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Time magazine showcases Top 10 photos of 2012

By dpreview staff on Dec 14, 2012 at 10:15 GMT

Time magazine has published its Top 10 photos of 2012. As part of its end-of-year series including the 'most surprising pictures of the year' and the 'Top 10 Photographic Magazine Covers', this set includes the images that moved the team the most in 2012. "They all deliver a strong emotional impact — whether they show a child mourning his father who was killed by a sniper in Syria; a heartbreaking scene in a Gaza City morgue  or a haunting landscape of New Jersey coastline after Hurricane Sandy" says Kira Pollack, Time's Director of Photography.

 "In front of me, a group of men that had just stormed into the room were facing the cruel reality of discovering the dead body of a loved one. Everything was happening very fast, but I remember seeing a teardrop falling over the inert hand and whispering “ma’a salama” (goodbye in Arabic). I’ve always thought that war brings out the best and the worst in humans. To me, this was a sad and tender moment of love." - Bernat Armangue (AP) . Gaza City. Nov. 18, 2012.

Comments

Total comments: 147
12
draleks
By draleks (Apr 11, 2013)

A bit as an afterthought - here is the list of the best news photos of 2012 by Reuters:

http://blogs.reuters.com/fullfocus/2012/11/30/best-photos-of-the-year-2012

Correct me if I am wrong, but I think those photos are much more intersting. Almost every one of them have something special about the composition and there is also depth to the sense of drama they evoke. Enjoy!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 50 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
draleks
By draleks (Apr 11, 2013)

My personal favourite: http://blogs.reuters.com/fullfocus/2012/11/30/best-photos-of-the-year-2012/#a=92

0 upvotes
Wedding photographer Mumbai
By Wedding photographer Mumbai (Dec 21, 2012)

I agree with you Phips243. It is every time story.

1 upvote
phips243
By phips243 (Dec 20, 2012)

Why am I not surprised, there is - as every year - a picture related to the Middle East conflict among the "top ones" - and it's never depicting the Israeli side of the story...

1 upvote
wkay
By wkay (Dec 17, 2012)

why not jam a camera up someone's face at a funeral in America? Because the photographer's are just thrill seekers to see who can get the most dangerous shot. Cant beat ARABS killing each other.

5 upvotes
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (Dec 18, 2012)

Yes, you can beat that; Israelis killing Arabs and Palestinians.

10 upvotes
SharksFan105
By SharksFan105 (Dec 18, 2012)

No, you cannot beat that, Valiant Thor. Lets ignore for a moment that the Gaza wars started because the Palestinians launched thousands of rockets on israeli cities for years. According to the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights, in the 2008/2009 Gaza war, 1,417 were killed, of which 926 where civilians. According to the Palestinians, in the 2012 Gaza war, 160 where killed, of which 105 were civilians. In the raging Syrian Civil War, according to the opposition forces, around 42,000 Syrians were killed so far, of which roughly half, or 20,000, were civilians. You do the math, Valiant Thor. You better check your facts before spreading lies.

4 upvotes
Kund
By Kund (Dec 18, 2012)

Here do you get your infos from?

0 upvotes
SharksFan105
By SharksFan105 (Dec 18, 2012)

Wikipedia:
1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaza_war
2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Pillar_of_Defense
3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_civil_war

3 upvotes
malabraxis
By malabraxis (Dec 18, 2012)

The point is not who started what war, but how so-called photo journalists exploit the misery of conflict. Judging by the above comments, who needs pictures to demonstrate human vanity...
Or is this no longer a forum for photography?

0 upvotes
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (Dec 19, 2012)

I did check my facts. Simply look up the video "Real History of Isreal" by Israeli Army Veteran Miko Peled who confirms that Israel is the true terrorist state.

3 upvotes
Nerval
By Nerval (Dec 19, 2012)

And a documentary is objective truth?

"A man says" can't be a fact. Real, True? Based on what?

Why not stop trying to find who is to blame, cause it might as well go back to USA and UK drawing the maps after world war II.

