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High-speed macro photographer shares his setup

By dpreview staff on Dec 20, 2012 at 18:47 GMT
Kiss of the Drops ©Maianer

German photographer Markus Reugels has gained quite a bit of attention over the years for his stunning and colorful high-speed photographs of the shapes and forms created when liquid is dropped into water.

Eruption ©Maianer Safety First ©Maianer
Put a Cap on ©Maianer Action Inside ©Maianer

If you've ever wondered what it takes to get shots like the ones above, here's a behind-the-scenes shot of the table-top rig Reugels currently uses. He shoots with a Sony SLT-A77 and Minolta 100 f2.8 Macro lens. He lights the scene with a Vivitar 285 that he's modified in order to set the output lower than 1/16 power.

The setup Reugels has built allows him to precisely control the drop rate and lighting when creating his unique imagery.

Reugels describes his process to us:

'The basic technique works with two drops. The first drop falls into the water and forms in succession, a crater, then a crown and finally, what I call the "pillar". The second drop must be timed so that it lands on the pillar, with the collision then forming shapes like a mushroom, hat or flying disc. It's actually the distance between the drops that determines the precise shape. At a rate of roughly 10 drops per second you get mushroom shapes. Increase that to about 15 drops per second and you get flying disc shapes. Slow the rate down to about 6 drops per second to create hat shapes. To get smooth shapes that hold their form longer before breaking up, I increase the viscosity of the water drops by adding guar gum.'

It's important to know that Reugels freezes the motion, not with shutter speed, but with flash.  He says, 'You must set the power of the flash lower than 1/16 to get sharp pictures. With such settings the flash duration is faster than 1/16000 second. This is the reason why the shutter speed is not important.'

You can see more of Markus Reugels' imagery on his Flickr photostream.

Comments

Total comments: 95
Terry Geig
By Terry Geig (Dec 31, 2012)

Is 1/16000 even [possible with an SB900?

0 upvotes
Kippostar
By Kippostar (Apr 13, 2013)

http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Flashes/4807/SB-900-AF-Speedlight.html#tab-ProductDetail-ProductTabs-TechSpecs

The term Speedlight is for a reason :P
The SB900 is approx. 1/38500 sec. at 1/128 output :)

0 upvotes
EvanSpellman
By EvanSpellman (Dec 29, 2012)

wow, this is really high tech, what a Beautiful Set up-just gorgeous results really worth the effort eh
!!

0 upvotes
EGouws
By EGouws (Dec 29, 2012)

Another proof that the most expensive is irrelevant is you have the talent and skill! Thanks for this!

2 upvotes
Rajamurthy
By Rajamurthy (Dec 28, 2012)

Amazing Herr.Markus and magnaimous to share ur setup and all other details.

Vielen Dank.

1 upvote
Sordid
By Sordid (Dec 24, 2012)

Amazing pictures!
What really caught my attention is the actually simple set up.
Großartige Arbeit, Markus.

1 upvote
driftnomore
By driftnomore (Dec 24, 2012)

great work,very innovative....like like like!

1 upvote
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 23, 2012)

Thank you all for your kind of words!

I´m Very happy that you like my work with the water drops.

I Wish you all a merry XMas and a Happy new Year !

Here i made a special picture for XMas...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/maianer/8300415153/

12 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Dec 23, 2012)

Markus, thanks you for sharing your technique and the (really amazing) results. The christmas tree is very nice and must make for a great postcard!

Merry Christmas to you too

0 upvotes
Duckysaurus
By Duckysaurus (Dec 25, 2012)

Found a whole bunch of new wallpapers!

0 upvotes
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Dec 23, 2012)

ABSOLUTELY awesome article !

1 upvote
warriormouse
By warriormouse (Dec 23, 2012)

Markus your images are amazing! they are most enjoyable :) congratulations!!! :D i do wish you all the best wishes, and i hope you continue to have much more fun in years to come!!!! Thanks for sharing :)

4 upvotes
SJN2004
By SJN2004 (Dec 22, 2012)

Very nice images, have you ever experimented with Realflow?

