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Time magazine showcases Top 10 photos of 2012

By dpreview staff on Dec 14, 2012 at 10:15 GMT

Time magazine has published its Top 10 photos of 2012. As part of its end-of-year series including the 'most surprising pictures of the year' and the 'Top 10 Photographic Magazine Covers', this set includes the images that moved the team the most in 2012. "They all deliver a strong emotional impact — whether they show a child mourning his father who was killed by a sniper in Syria; a heartbreaking scene in a Gaza City morgue  or a haunting landscape of New Jersey coastline after Hurricane Sandy" says Kira Pollack, Time's Director of Photography.

 "In front of me, a group of men that had just stormed into the room were facing the cruel reality of discovering the dead body of a loved one. Everything was happening very fast, but I remember seeing a teardrop falling over the inert hand and whispering “ma’a salama” (goodbye in Arabic). I’ve always thought that war brings out the best and the worst in humans. To me, this was a sad and tender moment of love." - Bernat Armangue (AP) . Gaza City. Nov. 18, 2012.

Comments

Total comments: 147
12
MrPetkus
By MrPetkus (Dec 14, 2012)

I like the pic by Stephen Wilkes. I wish there was metadata, being a gearhead and all...

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
JakeB
By JakeB (Dec 14, 2012)

Hard to understand the level of heartlessness being expressed here at photos of our fellow human beings in distress.

And then you have some idiot suggesting such photos are "easy" journalism. I'd like to see this armchair critic enter a war zone and take photographs.

Pathetic.

7 upvotes
mpilon
By mpilon (Dec 14, 2012)

Most people do not care if their living style creates injustices elsewhere - in fact they prefer not to ear about side effects of their materialism.

1 upvote
Karl Summers
By Karl Summers (Dec 14, 2012)

Obviously they haven't seen photos of my kids...

4 upvotes
Whois
By Whois (Dec 14, 2012)

...or my cat

4 upvotes
coudet
By coudet (Dec 14, 2012)

Typical - 80% of the pictures show human suffering.

2 upvotes
Priaptor
By Priaptor (Dec 14, 2012)

Of course, of a particular part of the world, selective to the "liberal cause"

3 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Dec 14, 2012)

Priaptor:
Exactly. That's what's so nauseatingly politically correct about the choice of photos. I suppose that it's easy journalism - there's not much imagination required to get an eyecatching shot of someone being beaten up. Thankfully, this sort of stuff isn't representative of humanity.

4 upvotes
ozturert
By ozturert (Dec 14, 2012)

80% of the pictures people suffering, and 10% of them shows one of the responsibles :)

0 upvotes
brn
By brn (Dec 14, 2012)

ozturert, I assume you're referring to the photo of Li Wei.

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Dec 14, 2012)

Huh? "Easy" to get war photos? A "liberal cause" conspiracy? The Time cover should feature more dog, cat, duck, and garden photos? Or maybe depict heros of placid, non-violent things like football, boxing, and NASCAR racing? Or maybe follow the lead of People, News of the World, and Town & Country?

5 upvotes
wetracy
By wetracy (Dec 14, 2012)

"If it bleeds, it leads." Journalism is about drama, not happy days.

0 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Dec 14, 2012)

Rubbish - journalism is about human life, only a small potion of which is violent.

1 upvote
Ermac
By Ermac (Dec 14, 2012)

Priaptor (who must have removed his original comment), gsum and ozturert. Would you be happy if Time only covered images of rich American's excess? You all seem to be pretty sheltered in your gated communitie's cul-du-sac.

3 upvotes
supeyugin1
By supeyugin1 (Dec 14, 2012)

And most of them are from Gaza. This is very expected.

0 upvotes
ptodd
By ptodd (Dec 14, 2012)

"And most of them are from Gaza."

If by "most" you mean "one".

Images from Gaza: 1.
Images from the USA: Ooops I lost count. Was it 5 or 6?

OK, I checked, it was 5. Correct me if I'm wrong.

I despair. The capacity of images like these to remind me of the bad side of humanity somewhat pales next to the experience of reading comments on the internet.

Oh dear, I normally try to avoid politics on dpr.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
supeyugin1
By supeyugin1 (Dec 15, 2012)

I just see one image here, and it's from Gaza. Image from Gaza took the first place, as usual. Remember Muhammad Al-Dura? The same story, and fake facts as usual.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
deleted_081301
By deleted_081301 (Dec 14, 2012)

not many there i consider that interesting ....... top ten "Photojournalist " photos maybee but TOP TEN photos not really ........

0 upvotes
Ermac
By Ermac (Dec 14, 2012)

Oh yes, let's see more photographs of empty boats on a placid lake in the morning and B&W images of old poor people or half nude women....

3 upvotes
deleted_081301
By deleted_081301 (Dec 14, 2012)

not my type of photo either ....as you would have known if you had bothered to look at my gallery..... maybe a more diverse selection would have been good .....