So sionists' expansionism, or Islam rejection of the jews... Does not matter anymore really.

It's to a point where there are factions hostile to each other and any pretext is good enough to try gaining ground.

No solution can ever arise like that.

And taking part for one or the other, or measuring atrocity on the account of death toll, documentaries, photographs, news or other is just plainly stupid self-righteousness.

"Oh yeah, this conflict is better: Look 42 000 deaths here..."

Yeah, right, killing people because they are perceived as different, or think differently or pertain to another culture relates to genocide. And wars are always unfair and atrocious.

This kind of comparisons leave me... aghast.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
wmac
By wmac (Dec 20, 2012)

The fact that the World (including Times magazine) starts to see things from Palestinians' aspect means something.

It is time for the world to awaken.

The land does not belong to you just because people from a same religion of you lived there several thousands of years ago. I would not be entitled for a piece as soon as I arrive there just because I am from the same religion.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bdkr65
By bdkr65 (Dec 24, 2012)

Imagine your neighbors on three sides of your home (right, left, and behind) hated you have dedicated their lives, and the lives of their ancestors and grandchildren to see you no longer draw breath...

That TIME see things from the Palestinian viewpoint is irrelevant, because a single image tells NONE of the story. A consistent stream of unbiased images from both sides of a conflict...then I give a damn. Barring that, it's just propaganda...

1 upvote
alexisgreat
By alexisgreat (Dec 27, 2012)

I agree Nerval, I would blame most of these conflicts on the US and UK especially because of what happened after world war 2 and how we still tamper world politics and economies, and now the US treats its own prisoners just as cruelly as any third world country does, go figure, pot kettle black Humanity (and I mean ALL of humanity) is just as worthless and ignorant as it has always been, as we destroy the environment, pollute our own foods in the name of the all mighty dollar (Monsanto) and destroy our climate with fossil fuels while we pop prescription pills and overmedicate ourselves to cover up the fact that our lifestyle causes our physical and mental ailments and its something no chemical can cure. America has become a plutocracy (it's ironic how that rhymes with hypocrisy) which highly favors the rich and powerful regardless of which party is in power and the rest of the world has followed suit.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
alexisgreat
By alexisgreat (Dec 27, 2012)

It's also ironic that while we are supposedly trying to protect our country from outside forces we are destroying it from within by taking away personal freedoms, in the words of Ben Franklin "Those who favor security over freedom deserve NEITHER."

2 upvotes
RStyga
By RStyga (Dec 17, 2012)

I read some of the members comments that photography is about emotion. In my view, photography is an art form and as such it is measured by the meaning it conveys not the emotional response it surely evokes.

In our times, sensationalism is omnipresent and crowned in visual media. Photography is -tragically- often an instrument of marketing at various levels of sophistication, from the distorted body images of fashion and gossip magazines to opinion-shaping prestigious news publications. The message is traded off for stark and mere impression; the harder is hits the senses the better it serves the purpose. Such purpose is not related to art but to guided emotional response towards achieving the publisher's goals.

I don't imply that TIME is one such publisher; not necessarily, that is. But more or less we are all entrenched and drenched in a sensationalist culture. Let's hope we will get over it before it consumes us.

Regards

3 upvotes
Boissez
By Boissez (Dec 17, 2012)

Who said good news photography was about art?

Comment edited 35 seconds after posting
1 upvote
RStyga
By RStyga (Dec 18, 2012)

It surely has not been about the news.

2 upvotes
BBGunWB
By BBGunWB (Dec 16, 2012)

Very interesting that this one didn't make it - http://ukcamerageek.com/blog/general/shocking-image-shows-tank-shell-hitting-rebel-outpost-in-syria/

2 upvotes
Jonathan Lee
By Jonathan Lee (Dec 16, 2012)

amazing footage.

0 upvotes
Alex da Veiga
By Alex da Veiga (Dec 17, 2012)

Maybe because they are from a video.

1 upvote
HarrieD7000
By HarrieD7000 (Dec 16, 2012)

Art is emotion. Even in one picture can be a story of life and dead. To be able to tell a story in one picture must be art and emotion.
Great pictures. DP thanks for the link.