0 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 23, 2012)

Some Years ago i have play with Cinmea4D. I have see some Realflow renderings/animations. They are amazing. But i have no time for such projects anymore.

0 upvotes
SJN2004
By SJN2004 (Dec 23, 2012)

Hi, your real life results are amazing and they made me think of C4D and Realflow. Once you create the mesh you can import it in C4D and then add lights sources/textures to any part of the mesh to get really beautiful results.

0 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (Dec 22, 2012)

Brilliant, I never would have worked out how he did these beautiful and weird images. And it's unlikely I would have told anyone either!

1 upvote
Duckysaurus
By Duckysaurus (Dec 22, 2012)

Ditto to all the compliments for Markus's work. Just spectacular. Takes real dedication, a bit of creativity, and probably a lot of patience and diligence to get those shots.

3 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (Dec 21, 2012)

Beautiful work!

0 upvotes
Dan Wagner
By Dan Wagner (Dec 21, 2012)

When using a studio strobe with more than one outlet, you can set the power setting to the lowest and then put as many heads as possible into the same power bank so the power is divided among them -- all this combines to shortening the flash duration. There are also custom made rheostats that can take the power of a studio flash way down. Of course none of this might make the flash duration as fast as Reugels.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 21, 2012)

It won't help that much. Most sttudio flashes lower their capacitor voltage to reduce power, which actually increases their duration. An external rheostat will make this even worse.

The only flashes that use speed light style IGBT circuitry to shorten the flash duration are the Broncolor Scoro, the Paul Buff Einstein, and the Photogenic Solairs.

Seriously, the very best way to go about this is to do what the OP did, speed lights on low power, and lots of them. I've been known to use as many as 8 Nikon SB800 on one shot.

1 upvote
facedodge
By facedodge (Dec 21, 2012)

I hadn't considered lowering the power on the flash. Is 1/16000 really necessary? I'd think that fast of an exposure is a bit overkill.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

The Flash Duration of 1/16000 is the lowest limit. Here are the splash sharp, but little sprinkles or a falling drop gets some motion blur. So better use a lower settings to reach a duration over 1/20000.

Take a look at this bullet shot. Here i work with over 1/22000 and the pellet gets motions blur. But i can´t get much lower, i need the light.

http://markusreugels.de/images/LiquidArts/shootemup/_DSC16543%20web.jpg

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 21, 2012)

Time to build an air gap flash...

0 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (Dec 21, 2012)

I've tried doing this before. My setup was not anywhere on your level. I poked a hole in a ziplock bag and hung it from my chandelier. I mixed a bit of blue paint in the water for color and put a gel on my flash.

Here is one example:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8447/7869104214_68ff1ac1c4_k.jpg

Another:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7102/6953959340_6fc11726a1_b.jpg

Do you know how to get the refraction in the droplet to be whole? As you can see, the image of the Redskins' logo kept getting cut in half.

0 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (Dec 21, 2012)

Also, I found timing with my remote shutter release was pretty good once I got the hang of it. I was getting about 50% success rate of catching a droplet or pier.

0 upvotes
Wilmar Boer
By Wilmar Boer (Dec 21, 2012)

I happen to have a D700 with a Tokina 100mm macro, a SB800 and SB900 flash.

i just want to experiment with this kind of photography. Is there a method of triggering the flashes without having to buy a +/- $300,- timing unit?

0 upvotes
hobbit mob
By hobbit mob (Dec 21, 2012)

You could check out hiviz.com - they have lots of different types of triggers that are relatively cheap. I'm not sure how they'll work with your flash (I use a modified disposable camera flash hooked up to a sound trigger), but it's a place to start looking.

0 upvotes
RaimondasKa
By RaimondasKa (Dec 21, 2012)

If you are using nikon d700 fx camera, you can trigger your sb900 with on camera flash.

