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Photographer creates time-lapse showing D600 'dust' accumulation

By dpreview staff on Nov 21, 2012 at 20:24 GMT
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Canadian photographer Kyle Clemens just bought a Nikon D600, but rather than get straight out and start shooting with it, he decided to investigate the widely-reported claims of a 'dust problem'. Clements set his D600 up with a fixed 50mm F1.8 lens, pointed it at a white wall, and shot 1000 images. Then he created a timelapse video which shows the slow accumulation of debris on the camera's sensor. Although the exposure of the individual frames isn't uniform, Clements' video clearly shows a steady buildup of debris over the course of shooting the 1000 frames. 

When we reviewed the D600 we expressed concern about the propensity of its sensor to gather specks of debris, and Clements reinforces the troubling possibility that whatever it is that's ending up on the D600's sensor could be coming from inside the camera.

During our own testing, we got our D600's sensor professionally cleaned by a local rental house, who had to resort to a full, 'wet' clean to remove all of the debris that had accumulated during less than a month of shooting. We have repeatedly asked Nikon for a statement on our findings and we will continue to report on this issue.

Via PetaPixel

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Comments

Total comments: 410
1234
Laurence Matson
By Laurence Matson (Nov 26, 2012)

95% of all dust on a sensor comes from the shutter shedding. The solution is to use material that does not shed. This is something we discussed with Sigma, which truly does have a problem with dust, since the imager does not throw away information and blur the rest. Sigma took that seriously and developed a new shutter with new material on the SD14. The dust problem decreased a lot.

Say what you want about Sigma as a whatever company, but they do listen and they have engineers who take problems seriously. Since this change, I have opened up two bodies once each to clean the sensor.

End of story

6 upvotes
Stephan Def
By Stephan Def (Nov 25, 2012)

I think there is quite a huge cultural gap between Japanese Corporations and U.S. customers. As this case once again illustrates. Its fairly ubelievable that Nikon leadership is just shutting-up and thinking that they can silently ride this one out like all the other quality incidents they rode out before this one.

If APPLE had such a problem at the launch with one of their new products then some top brasses head would role, as did happen in the past, for example, with the Iphone 4 antenna problem, for which Mark Papermaster publically got fired. I am sure we would never see someting comparable happen in japan, apparently the clocks still count time very differently there.

My expectation is: at least some qualified statement and a stop-gap solution, like a free but effective cleaning-kit from Nikon. Such a simple measure would go a long ways to patching things up a litlle bit.

3 upvotes
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 25, 2012)

Yet Canon don't seem to have the same issue. The two recent design issues they've encountered (hand grip on 650D and light leak on 5DMkIII) were quickly acknowledged, and fixed.

4 upvotes
Jettatore
By Jettatore (Nov 25, 2012)

I could be wrong, this is just a guess. But if you have one of the models that displays this issue (poster's below with the d600 say their camera has no such issue..) that if you wait a month and call Nikon, they would likely replace the camera for you and you will probably get a newer production run replacement that may or may not have the same issue. Usually customer support for products under warranty that are showing defects is pretty good, at worst a big company from time to time will replace your unit with another faulty unit, but I suspect they will fix this and you'll end up with a fine copy. Again, just a guess, and yes I'd be upset if a new, or even used camera, showed this problem, but I don't think it would deter me too much unless people were saying it's every single copy produced doing the same thing, then I would be slightly more concerned...

0 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (Nov 24, 2012)

You all do not understand this. If you buy a new car, you break in the engine and change oil. So here, shoot a 5000 shots first and then, change the whole shutter mechanism. This will then end with a totally broken in camera.

We might joke on this, but, NIKON, we take this serious.

0 upvotes
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 25, 2012)

Finally someone with the right "can-do" attitude. In keeping with the "breaking in a car" analogy, it would also make sense to only use slow shutter speeds - slower that 1/100 sec or so - for the first 5000.

1 upvote
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 26, 2012)

Drive 5000 miles and change the engine.

0 upvotes
Morpho Hunter
By Morpho Hunter (Nov 24, 2012)

Same here. Over the years, I've owned several Olympus FourThirds and MicroFourThirds cameras and have never found a dust spot on any of my photos. The dust removal mechanism is truely amazing.

1 upvote
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 24, 2012)

I'm not sure it's a matter of a good dust removal system. No dust removal system on a camera works like a wind shield wiper that is required for the D600.

3 upvotes
JoaCHIP
By JoaCHIP (Nov 25, 2012)

Ive been using Fuji S2/S3/S5 Pro for almost a decade (these cameras are based on Nikon bodies), and MOST of my pictures have lots of nasty dust specks on them. The more I close the aperture, the more they show up. It's really a problem, and something that will affect my choice of camera.

I'm rather sceptic about these automatic sensor dust removal mechanisms, as I have yet to see any scientific tests of how efficient they are. Also, the type of dust problem has a great deal to say. Are these oil specks, dry dust or something else?

I think dpreview should do an in-depth analysis and brand comparison on this subject, as it affects a lot of photographers out there.

PS: I broke a Fuji S5 trying to clean it, but I've cleaned my S2 and S3 multiple times with some success. Yeah it's hell! :(

3 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 26, 2012)

>I think dpreview should do an in-depth analysis and brand comparison on this subject

Absolutely! Great suggestion.