2 upvotes
gmoney65
By gmoney65 (Dec 16, 2012)

it give me a very sad and emotional feeling and I'm sure it is the hardest things in life

0 upvotes
papparazzi
By papparazzi (Dec 16, 2012)

the best photos are about war...for me they are the worst.

4 upvotes
Brek01
By Brek01 (Dec 16, 2012)

how can time be anti Semitic as the Zionists control the media?

5 upvotes
stevo1520
By stevo1520 (Dec 21, 2012)

What silly baseless tosh

1 upvote
Breitling
By Breitling (Dec 16, 2012)

Time is strange magazine, sounds like anti-Semitic as well.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
foto guy
By foto guy (Dec 16, 2012)

Is it 2013 already? And here I thought we had a couple more weeks left in 2012. I guess any photos shot from December 13 to 31 are deemed unworthy. We might as well put our cameras away until January 1...TIME has spoken.

4 upvotes
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (Dec 16, 2012)

Mainstream media is dedicated to generating fear and stress for the purpose of control and emotional manipulation. The only facts you can trust in a copy of Time Magazine are the date and price. Look to beauty, not because the horror is not present, but that focusing on what makes you feel inspired and hopeful generate chemicals and frequencies in our bodies that are forces of healing and growth, instead of disease and destruction. In my field of epigenetics, this is known as the biology of perception.

9 upvotes
Ernest M Aquilio
By Ernest M Aquilio (Dec 16, 2012)

Brilliantly stated

2 upvotes
John Koch
By John Koch (Dec 16, 2012)

Epigenetics: people who crave cameras alter their genes, become better creatures, and improve the world.

Hardly any proof of that.

3 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (Dec 16, 2012)

These are mostly emotion pics. Aren't we more concerned here with photographic merit rather than journalistic taste?

1 upvote
CFynn
By CFynn (Dec 16, 2012)

Of course these are emotional - they say they are the "pictures that moved us most" - and they are the picks of a few journalists.

To be fair, this only one group of "best photos of the year" Time is publishing. For the year they also have a Best Portraits, Best Photojournalism, Most Surprising Pictures, Best Magazine Covers, etc.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
John Koch
By John Koch (Dec 16, 2012)

OK, so give us your pick of the "10 best." Too difficult? Then admit failure.

0 upvotes
Marcus Beard
By Marcus Beard (Dec 16, 2012)

Unlike many others I think there are some wonderful provocative images here. I do agree though that the themes are a little narrow. I'm a Brit and we had some pretty spectacular positive stuff going on here this year - anyone remember the Olympic Games or the Jubilee?

2 upvotes
CFynn
By CFynn (Dec 16, 2012)

There were plenty of Olympics photos, and at least one of the Jubilee, in the Atlantic's In Focus "Year in Photos 2012" that was highlighted on DPR about 10 days back:
http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/12/07/The-Atlantic-In-Focus-Year-in-Photos-2012

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
lxstorm
By lxstorm (Dec 16, 2012)

I like Martin Schoeller - Des Moines, Iowa - Spring 2012 image a lot.
Agreed that real art is positive and peaceful.

1 upvote
Airless
By Airless (Dec 16, 2012)

Most of these choices are pretty lame. Any snapshooter could take a picture of someone crying or a sick person, or a posed gymnast. Nothing special there.

5 upvotes
draleks
By draleks (Dec 17, 2012)

I agree. Those photos are completely forgettable. Especially the "secret" shot of Obama preparing for a speech. Obama obviously knew that the photographer was there, and the smile looks completely fake, more like "how did you get in here? Please get him out, I need to prepare for the speech".

1 upvote
3DSimmon
By 3DSimmon (Dec 16, 2012)

Great Pictures, Nice altetnative to fluffy bunny, instagram world of happiness, Every now and then we need to pull Our heads out of the sand for a reality check

1 upvote
ChrisFA5
By ChrisFA5 (Dec 16, 2012)

I have to agree with (almost) everyone else. There is more to life than the misery that is shown in these pictures.