0 upvotes
tray48
By tray48 (Dec 21, 2012)

Although HVIZ offers fairly low cost timing devices, they are designed to trigger the camera and flash which is only one part of the system. The other is to time the release of the drops especially if you want to have one drop collide with the splash from another. For this you need solenoid valves and a valve controller. It becomes a bit more complicaed as the second drop needs to be precisely timed. Reugels describes his system in detail but it is quite complex. He also wrote a good deal of the software himself. His kind of design is beyond my capabilities to set up. Thus if you really want to do this type of water drop photography, you'll likely need to invest in a $300 controller along with valves, etc. Problbly you can assemble a system for $500. Me, I'd rather use that money to buy a lens.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

In the beginning i use the HiViz board too. It was a great helper to shutter the Camera.
You can capture Basic "Drop on Drop" pictures with this unit. The key to create an Collision is the Drop interval. To set the Drop interval i use a medicine dropper.

-The middle is 10drops per second. With this settings you can create Mushroom.
-When the drop intervall go to 6 drops per second. The Results are flyings Disc.
-At 15 drops per second, the Results are long hats.

I start this genre without any Technical helping devices. Only a trigger in one Hand and a cup in the other hand. With this i´m able to capture in good times 2 keepers from 10 attempts.

You don´t spend lots of money in an Timing device. When you are able to solder a little transistor circuit. you can built your own device with 50€. You don´t need to write an GUI for the timing device, i know 3 GUI for free. They can Control up to 3 Valves .

1 upvote
canondigi
By canondigi (Dec 21, 2012)

Where can one get two medical droppers that will dispense water at a variable rate? I've looked high and low and can't find anything that will allow me to control multiple droppers at variable rates without getting into solenoids and valves.

Thanks for sharing your outstanding pictures and technique!

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 21, 2012)

One dropper, not two. Squeeze gently, and one drop follows another.

I got more ambitious and bought a needle valve (about $8 at the hardware store) and mounted it in a hole I drilled in the plastic lid of a water bottle (about $0 from the recycle bin). Then I attached a "nozzle" that I improvised from a ball-point pen cap (about $0 from the bin, again) and viola, drops at adjustable intervals, all afternoon.

2 upvotes
canondigi
By canondigi (Dec 21, 2012)

Great ideas! I will have to try this myself. After three setups and no collisions this has got to be the key. Thanks again!

0 upvotes
MikesMultiMedia
By MikesMultiMedia (Dec 21, 2012)

did Mr. Reugels discuss what he uses as a trigger to time the taking of the photograph once the drops or drops collide on the surface of the water?

It appears he is using a slow shutter to capture the instant of a flash which is triggered according to the photographers wishes.

In that case, I can see how the shutter can be opened as the drops are let out of the source tube.

Then, is the flash just manually triggered in a guestimated way to capture the desired drop formation?

Or is there some trigger associated with this process that triggers the flash (while the shutter waits for any object to be illuminated accordingly.

0 upvotes
Wedding photographer Mumbai
By Wedding photographer Mumbai (Dec 21, 2012)

I like the post and according to me there are very nice shots..

0 upvotes
AV Janus
By AV Janus (Dec 21, 2012)

Output power or flash time duration lower than 1/16000? What is it?

Output power is easy to adjust with some filter but flash duration time is different...

0 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

The lower you set the power on the flash, the Flash duration gets Higher.
This is the reason why High-Speed Photography works only with lower power settings of the flashes . I use 1/16- 1/64 on my Vivitar 285.

0 upvotes
djorgji
By djorgji (Dec 21, 2012)

Actually it is the other way around.

The higher the output of the flash, the longer the duration, the more motion blur you get in the image.

If you want to freeze action, you select the lowest power of the flash possible. This is the shortest flash duration.

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 21, 2012)

Bet your German isn't as good as his English.

Substitute "speed" for "duration", and it makes more sense. Seriously, I got what he does from what he wrote. The essence is "turn the power way down to make it work".

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
cariboujones
By cariboujones (Dec 21, 2012)

Great post/images. I'm more familiar with Corrie White and she has a more in depth tutorial on her blog at 500px that's a great read: http://500px.com/blog/161/how-to-get-started-in-water-drop-photography

0 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

Yeah, Corrie is an great Artist too! I like her Pictures.