1 upvote
BelePhotography
By BelePhotography (Nov 28, 2012)

Actually I had exactly this problem with my Oly E-5 and it's probably not dust. Just as most here I couldn't clean it with air alone, a factory cleaning was necessary (my local dealer had no success either). Anyways it's probably not dust, what I was told is that it is more likely to be some residue or oil from the shutter/mirror. The idea is to grease it enough for it to be long lived but still not so much that this happens. Unfortunately that's a fine line.
btw - the dust removal on the oly really is amazing ;-)

0 upvotes
nofumble
By nofumble (Nov 24, 2012)

Must be one of those units made right after the big flood in Thailand.

1 upvote
Rickyscv
By Rickyscv (Nov 24, 2012)

My money is staying in my pocket. I almost bought one...Nikon has to step up and do better than this.

3 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Nov 24, 2012)

Attention: NIKON

One tiny internet voice here.

Each day you sit on this egg and keep quiet: You Loose BRAND LOYALTY.

You loose customers who WANT, RESPECT and LOVE your products.

Each time a loyal customer walks away: The effect is EXPONENTIAL.

Take courage and: PUT OUT A STATEMENT.

Canon did in their 5DIII light leak and eczema white grips.

Fujifilm did in their magic Orbs.

Apple did in their Uranus Maps accidentally upload on iMaps.

.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
14 upvotes
pwilly
By pwilly (Nov 28, 2012)

Attention readers, Canon troll!

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Nov 28, 2012)

The only trolls here are you and your friends who hijack decent DPR reviews like these.

2 upvotes
tallguy600
By tallguy600 (Nov 24, 2012)

The D600 should have never been rushed to market. Now that we're on this topic and thinking of the Wireless Adapter WU-1b. What a nightmare for a company with an otherwise great image.
That will only happen once to me, there are plenty alternatives and the DSLR in general and a Nikon specifically might not be among them, at least not for me.

2 upvotes
Noogy
By Noogy (Nov 24, 2012)

Good camera, not so good quality control. In the rush to market, there was so much pressure to not airtight some aspects of quality control. There is always an acceptable failure rate every NPI or new product introduction. Any data if this happens to, say, every 3 of 10 units? Don't get me wrong, this should not have gone to market at all in the first place if this was taking place inside the camera.

3 upvotes
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 24, 2012)

This doesn't really look like a quality control issue though. Quality control is more about the occasional dead pixel, loose circuit, dud flash etc. etc. What is happening here seems to be an inbuilt design fault. It's going to mandate a product recall.

7 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Nov 23, 2012)

>Measures to reduce effects of dust or foreign matter are optimized for each model. Therefore, the dust reduction system’s internal mechanism varies with each model. If the effects of dust or foreign matter on photographs become bothersome, customers are encouraged to consult their local Nikon service center
<

a first statement of Nikon . . .

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Kyle Clements
By Kyle Clements (Nov 24, 2012)

When I brought this issue up with Nikon, my response from the Nikon Service center was incredibly prompt, polite, and accommodating.

Can't wait to see how this thing works after the cleaning.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 24, 2012)

Kyle Clements, so every time you pay them for sensor cleaning they like you ?
Or was the service done free under warranty, recognising the factory defect ?

0 upvotes
Kyle Clements
By Kyle Clements (Nov 24, 2012)

It had better be covered under warranty.

The email suggested that I bring the camera in for cleaning and inspection, no need for pre-approval or authorization, they apologize for these problems, they strive to repair all items as quickly as possible, etc.

No mention of charging for this service was mentioned in the email.

1 upvote
Peace On Earth
By Peace On Earth (Nov 23, 2012)

I am so grateful for this post because I have been considering buying my first nikon d600. Coming from canon, I have to buy lenses etc too. Now, wondering if I should buy 6d or wait for D600 to be fixed before I buy one ?

2 upvotes
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 24, 2012)

Don't switch. I've just been through the same process, nearly traded my Canon L series lenses and bought a D600. Instead I bought a 5DMkIII. Never been happier with Canon as a brand.

0 upvotes
Manic Tuesday
By Manic Tuesday (Nov 23, 2012)

There will be several mid to top level management suicides in japan this weekend. and for what? so that someone can obsess over some atomic level imperfections?

was it worth it? was it?

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
1 upvote
BaconBit
By BaconBit (Nov 23, 2012)

What are you even talking about?

5 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 23, 2012)

I have to agree with BaconBit.. What in the world are you talking about?

As far as "obsess" ... How would you feel if your brand new $2000 camera was useless above f8? .. does that seem okay to just live with? ..

does it seem okay to have to wet clean your sensor every 20 photos? ...

NO. .

What would be appropriete is if Nikon would just say "yes we know of the issue and we are looking into it" ... no one is asking Nikon to commit suicide.

jeez.

6 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (Nov 24, 2012)

Both of you have not gotten the sense of what Manic Tuesday said in his comment.

The thing is that Japanese have a different sense of honor and most of them commit suicide if they fail. So, here a fault is shown up, that is a miss-conception issue and those responsible for that design will possibly commit suicide after having to face that truth. It could even lead to larger investment and totally review of the body what costs on the end a fortune to Nikon.

This is some kind a joke, but in Japan, such things are quiet common, and many commit Hara Kiri when they committed a fault and have to admit it. For sure, today some are more civilized and also Japanese admit that faults are normal, just human.

2 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 25, 2012)

guess my heated mind frame for this topic doesn't even allow for jokes. ;P .. but yeah now that you point it out i do get that.

0 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 26, 2012)

We need the capability of flagging our comments as "Ironic," as the case may require.

A "Deranged" flag might help too.