2 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Dec 16, 2012)

I could have taken that picture! If only I'd thought of it. If only I'd been there. If only I'd anticipated the subject would be there and do that at that moment. If only I'd planned ahead to be at the front of the crowd. If only I'd been willing to risk my life traveling though shelling and war and checkpoints controlled by 17-year-olds with AK-47s. If only I'd brought a fast prime lens. If only I'd schlepped a heavy bag of equipment halfway around the world for weeks and weeks away from home and family. Yeah, I could have taken that picture.

But I didn't.

9 upvotes
racketman
By racketman (Dec 16, 2012)

All that is true but it doesn't make the photos any more interesting because you or I are unlikely to put ourselves in the position to take them. The Atlantic selection was far superior to my eyes; having made the effort the photographers then found something extra for their images.

1 upvote
vegasdood
By vegasdood (Dec 16, 2012)

Top TEN? It is easy to sell an umbrella on a rainy day. A marginally trained monkey could have SNAPPED most of those shots.

1 upvote
Bundabah
By Bundabah (Dec 16, 2012)

Very poor & very unbalanced selection. Really pushing the misery cart.
There is much more to life than this.
Haven't read Time for years, and in no hurry to do so.

0 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (Dec 15, 2012)

Some seriously dull photos there. Sad, but dull.

1 upvote
malabraxis
By malabraxis (Dec 15, 2012)

And that's why I cancelled my subscription to Time! Of course the world needs to be informed, but if misery and death are priorities of good photography, then I'd rather read Marvel comics...!

2 upvotes
Lights
By Lights (Dec 15, 2012)

Granted it does (Time's choices) seem somewhat unbalanced in the death and misery department, and it's not at a good time for that for any of us who keep track of the news...There is a point where overload occurs, and a point where the right of privacy (and dignity) is a question. I think the real question is 'reportage' or sensationalism?...but of course those judgments differ. Where does morbid voyeurism start? and where does making people aware end? Guess we can only answer that for ourselves.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Lights
By Lights (Dec 15, 2012)

Let's pretend. That there was no Magnum, that Robert Cappa didn't die from a land mine, that Eugene Smith didn't get the Cr*p knocked out of him for exposing Minamata disease, that all of Walker Evans and Dorthea Lange's photography is meaningless. Or Alex Majoli's coverage of various not so pleasant wars and situations. I'm not defending the framing, the tonality, etc. of these Time magazine photos, but how do you dismiss a whole genre of photography just because it rocks the boat? Let's sugar coat the world, so it doesn't upset anyone, and we can all run on the treadmill of consumer complacency. If you don't like it, or if it disturbs...don't look.

6 upvotes
Malcolm Chalmers
By Malcolm Chalmers (Dec 29, 2012)

I would venture to say if you don't like it change it, don't just pretend it doesn't exist. Time Magazine is covering world issues and unfortunately this is what most of the world is having to deal with. Seeing these photos disturbs me, I wish I could come up with a solution to end this global waring. Sadly, I by myself cannot, if these images disturb you speak out and try to stop these photo ops from occurring. That is why Time or any other magazine chooses them. To inform and provoke us.

0 upvotes
S.A.
By S.A. (Dec 15, 2012)

Photos of misery always seem to get high praise... Any dimwit with a camera phone could have gotten those. Nothing special about any of them. Just some a'hole who gets paid to capture someone else' personal tragedies. Gross.
Time should have waited. I'm sure there are many pictures of the parents of children massacred in the Conn shooting available for Time magazines consideration. "Moved them the most" What a joke. Shouldn't even have a category like that.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
14 upvotes
AV Janus
By AV Janus (Dec 15, 2012)

+1
With the amount of opportunities for misery shots in todays world it would be more of a feat and good reporting to report good and nice things for a change.
I am sure our collective minds would appreciate a positive thought once in a while. For the health of our minds.

