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Nikon D800 and D800E 36MP full-frame DSLRs announced

By dpreview staff on Feb 7, 2012 at 04:00 GMT

Nikon has announced the D800 and D800E 36MP full-frame DSLRs. The pixel count of the long-awaited replacement for the D700 means it also trumps the D3X as the highest-resolution camera in Nikon's lineup. As well as the 'stock' D800, Nikon has also revealed a more expensive model, the D800E that will be free from the effects of an anti-aliasing filter. Aimed at studio and landscape professionals the D800E should theoretically begin to rival medium format digital equipment in terms of resolution.

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Press Release:

EXPECTATIONS SURPASSED: THE 36.3-MEGAPIXEL NIKON D800 IS THE MULTIMEDIA HD-SLR THAT SHATTERS CONVENTIONAL RESOLUTION BARRIERS FOR MAXIMUM FIDELITY

The New Nikon D800 Offers Unrivaled Resolution and Features Designed for a Variety of Demanding Professional Photographic and Multimedia Disciplines, Videographers and Filmmakers

MELVILLE, N.Y. (Feb 6, 2012) –  Today, imaging leader Nikon Inc. announced the highly anticipated D800 HD-SLR, engineered to provide extreme resolution, astounding image quality and valuable video features optimized for professional still and multimedia photographers and videographers.  A camera with an unmatched balance of accuracy, functionality and image quality, the Nikon D800 realizes innovations such as a high resolution 36.3-megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor, a 91,000-pixel RGB Matrix Metering System, Advanced Scene Recognition System and many other intuitive features designed to create the preeminent device for the most demanding photo and video applications.

Whether shooting high fashion, weddings or multimedia content, Nikon’s highest resolution sensor to date, a groundbreaking new 36.3-megapixel (7360 x 4912 resolution) FX-format CMOS sensor, affords flexibility and astonishing image quality to satisfy a myriad of client requests. The Nikon D800 incorporates the latest 91,000-pixel 3D Color Matrix Metering III and the Advanced Scene Recognition System, coupled with an improved 51-point AF system for images with amazing sharpness, color and clarity. With its compact, lightweight D-SLR form factor and extensive video feature set, the D800 allows photographers to transition to multimedia to create an immersive story. Professional videographers will appreciate practical features that go beyond NIKKOR lens compatibility and Full HD 1080p video, such as full manual control, uncompressed HDMI output, and incredible low-light video capability. With this innovative combination of features, the D800 celebrates resourcefulness and a dedication to the flawless execution of an epic creative vision. All of this is driven by Nikon’s latest EXPEED 3™ image processing engine, providing the necessary processing power to fuel amazing images with faithful color, a wide dynamic range and extreme resolution. 

“Whatever the project, visionaries need a tool that is going to help them stay on-time and on-task. The Nikon D800 re-imagines what is possible from this level of D-SLR, to address the needs of an emerging and ever changing market; this is the camera that is going to bridge the gap for the most demanding imaging professionals, and provide never before seen levels of SLR image and video quality,” said Bo Kajiwara, director of marketing, Nikon Inc. “The D800 is the right tool for today’s creative image makers, affording photographers, filmmakers and videographers a versatile option for capturing the ultimate in still image quality or full HD content, with maximum control.”

Extreme Image Quality

The new Nikon developed 36.3-megapixel FX-format (35.9 x 24mm) CMOS sensor realizes Nikon’s highest resolution yet, and is ideal for demanding applications such as weddings, studio portraiture and landscape, where there is no compromise to exceptional high fidelity and dynamic range. Nikon’s first priority is amazing image quality above all else, and resolution of this magnitude affords photographers the ability to portray even the smallest details, such as a strand of hair, with stunning sharpness or crop liberally with confidence. Photographers also shoot with the assurance of NIKKOR lens compatibility, because only a manufacturer with decades of optical excellence can provide the glass to resolve this kind of extreme resolution.

For shooting with minimal noise in a variety of lighting conditions, the D800 features a wide native ISO range of 100-6400, expandable to 50 (Lo-1)-25,600 (Hi-2). Nikon engineers have created innovative ways to manipulate light transmission to the sensor’s photodiodes, giving users the ability to shoot with confidence in challenging lighting conditions.  Internal sensor design, an enhanced optical low pass filter (OLPF) and 14 bit A/D conversion with a high signal to noise ratio all contribute to a sensor capable of excellent low light ability despite the extreme resolution.  Every aspect of this new FX-format sensor is engineered to deliver amazing low noise images through the ISO range and help create astounding tonal gradation and true colors, whether shooting JPEG or RAW. Images are further routed through a 16-bit image processing pipeline, for maximum performance. To further enhance versatility, users are also able to shoot in additional modes and aspect ratios such as 5:4 to easily frame for printed portraits or a 1.2X crop for a slight telephoto edge. For even more versatility, photographers can also take advantage of Nikon DX-format lenses for more lens options and enhanced focal range (1.5X), while still retaining sharpness and details at a high 15.4-megapixel (4800x3200) resolution.  

Contributing to the camera’s rapid performance and amazing image quality is Nikon’s new EXPEED 3 image processing engine that helps professionals create images and HD video with amazing resolution, color and dynamic range. From image processing to transfer, the new engine is capable of processing massive amounts of data, exacting optimal color, rich tonality and minimized noise throughout the frame. Despite the immense data, the new EXPEED 3 also contributes to energy efficiency, affording the ability to shoot longer.  