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 23, 2012)

Slightly clueless here, but how/why does the lens aperture have any effect on the visibility of dust/oil spots deposited on the surface of the sensor? This has nothing to do with focus of any sort - not depth of focus nor depth of field. If there are specs of dirt on the sensor, then surely they will be apparent against any uniform exposure of the sensor, much like a contact print of old? I just don't see what the light path has to do with it. What am I missing?
Unless, somehow (? how?) the action of the aperture blades stopping down at each exposure is generating the dirt?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 23, 2012)

I wondered this too when testing my camera, but the dust is definitely more prominent at f8+.

My reasoning is that with a wider aperture that it allow more light to come at an angle to the surface of the sensor. If there is light coming at angles, the dust is less visible. If you force the light more directly at the sensor than the dust will become more obvious. This is my understanding anyway.

2 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 24, 2012)

If the light comes in from all directions, spots obstructing it from reaching the sensor are circumvented, with the light coming in and reaching the affected sensor pixels from the side.

1 upvote
Laszlo13
By Laszlo13 (Nov 24, 2012)

An additional tidbit: dust isn't really on the sensor, but on the AA filter in front of it. This is why at brighter apertures (as mentioned above) light coming from a wider angle / multiple direction can get around the dust spec, but at narrower aperture it's coming head on. If there weren't AA fitlers, or any other filters in front of the sensor, then dust would indeed show up the same at all apertures.

5 upvotes
GarysInSoCal
By GarysInSoCal (Nov 23, 2012)

WOW... well call my D600 a freak... but I've got over 3000 shutter clicks on it since I bought it... zero dust or oil spots anywhere... and I've checked the sensor twice this week. Sorry Canon fanboys... very happy D600 owner here.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Nov 23, 2012)

'm looking up -
still exists the problem

2 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Nov 28, 2012)

GarysInSoCal: "My Nintendo is better than your Playstation" = 7 years old comment.

0 upvotes
Dan DeLion
By Dan DeLion (Nov 23, 2012)

I received my D600 two days after its release (ser. #3007970.) It now has over 4000 exposures and probably 200 to 300 lens changes. There's not one speck of dust on the sensor. I checked it yesterday with the mirror up, a high intensity lamp, and a magnifying glass. Remarkable handling and splendid images. - The camera has already paid for itself several times over! Did this fellow turn his camera on and off (for sensor cleaning) during his thousand exposures?

3 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Nov 23, 2012)

ha, ha, ha -
they need to look better

1 upvote
Kyle Clements
By Kyle Clements (Nov 24, 2012)

Nope. I was using the interval shooting option to make this timelapse.

I did turn the camera on/off after the first 500 shots, and select the sensor cleaning option from the menu, so the sensor went through 3 cleaning cycles in the middle of the video. Didn't seem to make much of a difference, unfortunately.

2 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 24, 2012)

Automatic sensor cleaning does not remove oil.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 24, 2012)

Dan DeLion, you are aware there is no dust involved? It's lubricant from the mirror that creates the dark spots visible on pictures you take.

2 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Nov 28, 2012)

No answer from Dan DeLion of course, he seems to post again and again the same "arguments" like a spammer. I wonder whether he is an immature one who is too limited to understand that OTHER THAN HIM may have problems he doesn't undergo, or if he is a Nikon company guy who has to flood every photo oriented web sites in order to counter-fight the complains that are justified by facts and figures. He doesn't seem to be alone in this case though, just look at all that posts which content is strangely similar: "my is fine" (so no problem for anybody else ! ) and an as repetitive as stupid joke about "Canon fanboys" these clones assume they are the ones who are the unhappiest here... of their brand new D600 ? Let's admire the coherence of these underbrained !!!

1 upvote
turretless
By turretless (Nov 23, 2012)

The funniest part of the video is the advertisement of Bank of Montreal popped up as the conclusion: "Confidence comes with a plan"
I know, I know, the things are different for other regions, but I found it hilarious :)

0 upvotes
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (Nov 23, 2012)

Maybe DPReview should consider suspending the Gold award and changing the camera's score to null, until such time that Nikon feels like responding to its customers and DPReview.

Nikon's shoddy treatment of its customers and any effort by the company to sweep this problem under the carpet should not go unpunished.

8 upvotes
mark murphy
By mark murphy (Nov 24, 2012)

Whilst - I appreciate they do call out the dust issue at the conclusion, it's still a bit strange to then go on and offer a Gold Award.
Hold off the Gold or stick a 'WARNING' label across it.

5 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (Nov 24, 2012)

DPR ratings are a Pain in the a.. anyway. Nothing fair and real, often very partial and brand oriented. To test a D600 it needed a week after issue, for a K30 an eternity. I refer more to the features and different test scaling on the end of a test. The green scales give you a better idea. IQ is the first concern, all other stuff is up to you to see if you need it and if the camera has the commands and controls you need or want. A Sigma DP makes amazing IQ, but is a restricted use item in all the resting fields and it serves to nuts in everything beyond 400 ISO. So, analyze if that fits you or not. There are cameras for all needs and requests. If I want a real test with compares to other brands, I ask Steve Huff to test a certain camera against certain others and in short time after he does, even a P&S against a Leica if the P&S is the most exceptional camera on earth, like the RX series of Sony. Anyone of the both is worth every cent, despite the foolish rating of DPR on RX100.

1 upvote
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 26, 2012)

>Maybe DPReview should consider suspending the Gold award and changing the camera's score to null, until such time that Nikon feels like responding to its customers and DPReview.