BTW:
Here are an Behind the Scene Video of my work, you can see my processing of the images too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rkCbKxJwdY

3 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (Dec 21, 2012)

wow amazing result!

0 upvotes
SDPharm
By SDPharm (Dec 21, 2012)

Now try 5000 fps:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNI-LIVs-to

2 upvotes
techmine
By techmine (Dec 21, 2012)

Excellent work and lab. Thanks for sharing.

1 upvote
avbee
By avbee (Dec 21, 2012)

pretty!!!

0 upvotes
carlosdelbianco
By carlosdelbianco (Dec 21, 2012)

Amazing images and studio.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Dec 21, 2012)

Nothing new about flash sync, aka stoboscopic photography. Harold Edgerton pioneered it in the 40's. Spectacular photos, though.

0 upvotes
SLRWIT
By SLRWIT (Dec 21, 2012)

I had the pleasure to meet Dr. Edgerton once at a conference. He was tweaking a repeating strobe with bright green fluorescent streaming water to make it look still and I asked him how he came to learn all he had about strobes and e-flash. He told me the secret was to "fool around a lot." He was right.

4 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Dec 21, 2012)

I never had the chance to meet Harold Edgerton, but I happened to see an exhibition of his photographs earlier this year. They are fantastic! I didn't mean to be dismissive of Reugels' work, but I couldn't help noticing the great amount of "OMG that's incredible how does he do it?» comments posted here.

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Dec 20, 2012)

Excellent work.

1 upvote
NancyP
By NancyP (Dec 20, 2012)

WOW. Markus, This is just fabulous. Your home-built apparatus plus your aesthetic sense has produced some great, and unusual, photos. Doc Edgerton would be proud of you! For those who don't get the reference, Edgerton of MIT pioneered photographic use of strobe light http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Eugene_Edgerton

For those who like insects in flight, there's another macro expert with his own home-built interrupted laser beam triggered PORTABLE setup. See the flikr account of fotoopa http://www.flickr.com/people/fotoopa_hs/ and Fred Miranda macro forum http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/780820/15 for

2 upvotes
frans_vdm
By frans_vdm (Dec 21, 2012)

As NancyP indicates, this is great work of Markus. The setup shows a precise finish of all details. The exposure contributes to high-quality images and beautiful color effects.

I have already started ( fotoopa) such recordings in 2004. Markus has however the setup worked out even better. You have to do it all yourself in order to obtain results. Markus does it with a lot of knowledge.

The Vivitar flashes are indeed very good. I also use the Vivitar 283 with modified short exposure time. The Nikon SB-80-DX flashes can also be very short trigger to less than 1/256 via the X and Q pin signals. I use 4 of this SB-80-DX flashes driven via my DIY controller hardware. The ringflash SB29s can also be driven to 1/512 power.

Now I lay me more on flying insects. Many of these techniques are also used with only one difference: you never know when an insect comes true infocus. I use laser systems for the detection.

Again, congratulations to Markus for these exceptional results.

fotoopa.

1 upvote
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

Thank you Frans!
You know i´m a huge Fan of your Work !

0 upvotes
Vladik
By Vladik (Dec 20, 2012)

Insanium in the Cranium Dawg! :)

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (Dec 20, 2012)

For strobes, light output per unit time is constant. The "power" fraction of the particular strobe varies the length of time the strobe flashes. Full power = longer duration of the flash. 1/16 or 1/32 power = shorter duration (full power time x power fraction). Of course, one sets up one's strobes such that one don't get unwanted bounce from background, and shoots in a dark room.

0 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

I don´t need to shoot in dark rooms. With an aperture of F16 the images are pitch black without the flashes!

2 upvotes
Airless
By Airless (Dec 20, 2012)

I don't get how the short flash duration makes sharp pictures. Doesn't the shutter stay open even after the flash ends?I have heard of 1/8000 shutter speed but not 1/16000.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Dec 20, 2012)

You need a dark or somewhat dark room. The shutter can stay open for 10 secs if there is little to no light. The flash will provide proper exposure. Here is some info from ken rockwells site for the sb-910
Flash duration

1/880 sec. at full output.