6 upvotes
Professor Pentax
By Professor Pentax (Dec 15, 2012)

I agree with you in so far as there is an imbalance of misery and happiness in the collection, however I don't agree that any dimwit could have gotten these images. They might not be of immense artistic value but they are of immense social value. The fact that these events are being documented and published to a western audience is a feat in itself. We are so used to being projected a false, harmonious image of the world that when we see something that challenges our naive perception we take offence. Photography isn't all about pretty pictures. Just because the media shelter us from the atrocities in the world, it doesn't mean that they are not happening. Photography is THE medium of objective reporting and has a duty to capture both moments of joy and moments of misery.

8 upvotes
Rotherhithe
By Rotherhithe (Dec 15, 2012)

I agree. Yet another example of someone having what little dignity they have ripped to shreds for the sake of the ego of an AP photographer.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Dec 19, 2012)

" Any dimwit with a camera phone could have gotten those. "

And you are not a dimwit because you learned a couple simple tricks about exposure and wb? Sheesh.

0 upvotes
castleofargh
By castleofargh (Dec 15, 2012)

i like the 11/11 pic best.

number 8: save the cheerleader save the world!

if those were the top 10 pics of 2012, something is seriously wrong with my tastes.

0 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Dec 15, 2012)

No. 6 is very good - I think - I do not need the other

0 upvotes
Bronze Age Man
By Bronze Age Man (Dec 15, 2012)

Not impressed.

4 upvotes
Rick Knepper
By Rick Knepper (Dec 15, 2012)

Pictures of dead, murdered people start or prolong wars more often than stopping them. Same for mass shootings: more pictures and videos, more imitators.

4 upvotes
Priaptor
By Priaptor (Dec 15, 2012)

Yes Rick. Excellent point. We as a culture sensationalize this stuff, particularly in movies and TV and then ask, "how does something like what in CT happen". Let's place a BandAid on it so we all feel better.

1 upvote
acidic
By acidic (Dec 15, 2012)

Dear Time,

Don't be so quick with your top ten; there's still a bit over two weeks left in 2012, and I still have a few hundred photos to shoot this year!

3 upvotes
opticaloptimum
By opticaloptimum (Dec 15, 2012)

DPReview should have put 'Top 10 Photos' in the title in quotes - its only some people at Time Magazine who think these are the best.

5 upvotes
mauritsvw
By mauritsvw (Dec 15, 2012)

Totally agree.

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Dec 16, 2012)

"Top 10 Photos" chosen by staff at Time Magazine who need to be replaced for the sake of survival of the mediocre magazine...

I used to admire Time Magazine... I guess the editors back then have retired...

.

2 upvotes
Wael Fallatah
By Wael Fallatah (Dec 15, 2012)

So nice

0 upvotes
Sammy Yousef
By Sammy Yousef (Dec 15, 2012)

Time isn't what it use to be...

6 upvotes
Press Correspondent
By Press Correspondent (Dec 15, 2012)

I prefer landscapes.

1 upvote
hc44
By hc44 (Dec 15, 2012)

<whispers> "I see dead people"

"Ghosts?"

"Nah, I'm reading Time!"

1 upvote
Michael Alex
By Michael Alex (Dec 15, 2012)

It's called "freedom of speech". Would you like to change that? Hope not...

2 upvotes
Chekr
By Chekr (Dec 15, 2012)

There are responsibilities that come with rights. Everyone is so quick to state their rights but forget the other part. You and I do not have an inalienable right to free speech without boundaries, never have, never will. Get over it.

0 upvotes
Priaptor
By Priaptor (Dec 15, 2012)

Michael, do you really think there is "Freedom of speech" in America? Yeah, I guess YOU can say anything you want, BUT, when it comes to the overwhelming majority of our mainstream "news" papers and TV news/shows the news and stories are parsed through a political slant deluding the masses with propaganda.

That is freedom of speech gone awry.

TIME is just another pawn in the Progressive perspective our country has chosen to take. Not my cup of tea and hardly "freedom of speech" when the views of slightly less than 1/2 the country is squelched and or censured

0 upvotes
Sam Carriere
By Sam Carriere (Dec 15, 2012)

Why are "comments" like this allowed?