The D800 also features the Advanced Scene Recognition System with the 91,000-pixel 3D Color Matrix Meter III to provide unrivaled metering in even the most challenging of lighting conditions. At the system’s core is a newly designed RGB sensor that meticulously analyzes each scene, recognizes factors such as color and brightness with unprecedented precision and then compares all the data using Nikon’s exclusive 30,000 image database. Additionally, this new sensor now has the ability to detect human faces with startling accuracy, even when shooting through the optical viewfinder. This unique feature is coupled with detailed scene analysis for more accurate autofocus (AF), Auto exposure (AE), i-TTL flash control and even enhanced subject tracking. The Color Matrix Meter also emphasizes priority on exposure of the detected faces, allowing for correct exposure even when the subject is backlit. Even in the most difficult exposures the D800 excels, such as maintaining brightness on a bride’s face while retaining the dynamic range to accentuate the intricate details of a wedding dress beside a black tuxedo.    

Advanced new automatic systems make it even easier to capture amazing images. The camera features a new enhanced auto white balance system that more accurately recognizes both natural and artificial light sources, and also gives the user the option to retain the warmth of ambient lighting. Users can expand dynamic range with in-camera High Dynamic Range (HDR) image capture, and enjoy the benefits of Nikon’s Active D-lighting for balanced exposure. Another new feature is direct access to Nikon’s Picture Control presets via a dedicated button on the back of the body to tweak photo and video parameters on the fly, such as sharpness, hue and saturation.

True Cinematic Experience

The Nikon D800 has a compact and lightweight form factor that’s preferable for a production environment, yet is packed with practical and functional features. The D800 is ideal whether the user is a filmmaker on location or in the studio or a documentarian in the field who requires portability and the NIKKOR lens versatility and depth of field that only a HD-SLR can offer. Filmmakers have the choice of various resolutions and frame rates, including Full HD 1080 at 30/24p and HD 720 at 60/30p. By utilizing the B-Frame data compression method, users can record H.264/MPEG-4 AVC format video with unmatched integrity for up to 29:59 minutes per clip (normal quality). This format produces higher quality video data without increasing file size for a more efficient workflow. The optimized CMOS sensor reads image data at astoundingly fast rates, which results in less instances of rolling shutter distortion. The sensor also enables incredible low-light video capability with minimal noise, letting filmmakers capture footage where previously impossible or expensive and complex lighting would otherwise be necessary. Users are also able to have full manual control of exposure, and can also adjust the camera’s power aperture setting in live view for an accurate representation of the depth of field in a scene.  Whether shooting for depth of field in FX-format mode, or looking for the extra 1.5X telephoto benefits of DX mode, the high resolution sensor of the D800 allows videographers to retain full 1080p HD resolution no matter which mode they choose to best suit the scene. Users are also able to easily compose and check critical HD focus through the 921,000-dot, 3.2-inch LCD monitor with reinforced glass, automatic monitor brightness control, and wide viewing angle.

For professional and broadcast applications that call for outboard digital recorders or external monitors, users can stream an uncompressed full HD signal directly out of the camera via the HDMI port (8 bit, 4:2:2). This output signal can be ported into a display or digital recording device or routed through a monitor and then to the recording device, eliminating the need for multiple connections. This image can also be simultaneously viewed on both the camera’s LCD and an external monitor, while eliminating on-screen camera status data for streaming purposes. The D800 also includes features concentrated on audio quality, such as a dedicated headphone jack for accurate monitoring of audio levels while recording. Audio output levels can be adjusted with 30 steps for precise audio adjustment and monitoring. The D800 offers high-fidelity audio recording control with audio levels that can be set and monitored on the camera’s LCD screen. A microphone connected via the stereo mic jack can also be adjusted with up to 20 steps of sensitivity for accurate sound reproduction. What’s more, recording can be set to be activated through the shutter button, opening a world of remote applications through the 10-pin accessory terminal.

Wield Speed and Performance with Astonishing Accuracy

Whether shooting the runway or fast moving wildlife, the enhanced 51-point AF system of the D800 delivers blazing fast AF with tack-sharp results. Nikon has enhanced the Multi-Cam 3500-FX AF sensor module and algorithms to significantly improve low light acquisition, for precise focus to an impressive -2 exposure value (EV). The focus system utilizes 15 cross-type AF sensors for enhanced accuracy, and the system also places an emphasis on the human face, working in conjunction with the Advanced Scene Recognition System to provide accurate face detection even through the optical viewfinder. The camera also utilizes nine cross-type sensors that are fully functional when using compatible NIKKOR lenses and teleconverters with an aperture value up to f/8, which is a great advantage to those who need extreme telephoto focal lengths (single cross type sensor active with TC20E III). For maximum versatility in all shooting situations, whether photographing portraits or static subjects, users are also able to select multiple AF modes, including normal, wide area, face tracking and subject tracking to best suit the scene.

The D800 delivers upon a professional’s need for maximum speed when it counts. The camera is ready to shoot in 0.12 seconds, and is ready to capture with super-fast AF and response speed. To photograph action in a burst, the camera shoots up to 4 frames per second (fps) in FX mode at full resolution, or up to a speedy 6 fps in DX mode using the optional MB-D12 Battery Pack and compatible battery. Further enhancing the speed of the camera and overall workflow, the D800 utilizes the new USB 3.0 standard for ultra fast transfer speeds.