1/1,100 sec. at M 1/2 output.

1/2,550 sec. at M 1/4 output.

1/5,000 sec. at M 1/8 output.

1/10,000 sec. at M 1/16 output.

1/20,000 sec. at M 1/32 output.

1/35,700 sec. at M 1/64 output.

1/38,500 sec. at M 1/128 output.

4 upvotes
Juergen
By Juergen (Dec 21, 2012)

That is commercial spam!

The data is easily found on the Nikon USA website at
http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Flashes/4809/SB-910-AF-Speedlight.html

"1/880 sec. at M 1/1 (full) output
1/1100 sec. at M 1/2 output
1/2550 sec. at M 1/4 output
1/5000 sec. at M 1/8 output
1/10000 sec. at M 1/16 output
1/20000 sec. at M 1/32 output
1/35700 sec. at M 1/64 output
1/38500 sec. at M 1/128 output"

http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/Speedlights/SB-910_EN.pdf
on page H-14

4 upvotes
MIKE GG
By MIKE GG (Dec 21, 2012)

but how does 1/38500 work when shutter stays open longer... 1/8000? or is it completely dark and the only image will be when the flash lights?

0 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (Dec 21, 2012)

MIKE GG in a dark room, shutter can open as long as you want, but camera will capture the picture only when there's light, in this case from flash. the lenght of exposure then determined by the lenght of flash output.
So, even you put 10sec shutter, then the flash is 1/128 power, your object only got the light for 1/38500 secs.

0 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

The images are freeze by the flashes. The Shutter speed higher then 1/20000 is necessary to freeze the fast movement in a sharp image. I use a shutter speed of 1/160, but only for my wireless trigger.

1 upvote
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Dec 27, 2012)

I'd like to try this, but I'm confused about the flash duration. My Olympus FL-50 on manual seems to go down to 1/128. Would that be a similar duration to the Nikon numbers listed above or are they all different? So set a shutter speed at 1/60 and flash faster than 1/32 and give it a go? I'm sure I'm just revealing my ignorance, but learning is worth it. ;)

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Dec 20, 2012)

He forgot to talk about the 2 hours of POST on each image.

3 upvotes
BMWX5
By BMWX5 (Dec 20, 2012)

what do you mean?

0 upvotes
Ignat Solovey
By Ignat Solovey (Dec 20, 2012)

If you want to live without post-processing, stick to original Daguerre's process. Everything else REQUIRES post-processing. Even when you print straight from negative to paper in a darkroom, there IS some degree of post-processing, whether you want it or not. Digital image is already post-processed even when you have "raw" file to play with, since ADC in your camera already assigned colors to pixels according to filter array (if it's not Leica M Monochrom or ancient digital back), included different corrections (like dead pixels remapping) and some settings.

You surely have to know the limit where photography turns into unspoken visual havoc and never cross it, but you're in your full rights to correct exposure, brightness, contrast, color balance, clean up dust and, since technology allows that, get rid of lens imperfections like CAs and distortion. If you consider it's not "classic", I dare say that everything I mentioned, except CAs correction, can be done in a darkroom.

20 upvotes
moizes 2
By moizes 2 (Dec 20, 2012)

Nice said! Indeed!

0 upvotes
Ednaz
By Ednaz (Dec 20, 2012)

As someone who does similar shoots with similar gear, looking at his images very closely, there's not much post processing. Dust or blot removal, for certain, I'm amazed every time I do a session at how much stuff that I don't see in the normal world shows up in the micro world. But the assumption that he's grafting images together into the shapes you see is a false one - I've gotten similar shapes with my setup, which is two droppers with a computerized speed and droplet size control for the droppers. If there's any fudging in his description, it's probably that he uses viscosity management more than he says. And uses snoots, flags, etc on his flash, but everyone into this sort of photography does.

