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Nikon D800 and D800E 36MP full-frame DSLRs announced

By dpreview staff on Feb 7, 2012 at 04:00 GMT

Nikon has announced the D800 and D800E 36MP full-frame DSLRs. The pixel count of the long-awaited replacement for the D700 means it also trumps the D3X as the highest-resolution camera in Nikon's lineup. As well as the 'stock' D800, Nikon has also revealed a more expensive model, the D800E that will be free from the effects of an anti-aliasing filter. Aimed at studio and landscape professionals the D800E should theoretically begin to rival medium format digital equipment in terms of resolution.

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Press Release:

EXPECTATIONS SURPASSED: THE 36.3-MEGAPIXEL NIKON D800 IS THE MULTIMEDIA HD-SLR THAT SHATTERS CONVENTIONAL RESOLUTION BARRIERS FOR MAXIMUM FIDELITY

The New Nikon D800 Offers Unrivaled Resolution and Features Designed for a Variety of Demanding Professional Photographic and Multimedia Disciplines, Videographers and Filmmakers

MELVILLE, N.Y. (Feb 6, 2012) –  Today, imaging leader Nikon Inc. announced the highly anticipated D800 HD-SLR, engineered to provide extreme resolution, astounding image quality and valuable video features optimized for professional still and multimedia photographers and videographers.  A camera with an unmatched balance of accuracy, functionality and image quality, the Nikon D800 realizes innovations such as a high resolution 36.3-megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor, a 91,000-pixel RGB Matrix Metering System, Advanced Scene Recognition System and many other intuitive features designed to create the preeminent device for the most demanding photo and video applications.

Whether shooting high fashion, weddings or multimedia content, Nikon’s highest resolution sensor to date, a groundbreaking new 36.3-megapixel (7360 x 4912 resolution) FX-format CMOS sensor, affords flexibility and astonishing image quality to satisfy a myriad of client requests. The Nikon D800 incorporates the latest 91,000-pixel 3D Color Matrix Metering III and the Advanced Scene Recognition System, coupled with an improved 51-point AF system for images with amazing sharpness, color and clarity. With its compact, lightweight D-SLR form factor and extensive video feature set, the D800 allows photographers to transition to multimedia to create an immersive story. Professional videographers will appreciate practical features that go beyond NIKKOR lens compatibility and Full HD 1080p video, such as full manual control, uncompressed HDMI output, and incredible low-light video capability. With this innovative combination of features, the D800 celebrates resourcefulness and a dedication to the flawless execution of an epic creative vision. All of this is driven by Nikon’s latest EXPEED 3™ image processing engine, providing the necessary processing power to fuel amazing images with faithful color, a wide dynamic range and extreme resolution. 

“Whatever the project, visionaries need a tool that is going to help them stay on-time and on-task. The Nikon D800 re-imagines what is possible from this level of D-SLR, to address the needs of an emerging and ever changing market; this is the camera that is going to bridge the gap for the most demanding imaging professionals, and provide never before seen levels of SLR image and video quality,” said Bo Kajiwara, director of marketing, Nikon Inc. “The D800 is the right tool for today’s creative image makers, affording photographers, filmmakers and videographers a versatile option for capturing the ultimate in still image quality or full HD content, with maximum control.”

Extreme Image Quality

The new Nikon developed 36.3-megapixel FX-format (35.9 x 24mm) CMOS sensor realizes Nikon’s highest resolution yet, and is ideal for demanding applications such as weddings, studio portraiture and landscape, where there is no compromise to exceptional high fidelity and dynamic range. Nikon’s first priority is amazing image quality above all else, and resolution of this magnitude affords photographers the ability to portray even the smallest details, such as a strand of hair, with stunning sharpness or crop liberally with confidence. Photographers also shoot with the assurance of NIKKOR lens compatibility, because only a manufacturer with decades of optical excellence can provide the glass to resolve this kind of extreme resolution.

For shooting with minimal noise in a variety of lighting conditions, the D800 features a wide native ISO range of 100-6400, expandable to 50 (Lo-1)-25,600 (Hi-2). Nikon engineers have created innovative ways to manipulate light transmission to the sensor’s photodiodes, giving users the ability to shoot with confidence in challenging lighting conditions.  Internal sensor design, an enhanced optical low pass filter (OLPF) and 14 bit A/D conversion with a high signal to noise ratio all contribute to a sensor capable of excellent low light ability despite the extreme resolution.  Every aspect of this new FX-format sensor is engineered to deliver amazing low noise images through the ISO range and help create astounding tonal gradation and true colors, whether shooting JPEG or RAW. Images are further routed through a 16-bit image processing pipeline, for maximum performance. To further enhance versatility, users are also able to shoot in additional modes and aspect ratios such as 5:4 to easily frame for printed portraits or a 1.2X crop for a slight telephoto edge. For even more versatility, photographers can also take advantage of Nikon DX-format lenses for more lens options and enhanced focal range (1.5X), while still retaining sharpness and details at a high 15.4-megapixel (4800x3200) resolution.  

Contributing to the camera’s rapid performance and amazing image quality is Nikon’s new EXPEED 3 image processing engine that helps professionals create images and HD video with amazing resolution, color and dynamic range. From image processing to transfer, the new engine is capable of processing massive amounts of data, exacting optimal color, rich tonality and minimized noise throughout the frame. Despite the immense data, the new EXPEED 3 also contributes to energy efficiency, affording the ability to shoot longer.  

The D800 also features the Advanced Scene Recognition System with the 91,000-pixel 3D Color Matrix Meter III to provide unrivaled metering in even the most challenging of lighting conditions. At the system’s core is a newly designed RGB sensor that meticulously analyzes each scene, recognizes factors such as color and brightness with unprecedented precision and then compares all the data using Nikon’s exclusive 30,000 image database. Additionally, this new sensor now has the ability to detect human faces with startling accuracy, even when shooting through the optical viewfinder. This unique feature is coupled with detailed scene analysis for more accurate autofocus (AF), Auto exposure (AE), i-TTL flash control and even enhanced subject tracking. The Color Matrix Meter also emphasizes priority on exposure of the detected faces, allowing for correct exposure even when the subject is backlit. Even in the most difficult exposures the D800 excels, such as maintaining brightness on a bride’s face while retaining the dynamic range to accentuate the intricate details of a wedding dress beside a black tuxedo.    

Advanced new automatic systems make it even easier to capture amazing images. The camera features a new enhanced auto white balance system that more accurately recognizes both natural and artificial light sources, and also gives the user the option to retain the warmth of ambient lighting. Users can expand dynamic range with in-camera High Dynamic Range (HDR) image capture, and enjoy the benefits of Nikon’s Active D-lighting for balanced exposure. Another new feature is direct access to Nikon’s Picture Control presets via a dedicated button on the back of the body to tweak photo and video parameters on the fly, such as sharpness, hue and saturation.