Construction and Operability

The body of the D800 is designed to offer a compact form factor and a lightweight body for the utmost versatility. The chassis is constructed of magnesium alloy for maximum durability, and is sealed and gasketed for resistance to dirt and moisture. Users are able to easily compose through the bright optical viewfinder, which offers 100% frame coverage.  For storage, the D800 has dual card slots for CF and SD cards, and offers users the ability to record backup, overflow, RAW/JPEG separation, and the additional option of shooting stills to one and video to the other. For high speed recording and transfer, data can be recorded to recent UDMA-7 and SDXC / UHS-1 cards. The shutter has been tested to withstand approximately 200,000 cycles, and the camera also employs sensor cleaning. The D800 also features a built-in flash and is compatible with Nikon’s acclaimed Creative Lighting System, including a built-in Commander mode for controlling wireless Speedlights.

D800E - Maximum Resolution Unleashed

In addition to the D800, Nikon will also be releasing a supplementary model for those professionals who demand even higher resolution and D-SLR versatility; the D800E. This model treads in medium format territory for studio work or landscape photography when there is no exception to only the highest fidelity and sharpness. This unique alternative model will effectively enhance the resolution characteristics of the 36.3-megapixel CMOS sensor by cancelling the anti-aliasing properties of the OLPF inside the camera. By doing this, light is delivered directly to the photodiodes, yielding an image resulting from the raw light gathering properties of the camera. A color moiré correction tool will also be available within Capture NX2 to enhance the D800E photographer’s workflow.

Price and Availability

The Nikon D800 will be available in late March for the suggested retail price of $2999.95.1 The D800E version will be available in mid April 2012 for a suggested retail price of $3,299.95. For more information about these models, NIKKOR lenses and other D-SLR cameras please visit www.nikonusa.com

Nikon D800 specifications

Price
MSRPUS: $2999.95 UK: £2599.99 EU: €2829
Body type
Body typeMid-size SLR
Body materialMagnesium alloy
Sensor
Max resolution7360 x 4912
Other resolutions6144 x 4912, 6144 x 4080, 5520 x 3680, 4800 x 3200, 4608 x 3680, 4608 x 3056, 3680 x 2456, 3600 x 2400, 3072 x 2456, 3072 x 2040, 2400 x 1600
Image ratio w:h5:4, 3:2
Effective pixels36 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors37 megapixels
Sensor sizeFull frame (35.9 x 24 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorExpeed 3
Color spacesRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter arrayPrimary Color Filter
Image
ISO100 - 6400 in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 EV steps (50 - 25600 with boost)
White balance presets12
Custom white balanceYes (5)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal, Basic
File format
  • NEF (RAW): 12 or 14 bit, lossless compressed, compressed or uncompressed
  • TIFF (RGB)
  • JPEG
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampYes
Digital zoomNo
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points51
Lens mountNikon F
Focal length multiplier1×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3.2
Screen dots921,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT Color LCD with 170 degrees wide-viewing angle
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage100%
Viewfinder magnification0.7×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/8000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Programmed auto with flexible program (P)
  • Shutter-priority (S)
  • Aperture priority (A)
  • Manual (M)
Built-in flashYes (pop-up)
Flash range12.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flashYes (Hot-shoe, Wireless plus sync connector)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-eye, Slow sync, Rear curtain, High-speed sync
Flash X sync speed1/250 sec
Drive modes
  • S (single frame)
  • CL (continuous low speed)
  • CH (continuous high speed)
  • Q (quiet shutter-release)
  • MUP (mirror up)
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive4 fps
Self-timerYes (2 to 20 sec, 1 to 9 exposures at intervals of 0.5, 1, 2 or 3 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 1 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (2, 3, 5, 7 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (2 to 9 frames in steps of 1, 2 or 3)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50, 30, 25 fps), 640 x 424 (24 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
MicrophoneMono
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesCompact Flash (Type I), SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-I compliant
Storage includedNone
Connectivity
USB USB 3.0 (5 GBit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini Type C)
Remote controlYes (Optional, wired or wireless )
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes (Water and dust resistant)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion EN-EL15 rechargeable battery & charger
Weight (inc. batteries)1000 g (2.20 lb / 35.27 oz)
Dimensions146 x 123 x 82 mm (5.75 x 4.84 x 3.23)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingYes
GPSOptional
GPS notesGP-1

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Comments

Total comments: 278
123
I Wayan Pica
By I Wayan Pica (Feb 7, 2012)

Love this new toy... and.., my dear Nikon, will you strip out the video feature, please... How much will you charge me for that.. hahaha...

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
1 upvote
DaSigmaGuy
By DaSigmaGuy (Feb 7, 2012)

To be frank, with no 60fps at 1080p option they may as well not have bothered adding video in the first place!

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Nikonhead
By Nikonhead (Feb 7, 2012)

Why do people compare to Canon and threaten to leave Nikon if the Canon equivalent has better specs. Are people actually going to sell all there Nikon lenses and speedlights to switch? Just because the D800 has 36MP doesnt mean you have to use them all. Keep your setting on 18 or 12mp's and the one day you need the 36mp it will be there. Now, where is my D400.

0 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Feb 7, 2012)

You are absolutely correct. It is a silly argument as both both companies have produced some amazing cameras. That being said, the D4 and D800 are both pretty sexy.

Spare me the Sony, Fuji mirror-less innovations. If you are trying to make a living with a camera, 95% of us will choose Nikon or Canon.

4 upvotes
Jmmg
By Jmmg (Feb 7, 2012)

really...so no Hasselblad, Leica or Mamiya...for professional then....interesting.

3 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

Honestly those probably are less than 5% of professional use. Very high end studio work that requires a MF sensor is definitely a minority of "professional" usage.