Right on target, Lotus. Squeeze their earlobes until they smile.

Get tough, DPR. Please.

1 upvote
Madaboutpix
By Madaboutpix (Nov 23, 2012)

Boy, that's not a tendency I would want my camera to have. This doesn't look like slow accumulation of dust over time, or in challenging environments - all DSLR sensors are more or less prone to that - but, sorry, that D600 sensor seems to be one dust collector! By the way, I'm not trying to bash Nikon over this: I would be equally upset if such a thing had befallen my trusted K-7, which after nearly 7,000 actuations, is beginning to show some dust particles. Which for the most part can be eliminated in PP. But it's time-consuming, and a bit frustrating. Sure, you can clean the sensor, or have it cleaned, but how often are D600 users supposed to do that - once a month? Jeez. C'mon, Nikon, admit that there is an issue. It has happened to others in the industry (Pentax included, that's for sure). Then address the problem, and photographers out there will dig it. Photography is supposed to be fun, right?

2 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Nov 28, 2012)

If the D600 collect so much dust so quickly, that's probably because... it's not dust at all !

1 upvote
digitalanalog
By digitalanalog (Nov 23, 2012)

Large companies' products are getting more and more 'shabby'. Canon, Nikon, Apple - you name it. Looks like they don't care at all - which is probably the truth. It's a shame.

6 upvotes
WaddleWaddle
By WaddleWaddle (Nov 23, 2012)

Hey, don't touch Apple.
I have iPod classic I bought in 2010. I only change vinyl cases every 6 months and it's fine.
I have 2.5 years old Apple MacBook Pro. It is still working, even though doesn't run latest software smoothly. Build quality is good, no issues.

1 upvote
MarkByland
By MarkByland (Nov 23, 2012)

There is no such thing as a perfect company that produces perfect products that will never fail regardless of the situations they are subjected to.

It's a man made product with man made issues.

Whereas I don't agree with Nikon not acknowledging the issue, I definitely disagree more with company bashing in light of the inability to deliver a better, problem-free, perfect product.

It's Earth, we're human, sh*t happens. Just ask every single manufacturer of cars in the history of making cars.

1 upvote
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 23, 2012)

Absolutely true Mark, and if sh*t does happen, particularly if you're a company like Nikon, you should acknowledge it and fix it. Trivialising or ignoring the issue will only serve to alienate people even more.

4 upvotes
BaconBit
By BaconBit (Nov 23, 2012)

How does Apple fall into this category? Apple products have arguably better build quality today than they ever have.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 24, 2012)

BaconBit, why do you think so ?

0 upvotes
castleofargh
By castleofargh (Nov 23, 2012)

many years ago, i don't remember what camera model i had where a little foam part was slowly breaking into dust after being slapped by the mirror a lot of times.

troubles like that are not a new thing nor are they really a huge problem. what is stupid is nikon keeping silence about it.
as a consumer i can forgive mistakes, but i cannot forgive being taken for a fool.
they can make the very best product in the world, if i can't trust them i ll go somewhere else. nikon should understand that very well and come out clean.

4 upvotes
Beach Bum
By Beach Bum (Nov 23, 2012)

It's about time people woke up to the deficiencies within Nikon.

I can't say that I've ever been on the Nikon bandwagon, but my first taste of these deficiencies were when I was considering buying a bridge camera and first tried the Nikon P500. It took me a while to realize what a piece of junk it was, but I eventually realized it couldn't compare to the Sony, Canon, or Panasonic offerings.

Yet, when I read online reviews, they seemed to be giving some kind of deference to Nikon that was clearly unmerited by the quality of their product. It was then that I realized that something wasn't kosher with online reviews, and this type of bias in reviews would threaten the quality of cameras in the future. Apparently the Nikon name opens up a lot of doors that shouldn't be opened.

This is where a forum like this really shows its value. The average person has a voice and can demand some change, without Nikon being able to censor or silence people, like they do on their own site. :)

4 upvotes
dpreviewprov
By dpreviewprov (Nov 23, 2012)

I am sorry to hear about your bad experience with Nikon P500.

However, Nikon does (and have) made many excellent, state-of-the-art and reliable cameras.

Nikon and Hasselblad are among the FEW brands that NASA chose to go to the outer space.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2010/06/14/nikoniss

http://imaging.nikon.com/library/microsite/spacemovie/index.htm

3 upvotes
Beach Bum
By Beach Bum (Nov 23, 2012)

I cannot tell a lie. I've never had a bad experience with a Nikon, because I don't own a Nikon.

However, what I was trying to convey was my eye opening experience that I had a couple years ago. I eventually went with the Sony, BTW.

Since then, I've been studying cameras VERY thoroughly, and I really believe that there's a bias among reviewers toward Nikon. IOW, they get the benefit of the doubt and some extra points just because it is a Nikon.

If I were the more paranoid type, I would think there were monetary factors in these reviews, but I have no evidence to back this up. Just to be clear, I'm not talking about DPReview here, just review sites in general.

Just based on my own hands on testing, there are clearly better camera makers out there, and I'm hoping people wake up to this before these better manufacturers get out of the camera business entirely.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 23, 2012)

well and why nasa uses nikon nobody can say.
maybe nikon payed them for this advertising opportunity... like in the TV series CSI Las Vegas.

and nasa is not free from mistakes.. remember the mars rover mission... LOL

1 upvote
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 23, 2012)

Sorry Nikon boys - the fact that Nikon were "chosen by NASA to go to outer space" really should not have any relevance to anyone here.