True Cinematic Experience

The Nikon D800 has a compact and lightweight form factor that’s preferable for a production environment, yet is packed with practical and functional features. The D800 is ideal whether the user is a filmmaker on location or in the studio or a documentarian in the field who requires portability and the NIKKOR lens versatility and depth of field that only a HD-SLR can offer. Filmmakers have the choice of various resolutions and frame rates, including Full HD 1080 at 30/24p and HD 720 at 60/30p. By utilizing the B-Frame data compression method, users can record H.264/MPEG-4 AVC format video with unmatched integrity for up to 29:59 minutes per clip (normal quality). This format produces higher quality video data without increasing file size for a more efficient workflow. The optimized CMOS sensor reads image data at astoundingly fast rates, which results in less instances of rolling shutter distortion. The sensor also enables incredible low-light video capability with minimal noise, letting filmmakers capture footage where previously impossible or expensive and complex lighting would otherwise be necessary. Users are also able to have full manual control of exposure, and can also adjust the camera’s power aperture setting in live view for an accurate representation of the depth of field in a scene.  Whether shooting for depth of field in FX-format mode, or looking for the extra 1.5X telephoto benefits of DX mode, the high resolution sensor of the D800 allows videographers to retain full 1080p HD resolution no matter which mode they choose to best suit the scene. Users are also able to easily compose and check critical HD focus through the 921,000-dot, 3.2-inch LCD monitor with reinforced glass, automatic monitor brightness control, and wide viewing angle.

For professional and broadcast applications that call for outboard digital recorders or external monitors, users can stream an uncompressed full HD signal directly out of the camera via the HDMI port (8 bit, 4:2:2). This output signal can be ported into a display or digital recording device or routed through a monitor and then to the recording device, eliminating the need for multiple connections. This image can also be simultaneously viewed on both the camera’s LCD and an external monitor, while eliminating on-screen camera status data for streaming purposes. The D800 also includes features concentrated on audio quality, such as a dedicated headphone jack for accurate monitoring of audio levels while recording. Audio output levels can be adjusted with 30 steps for precise audio adjustment and monitoring. The D800 offers high-fidelity audio recording control with audio levels that can be set and monitored on the camera’s LCD screen. A microphone connected via the stereo mic jack can also be adjusted with up to 20 steps of sensitivity for accurate sound reproduction. What’s more, recording can be set to be activated through the shutter button, opening a world of remote applications through the 10-pin accessory terminal.

Wield Speed and Performance with Astonishing Accuracy

Whether shooting the runway or fast moving wildlife, the enhanced 51-point AF system of the D800 delivers blazing fast AF with tack-sharp results. Nikon has enhanced the Multi-Cam 3500-FX AF sensor module and algorithms to significantly improve low light acquisition, for precise focus to an impressive -2 exposure value (EV). The focus system utilizes 15 cross-type AF sensors for enhanced accuracy, and the system also places an emphasis on the human face, working in conjunction with the Advanced Scene Recognition System to provide accurate face detection even through the optical viewfinder. The camera also utilizes nine cross-type sensors that are fully functional when using compatible NIKKOR lenses and teleconverters with an aperture value up to f/8, which is a great advantage to those who need extreme telephoto focal lengths (single cross type sensor active with TC20E III). For maximum versatility in all shooting situations, whether photographing portraits or static subjects, users are also able to select multiple AF modes, including normal, wide area, face tracking and subject tracking to best suit the scene.

The D800 delivers upon a professional’s need for maximum speed when it counts. The camera is ready to shoot in 0.12 seconds, and is ready to capture with super-fast AF and response speed. To photograph action in a burst, the camera shoots up to 4 frames per second (fps) in FX mode at full resolution, or up to a speedy 6 fps in DX mode using the optional MB-D12 Battery Pack and compatible battery. Further enhancing the speed of the camera and overall workflow, the D800 utilizes the new USB 3.0 standard for ultra fast transfer speeds.

Construction and Operability

The body of the D800 is designed to offer a compact form factor and a lightweight body for the utmost versatility. The chassis is constructed of magnesium alloy for maximum durability, and is sealed and gasketed for resistance to dirt and moisture. Users are able to easily compose through the bright optical viewfinder, which offers 100% frame coverage.  For storage, the D800 has dual card slots for CF and SD cards, and offers users the ability to record backup, overflow, RAW/JPEG separation, and the additional option of shooting stills to one and video to the other. For high speed recording and transfer, data can be recorded to recent UDMA-7 and SDXC / UHS-1 cards. The shutter has been tested to withstand approximately 200,000 cycles, and the camera also employs sensor cleaning. The D800 also features a built-in flash and is compatible with Nikon’s acclaimed Creative Lighting System, including a built-in Commander mode for controlling wireless Speedlights.

D800E - Maximum Resolution Unleashed

In addition to the D800, Nikon will also be releasing a supplementary model for those professionals who demand even higher resolution and D-SLR versatility; the D800E. This model treads in medium format territory for studio work or landscape photography when there is no exception to only the highest fidelity and sharpness. This unique alternative model will effectively enhance the resolution characteristics of the 36.3-megapixel CMOS sensor by cancelling the anti-aliasing properties of the OLPF inside the camera. By doing this, light is delivered directly to the photodiodes, yielding an image resulting from the raw light gathering properties of the camera. A color moiré correction tool will also be available within Capture NX2 to enhance the D800E photographer’s workflow.

Price and Availability

The Nikon D800 will be available in late March for the suggested retail price of $2999.95.1 The D800E version will be available in mid April 2012 for a suggested retail price of $3,299.95. For more information about these models, NIKKOR lenses and other D-SLR cameras please visit www.nikonusa.com

Nikon D800 specifications

Price
MSRPUS: $2999.95 UK: £2599.99 EU: €2829
Body type
Body typeMid-size SLR
Body materialMagnesium alloy
Sensor
Max resolution7360 x 4912
Other resolutions6144 x 4912, 6144 x 4080, 5520 x 3680, 4800 x 3200, 4608 x 3680, 4608 x 3056, 3680 x 2456, 3600 x 2400, 3072 x 2456, 3072 x 2040, 2400 x 1600
Image ratio w:h5:4, 3:2
Effective pixels36 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors37 megapixels
Sensor sizeFull frame (35.9 x 24 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorExpeed 3
Color spacesRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter arrayPrimary Color Filter
Image
ISO100 - 6400 in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 EV steps (50 - 25600 with boost)
White balance presets12
Custom white balanceYes (5)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal, Basic
File format
  • NEF (RAW): 12 or 14 bit, lossless compressed, compressed or uncompressed
  • TIFF (RGB)
  • JPEG
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampYes
Digital zoomNo
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points51
Lens mountNikon F
Focal length multiplier1×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3.2
Screen dots921,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT Color LCD with 170 degrees wide-viewing angle
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage100%
Viewfinder magnification0.7×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/8000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Programmed auto with flexible program (P)
  • Shutter-priority (S)
  • Aperture priority (A)
  • Manual (M)
Built-in flashYes (pop-up)
Flash range12.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flashYes (Hot-shoe, Wireless plus sync connector)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-eye, Slow sync, Rear curtain, High-speed sync
Flash X sync speed1/250 sec
Drive modes
  • S (single frame)
  • CL (continuous low speed)
  • CH (continuous high speed)
  • Q (quiet shutter-release)
  • MUP (mirror up)
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive4 fps
Self-timerYes (2 to 20 sec, 1 to 9 exposures at intervals of 0.5, 1, 2 or 3 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 1 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (2, 3, 5, 7 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (2 to 9 frames in steps of 1, 2 or 3)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50, 30, 25 fps), 640 x 424 (24 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
MicrophoneMono
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesCompact Flash (Type I), SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-I compliant
Storage includedNone
Connectivity
USB USB 3.0 (5 GBit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini Type C)
Remote controlYes (Optional, wired or wireless )
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes (Water and dust resistant)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion EN-EL15 rechargeable battery & charger
Weight (inc. batteries)1000 g (2.20 lb / 35.27 oz)
Dimensions146 x 123 x 82 mm (5.75 x 4.84 x 3.23)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingYes
GPSOptional
GPS notesGP-1

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Comments

Total comments: 278
123
pcblade
By pcblade (Jul 26, 2012)

How does it compare to the d700 ?