3 upvotes
tmy
By tmy (Feb 13, 2012)

that's right, most of the time it is Nikon or Canon that we buy, but for MF work when required, it's usually hired.Kinda the same in film production, you hire the Red or 35mm Arri or whatever else as required and not expected to own one yourself. Unless you have work that requires MF on a regular basis, very hard to justify to your accountant a $20,000-50,000 on extra kit! (on top of the already very expensive fleet of Nikon or Canon lenses and bodies, and lighting and computers and PocketWizards and blah blah etcetc...) And you need lenses and other bits too, not just a basic Pentax 645D kit out of the shop.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Costaricabirdwatcher
By Costaricabirdwatcher (Feb 27, 2012)

Wow, hey people its hard to keep up with all comments, the good and the not so good about this camera. Does it make sense to spend that much money? Simple, for those how got the cash, go head! For the rest of us, lets please remember that we decided spend a great amount of time behind a viewfinder we chose to be photographers for a life or for a day it does not matter. So why not just save up some money, wait for more serious reviews and make the decision them or just keep the cash for a trip somewhere with your old bodies.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Feb 7, 2012)

what is the size of RAW of 36 MP?

0 upvotes
Blaise06a
By Blaise06a (Feb 7, 2012)

My guess would be around 50 mb

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 7, 2012)

If the video is similar to the D4 samples I've seen, I might have to have a sit down with my 5D Mk II as I've always preferred Nikon's tank-like bodies and viewfinders. The Canon lenses are great, but Nikkors have been reaching sick levels of quality in the last few years with the 14-24, 70-200, the f1.4 G Primes, et al.

The D800 is also a decent price relative to their other pro bodies.

0 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Feb 7, 2012)

Sir, in which world the Nikkor 70-200 f/2.8 II is better than the latest 70-200 f/2.8 from Canon (that indeed has insane quality)?!? PLease read at least 5 reviews to find out. Yes, you are right about the 14-24, but there is no equivalent from Canon, yet. Next: in which world the "not yet built" Nikkor 70-200 f/4 IS USM is better than the Canon counterpart (that indeed has a sick level of quality)?!? And so on... (Canon 50 f/1.2, the T&Ss 17&24, the new 300 & 400 f/2.8 etc). Think twice, you can do amazing things whit the 5DII & available lenses. One last thing: how do you know that Nikon bodies are better? Did you used the 5DII uin snow, rain, mud etc and it failed you? Because I did, and it didn't. I am unsure about breaking bricks with the camera (regardless of the brand), but I do not think that this is the intent these cameras are built for. Cheers! P.S.: even a plastic body can be very resilient, you know...

2 upvotes
nicolaiecostel
By nicolaiecostel (Feb 7, 2012)

Zerg: That 70-200 nikon is allmost as good as, for 500 euros less, in my country. As far as the other lens, nikon does not have it, for a reason. A year passed since the nikon 24-120 f4 was released, do you hear any nikonian raving about it, does it sell like a monster ? It doenst, does it ? No one wants a cheapo f4 to use on a 4-5 thousand dollar camera. Just face it, the nikon 24-70 has no rival, the 70-200 is very good and the 14-24, well, we know canon has a big dissadvantage on the wide end except for the TS lenses, but even canon users buy the 14-24, which is a statement in it;s own. Be happy with what you got but remember that canon is't running the game since about 2007. All that you have is compromise, a 1Ds4 allmost as good as an old D3, a 5D2 with an ancient AF, a 7D with 1-2 stops behind the D7000 and so on.

0 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Feb 7, 2012)

@nicolaiecostel: Sir, the 24-70 has a rival (please check dpreview today news - we do not know the performance yet, it is true, but I will expect a serious "catch-up" vs the Nikkor version), the 14-24 not yet indeed. I am unsure about the Nikkor pricing, but I was not discussing the price, I was discussing the ultimate quality of the lens. And the crown so far is on the Canon side for 70-200s, both f/2.8 and f/4 in their IS, II, L etc versions. Also, please note that 1Ds4 was not yet invented and produced, 1D4 is as good as the D3s -again, check the reviews, dpreview included, and not my opinion-; 7D: really, oh really, do you want to compare that camera with the 7000D?!? As per the 5D2 ancient AF, I agree, but you should just ask the huge crowd of wedding photographers that found it useful, still. And so on. And about "running the game", hmmm, this is not photography, this is business, I suggest you to ask a finance analyst about the topic.

1 upvote
idlecynic
By idlecynic (Feb 7, 2012)

Nicolaie, good points except for the f4 argument. the Canon 70-200 f4's are known to be among the best zooms ever built. There are literally hundreds of reviews supporting that. Just because Nikon built a crappy 24-120 f4 it doesn't mean the Canon 70-200 f4's are bad.

0 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Feb 7, 2012)

@idlecynic: Sir, there are hundreds of reviews regarding the Canon 70-200 f/2.8 L IS USM II, too... But I have a suggestion, as "brand loyalty" is a serious matter: folks, establish a clear set of criteria in order to compare one brand with another (e.g.: company size, number of items -bodies & lenses- produced/sold, number of "best of" in each camp, R&D "capability" etc). One last thing: I wonder how the market will react when Canon will put that 24X36 50 Mp sensor in a 5D (or whatever) - like body, whaaa... this is getting silly.

1 upvote
lensberg
By lensberg (Feb 7, 2012)

"All that you have is compromise, a 1Ds4 allmost as good as an old D3, a 5D2 with an ancient AF, a 7D with 1-2 stops behind the D7000 and so on."