Firstly, it was almost certainly nothing to do with camera quality but a commercial transaction, and even if there *were* camera factors particular to the Nikon that were pivotal to the space mission - how many shots in outer space did you take last week?

1 upvote
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 23, 2012)

To compare it with CSI - that is plain daft. The camera in CSI does not actually have to work. I'm quite sure that is pure product placement.
But for NASA, even if 'product placement' was part of it, I'm quite sure no amount of money would ever convince NASA to take an unreliable or sub-par device into space for use by their astronauts.
I don't need to take pictures in outer space for the engineering prowess and reputation of the manufacturer to be relevant.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 23, 2012)

1.So you are saying that if Nikon offered NASA a hundred billion dollars to take a competent, but potentially unreliable camera (like the D600) into outer space, they wouldn't do so - correct?

2. It is intuitive to think "wow outer space! that equates to techno/ruggedness/cutting edge/no-margin-for-error/Houston-we-have-a-problem" but as far as the camera that gets taken along, how valid is this really?

3. But the number of cool Nikons featured on "Dexter" very very nearly had me buying me one. :)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
RPalamara
By RPalamara (Nov 23, 2012)

Just to chime in, NASA would never take one these cameras into space, no matter who manufactures it. Keep in mind that they use CPUs that are a decade+ old because they are reliable. The amount of radiation would destroy a modern processor. They use items that are tested for years and have to be modified to be heavily shielded for missions. Your phone probably has more processing power than the chips they are using currently.

The means that they are not using any current cameras for missions, at least not digital.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
1 upvote
andrewD2
By andrewD2 (Nov 24, 2012)

Really? http://www.dpreview.com/news/2011/11/14/MichaelKonigNASAvideo

1 upvote
Gosman
By Gosman (Nov 23, 2012)

We have been through all of this with the D800 on the left focusing issue. They continue to deny that too. So it doesn't surprise me one bit that Nikon is staying silent on this quality issue too.

2 upvotes
K10D
By K10D (Nov 23, 2012)

Nikon are not denying the problem, my local service centre in Perth, WA are well aware of the issue and have a fix.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 23, 2012)

That's great, K10D, what is the address of the service center and how do they fix it ?

0 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Nov 28, 2012)

The Nikon center know, doesn't deny the problem but all in all, it does not equal to "we are on the verge of doing something". No ! Not even posting a reassuring message on their sites ! That's a work too demanding for the yellow brand which has better to do elsewhere: working for the NASA in order to prove their cameras are the best ones on earth, for instance ?

0 upvotes
narddogg81
By narddogg81 (Nov 23, 2012)

we have lots of white wall f22 shooters, i guess. i had some specs on my d600, i cleaned them off and moved on with my life.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 23, 2012)

well you have no clue at all .... that is the problem.

try sunburst images with this dirty POS camera.....

but for nikon fanboys this is ok.. i know.

4 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 26, 2012)

My wall is caked with oily dust. Could that be the problem?

0 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Nov 28, 2012)

[...] i cleaned them off and moved on with my life.

No, you don't, you're writing on web site that YOU don't have a problem to people who HAVE a very big problem with their hard-earned money paid D600. What's next ? Posting on a health-oriented website to tell cancer-patients that YOU are OK ? Do you think the "don't worry, be happy" attitude is a mature one ?

0 upvotes
J2Gphoto
By J2Gphoto (Nov 23, 2012)

I have never had any dust on any of my Olympus sensors, and I was never careful changing lenses inside or outside. Never a speck. This is not good.

1 upvote
Pasha001
By Pasha001 (Nov 23, 2012)

4/3 and micro 4/3 are indeed highly immune to dust. It is there but it is almost invisible. I tried to find dust spots on G2 sensor and they show up only after setting an extreme aperture f/22 and bumping up contrast in postprocessing to a really _enormous_ degree. My D7000 is much worse in that respect.

Maybe this is because of a thick sensor cover or because of a different approach to lens design, I don't know.

2 upvotes
dpreviewprov
By dpreviewprov (Nov 23, 2012)

I am not denying the problem.

However, if you shoot with a DSLR, prepare to clean your own sensor at some point.

It is easy enough. Watch here:
http://visibledust.com/page.php?videos=wet&vswabs=1

1 upvote
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Nov 23, 2012)

I expect to have to clean my sensor from time to time but I really wish Nikon sold this with a wet-clean system. Compared to the sot of the camera, it is not a lot of money but a part of me resents having to give the D600 a sponge bath once a week.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 23, 2012)

buy a swiffer....

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Nov 24, 2012)

It says right in the manual cleaning the sensor yourself voids your warranty. It is not part of the normal end user maintenance Nikon is expecting it's customers to do! Nikon will therefore NEVER include a sensor cleaning kit with there cameras.

2 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Nov 23, 2012)

Well, you can't ask for more proof than that. Is anyone aware of Nikon making a statement about this?

4 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 23, 2012)

A Nikon store rep once told me (back on nov 17th i think it was) that he heard Nikon was going to acknowledge it.. but i asked Nikon directly about this, and they didn't confirm either way.

I'm really upset about this... my sensor had corruption on the right side too... red/white/black bands of corrupted data since photo #1.

i kept asking Nikon - how can they confirm they have fixed my dust problem if they won't acknowledge it's a problem that they have a solution for. Again they answered around my question not answering it.