0 upvotes
Khizer
By Khizer (May 12, 2012)

I can't believe the D800 score didn't even beat Pentax K-5 !

0 upvotes
h0tsauce
By h0tsauce (Feb 10, 2012)

wow high iso samples of the D800 can be found here.

http://cmphotography.com/blog.cfm

0 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 10, 2012)

I've seen: very very good samples.
But I don't know how a D700 could give worse results with same author, same lens (85/1.4G), same lights, same ISO and same pp.
Surely face recognition can help but I would see a direct comparison D700 vs D800 at same conditions.

0 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Feb 13, 2012)

Up to 3200 it's good, but at 6400 it obviously starts to fall apart. I seriously doubt the high ISO will be as good as the D700.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 26, 2012)

@raztec Obviously the D700 is a great camera, but I've already seen at least 3 sets of samples at different websites where the D800 high ISO images are better with less chroma noise from ISO 6400 to 25,600. And these were likely pre-production D800's.

0 upvotes
Russell McMahon
By Russell McMahon (Feb 10, 2012)

I'm looking forward to the D700s. I wonder when they will announce it? :-)

0 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Feb 9, 2012)

I saw some photo and video samples and... Well done, Nikon! It took long for them, finally, to bring a real competitor to the Canon 5D Mark II. Now let's see if it was worth the wait or if the 5D Mark II successor will mean another 3 years for Nikon to come up with something better.

1 upvote
raztec
By raztec (Feb 8, 2012)

Ridiculous and typical of Nikon. I can't make out this company. Honestly. They don't seem to consider the needs of amateur photographers.

Who needs 36mp other than studio photographers, or those that blow up their images to bill board size?

Why not give us the D4 sensor in a D800 body?

We want full frame, max 24mp, fast AF, 1.5x crop factor option to use our DX lenses, excellent high iso.

Is that asking too much? They have the technology to do it. So why don't they?

Raz

1 upvote
88SAL
By 88SAL (Feb 9, 2012)

Your use of sarcasim through out this entire entry is seamless!

1 upvote
h0tsauce
By h0tsauce (Feb 9, 2012)

Because amateurs don't buy $3000+ semi pro bodies. Amateurs don't buy 5D Mark II over D700 to make movies.

1 upvote
djobojojo
By djobojojo (Feb 10, 2012)

You're either being sarcastic or you're missing the point. Nikon are catering for a market that they haven't been a part of since the 5D MKII was released: full frame, affordable and high resolution. Maybe there will be a D700x, but for now this camera is filling a gap that has needed filling for quite some time.

Plus, as it's already been said, amateurs don't buy these cameras.

0 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Feb 11, 2012)

I bet if they made it 24mp FF they would sell more. Both pros and amateurs would be lining up to buy one. At 36mp they are catering to a niche market.

24mp is more than enough and with todays chips we know the high ISO would probably be as good as the D700.

But I believe that Nikon and Canon know exactly that the ideal camera would sabotage their other sales. And this camera would be the absolute perfect ideal if it was 24mp FF

0 upvotes
Murray McCulloch
By Murray McCulloch (Feb 17, 2012)

You don't need high res for billboards. A low res image upsampled is fine for any large print where you view it from a normal distance.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 26, 2012)

Why should Nikon consider amateurs with their professional line? Their APS-C line is not good enough for you?

Why would Nikon make a 24mp FF when Sony is getting set to release a 36mp FF camera? With the D800 Canon will not have anything to touch the resolution of the D800. I am so glad you guys don't run Nikon because I'm positive they'd be bankrupt now if you did.

Besides, you are not required to shoot at max image size. I need remember to just wait for my camera to arrive without DPR as these endless "I want less MP" posts are well past annoying at this point.

1 upvote
Thudd
By Thudd (Feb 8, 2012)

Typical, that with the D800E they *remove* something, and charge more.

(yes, I know it's not quite as simple as that, but still)

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

In the D800EX, they will also remove the viewfinder, and charge $300 more for it yet! :-))

0 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 8, 2012)

D800E has two optical low pass filters to prevent luminescent aliasing (one of them is a SPECIAL filter).

0 upvotes
h0tsauce
By h0tsauce (Feb 9, 2012)

They did not removed anything, they replace one thing with another. The D800E has a different filter than the D800, one without an anti-aliasing component. The $300 surcharge is the fact that Nikon probably think they will sell less 800E than 800, less demand = more production cost. This might or might not be correct since a lot of people might preferred the 800E over the 800 imo.

1 upvote
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 10, 2012)

Nikon D800E has an infrared absorption filter and "two" low-pass filters to maintain the same focal plane.
A different project could be cheapier but, in my opinion, with problems in order to achieve the interchangeability with existing Nikon lens.

0 upvotes
tmawest
By tmawest (Feb 8, 2012)

Jim Brandenburg has posted a blog article on the new D800. He's used it for a month now. Great perspective on the new camera from a master photographer.

http://jimbrandenburg.blogspot.com/2012/02/preview-of-jims-work-with-nikon-d800.html

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

Not too shabby... BUT:

A 36.3MP imager -- in my view, a serious overkill for almost everyone. Better get the D4 -- that one only has a 16MP sensor, ha-ha-ha-ha!!!

"THE SENSELESS SENSOR WARS CONTINUES -- we will be right back, folks!!!"

Optical Viewfinder: probably will NOT WORK AT ALL whilst in video mode, correct?

LCD sceen looks pretty lame -- 921K rez only, and non-tilting, phew....

Flash cards: 1x CF and 1x SD. Not too good IMHO. Should have been 2x CF or 2x SD instead.

For audio features, the only thing here that for example the $800 Fujifilm X-S1 lacks is a 3.5mm headphone jack. And of course the manuakl override capabilities of the D800.

Accessories are super pricey. Like, a mind numbing $616 for a simple battery grip, ha-ha-ha-ha!!! The Canikon DSLR Group strikes back at ya' all, folks!!!

0 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (Feb 8, 2012)

So, don't buy it.

6 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

"So, don't buy it."

So, that's the idea? These wayward camera manufacturers are releasing all sort of exciting and weird stuff, and then they expect none of us will buy any of it, anyhow?

Brilliant idea, GodSpeaks!

0 upvotes
Alex Tempone
By Alex Tempone (Feb 8, 2012)

well nikon just released my dream camera.

francis have you LOOKED at those samples? the feel is unreal. I salute nikon for upping the game AMAZINGLY.

go back and smoke something and leave this camera to the serious people. i'm sure you'll get your wish with for a camera with tilting (gimmick) screen.

as for hi - iso - we are STREETS ahead of the film days already. we have it easy at the moment - and 36mp +1 for nikon.