Where in the world do people get these horribly distorted facts from??!! The Canon 1D 4 was far superior to the Nikon D3 in every aspect... As far as high ISO performance was concerned, the 1D 4 were visibly better at every ISO setting... by about 1 full stop... heck the 1D 4 was on par with the Nikon D3S until around ISO 12800. The Canon 5D mark 2 has long been one of the best cameras on the market despite the limited autofocus... In this class of cameras it was the megapixel count / image quality / and Full HD video capability that mattered most... thats why the 5D mark 2 sales contine to trounce the Nikon D700 till this day... AND... you actually think that the Nikon D7000 is 1-2 stops better that the Canon 7D ??!! Dream on... the two cameras are literally neck & neck until ISO 6400 after which the D7000 enjoys a very minor edge in IQ.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Feb 7, 2012)

eat that canon! whew

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Feb 7, 2012)

well the fanboy has spoken

12 upvotes
Cermet
By Cermet (Feb 7, 2012)

The lack of flip viewfinder is v.v.disappointing. Slow multi frame - a bit disappointing. I sold my D700 in anticipation of this but I'm sure not gonna leap into a purchase.
I'd trade 36mp fr the above specs in a heartbeat. Remember Nikon's justification fr D700 12Mp was the quality derived from large sensor size. That still make sense to me On the face of it,this doesn't seem the huge leap forward that I've been anticipating

1 upvote
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

Good job selling in advance. I thought about it but wasn't sure how long the D800 would take, now I'm sure I will get significantly less for it. Although it might be some time before D800s are widely available and even longer before they are discounted, and the D700 is still awesome so...meh...I can wait.

0 upvotes
pitaw
By pitaw (Feb 7, 2012)

I want a D800 but without video and cheaper.

6 upvotes
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (Feb 7, 2012)

Like the hobo said to the other hobo: If we had some ham, we could have some ham and eggs; if we had some eggs.

3 upvotes
Kane Joseph
By Kane Joseph (Feb 7, 2012)

It is lighter and smaller than the D700. Handling this beast will be a breeze!

Glad they didn't go with the QXD memory card and opted for the SD/CF combo.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Babya
By Babya (Feb 7, 2012)

Battery is the EN-EL15 and not the EN-EL3, please change that in the specs.

I like seeing USB 3.0 on the D800. Will be interested in seeing samples from the D800E.

0 upvotes
LJohnK2
By LJohnK2 (Feb 7, 2012)

Megapixels with a capital M....so the RAW files must be ....yikes.

Budget 6.5 K....3.5 for the body and 3 for a new computer with the processing power needed....LOL.

Still, looks like a sweet piece of hardware for those who need it.

1 upvote
Blaise06a
By Blaise06a (Feb 7, 2012)

Fair point. When I moved from the 12mp 5D to the 21mp 5D2 I had to change my computer to process to RAW files.

1 upvote
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Feb 7, 2012)

I realize this is supposed to replace the D700, but doesn't it also effectively replace the D3X?

1 upvote
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 7, 2012)

It looks more like they replaced the D3x, removed the grip and used the name of the D700 replacement.

The D700 was speed, low noise and 95% a D3 at less than half the price. An instant classic.

With the D800, the main priority clearly is resolution at low ISO. And video. I can understand some D700 owners looking for an upgrade (95% of a D4 for half the price) could be disappointed.

2 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

If the low ISO performance is close to D3S, I'll be impressed. If it's just equal to D700 or even worse, I'll be disappointed. In that case I would rather they had gone with 18MP with larger photosites.

1 upvote
candleJack
By candleJack (Feb 7, 2012)

Well, it sure doesn't look like a replacement for the D700, based on specs. Besides the AF which spans the entire Nikon pro range, what does it take from the D700? Speed no, ISO no..

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Feb 7, 2012)

so boring camera...but usefull

0 upvotes
Jens_G
By Jens_G (Feb 7, 2012)

If the 5D3 is 16-18MP and cheaper, I'm getting that.

1 upvote
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

Guess that will be AT LEAST 24MP, probably more.

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 7, 2012)

There is no way the 5D3 will be less mega pixels than the 5D2. My guess is it will have similar mega pixels as the D800. The 5D2 is the best selling full frame camera because it is affordable and most types of photography favor resolution over speed. The 5D2 has been the go to DSLR for the majority of pro wedding/portrait/studio/landscape photographers for years. In fact that is the very reason the D800 isn't a sports camera like the D700 was. It turns out far more people need the resolution than need the speed. Canon was killing Nikon as far as the D700 vs 5D2 sales goes. It would be suicide for canon to make the 5D3 a sports camera. It was obviously a mistake when Nikon made the D700 a sports camera. Canon wont make the same mistake.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Feb 7, 2012)

@Jens_G & HiRez: good points; what about 24 Mp AND cheaper?In the "what if" section, I wonder how a business plan from Canon including both a 5DIII with a 24 Mp sensor / 2000$/EUR AND a 5DX with 50 Mp super-sensor (that we know it's already available) and 3500 k$/EUR will look like - will this be profitable enough for Canon? I think the dual release strategy might have an immediate benefit. And it can give a choice in the same brand, too. :)

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 7, 2012)

LOL DpReview does not allow images of this size to be uploaded into galleries. Can we make a request for all D800 owners to raise that limit please?

2 upvotes
akjos
By akjos (Feb 7, 2012)

Holy f balls. Its finally here.... it sucks to be broke right about now....

4 upvotes
Hynee
By Hynee (Feb 7, 2012)

Why no crop video modes of the D4?
It could have gone all the way to 3.8x crop.