3 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 23, 2012)

they also deleted my review on nikon.com.... twice......

it wasn't rude.. it wasn't inaccurate..

I asked them about that too, and how many other reviews were deleted... again with no real response. It's unbelievable.

10 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 23, 2012)

"they also deleted my review on nikon.com.... twice."
This could amount to conspiracy to defraud.
Maybe someone wants to start a RICO suit ?
Who knows a good lawyer ?

1 upvote
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 23, 2012)

i wrote Nikon today asking them for the highest ranking person i can speak with who won't ignore my questions about this issue since that's what front level support does.. I asked for the CEO if they could offer me his contact. Someone *has* to be responsible here..

I would encourage others to post negative reviews who have experienced the D600 persistent dust/oil or other production issue.... lets see if we can get more negative reviews than positive. If they have to delete 1000+ negative reviews would that get someone's attention?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
naththo
By naththo (Nov 23, 2012)

That doesn't sound too good about deleting your review. Something is not right with Nikon Company. I think they are very embarrassed because they knew too well and they are in trouble now. I think the the consumer affair authorisation should look up and see whether if Nikon had breach the law on these situation and they can put on action against Nikon. We have very strict ACCC in Australia though if they see it they will take action straight away but court proceed can take a long time though. So it is a bit of hectic task. There no need to get lawyer to sue Nikon it won't do a thing. Just get the consumer affair to look at.

1 upvote
Aleksandr Pishchik
By Aleksandr Pishchik (Nov 23, 2012)

What about D800, is there internal dust accumulation as well or not?

1 upvote
Harry L Reid
By Harry L Reid (Nov 23, 2012)

Yep, my D800 is giving me a lot of repeat dust problems even after several wet cleans. I can't seem to clear the dust for any extended period. My trusty D700 is much less problematic regarding dust. So, what's going on Nikon,.respond please.

2 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Nov 23, 2012)

@DPREVIEW Staff - I know you guys said you would post an update in the review to this dust/oil issue, but so far has Nikon basically ignored your statement and questions about it?

That's what they did to me. No matter how obvious i made the questions they would simply not respond directly other than to send my camera in to get looked at. Regardless of other media online, etc etc... It's as if they were trained to not talk about it at all.

I'm just curious what DPREVIEW's response has been so far. I'm surprised it's taken so long to get a response.. I see no reason why they can't say "yes we know of it, and we are looking into it" .. at least that would instill some confidence in the customer base. but no.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
8 upvotes
RPalamara
By RPalamara (Nov 23, 2012)

You do have to take into account that this is thanksgiving week. At least give them to next week to respond.

0 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Nov 23, 2012)

I want a camera that has constantly dust and oil on the sensor?
Nikon pulls the camera back why not worldwide -
and why Nikon is silent???

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Shamael
By Shamael (Nov 24, 2012)

why do you want such a camera? I dont.

0 upvotes
wutsurstyle
By wutsurstyle (Nov 23, 2012)

Would you rather have this or Canon's light leak in Mark 5D III?

1 upvote
Leichhardt
By Leichhardt (Nov 23, 2012)

Definitely the later, as that problem has been solved, and I have a set of Canon lenses

4 upvotes
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 23, 2012)

And the light leak was a misnomer. It was only relevant when shooting literally in the dark, and anyway, has long since been rectified. To Canon's credit, it was also quickly acknowledged.

5 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 23, 2012)

i choose the light leaks as i don´t shoot with the lens cap on.

and wehn i shot at night i don´t expects a correct automatic exposure.... i have to adjust the exposure anyway.

1 upvote
ImageAcquisitions
By ImageAcquisitions (Nov 23, 2012)

It never crossed my mind to consider the D600 when moving from my D700.
I'm glad I didn't have to go that route.

Right now I just got through shooting a product using the D800. Basically handles the same as the D700 but with more megapixels - which you can adjust in the image size menu option if that is too many for any one particular situation.

The camera is basically a small part of the entire operation (lights, pocket wizards, stands, backgrounds, etc.) After a while, and dependent on your application, they all do about the same thing. Video is nice to have, but will rarely see the light of day- or, will inspire me to do those documentaries around town I've been dying to do - like the fact that the rich part of town homeowners don't have sidewalks along their streets.
They also consume the easement with landscaping, as such, making their homes look bigger - indirectly increasing property value.
I'll keep following this D600's poo poo on the sensor issue - ha ha.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Nov 23, 2012)

I would keep the D700 - anyway ;)

0 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Nov 22, 2012)

I remember the endless discussion with the X10 Orbs - ha, ha, ha - Nikon Fanboys

1 upvote
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 23, 2012)

Kudos to DPR for getting Fujifilm to fix that X10 flaw. It took a lot of sandbagging.

Now it's time to drub the tar out of Nikon.

2 upvotes
pixelrazzi
By pixelrazzi (Nov 22, 2012)

I have owned a D600 for about a month and really like it. It has some specks that I found by testing due to talk here at DPreview. I don't want a different camera and I appreciate the scrutinizing it has gone through. This has to be good for us in the long run.
My store will take it back but I will let Nikon respond first. In the past they have taken care of me very well and I am confident they will again. Fact is this is a GREAT camera and that's the reason I haven't returned it and don't want to.

2 upvotes
Lotzy
By Lotzy (Nov 22, 2012)

With this war of cramming as much features as you can in the camera body, has anyone checked if the Nikon guys actually have not built a micro bubble jet printer inside the D600 mirror box? Maybe the black color nozzle is faulty and sprinkles the sensor.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Nov 22, 2012)

Nikon should follow the dust trail to the mirror box mechanism supplier.