1 upvote
88SAL
By 88SAL (Feb 9, 2012)

You dope, go look at some medium format DSLR images and tell me the resolution is not a benefit. You stun me with your need to mention the OVF not working in video mode, you do understand the nature of how this feature works? Only sony impliments a style of EVF in their SLRs that allows viewing in vid.

This camera will walk out the door, sales will flow, dont you worry. Its just a shame the 5DMKII had such a long reign, un-accosted by this new contender.

0 upvotes
h0tsauce
By h0tsauce (Feb 10, 2012)

Who said no one will buy this camera, this is the #1 selling camera on Amazon right now. Just because it's not a camera for you doesn't mean the same case can be said about other people. This is a studio/wedding/landscape camera, not a sport journalistic camera, go buy a D4 if speed + low light is what you need.

0 upvotes
luxborealis
By luxborealis (Feb 7, 2012)

Wow - what a camera!

Finally 35mm digital is coming of age, especially with 800E option. Landscapes need to be big when printed and this is seems to be the 35mm camera to do it. (I know - someone will try to tell us that they printed a 40"x60" print from their 5mp camera but really, let's be serious here!). I've canoed and backpacked with 4x5 and 6x7 gear - I'd take the 800E over those any day!!

Thanks Nikon!!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

40" x 60" pro-quality color prints sounds pricey, especially if you a couple of dozen each day, no?

0 upvotes
Alex Tempone
By Alex Tempone (Feb 8, 2012)

man francis 40x60" prints really aren't that expensive. btw you can print any size image to any size print wether or not it's good is another story. this is where the 36mp will come into it's own.

0 upvotes
oselimg
By oselimg (Feb 7, 2012)

Like sensor filters in DSLR's there should be a "gear head " filter in these forums.

1 upvote
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 7, 2012)

I already got my D800 on order, but this might put up a fight, especially for video crowd.

Canon 5D Mark X
Rumored Specs:
22MP
7.5 fps
1080p 60fps or (4k video!)
$2700
February 28

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

That is correct, Mssimo. CANON is all rumors, all the time. And even when they announce and supposedly release something, Canon is not past "changing its mind" later. Canon waits until EVERYONE ELSE comes out with something -- before they utter a peep.

Pretty lame, really. "4K video?" Really?

0 upvotes
lensberg
By lensberg (Feb 8, 2012)

I suspect the new Canon sensor for the 5D mark 3 will be along the lines of 32.8 MP FF sensor - approximately 6.5 fps at full resolution - Dual Digic 5 - 45 point autofocus with 29 cross sensors - 1080p at 60fps - ISO range from 50 - 102400 - and would retail for about $3000 (body only)

1 upvote
maxz
By maxz (Feb 8, 2012)

A 5DIII with above spec will be announced in 2018

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

@ lensberg: Apparently you know more about this particular Canon camera than anyone remotely affiliated with Canon does. Say, just how did you do it?

0 upvotes
lensberg
By lensberg (Feb 8, 2012)

Its just speculative stats on the upcoming 5D mark 3 ... I never professed that the stats were 100% accurate... But seriously... a 32 MP full frame sensor has been doing the rounds for ages... so it would not come as any surprise... Plus anywhere in the relm of 6 - 6.5 fps would make it an extremely versatile tool... which would add a lot more incentive to sway people towards the Canon product... If they could utilize Dual Digic 4 processors for the Canon 7D ... its really not unfathomable to assume they would adopt the same approach for the 5D mark 3 ... And the ISO range seems like a logical progression given Canon's outstanding noise control at high sensitivities... maybe 102400 was slightly on the ambitious side... but 51200 is well within reach to achieve excellent results... When Nikon announces a 36 MP sensor, pixel crammed to the hilt... nobody says anything... I'll bet the noise performance will never match even the D700 despite their highfalutin claims...

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (Feb 7, 2012)

I kinda like the announcement war:
Canon putting out a gazzilion of compact right after Nikons big announcement, just so the Nikon will fall of the first page on webpages.

4 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

Canon is desperate, and rumor has it that they will PULL OF THE MARKET their totally messed-up and wholly unwanted $16,000 EOS C300 camera.

0 upvotes
maxz
By maxz (Feb 8, 2012)

They better not. The C300 is a joke but it helps to milk some last cash out of their ancient sensor fab. If they do that then they will have to shell out 2 billion for new fabs which is unlikely in this economy. End result, left in dust by Sony+Nikon alliance

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

Pulling something off the market because nobody is ordering one for the ridiculous US$16,000 price would be the proper way to go in this case.

0 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Feb 8, 2012)

@Francis Carver & maxz: do you have the inside Canon corporate reports showing how much "desperate" they are? Do you have any (Canon) internal reliable information on the sales reports / orders? Do you consider Nikon & Sony an "alliance"? To summarize: Sony is big indeed, but Canon is 4-5 times bigger than Nikon. So, if someone is going after Canon, that is Sony, and not Nikon. And it might end up by going after Nikon. Because Nikon is the easy prey here.

1 upvote
Lu64
By Lu64 (Mar 16, 2012)

Sorry, but Sony has a history of successes but also failures. Sony is in fact Minolta at this game!

0 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Feb 7, 2012)

One thing about the Mp "race" trendy again starting today: http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/360568/canon-unveils-120-megapixel-camera-sensor
My take: dear Sony, please don't disturb Canon too much, or the lab monsters might get to the market. And we did not changed the laws of physics, yet.

0 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Feb 7, 2012)

So in the specs it says the battery is en el3e, but in the handa on preview, the battery is en el15,,,

0 upvotes
Bokeh Bro
By Bokeh Bro (Feb 7, 2012)

The D800. This IS a conundrum. These 36.3 million pixels are each 4.9 microns by 4.9 microns on a side. Electrical noise and optical crosstalk issues aside, the smaller the better. Right? Well you have to look at what WILL limit your picture resolution. It's going to be the pixel size OR it's going to be your optics. Perfect optics forms a point of light distributed across one of these 4.9 micron by 4.9 micron pixels for a color wavelength of 0.55 microns (green) at f/3.45. Longer, redder wavelengths start spilling over this pixel boundary as does higher f/nos. When you read Nikon's website for the optical performance of their Nikkor lenses, none of them are perfect. "Sharp as a tack" just isn't good enough for the D800. So Nikon should tell us what small subset of its lenses actually delivers the best resolution you can achieve from the D800. This way, if you're interested in picture resolution, you can spend your money wisely between the sensor and the lens combination.

4 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 7, 2012)

It is clear that if 36+MP DSLRs are going to be the new standard, new lenses that can keep up are also needed. I suspect this is the motivation behind the new 24-70 lens Canon has just announced. Both Canon and Nikon have to know they are pushing their lenses to their limits and maybe even slightly beyond.

1 upvote
Mike Fulton
By Mike Fulton (Feb 7, 2012)

Even a 36mp sensor is still falling a little short of ideal for capturing images projected by lenses that achieve about 100 lines per millimeter, which is well within the specs of most decent lenses today. The improvement in perceptible image quality gets smaller and smaller with each new bump in resolution, but we're still not quite at the point where image sensors capture every last bit of detail.

1 upvote
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 8, 2012)

36mp on FX is about 16mp on DX. That's D7000. D7k equipped with one of the best low light sensor out there(let us put aside oil spot and heat problems).