0 upvotes
Hynee
By Hynee (Feb 7, 2012)

Apparently it has full 1080p in DX crop too, but I can't tease that out of the specs.

0 upvotes
Visualiza
By Visualiza (Feb 7, 2012)

More impressive than the tech specs is the PRICE. My goodness, talk about an aggressive entry; I was fully expecting this camera to clock in at above $4000, considering the D4 and 1Dx after all. Bravo Nikon, bravo. If this can at least match the D700 for IQ, it may very well be the last DSLR I ever purchase.

6 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Feb 7, 2012)

I think Sony is charging big money for their sensors

0 upvotes
dspphotos
By dspphotos (Feb 7, 2012)

Most definitely go for a non-AA version for me... Having seen how non-AA cameras look, you'd be silly not to consider it if you're not shooting images that are very prone to moire.

http://wp.me/pkDKu-11i

0 upvotes
corntrollio
By corntrollio (Feb 9, 2012)

But that just confuses digital artifacts for apparent sharpness. If you want that, you can do it just as easily in post. What you can't easily fix is certain types of moire.

0 upvotes
Deleted1929
By Deleted1929 (Feb 7, 2012)

I'm numbed by the need to pump 36 Mp into this. Someone needs to take Nikon management off whatever strange substances they're taking.

And why is it that Nikon won't let you bracket in more than 1EV steps ? Why such a ludicrous limitation ? So if I want to bracket for HDR I have to shoot 5 shots just to cover 4 EV extra ? Does anyone in Nikon actually do HDR ? On a D5000 I can bracket 4 EV in just three shots.

4 upvotes
ovrebekk
By ovrebekk (Feb 7, 2012)

People have been b|tching about a reasonable high res Nikon since the dinosaurs, and I don't mind them filling that gap.

I totally agree on the bracketing thing though. Is the dynamic range in the pro cameras really so poor you need a shot for every single stop?

0 upvotes
gonzalu
By gonzalu (Feb 7, 2012)

So get a D5000 ... I mean, you answered your own q!

0 upvotes
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

We'll have to see about the sensor's low light performance, but my favorite new features are:

-- Dual cards, and SD card will make transferring photos much easier

-- 100% VF coverage

0 upvotes
naththo
By naththo (Feb 7, 2012)

Hi, I am surprised to see that announcement all of sudden, but 36mp and full frame size, would it be as good quality as 20mp+ full frame sensor, but I have bad feeling it gonna be a bigger interpolation that will make pic look awful quality. (Keep in mind, think about micron pixel, bigger the number, the worse quality will be) The true 4000dpi film scanner can go up to 20mp+ for 35mm that is a pure resolution, not digitial camera resolution. So therefore full frame sensor and 20mp+ is acceptable to me. But 36mp? I dunno. So I have to wait see what the sample image is gonna be like. But nice specification there. Will see what Canon is up to next.

1 upvote
NowHearThis
By NowHearThis (Feb 7, 2012)

I think you can be assured that Nikon spent plenty of time testing it. Nikon has never released a FF camera that didn't take great photos and this one won't be an exception to that. Heck most of their APS-C cameras shoot great too.

0 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Feb 7, 2012)

I think the MP count will shine on the non AA filter version.

0 upvotes
Deleted-pending
By Deleted-pending (Feb 7, 2012)

Here it IS !!! YES , hope the video will be good though :)

NIKONATOR D800 tadadadada tadadadada :):):)

1 upvote
ljmac
By ljmac (Feb 7, 2012)

I suspect this will be the beginning of the end of medium format - why would anyone choose MF over this?

I think we will see mirrorless overtake the mainstream DSLR and bridge camera market, full frame overtake the medium format market, and mobile phones overtake the compact market.

4 upvotes
Jens_G
By Jens_G (Feb 7, 2012)

MF lenses still have advantage. FF lenses are at their limit. My 12MP 5D1 still takes good photos.

0 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 7, 2012)

I doubt it. From the first samples I have seen, I am not seeing the same or better that MF is offering. And secondly, MF is not asleep. 80MP sensors are available.
It's still a 135 film sized sensor, no MF size.

A bridge between FX en MF, yes. And great selection of lenses. But no complete takeover of the MF world, let alone professional buyers.

1 upvote
Digitall
By Digitall (Feb 7, 2012)

It may not be the beginning of the end, but will force the traditional medium format to rethink in practicing price and be more accessible for the common mortal.

1 upvote
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (Feb 7, 2012)

MF has better DR which some will some value over FF. Yet, you have a point, MFs is huge in physical dimensions and rice too.

0 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (Feb 7, 2012)

Jens_G - Use MF lenses then if you actually believe that. Its not that the lenses are better, but the big capture area/big pixels.

0 upvotes
ljmac
By ljmac (Feb 7, 2012)

I should clarify that this clearly isn't the end of MF yet, but it really does look as though that's the way things are going - R&D moves a lot more quickly with 135 than it does with MF, so I think a takeover is inevitable. Plus MF users will love having good high ISO. Jens_G's point about lenses may be the fly in the ointment, however.

0 upvotes
Giep
By Giep (Feb 7, 2012)

Thank you Lord!!!!

3 upvotes
smallcams
By smallcams (Feb 7, 2012)

Who in the heck needs this many MP?

Answer: No one that hangs out here.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
1 upvote
HiRez
By HiRez (Feb 7, 2012)

This is crap, I am definitely waiting for 60MP.