They probably followed the trail that leads to their own labs.

Nikon is good at keeping quality. They replaced faulty batteries on the D70 back in 2005 - 2006 for FREE.

But batteries are easier to replace than dirty mirror mechanisms, so this is a very difficult situation.

Keeping quiet doesn't help Nikon one bit.

Each day that they sit on this: brand loyalty is lost.

.

4 upvotes
digitalanalog
By digitalanalog (Nov 22, 2012)

Is the D600 body weather-proof?

Because I suspect this might be caused by beer.

2 upvotes
digitalanalog
By digitalanalog (Nov 22, 2012)

I wonder who's trolling, according to your posts. You're just another smartie with excessive lack of humor.

4 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (Nov 24, 2012)

don't mind, some people have no sense of humor. No wonder that they are stressed if they take all serious.

0 upvotes
VivaLasVegas
By VivaLasVegas (Nov 22, 2012)

Other hard evidence of the reknowned oil&dust sensors from Nikon, it's so good, it crippled the dust cleaning feature.

1 upvote
Vetteran
By Vetteran (Nov 22, 2012)

The F4s (remember that camera) had a mirror box that literally would self-destruct over time. Very small particles of metallic "dust" would accumulate inside the mirror box. Wasn't noticeable on film because film always was replaced after 36 or so shots. So, point is, Nikon has had similar issues in the past. not surprised.

Too bad because I was seriously interested in buying the D600, but I suspect Nikon will not "admit and address the issue" until after the Holiday buying season, if at all.

BTW, I have two D300 since they first came out and have no dust at all.

1 upvote
PanErwin
By PanErwin (Nov 22, 2012)

Cool! Now we need someone to develop an app, so we can replicate that effect for our smartphone cameras!

12 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Nov 22, 2012)

c'mon - Nikon obviously made a mistake here and as it does not happen so often at this scale it clearly makes them a target for jokes and satire. It's normal. Just live with it.

So just stop counting those "Canon trolls". You are the one spamming the whole thread.

8 upvotes
chadley_chad
By chadley_chad (Nov 22, 2012)

@imageacquisions - DP haven't done a full exposé on this as they're too busy reviewing camera phones and iPhone apps!!!

7 upvotes
aris
By aris (Nov 22, 2012)

Canon had a similar issue with the 1Dsmk3 - lubricating oil came loose and went in the sensor. Canon fixed this FOC for all owners.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
rusticus
By rusticus (Nov 22, 2012)

why our clients is such Bullshi sold * ???

1 upvote
ImageAcquisitions
By ImageAcquisitions (Nov 22, 2012)

I'm curious why Dpreview hasn't done a full blown out review on this issue. Especially after seeing this clear example of an issue.
I wonder if:
1. dpreview is handling Nikon with kit gloves to avoid any conflict with them so they can keep getting free equipment to do reviews. Sure, they can talk about the feature differences, but exploring this potentially defective product issue may be what they are contractually not able to do? What did the article say above "Expressed concerns" Asked nikon for a comment? Nice soft approach.
He, do a full blown out review of this particular issue - don't wait for Kyle Clemens to explore it. Use your professional staff, paid no doubt, to do a full blown out investigation of the gear.

2. Nikon isn't ready for a multimillion dollar product recall. All the elements are there for a class action lawsuit against Nikon to a) Stop continually selling the defective product (maximize profits); preying on customers unaware of the situation who buy it anyway.

9 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Nov 22, 2012)

I consider the fact that DPReview posted this video in their news feed proof of exactly the opposite of what you claim.

Go ahead and do your "full blown investigation" on any camera and see how many dust spots you will find shooting white surfaces at f/22 and cranking up the contrast to 800%. You will be surprised what you will see.

6 upvotes
meanwhile
By meanwhile (Nov 22, 2012)

Exactly IA! Why aren't DPReview covering this story? I had to go all the way to DPReview to see this video!

2 upvotes
ImageAcquisitions
By ImageAcquisitions (Nov 23, 2012)

Well, look, there is one thing to build charts and compare and contrast, but to basically do a targeted review highlighting a publicized flaw in the product is a different flavor of a review.
Basically, they will be providing evidence to be filed in the class action lawsuit against Nikon by D600 owners, and the retailers as well who were "told" the camera is good to go.

The video here was done by who? Is that guy affiliated with DPR? Or is he a camera enthusiast.

Once DPR "authors" a position on this, then they'll step up the the critical plate.
That's okay though, because what they don't do, somebody else will - I guess somebody out there will have to carry the man size load when talking about cameras.
You see, DPR is add revenue generated - get the picture?

0 upvotes
RPalamara
By RPalamara (Nov 23, 2012)

Well obviously they posted this new article and are waiting for a response. You do realize that this was posted 2 days ago? If they don't get a response, well then the in depth review would be justified.

0 upvotes
Kyle Clements
By Kyle Clements (Nov 24, 2012)

"The video here was done by who? Is that guy affiliated with DPR? Or is he a camera enthusiast."

I'm just a camera enthusiast.

I didn't even have an account here until I saw that my video was posted.