1 upvote
Bokeh Bro
By Bokeh Bro (Feb 9, 2012)

An IDEAL CMOS pixel of dimensions 4.9 micron by 4.9 micron would resolve 102 lines/mm. A REAL CMOS doesn't behave ideally because the generated photo electrons smear across pixel boundaries due to diffusion and, notably, optical cross talk. Optical cross talk happens when some of the light deposited in the volume of one pixel extends into the volume of its neighboring pixels. And the lower the f/no and the farther off axis the image point is from the frame center, the more of an issue this becomes. Again, Nikon doesn't tell us about the details here.

0 upvotes
Lu64
By Lu64 (Mar 16, 2012)

Somewhere I read that there is a physical limitation for the lenses at 40Mpixels. But I don't remember the size of the captor (APS-C or full frame). But anyhow, we are reaching some nice limits here.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Feb 7, 2012)

Nikon needed a strong product and this look's ok. The 36MP CMOS is overkill and is just not needed. But it does look good on paper... But that might be it.....

1 upvote
88SAL
By 88SAL (Feb 9, 2012)

People cannot be pleased. The bitching and moaning about the D4 lacking MP was rediculous on this site when it was announced.

1 upvote
Superka
By Superka (Feb 7, 2012)

Glad to see more and more FF cameras under 3000$. 36Mpx may be too much for 36x24, but lets see test images. I'll wait for Canon answer.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

That is indeed all that CANON can do any more. "Answer" to all the other camera manufacturers out there. Sad, more than anything else, really.

0 upvotes
Lu64
By Lu64 (Mar 16, 2012)

Canon does not need to answer... they are the leader! :-)

0 upvotes
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Feb 7, 2012)

Well done Nikon, amazing camera

3 upvotes
Ithackermike
By Ithackermike (Feb 8, 2012)

Agreed.

0 upvotes
svx94
By svx94 (Feb 7, 2012)

Looks like a very complete and powerful tool. No too excited about the huge pixel count, but I guess it won't be too bad (for processing time, continue shoots, noise level, etc.).

I don't understand why Nikon needs a separate control for still photo and movie. I can be integrated with the main on/off switch, right?

On the D700, when you use MLU with self-timer, the default delay is only 2s. I don't know if D800 make it customizable.

1 upvote
maxz
By maxz (Feb 7, 2012)

Canon's days is over. I own a boatload of canon L lenses but their struggling is too obvious. They are still relying on their aged stepper and fabs that cannot compete with Nikon+Sony alliance. In order to do so they need to shell out two billion, heck they need to sell a few more trucks of old cameras to achieve that. 18MP as the 'all-in-one flagship', i can hear crickets in my house laughing.

1 upvote
fmian
By fmian (Feb 7, 2012)

What are you talking about?
The D4 is 16MP.
Troll much?

4 upvotes
maxz
By maxz (Feb 7, 2012)

Sorry Mr. DRebelX, D4 is sports camera, while 1Dx was advertised as a COMBINED flagship.

1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 7, 2012)

Come on, does any one honestly believe there is actually a practical differnce between 16 and 18 megapixels?

3 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Feb 7, 2012)

@maxz: 1D X is pro-level and replaces the 1D and 1Ds lines. It's still not clear whether Nikon has done the same with the D4, i.e. replaced both the D3S and D3X, or if there will be a high-resolution D4X alongside it.
As for the D800, it's semi-pro and should be compared with the upcoming 5D Mark III.

2 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 7, 2012)

@ Revenant.
I wonder what makes the D800 not pro, but semi-pro. Is it the professional body with professional video qualities, professional AF unit and a professional highest resolution sensor in it? Or the targeted professional studio and landscape photographers?

3 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Feb 7, 2012)

Well, it sits below the pro D4 and above the enthusiast D7000 in Nikon's line-up, just as Canon 5D MkII sits between 1D X and 60D. This portion of the market is usually called semi-pro, and offers full frame (D700/800, 5D MkII) as well as APS-C (D300s, 7D) alternatives.
Of course semi-pro bodies are used by both professionals and enthusiasts, heck I know pros who use entry-level cameras, so these marketing designations should be taken with a grain of salt.

0 upvotes
ashwins
By ashwins (Feb 7, 2012)

Heck, Revenant, you put D700 and D7000 in the same league?? Are you joking? I'm a D7000 owner and I can tell you that D700 is totally different beast. D700 is a perfect tool for professionals and thus a pro camera. Just ask any professional who is using a D700.

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Feb 7, 2012)

No, I don't put D700 and D7000 in the same league. I wrote that D800 (and its predecessor D700) sits below D4 and above D7000, i.e. between the pro and enthusiast levels. This is usually called semi-pro, prosumer or whatever. I know full well that many full-time professionals use the D700, just as they use the 5d MkII, another DSLR that often is labelled "semi-pro". I didn't invent these marketing categories, and I don't think they're that important either.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

Revenant sez: "As for the D800, it's semi-pro and should be compared with the upcoming 5D Mark III."

Q: Who told you that a camera named such as this is "upcoming" from anyone? I am sure nobody working for Canon did, right?

"1D X is pro-level"

Q: Oh, really? You mean that camera with plenty of still missing specs and a missing list price is "pro-level?" Why is it, because maybe Canon hopes so? My, my....

0 upvotes
Lu64
By Lu64 (Mar 16, 2012)

Have you ever had the need for 16Mpix? Not me! And I'm doing A0 posters with my shoots (8Mp+).

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 7, 2012)

This camera is unholy. Unholy I tell ye.

Cheap too. Nice. A99 should be cheaper still.

1 upvote
Jack L Casner
By Jack L Casner (Feb 8, 2012)

I EAGERLY AWAIT THE SUCCESSOR TO MY A900.

1 upvote
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Feb 7, 2012)

Nice substitute for the D700, but they are missing a good point. In the film era everybody could own a full frame camera, but nowadays only a few people.

The use of a smaller sensor was to help decrease certain problems concerning image quality, but that is not a problem since a good time already, so camera makers are clearly taking advantage of this and selling FF like an exclusive camera.

I wonder which maker is gonna be the first to break this barrier, and bring down the FF to the masses. Sony gave a little step in this direction with the A850 but then they seem to have stopped or whatever.

And it seems clear Nikon and Sony are working together in some way to get Canon users to them, but I don't doubt Canon is gonna surprise, because they always do.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Feb 7, 2012)

"The use of a smaller sensor was to help decrease certain problems concerning image quality"

Small sensors were standardised on because they were much cheaper to manufacture; which remains the case today. When you factor in the total cost of a system, full-frame is never going to be a cheap option.

0 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Feb 8, 2012)

No, you're wrong. Being cheaper to produce was a consequence, an obvious consequence. If you look for past articles on that you'll find the layout of photo captors on large sensors had problems to capture the light coming diagonally, especially when using wideangle lenses.

Of couse, the high demand and the passiveness of consumers for accepting entering the digital era seeing the world cropped made the makers realise they could just continue to work on increasing the production of the cropped sensor instead of the FF.

So, the cropped sensor was an attempt to bring a solution that could solve that problem and make DSLRs much available to the masses as soon as possible (the demand was already high) while they were trying to fix the issues on FF sensors, but I'm quite sure most companies didn't expect people would simply accept the "crippled FFs" as something "normal".