1 upvote
DavidVidgen
By DavidVidgen (Dec 14, 2012)

Some great examples of photojournalism... Not necessarily to everyones taste but most of the images are self explanatory and depict a story of some kind. Remember, they are Time Magazine Top 10 images, so i'm guessing the shortlist has only been derived from those images published in Time Magazine in 2012.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
itchhh
By itchhh (Dec 14, 2012)

First thing that stands out for me? I see 7 or 8 pictures in a row of pain and suffering in one shape or form. We go from a woman holding an American flag of her loved one and the very next one is the PONTUS smiling and laughing.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Braindad
By Braindad (Dec 14, 2012)

I would say that this would be better titled Top Ten Newsworthy Photos or Top Ten Photos of Events That were Emotionally Moving to the Judges. The photos are very descriptive of the events, but I was expecting something very different when I read "Top Ten Photos"

0 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Dec 14, 2012)

The whole "top ten" idea is a bit of the past in my eyes

Soon we have a "top ten" of "top ten" photo choices

2 upvotes
jhahilt
By jhahilt (Dec 14, 2012)

Every one of these photos required at least a paragraph of explanation to make them relevant, a good picture should be able to stand and deliver on its own. Time has in the past given the world some incredible images, this lot fails

10 upvotes
etothej
By etothej (Dec 14, 2012)

Agreed, however I do think the first image and the image of Gabby Douglas are fantastic!

1 upvote
EricWN
By EricWN (Dec 14, 2012)

I was able to watch them all with great interest even without reading the descriptive text passage. Which, for me, is a nice add-on. If you don't need text or don't want text, just don't read it.

2 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Dec 16, 2012)

And every movie should be silent.

1 upvote
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Dec 14, 2012)

Picking the Top-10 of such material is a very (ir)responsible task, and I'm not sure it should be done. Why not Top-15, or 100? It boils down to the taste and understanding of one or several persons, and makes such emotional documents into some kind of a contest, which is rather heartless and quite inappropriate. What about all the other images shot at similar situations, containing similar emotional charge?
These are documents, NOT contest material, and putting several "chosen" pictures in such context tends to diminish their original purpose by letting someone decide which ones are the most "spectacular"...

7 upvotes
moizes 2
By moizes 2 (Dec 14, 2012)

Couldn't agree more...

2 upvotes
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (Dec 14, 2012)

Especially in this day of instant and limitless content on the web we can handle more, say 100 images, it doesn't take long to view through all of them.

But there's the other thought that less is more, you'll take time to view great images and analyze or whatever, you can get more in depth with less material.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Dec 14, 2012)

We pick "top ten" because we have 10 fingers. Moses stopped with 10 Commandments, because any consigned to the toes might not receive comparable attention.

2 upvotes
Digital Suicide
By Digital Suicide (Dec 14, 2012)

Nothing new and unusual. Take a picture of death and pain - and you'll the best.
Times of making the sensation.

8 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (Dec 14, 2012)

Wow, usually I would be on here fighting the other commentors ...but those are just about the ten worst images I have ever seen for photos of the year ...who picked them out?

5 upvotes
skymartin
By skymartin (Dec 14, 2012)

Agreed. If I was thinking of buying "Time", this selection would make me run a mile. Depressing rubbish.

3 upvotes
RP McMurphy
By RP McMurphy (Dec 14, 2012)

What is depressing is your attitude

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Dec 14, 2012)

Consider, then, a copy of Oprah, Gourmet, or Ducks Unlimited.

2 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Dec 14, 2012)

These top ten images show why Time Magazine is in drastic decline of readers and viewers.

There's already so much suffering, anguish and bloodshed in tabloids, blogs, and social media... why replicate it again and again?

The only saving grace is the tornado.

.

18 upvotes
topstuff
By topstuff (Dec 14, 2012)

Time magazines publishes photos that show the big events of our time. It always has. Some parts of the world are troubled right now. The photos reflect this.

Criticising the Time photos because they are depressing , totally and completely misses the point. When Time and Life magazine were publishing iconic images of the second half of the 20th century, would we rather they only publish happy ones?

What nonsense !

12 upvotes
Banana Chips™
By Banana Chips™ (Dec 14, 2012)

@CameraLabTester, your comment is bizarre; you complain about photos depicting suffering and anguish and bloodshed and yet the one you point out as "saving grace" is the tornado photo as if the tornado signifies happiness and unicorns?

And as @topstuff said, you missed the point.

I personally think Dominic Nahr's photo is the most striking...but that's me, of course.

2 upvotes
RP McMurphy
By RP McMurphy (Dec 14, 2012)

Deary me

Dreadful things happening, poignant photography and you have the temerity to criticise because you want Happy Snaps

2 upvotes
gsum
By gsum (Dec 14, 2012)

RPM- It's not happy snaps that I want. I'm simply bored to death of photos of violence. There's a lot more going on in the world that's of far more interest.

6 upvotes
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (Dec 14, 2012)

3 out of 10 shots are from Syria... really, there has to be more going on in the world than that war. They're all good shots, they have a story, but worth it taking up a third of the Top 10 about the same story? War and tragedy can bring out very humanistic portraits, but being human goes beyond suffering, were there not any events of joy photographed like someone saved from a disaster? Aid finally reaching a community somewhere?

3 upvotes
EricWN
By EricWN (Dec 14, 2012)

If you cannot stand pictures of people suffering, maybe it's time for you to get back to the alternate reality where you seem to spend most of your time.

1 upvote
Total comments: 147
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