1 upvote
panos_m
By panos_m (Nov 22, 2012)

OMG!! I can't believe it!! I just checked my D3 and after 10,000 shots without cleaning it has dust on the sensor!! Dust on a FX sensor in an interchangeable lens camera!! Should I return it for a replacement? :).
Here is the proof. My dirty D3 sensor:
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/41964233/panos_11_2012_0001.jpg
Is this enough dirt for you? :)

4 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Nov 22, 2012)

Sorry but if you think this relates in anyway to a video of a NEW camera straight out of the box acquiring oil/dust/whatever it is on it's sensor without changing the lens even once after it was put on, you either lack the ability for logical thinking or are spreading misconceptions about the nature of this issue on purpose.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
17 upvotes
panos_m
By panos_m (Nov 22, 2012)

@Josh152. Even not ILCs acquiring dust. Check for example RX100. What did you expect?

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Nov 22, 2012)

What does that have to do with anything? Every major review site as well as a large camera rental business who had 20 D600 with this issue, I think it was barrow lenses, has found this issue to be true and more than just normal accumulation from use. D700's dont' have this problem, 5D mark IIIs don't, D800s don't ect.

Your rx100 example is laughable since it has a retracting lens which will suck dust in and there are precious few reports of it. You are grasping at straws and making yourself look even more foolish.

6 upvotes
panos_m
By panos_m (Nov 22, 2012)

@Josh152. Ok, you are right. D600 is faulty.

2 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 22, 2012)

if you ask nikon user you can be pretty sure even a complete damaged nikon camera will be "completely fine" for them.

green LCD.. that is a feature, dust.. that´s no problem, completely locked camera (D7000 or was it D5000?)... no problem..... and so on.

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Nov 24, 2012)

@panos_m

I think saying that all D600s are faulty is taking it too far. It is simple a Q.C. issue that appears to not effect every D600 manufactured as some are reporting they have D600s that don't have the problem.

0 upvotes
Daxs
By Daxs (Nov 22, 2012)

Thanks CANON! :)

1 upvote
jtan163
By jtan163 (Nov 22, 2012)

My D7000 seems to be about the same. Clean the sensor and 5 shots later.....spots.

3 upvotes
blaster182
By blaster182 (Nov 22, 2012)

Same issue with my D7000, I first noticed the sensor was dirty after a couple of monets. Seemed to be oil of some sort, definitely came from the camera interior.

I cleaned the sensor regularly with DustAid wet cleaning kit (very recommendable), it was necessary every few shots really. I cleaned the sensor maybe six or seven times, then I finally ended up sending the camera back to Nikon (Germany) through my dealer. They fixed it on warranty and zero spots since April 2012, about 5000 shots later.

I hope you still have warranty on the body!

2 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (Nov 22, 2012)

Still at least you can take Monets, most people here stick to white walls, and cats and dogs. ;-)

3 upvotes
mantra
By mantra (Nov 22, 2012)

my viewfinder is the same !
in short i got sensor and viewfind with a dust collection

1 upvote
blaster182
By blaster182 (Nov 22, 2012)

The Monets in my living room are the best at finding sensor dust, much better than the van Goghs.

Nice typo, I meant *months* of course.

Oil and dust abrasion from the mirror mechanics and motor are a likely source for the repeating sensor spots. I found some fellows on the net with the same issue on their D7000s. I wouldn't be surprised if it happened on some D600s, too.

Of course, some dry dust cannot be avoided on a DSLR, using interchangeable lenses and zoom lenses. I just need the Pentax sensor cleaning kit every few months now against dry dust. Nice tool, easy to use, I can recommend it.

1 upvote
Kyle Clements
By Kyle Clements (Nov 24, 2012)

I've spent a lot of time with a few D7000's and never had an issue with dust or oil spots.
This is precisely what lead me to believe the D600 dust issue was overblown, run out, purchase one, and do this test.

2 upvotes
ivan1973
By ivan1973 (Nov 22, 2012)

I thought there is a build in vibration-based dust removal?

1 upvote
ageha
By ageha (Nov 22, 2012)

Haha, that's a nice one. Do you actually own a DSLR?

0 upvotes
pannumon
By pannumon (Nov 22, 2012)

Sure there is: http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d600/features01.htm (see the second paragraph: Nikon's Integrated Dust Reduction System with Image Sensor Cleaning function).

The problem is that dust removal is not perfect even for dust, and does not help for oil or other liquid/sticky materials.

1 upvote
Armando Peralta
By Armando Peralta (Nov 26, 2012)

Hi. I had similar issue with D800. I am still very happy with the things this camera does, but was very surprised to find dust and several round blobs (oil spots, I guess), after just 1 month of use. There were more spots on the sensor, than any other of my digital cameras have accumulated in years, even when they have been opened, modified, and abused. 18 spots, some easily visible over sky or other uniform subjects.

Since I had been shooting at 3 second intervals for up to one hour for several days, I initially thought that I was demanding too much from the D800, but my D2x was working in parallel under the same conditions and has only 3 small spots.

Carefully cleaned it myself with Sensor Swabs and methanol (it took three swabs). A few days later, made some aerial shots and checked for spots before take-off, but another large particle appeared. It could have spoiled an expensive job (travel, rent, airplane, etc.). I hope someday it will stop shedding particles.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 22, 2012)

i rather buy a dust devil....

1 upvote
yudhir
By yudhir (Nov 22, 2012)

I think D600 is somehow forming tiny worm holes through space and the resulting dust is coming from outer space

11 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Nov 22, 2012)

Even better, I think every dust particle in the D600 forms a cosmic universe on it's own...by that you actually use a wonderful box of big bang theory.

2 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 23, 2012)

Time to get back to that chili recipe thread.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 410
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