Let's go for a "Less-than-1-kilobuck-fullframe NOW!" campaign.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
LeeDo
By LeeDo (Feb 7, 2012)

Looks like Sony (is this a CMOS from Sony? Probably) is taking Canon to the cleaners. 1Dx 18.1 megapixel vs this beast, C'mon. NEX-7 with an APS-C sized sensor that rivals the FF 3DX. And now this! Whatever Sony & Nikon have up their sleeves is anybodys guess. But I have a gut feeling they want to RULE!! And at this rate they will.

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Feb 7, 2012)

You make no sense comparing cameras that are not in the same category.
Wait till Canon announce the 5DMkII replacement and maybe then you might have something intelligent to say.

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

"Wait till Canon announce the 5DMkII replacement."

Wow, are you still waiting for that to happen, Friend? For how many years now, if I might ask? It's been a mighty looooong wait, hasn't it though?

0 upvotes
Lu64
By Lu64 (Mar 16, 2012)

At these Mpix, 18-20-25-30... you will hardly see the difference. And 18Mpix is for sure better at high ISO -> low light!

0 upvotes
GearGuru
By GearGuru (Feb 7, 2012)

I'm impressed with the specs so far. Sure hope image quality is great. I really wish Nikon would adopt Canon's ability to shoot different sized RAW files. I'd love to see a setting for 6 MP, 12mp, 18mp, 24mp and 36 MP. If it had this feature, I'd pre-order it in a heartbeat. I just do not want full 36mp files for everything. And the DX shooting option is fine, except for the fact that I don't want a cropped viewfinder view when composing my images. .

Anyone else wish the camera could shoot at different RAW file sizes?

2 upvotes
BruceB609
By BruceB609 (Feb 7, 2012)

Great comments. I guess this is a very nice Nikon with a not so nice RAW at 36MP only feature. I hope I'm wrong. At least it gives a TIFF and that may be their compromise as I've frequently processed TIFFs in ACR. Very happy about the DX but absolutely right about a VF crop. That would defeat much of the purpose. May have to wait for EVF days on that. Also happy about the 4:5 but why not a 1:1 or even 3:4 as well? It's great for composing and could lend more to storage and CPU capabilities. Start layering a 36MP high quality file and patience will have to be added on older hardware.
Very nice... interesting but I'll take my time on this one.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Feb 7, 2012)

No emotions: good, big, high MP, fast and boring device.

1 upvote
Anthony
By Anthony (Feb 7, 2012)

Not sure why everyone's complaining about the price.

The Canon D30 was $3,300.00 USD in 1999.

Ask me how I know.

4 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 7, 2012)

My experience with the D700:
a) no noise until 3200 ISO (very good on sunset's lights)
b) very good large prints with high resolution lens (as 50/1.4G)
c) excellent portraits with 85/1.8 lens.
I don't need better Nikon's cameras.
I need other Nikon's lens (300/4G, 400/4G).

0 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 7, 2012)

PS: 300/4G VRII, 400/4G VRII.

0 upvotes
bikinchris
By bikinchris (Feb 7, 2012)

There is already a 400 f4. It's called a 200-400 f4 VRII.
And before anyone asks for a 400 f5.6, use a 300 f4 and TC14

2 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 8, 2012)

I'm waiting for 300mm f/4G VRII.
With TC14 I'll have a 400 f/5.6.
But with a 400mm f/4G VRII lens
probably I would have better results
than a 300+TC1.4 or a 200-400.

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Feb 7, 2012)

So they remove the AA filter, and decide to charge more for it?
Nikon must think their users are chumps.
Why even have a model with the AA filter if it's better without?
Still no 60fps @ 1080p.
And this has USB 3.0 but the D4 does not.
Sounds like the left hand does not know what the right hand is doing.

For what it's worth, not impressed by the recent Canon lens announcements either.

5 upvotes
J R R S
By J R R S (Feb 7, 2012)

No 25p either....

1 upvote
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul

Charge more from Nikon is better than buy Nikon camera and removed it by someone else.

0 upvotes
mscore
By mscore (Feb 7, 2012)

Removing the AA filter increases resolution but introduces other issues (for ex moire). Having a choice sounds smart.

1 upvote
Raizen J
By Raizen J (Feb 7, 2012)

Nikon didn't remove the filter but developed a new way to cancel the OPLF effect.
http://www.dpreview.com/previews/nikond800/images/d800e-olpf.jpg

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Feb 8, 2012)

Oh crap. I didn't know they just modified it. My bad.
I still think they should only have one model, and feel the D800E is just a last minute afterthought kneejerk reaction to the Fuji X Pro 1 not having a filter. Otherwise the D800 and D800E would be released at the same time no?

Nikon: Oh, if some company who still has 'film' in their name can do it and claim higher quality than larger sensor cameras, maybe we can too!! And don't bother changing the D800 release schedule, we'll just tack on another model a few months later. Watch how many people are forced to double dip!!

Sorry to sound cynical about all this. I just feel there are way too many camera models on the market already. Consumers need less models that are so similar, with wider gaps in specs between models.

Just my opinion.

1 upvote
CrunchyLens
By CrunchyLens (Feb 7, 2012)

Pros: Everything

Cons: It's a Nikon and my glass isn't.

18 upvotes
williams359
By williams359 (Feb 7, 2012)

If you need to print HUGE it's for you. As wedding photographer 36MP is too much, Hi iso DR are more important. Im sure it will have its fans but it would be nice if they brought one out at 20MP with 8 PPS and better DR and hi iso performance. It's also a shame that Nikon or Canon do not have a low end full frame camera for people just can't afford these prices

4 upvotes
DanCart
By DanCart (Feb 7, 2012)

your concerns are understandable but look on the bright side with D800 now announced there are going to be alot of D700s washing up on the used camera market , not to mention the D700s that havent been sold whose price is going to take a hit from this............its never been a better time to be in the market for an affordable full-frame camera. The same thing will apply when Canon brings out the 5D MkIII

0 upvotes
Ithackermike
By Ithackermike (Feb 8, 2012)

D700s? [edit: I misread that as a non-existent model D700"s". Wow I need to get some sleep,]

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

"The same thing will apply when Canon brings out the 5D MkIII."

Yes, I understand that is the model coming out in spring 2018, correct?

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Feb 7, 2012)

photographer who need 36 or more MP for their JOB have a MF camera.

i don´t understand how some self called "experts" here say they need this camera for their job and that they have waited so long for it.

if they would really WORK in photography and need this high MP count they have bought a MF camera already.

so i think most who says they need this camera for studio or landscape work are just amateurs who pretend to be pros. or they are really BAD pros who can not afford the right tools for their job.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
13 upvotes
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Feb 7, 2012)

hahaaa
Well said
So many people with a camera still caught in the old
"more megapixel is better " trap.
BUT be thankful for them, their purchases helps keep prices down and get the camera-makers push out new models.

8 upvotes
parham jan
By parham jan (Feb 7, 2012)

if you mean MF is manual focus. whats the problem with use these budies and MF.according to my info MF is related to lenses capabilities.
i thinke you are a pros in photography.whats your suggestion for budy and lens for studio photography?

