
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