8 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Feb 7, 2012)

Hirez you images look like made by some child. maybe you should invest in a few books about composition not camera gear?

1 upvote
arndsan
By arndsan (Feb 7, 2012)

Lord - so much more expansive for a sensor update most people don't need.
Will there be a real replacement in Price range of the D700?
Or is Nikon telling us that only pros need full-frame. then, thank you and goodbye

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Feb 7, 2012)

That *is* the price range of the D700 when it was announced. At least, after adjustment for various disasters, changes in currency, etc. It will drop just as any other camera drops eventually. But what a machine in the mean time ... the D700 still floats around 2200 used if you want FF cheaper. It's not like this camera makes the D700 any less excellent.

4 upvotes
arndsan
By arndsan (Feb 7, 2012)

not true
but anyway,
I just want the D4 sensor in a the D700 way please.

0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 8, 2012)

I don't think its the sensor that makes D4 better. I think it's the processing.

0 upvotes
Kfrog
By Kfrog (Feb 7, 2012)

Nice. Nikon ups the anti just a bit more!

1 upvote
photo perzon
By photo perzon (Feb 7, 2012)

I only buy mirrorless now

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Feb 7, 2012)

coolpix you mean?

2 upvotes
Peter G
By Peter G (Feb 7, 2012)

Deleting the AA filter from a camera at the factory shouldn't increase it's price.

0 upvotes
tkpenalty
By tkpenalty (Feb 7, 2012)

you get more software bundled with the camera that corrects moire.

0 upvotes
Zebooka
By Zebooka (Feb 7, 2012)

Who needs this bloatware?
Such tools are needed and would be usedin Photoshop, Lightroom, Aperture, not in bundled software.

1 upvote
Digitall
By Digitall (Feb 7, 2012)

By logic, would be most fair.

0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 8, 2012)

Want cheaper alternative, get your AA filter removed. After warranty period is over, of course.

0 upvotes
corntrollio
By corntrollio (Feb 9, 2012)

The D800E doesn't simply delete the AA filter, but rather uses the 2nd pass to undo the first. You should look up the technical details.

As to price, I can't really speak to that. I'm unclear on whether this is a luxury feature, or whether it technically costs more.

0 upvotes
Smia
By Smia (Feb 7, 2012)

Yes...I waited long enough!

1 upvote
manhngo
By manhngo (Feb 7, 2012)

wow.EX ~3k

0 upvotes
cteckwee
By cteckwee (Feb 7, 2012)

Now I still can reuse all my DX lenses and shoot in 15.4 MP, kudos to Nikon.

2 upvotes
mick232
By mick232 (Feb 7, 2012)

No to Sony, as they make the high-MP sensor.

2 upvotes
BJL
By BJL (Feb 9, 2012)

@mick232 What part does Sony have in this sensor? It is a Nikon design, according to Nikon. I have read claims that Sony is involved, but no evidence or details.

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Toriusa
By Toriusa (Feb 7, 2012)

I will wait until Canon announce 5DMarkIII.

3 upvotes
Archiver
By Archiver (Feb 7, 2012)

It looks fantastic. More than I need, though. I like how Nikon really pulled out all the stops regarding video, and offers a model that cancels the AA filter effects. Very interesting.

1 upvote
wskb
By wskb (Feb 7, 2012)

Anyone care to explain why there are two version, one with an E? Why not make all bodies the E version if cancelling the antiA filter is so beneficial? ... No doubt more to come on this.

0 upvotes
vFunct
By vFunct (Feb 7, 2012)

Because canceling the AA filter requires more post-processing work, which most people won't do.

2 upvotes
Tom_A
By Tom_A (Feb 7, 2012)

If this uses a bigger variant from Sony's sensor of the NEX-7, which is possible since if I am not misremembering Nikon often uses Sony sensors, and the megapixel numbers scale up similarly with the sensor surface area, then this camera could offer both incredible resolution and for most usages acceptable high iso performance (from the NEX-7 review). A great combination, then.
Curious for test pictures.
Obviously you'll need to use top flight nikon glass to really benefit from the extra pixels.
Now the remaining question is: should I go for the normal one or the one without the anti alias filter...

0 upvotes
mick232
By mick232 (Feb 7, 2012)

It has long been known that this is Sony's new FF sensor.

0 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Feb 7, 2012)

It seems to use a bigger version of the sensor in the D7000 / K5 / A580 / NEX5c. The NEX 7 sensor at full frame size would be way over 36mp

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Feb 8, 2012)

FX version of D7000 sensor.

0 upvotes
Maxfield_photo
By Maxfield_photo (Feb 7, 2012)

Tempting, very tempting.

0 upvotes
jkokich
By jkokich (Feb 7, 2012)

4fps? 4? $3,000? Really?

0 upvotes
nicolaiecostel
By nicolaiecostel (Feb 7, 2012)

Does your GF1 have 36 megapixels at 14 bit ?

4 upvotes
Ernest M Aquilio
By Ernest M Aquilio (Feb 7, 2012)

There is a reason for this...if you NEED a faster camera, buy the D4. Big emphasis on NEED

7 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Feb 7, 2012)

ilovemyrobot
keep shooting ducks in the pond with your Pana,
let professional photographers use pro tools.

3 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Feb 7, 2012)

I think it is pretty obvious the D800 is meant for mind blowing resolution while the D4 is the low-light, fps champ. Even before the sample pics come in, I think it is pretty obvious, these two cameras will set the bar pretty high.