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
nojustice
By nojustice (Feb 7, 2012)

Haters gonna hate. Medium format is perfect for pros who shoot studio or controlled light situations, but cannot be used in low-light. If a small business photographer wants to be versatile, but can't afford $10,000-$50,000 for a MF kit, this is ideal. I find this camera very attractive for weddings, concert photography, high school sports, landscapes, natural light portraits, and numerous other applications. I've been doing all of those things with a pair of D700s and the "trio" of pro zooms, and have done them pretty well for a side business. I would love to upgrade to this camera for the (probable) better IQ, HD video, and other obvious advances. Don't hate on the little guys, please - not everyone has a giant studio with assistants, $100,000 of gear, and a series of instructional books and videos to pay for their life.

If someone is shooting this camera and DOESN'T want huge 36MP images, I suggest decreasing the resolution to half of that and enjoy the high IQ.

4 upvotes
walnist
By walnist (Feb 7, 2012)

What most people don't understand is that, just because this is called D800, doesn't mean that its image quality will be same or better than the D700, having 3x more megapixel.
There are limitations given by the laws of physics concerning pixel size Vs SNR, dynamic range, sensitivity.
Technology improvements can squeeze more out of a certain sensor size using tricks like back illumination and improved microlenses, but right now we're way past the point of diminishing returns.
This camera in comparison with the 12Mpixel D700 will have worse ISO / low light performance, worse dynamic range and generally worse image quality.

So as somebody said before, if you really need this resolution, you need to get a MF (medium format) sensor.

2 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Feb 7, 2012)

@Henry, Tommy, et al. Other things being equal, more MP means more scope to crop selectively. For example, the DX area of the sensor yields a 15MP image. If that is 'enough' then you have a 1.5x zoom for free. Tell me how many MP is 'enough' for you - then work out what digital zoom you get 'for free'. Maybe you could get by with just a pancake lens for all your street photography where otherwise you might need a bulkier, less discreet, zoom lens. Digital-Zoom does not have to be a dirty word.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Martin Datzinger
By Martin Datzinger (Feb 7, 2012)

I love all the whining about memory cards and computer processing power needed for those oh-so-huge files. While at the same time nobody gets nervous about lenses, tripods and printing costs! :D

1 upvote
SirKingly
By SirKingly (Feb 7, 2012)

What a great new SLR...

1 upvote
DaSigmaGuy
By DaSigmaGuy (Feb 7, 2012)

But only for those who already have a collection of Nikon mount lenses. ;)
I would wait till the 5D MkIII is announced before you decide to splash your cash on a D800, or not...Its probably only about a month away from announcment so if your patient it could reap benefits.

2 upvotes
bikinchris
By bikinchris (Feb 7, 2012)

Then you will always be waiting for the next camera, and then the next camera and so on.
Buy what you need today. If you bought a D700 last week, then use it. If you have Canon lenses, then a 5D MKII is just fine.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

"I would wait till the 5D MkIII is announced before you decide to splash your cash on a D800, or not...Its probably only about a month away from announcment."

@ DaSigmaGuy: I know of one person who has been waiting now for TWO WHOLE YEARS for the Canon 5D Mark III. How about you, how long have you been waiting for it? About the same, more, or less time?

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Feb 8, 2012)

Francis.... Do you actually read the news or make it up as you go along. What happened last year in March in Japan. Yea thats right an earthquake that hit Canon's manufacturing badly for 2011. The expected 5DMk III probably would have been out but how can you make an announcement on whats probably going to be a more popular camera than the greatest Camera ever the 5DMk II (voted by What Digital Camera Readers in 2011)

0 upvotes
Aaron Shepard
By Aaron Shepard (Feb 7, 2012)

If you want to know the prime reason for such a high resolution sensor, here it is: Videographers can shoot full HD with DX lenses as well as FX. This gives the D800 a versatility in video that nothing else can match.

0 upvotes
DaSigmaGuy
By DaSigmaGuy (Feb 7, 2012)

I assume your joking?...The fact it has a Nikon mount instantly makes it *far* less versitile for video use than any modern Canon DSLR. The 36mp stills resolution makes *zero difference* to its video resolution as 1080p video is now standard on most modern DSLR's, irrespective of brand, even ones with far lower stills resolution than the D800. And no 60fps at 1080p, hardly a videographers dream!...Even the Canon 7D can do 60fps at 1080p.

2 upvotes
CharlieMatters
By CharlieMatters (Feb 7, 2012)

Except of course, it can't. In fact the 5Dii, 1Dx (and any other DSLR that I've heard of) also can't.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 8, 2012)

@ DaSigmaGuy: "Even the Canon 7D can do 60fps at 1080p."

Q: Since when is 1080p = 720p? Oh, I got it. Since the time Canon released their 5D Mark III, he-he-he.

0 upvotes
Hauer
By Hauer (Feb 7, 2012)

The memory card boys must be happy!

1 upvote
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

I'm loving the SD card slot, this means I can easily get photos into my MacBook Air, iMac, and even iPad on the road without additional adapters.

0 upvotes
Gary Leland
By Gary Leland (Feb 7, 2012)

Somebody is going to have to expand "the cloud"
hehe.

0 upvotes
lifeispixels
By lifeispixels (Feb 7, 2012)

Nice strategy from Sony side to sell this sensor to Nikon. Remember how some people have been bitching about 24MP sensors being too dense and that Nikon & Canon know better about cameras, etc.

Not only Sony makes some big $$$ selling the sensors to Nikon, this breaks the barrier and shuts the mouths of those fanboys. Now Nikon is leading Sony in higher mega pixel full frame. Nobody would complain anymore about 24MP being too high in A850, A900, A77, A65. We can point finger to Nikon D800. And when Sony come out with their own 36 MP full frame machine next year, no troll would have an excuse to bitch about this LOL.

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Feb 7, 2012)

No. The issue is pixel density, not megapixels absolute. So this FX sensor has the pixel density of a DX sensor at 15MP - so that would be a significantly lower pixel density than the A77 which pushes its APS-C sized sensor to over 24MP. It is lower even than the Nikon D7000, @16MP DX

So no, you can't point the finger here. LOL?

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
Rashkae
By Rashkae (Feb 8, 2012)

Hi point is still valid for the A900/A850 though. A lot of those people who slammed the A900/A850 for succumbing to the "megapixel race" are now singing the praises of the D800. :P

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Feb 9, 2012)

could you link to their posts? You say there are 'a lot' of them?

0 upvotes
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (Feb 7, 2012)

Ordered one from B & H. Hope stock and delivery is soon!

0 upvotes
johtuomi
By johtuomi (Feb 7, 2012)

Very nice ! I only would like to see also much lower ISO's ( - 5 f-stops) to shoot in sunlight with battery power packs, use studio flashes with larger aperture.

2 upvotes
4Motioner
By 4Motioner (Feb 7, 2012)

Looks good! I've been thinking about moving to FF, but I'll stick with my D7000 for now. I don't have the hardware to handle 36Mp (probably about 25Mb?) RAW files. 4fps is a bit slow too, but I could live with that.

I would've also liked a swivel screen for LV.

1 upvote
phoenix15
By phoenix15 (Feb 7, 2012)

Wow, 36 Mpx is really a big jump from 12 Mpx in D700. If it is lighter than D700, then this is my dream DSLR to replace my current Nikon D-90.