3 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Dec 20, 2012)

If you look on his flickr, you will find heavy photoshop. Very well done BTW. I like his images, and I can tell its not as simple as taking the image and making a few adjustments in lightroom.

2 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

No, i don´t forgot to talk about post processing. There are only some basic adjustments. The processing of an images takes about 5 min.

In this Video i show my post processing...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rkCbKxJwdY

3 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Dec 21, 2012)

Mssimo, you just got moded. Assuming PP work is futile. Shhh.

Carl

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Dec 23, 2012)

Im sorry for the hash comment. Please provide more details on the overall process if possible. I'm sure many of us would like it.

0 upvotes
Toemel
By Toemel (Dec 20, 2012)

Really amazing, thanks for showing this on dp and "dankeschön" for sharing your techniques with us!

1 upvote
JEROME NOLAS
By JEROME NOLAS (Dec 20, 2012)

Interesting...

0 upvotes
MrPetkus
By MrPetkus (Dec 20, 2012)

These are wonderful images. Thanks for sharing!

0 upvotes
Graystar
By Graystar (Dec 20, 2012)

"Safety First"...Ha! That's a good one! ;)

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 21, 2012)

Mixing high voltage electronic devices and water is fun, lol.

Flashes use the same sort of circuitry as defibulators.

1 upvote
Graystar
By Graystar (Dec 21, 2012)

"Mixing high voltage electronic devices and water is fun, lol.

Flashes use the same sort of circuitry as defibulators."

Ummm....right.

You don't get out much...do you...

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 21, 2012)

I'd say if you missed the humor in that, it's you who needs to get out more. Seriously.

5 upvotes
Graystar
By Graystar (Dec 22, 2012)

The humor in what?? What does your comment have to do with the water drop that looks like a condom (hence, "safety first")?

You're thinking voltage and flash circuits...we're thinking something different.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 22, 2012)

I didn't catch that caption. Now this conversation makes some sense.

0 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Dec 20, 2012)

Now there's a good project for a winter's day. Great shots.

0 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (Dec 20, 2012)

The strobes ...who is the manufacturer????? Looks like home made snoots.

0 upvotes
Vibrio
By Vibrio (Dec 20, 2012)

he uses a flash not a strobe

Vivitar 285 tells you above

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Dec 20, 2012)

flash = strobe = flash

Interchangeable words. Although, you're probably trying to say that he's using a plain old ISO hot shoe style "flash gun" which is true.

0 upvotes
Vibrio
By Vibrio (Dec 21, 2012)

they are not interchangeable words

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Dec 21, 2012)

I suppose you're right.

If you haven't read a single piece of photographic literature in the last half century or so, or talked to another photographer, then sure, they aren't interchangeable words.

1 upvote
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Jan 15, 2013)

...perhaps they're right. Flash is ambiguous and could also mean magnesium powder, which is still in heavy use. I stand corrected.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Dec 20, 2012)

He is really good at that!

3 upvotes
Benarm
By Benarm (Dec 20, 2012)

very clever, great use of A77's superior frame rate

0 upvotes
Dennis
By Dennis (Dec 20, 2012)

How so ? He's shooting flash. I doubt it's recycling at 10fps.

4 upvotes
BMWX5
By BMWX5 (Dec 20, 2012)

The secret is setting your flash to manual and set the power to about 1/16 power, now you can use your flash in a rapid succession - no need to fully recharge after each flash. Combine this with the fastest DLSR, you get awesome results like Maianer macro photos.

1 upvote
yvind Strm
By yvind Strm (Dec 20, 2012)

You need to rethink if you think these kind of shots have anything to do with fast fps.
They are probably shot with shutter open for 2 seconds or so.
One uses a machine to time the drops and the flash.

0 upvotes
Markus Reugels
By Markus Reugels (Dec 21, 2012)

Thats right, all are single captures, freeze by the light.
Without Timming device, it´s nearly impossible to create such complex images with water drops.

2 upvotes
stan_pustylnik
By stan_pustylnik (Dec 20, 2012)

Wow! these are beautiful macros!

1 upvote
Total comments: 95