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Dec 15, 2012)

Keep in mind that some photos in war areas are stagged photos, a photo shoot per say. And DPR's news item of faked photos just this week is another knife in the heart of these types of photos. Good "real" moments now are hard to come by in photos.

2 upvotes
sl os
By sl os (Dec 15, 2012)

Plus poor framing/croping and evident make up

1 upvote
maboule123
By maboule123 (Dec 14, 2012)

Human disgrace sells.

7 upvotes
mpilon
By mpilon (Dec 14, 2012)

You will be a buyer if tragedy strike your family.

1 upvote
onlooker
By onlooker (Dec 15, 2012)

> You will be a buyer if tragedy strike your family

What in the dickens are you talking about? Do you actually think that people enjoy their tragedy paraded in supermarket stands?

1 upvote
mpilon
By mpilon (Dec 15, 2012)

I understand your point about useless voyeurism. This is not suitable.

My point is regarding the positive of aspects of Time's stories: The victims want injustice to end and medias bring the required attention to address famine, dictatorship, unfairnesses, wars.

This is what I am talking about.

4 upvotes
Jason Racey
By Jason Racey (Dec 14, 2012)

Time is obviously judging the content not the execution. Without a back story none of these are particularly good photographs. We are presented with a camera-phone snapshot of a boy crying. Why? Did his soccer team lose? He dropped his ice cream? Oh his father was killed. How? Was it a lawnmower accident? Oh he was killed by a Syrian army sniper. Ok now I get it. Yes that's a "Photograph of the Year"!

Time is in the business of selling human tragedy. This is what they reward. The technical execution of the photograph is secondary.

11 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (Dec 14, 2012)

Yeah, and the tornado and all the Arabs with guns, just what the hell is going on in these pictures?

Wish I read newspapers, I might have got a few of the references.

1 upvote
mpilon
By mpilon (Dec 14, 2012)

Stories and pictures, both can trigger emotions. Whatever it takes to interest you in what's going on outside of your comfort zone is a success. There wouldn't be a story without that picture - at least a story here, in this forum. Compassion is a foreign emotion for those who have it all.

0 upvotes
aris14
By aris14 (Dec 14, 2012)

Old times classic recipes. Unfortunately...

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Dec 15, 2012)

Agreed. The "top photos of 2012" should be able to tell their own story without a caption. The photo of just people crying... could be anywhere in the world about anything. Discard.

0 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (Dec 14, 2012)

Time faithfully continues the old media tradition that nothing livens up the page like a dead body. Read the quote from Kira Pollack at the top.

People have access to other sources of information. Media moguls see that their empires are crumbling, and all they can come up with is more suffering and violence. Pandering to the lowest common denominator. I got rid of my TV years ago because that's pretty much all that networks feed you with, combined with imbecilic soap operas. They can't understand that populace may want more intelligent content, now easily available on the Internet. It scares them because I don't think most of them can understand that content themselves. That's why they're disappearing.

12 upvotes
klopus
By klopus (Dec 14, 2012)

Majority of photos are indeed very strong and emotionally charged. But there’s a problem and it isn’t in an overwhelming number of images depicting tragedies and human suffering. This choice is natural and has nothing to do with “liberal” slant as was mentioned in one of earlier threads. What’s disturbing and indeed reflects bias is double standard in choosing victims based on whose tears and corpses are currently more politically en vogue. Take Syria for example. Are deaths and suffering only on one side? Assad is a damn butcher and tyrant but ragtag bands of guys on the other side are also far from being angels, bear a lot of innocent blood on their hands and aren’t known for valuing human life any higher. Little kid having to bury his father isn’t less deserving of chronicling his tragedy because his dad was on a wrong side of a line between good and evil that Time PC gurus have drawn from the safe distance. Same, even worse, goes for Gaza.

5 upvotes
mpilon
By mpilon (Dec 14, 2012)

Yes, tragedy strikes both sides, that makes tragedy even worse.