I am not going to buy anything else in the future if I have nikon D800. I actually don't care about video capability, since I am not really into it. I love taking picture, thus the higher pixel count does matter so much. With nikon D-90, I got much grainy photo at ISO higher than 800.

My best combo for the next camera will be Nikon 800 and Pentax K-01 to replace my mirrorless olympuss.

1 upvote
DaSigmaGuy
By DaSigmaGuy (Feb 7, 2012)

The D90 only does 720p video...wait till you get a load of 1080p video, you might change your mind!
The D90 has an old generation 2T-3T per photosite sensor giving ISO3200 tops...The D800 is only a stop faster despite having newer generation 4T photosites, because of it high pixel density...So I would'nt expect it to be significantly better for high ISO noise than your D90.

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Pik2004
By Pik2004 (Feb 7, 2012)

WOW $3000! I guess it's not an exact D700 replacement. Nice though... I'm not sure why people are making big fuss about 36MP, I would always welcome higher resolution. For low light, you could use what you already have like D700/D3s and rest for D800.

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Feb 7, 2012)

So Nikon D800E is like the studio version of 5D and 7D availalbe from canon.

1 upvote
Jmmg
By Jmmg (Feb 7, 2012)

36MP? Really!? When is this My DiXX bigger than your DiXX cold war going to end? Why don't they just simply made a digital back with different MP counts for all the people believe the more MP=better photographer they will become...Few people could use a P & S camera less then 6mp to get great shots, many people paid ridicules money but their photos still looks like crap...Money and MP do not = better photographer or better pictures, just my humble 2 cents.

1 upvote
draschan
By draschan (Feb 7, 2012)

there are many pro jobs out there where the MINIMUM requirement ist 60MP as being stated in the briefings. so even with the 40mp hasselblad you can't apply for the job. 36mp ist not so much when you actually print the images in large format for exhibitions as I do. I am happy that I can get 36mp without the aliaising filter in an affordable package. that brings me closer to MF which is still too bulky for carrying and too expensive for bad weather etc.

0 upvotes
Marcello Zini
By Marcello Zini (Feb 7, 2012)

True what draschan says, but if only those with your specific needs would buy the D800, Nikon wouldn't be able to justify the RD put into its development. The revenue will come from all the others wanting the D800 just because pixels are cool ;)

0 upvotes
Dafffid
By Dafffid (Feb 7, 2012)

It will end when people stop buying on the basis of Mp, and when customers stop demanding it. Same reason so many other products are not optimal - the customer is uneducated to their own needs.

1 upvote
AshMills
By AshMills (Feb 7, 2012)

Are there really many jobs asking for 60MP files? Or do you mean 60MB files?

Either way there are still plenty of people in the print world who have no idea about digital/pixels vs dpi.

I have had 3 calls from "designers" who want an image at 300dpi, so I rescale it (or even now just have it set in camera as 300dpi by default) and they are happy.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
walnist
By walnist (Feb 7, 2012)

Another thing to keep in mind in comparing this to MF is that, just because you have "nominal" 36MP doesn't mean that you'll get the same effective resolution.
This because you'll need lenses with a much higher MTF and little to no aberrations to make use of the high resolution of such a small sensor.

2 upvotes
backayonder
By backayonder (Feb 7, 2012)

How much for your old D700?

1 upvote
scott_mcleod
By scott_mcleod (Feb 7, 2012)

A lot less than I would have got last week :(

2 upvotes
backayonder
By backayonder (Feb 7, 2012)

Bad for you, but good for me

2 upvotes
ashwins
By ashwins (Feb 7, 2012)

I think that it's now finally the time to look around for a second hand D700 body...

1 upvote
backayonder
By backayonder (Feb 7, 2012)

. Me too the D700 was always just that little bit out of my price range, hence the D300s as backup to my D200.
I'm sure the D700 still takes great pictures at low light with a good prime so for the time being it will be good enough for me. Well okay a D800 would be better but there you go.

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Feb 7, 2012)

Ahaha - The sans-AA model is more expensive.

Like Porsche charging you more for an RS model without carpet or air con...

Jokes aside though, if I was still into FF - 36MP without AA = awesome mobile and flexible landscape platform.

1 upvote
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Feb 7, 2012)

hmmm... looks like D800/D800E will STILL be missing Exposure Simulation Live Preview, like D700 before it...

while Nikon keeps it to pro-body D3/D3x/D3s, and now
only D4 will be sole new model to have it... (aka: ExpSim LV of Canon)

DOF preview is very rudimentary for LV... why not include ExpSim LV too???

and no VASS??? (vari-angle swivel screen? not even a modular one?)

as for higher Mp... well, with higher pixel density, hi ISO will not be it's strength, meaning it will be available light friendly only... (makes sense), but this means it is more for studio work where higher res benefits will not venture deep into natural landscapes much darker, which D3s handles better... ISO25600 max... hope it's not noisy such that the fine details are obliterated which would defeat the point of having high Mp...

the push on the high MP hi-res FF boundary is still welcome though.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Alex Tempone
By Alex Tempone (Feb 8, 2012)

to be honest not many real photographers want a swivel screen. myself i cant stand swivel screens, we never had them in film days and we dont need them now. gimmicky and just another place they can increase costs and another pain in the a#$e for dust, water, etc.

0 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Feb 7, 2012)

Excellent Specs but FF cameras seems to be more out of reach of amateurs.....instead of declining the prices are climbing high with every release ......

0 upvotes
Rasmus Vedel
By Rasmus Vedel (Feb 7, 2012)

So you were expecting a brand new item to have a lower price than an existing one, that's been on the market for some years?
Or did you just expect the prices to be exactly the same on the newly released D800 as it was on the newly released D700 without any regard to the inflation of currency? What a minute - it IS the same price as when the D700 was released, which then means that it IS cheaper, taking inflation into account.. Peculiar, eh?

1 upvote
fmian
By fmian (Feb 7, 2012)

Buy a film camera if you want 135 on the cheap.
Perfect option if you're on a budget.

0 upvotes
DaSigmaGuy
By DaSigmaGuy (Feb 7, 2012)

Er, whats Film? ;)

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Feb 8, 2012)

:)
It's what you can't put in a $3000 full frame digital camera, but can put in a $50 second hand camera from 40 years ago that still works even without a battery.
Camera manufactures from the future somehow traveled back in time and made sure that film did not exhibit moire, something that this unfortunate generation has to pay extra for.

0 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (Feb 7, 2012)

That interesting because 90% of the 'experts' passing comment on this camera have probably never even printed a picture let alone a large or very large picture. I'd say most manufacturers are missing the point that the majority of photographers don't even print pictures anymore and would need nothing more than a 4MP camera.

Can't wait to see some sample of the higher ISO pictures, could be interesting.

1 upvote
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Feb 7, 2012)

I see you are an "expert" that never crop your photos

1 upvote
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

I understand the need for a little extra for cropping purposes, but 36MP is extreme. I very rarely remember cropping more than about 20-25% off a photo. That's going to be a ton of extra storage requirements, and is going to put a lot more strain on CPU and memory resources as well.

1 upvote
corntrollio
By corntrollio (Feb 9, 2012)

Mtsuoka, agree with HiRez on this. If you composed the photograph properly, why would you need to do significant cropping?

1 upvote
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Feb 7, 2012)

thats why new lenses coming from tokina and tamron :))

0 upvotes
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