0 upvotes
Aero Windwalker
By Aero Windwalker (Feb 7, 2012)

Let's see how Canon 5D Mark III is going to kick his ass this round. ;-)

0 upvotes
ovrebekk
By ovrebekk (Feb 7, 2012)

Good luck with that ;)

0 upvotes
mkln
By mkln (Feb 7, 2012)

yeah about that.
as a 5D2 owner, I feel like Canon is going to fail miserably this time.

nikon just released the perfect camera.
if only they had canon glass.

1 upvote
canon6188
By canon6188 (Feb 7, 2012)

No, 5D mark II is still a very capable body for image quality. Hope that Canon don't go the same MP race as Nikon. I bet less than 0.1% of user need anything more than 20Mp resolution.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 7, 2012)

I bet landscape photographers who like to make big prints are loving the Mega pixel race.

0 upvotes
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul

L glass is totally worse.

Try to look 50 1.2L and 85 1.2L II on Photozone.de.

0 upvotes
Dianoda
By Dianoda (Feb 7, 2012)

Both companies make great glass; leave blanket statements saying otherwise to the fanboys and gear hoarders.

And it's really quite silly to complain about the performance of the 50L/85L when Nikon doesn't have a modern 85mm f/1.2 or 50mm f/1.2.

1 upvote
reginalddwight
By reginalddwight (Feb 7, 2012)

D800 = 5DMkIII killer!!!

8 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (Feb 8, 2012)

Amazing, then please share with the group the 5DMkIII specs. Thank you.

0 upvotes
Jonathan Reed
By Jonathan Reed (Feb 7, 2012)

I'd be curious to see what percentage of buyers go for the non AA filter model. Amazing.

0 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Feb 7, 2012)

depends on the resolution difference ... as 36MP already too good without any enhancement

0 upvotes
love_them_all
By love_them_all (Feb 7, 2012)

Can't wait to see how the DR and noise performance are.

1 upvote
canon6188
By canon6188 (Feb 7, 2012)

When 5D mark II came out with 21 MP, the pros are saying the lens are having hard time keep up with the resolutions. Noted that Nikkor has new lens but 36 MP is lot of resolution for lens to perform well..

In addition, it is very taxing on CPU processing time and transfer time.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul

Hi, boy don't cry and go to Photozone.de to compare Nikkor with stupid6188 lens.

0 upvotes
healer81
By healer81 (Feb 7, 2012)

6 fps for files that big is quite a feat. im sure this camera will be worthy of praise, lets so what canon will do about it.

0 upvotes
Redteg94
By Redteg94 (Feb 7, 2012)

6FPS is in DX mode, so the files are 15MP. Still 4FPS at 36MP is impressive as well; about the same as the 7D

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Feb 7, 2012)

The resale value of my D700 just went up.

4 upvotes
arndsan
By arndsan (Feb 7, 2012)

yes - i think so too!

0 upvotes
Jens_G
By Jens_G (Feb 7, 2012)

A 16MP D700S would be nice.

3 upvotes
Ithackermike
By Ithackermike (Feb 7, 2012)

Finally! I'm so ready to,upgrade from my D300 to FF!

2 upvotes
Franklin
By Franklin (Feb 7, 2012)

Nice camera. Wish I have excuse to get one of these.

0 upvotes
sandy b
By sandy b (Feb 7, 2012)

$2995 US! Yes!

8 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Feb 7, 2012)

Wow, can't wait for some images.

0 upvotes
wskb
By wskb (Feb 7, 2012)

Ahhh, so it is 36M! Don't need that then... though I'm sure lots will!

1 upvote
nicolaiecostel
By nicolaiecostel (Feb 7, 2012)

There's nothing wrong with downsizing from raw, you get 9 MP at 50% size ! That means super sharp images and way less noise !

1 upvote
tkpenalty
By tkpenalty (Feb 7, 2012)

nicolaie, the proportion of noise does not change regardless of resolution. Also colour accuracy suffers as well as tonal information which is the mail pitfall of smaller pixels like this camera... with that said the D7000 sensor knocks on the door of a 5d mk II, and thus this D800 should be just as good as a 5d mk II if not better.

1 upvote
nicolaiecostel
By nicolaiecostel (Feb 7, 2012)

Yeah, it does. Take a picture at ISO6400 with the D700, look at it full size, then apply a 50% reduction, at 3 MP and look at the 3MP photo again. At 3 MP and 100% it will look tons sharper and with less noise. This is very usefull if you want to give downsized images to costumers, not when you will want to print. Off course the most details will be on the full size picture, but unless you want to print, this is secondary. Now, with the D800 you get 9 MP images allready downsized to 50%, making them much more appealable for any pixel peeper looking at them at 100% and less of a pfaff if you want to do a quick edit, presuming you do not need the whole 36 mpix jpeg stored on your computer or your client's blue ray.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
woffles
By woffles (Feb 7, 2012)

Some of the new exposure features are very interesting. Face recognition attached to exposure evaluation that will do proper backlit situations, cool tool for wedding photographers shooting fast! Works with fill flash too from photos I've seen!

0 upvotes
corntrollio
By corntrollio (Feb 9, 2012)

Methinks tkpenalty doesn't understand how light gathering works. If you downsize/normalize at 50% from 36MP to 9MP, of course you'd have lower noise, as nicolaiecostel said. You would be basing the picture on 4X the photons per pixel by downsizing, so you'd get better signal to noise ratio.

Comment edited 15 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
corntrollio
By corntrollio (Feb 9, 2012)

(by the way the 4X photons isn't exactly true because of how Bayes filters work, but I'm talking about the principle)

0 upvotes
Total comments: 278
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