0 upvotes
webrunner5
By webrunner5 (Dec 14, 2012)

The older I get the more I think the human race was a mistake. We are just cruel as Hell to each other.

8 upvotes
mauritsvw
By mauritsvw (Dec 15, 2012)

You've got a point.

0 upvotes
Priaptor
By Priaptor (Dec 15, 2012)

webrunner,

I agree, but don't worry, it's almost over. We worry about man made global warming, but man will never make long enough to experience whether the theory was right or wrong.

1 upvote
Tape5
By Tape5 (Dec 14, 2012)

Why do people constantly talk about ''emotion'' in relation to photography? The problem with a pre-occupation with a desire to ''deliver emotional impact'' is that things get a bit cheesy. Because pro photographers will always be only pre-occupied with making more money and fame and winning more prizes than to deliver emotional impact free of charge. So we end up getting lame photographs of emotional impact being delivered to someone else. Art reduced to curiosity and voyeurism. The wounded citizen or Warren Buffett, take your pick.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Jack Simpson
By Jack Simpson (Dec 14, 2012)

Francois Mori says it all with " .... sometimes we don't take photos, we receive them."

5 upvotes
Jack Simpson
By Jack Simpson (Dec 15, 2012)

Thanks "likers" :)

0 upvotes
Paul Storm
By Paul Storm (Dec 14, 2012)

Their criteria was "the pictures that moved us most in 2012". A photographic chick flick. Morally obvious, sentimental and lame.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
PaulBearer
By PaulBearer (Dec 15, 2012)

How very sad for you...

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Dec 14, 2012)

OK, so what would the anti-Time critics pick a the 10 best news photos of the year? Very likely, the images would be other views of disaster, mayhem, rescues, or mourning. When your neighbor is berieved, do you pick a shot of a touchdown pass as "the most memoriable image of 2012"? Or should that image be a sonogram of an expected Royal heir? Images of flags, steeples, and mother? A dwarves' cottage and Bambi by a silver stream?

Good things happened in 2012, surely, but do they allow for imaginative photographic depiction? Will any rank as "important events" after 10 years?

Heavens, think of the temerity if Time ventured to pick a "Camera of the Year"? Oh, the carnage that would ensue!

3 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Dec 14, 2012)

The only thing sadder than the shear amount of mayhem is the notion that this is what it takes to make a memorable picture. Publish these enough and they will be iconic but after enough of these in a row they start to cancel out.

3 upvotes
Ermac
By Ermac (Dec 14, 2012)

Umm the name of the magazine is Time as in these current times. But I agree somewhat, all this shows us is that nothing has changed since humans figured out fire - we like to kill each other and make even more suffer. I do prefer to see them in a row rather than one image of a dead person next to an ad picturing little white kids enjoying their peanut butter.

1 upvote
deleted_081301
By deleted_081301 (Dec 14, 2012)

Its not claimed to be "The 10 best news photos of the year "
its claimed to be "top 10 photos of the year" and they clearly are not that .....

2 upvotes
JohnBee
By JohnBee (Dec 14, 2012)

The execs picking these photo's are clearly attracted to a certain genre of photography. That being said, this may be Times pride and joy, but I've seen far more engaging photography from DPReview members over the year.

3 upvotes
wkay
By wkay (Dec 14, 2012)

of course, it's always third world types in their raw states.. Suzie Sorority in Suburbia will never be newsworthy to Westerners.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Dec 14, 2012)

Not true. The better part of media attention seems to go to female celebrities whose sole significance is that every non-event in their daily agenda becomes an object of gawking and gossip. The people are "newsworthy" because the Suzies and Sams track such celebrities incessantly, vastly dwarfing the amount of attention given to anything else, except perhaps self-improvement, weight loss, apparel, and weather. Knowledge becomes altogether incoherent and sketchy if the topic becomes political, economic, or scientific.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
lds2k
By lds2k (Dec 14, 2012)

I agree with what was said before me
top photojournal images, maybe but certainly not top ten photos for 2012 and yes, nauseatingly politically correct

4 upvotes
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