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Photographer creates time-lapse showing D600 'dust' accumulation

By dpreview staff on Nov 21, 2012 at 20:24 GMT
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Canadian photographer Kyle Clemens just bought a Nikon D600, but rather than get straight out and start shooting with it, he decided to investigate the widely-reported claims of a 'dust problem'. Clements set his D600 up with a fixed 50mm F1.8 lens, pointed it at a white wall, and shot 1000 images. Then he created a timelapse video which shows the slow accumulation of debris on the camera's sensor. Although the exposure of the individual frames isn't uniform, Clements' video clearly shows a steady buildup of debris over the course of shooting the 1000 frames. 

When we reviewed the D600 we expressed concern about the propensity of its sensor to gather specks of debris, and Clements reinforces the troubling possibility that whatever it is that's ending up on the D600's sensor could be coming from inside the camera.

During our own testing, we got our D600's sensor professionally cleaned by a local rental house, who had to resort to a full, 'wet' clean to remove all of the debris that had accumulated during less than a month of shooting. We have repeatedly asked Nikon for a statement on our findings and we will continue to report on this issue.

Via PetaPixel

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Comments

Total comments: 410
1234
Alex Akai
By Alex Akai (Nov 22, 2012)

I got the D600 too, I have not noticed any dust issue so far. My guess is that since the dust accumulates on the upper left side (actual lower right side of sensor) it is most likely due to the shutter mechanism lubrication (if there is any kind used).If it were dry particles, auto sensor cleaning should have helped. I doubt it's due to mirror since mirror comes down after shutter closed ( I think ?)

2 upvotes
Lotzy
By Lotzy (Nov 22, 2012)

I Am Dalmatian ... I Am The New Nikon D600. I am the DSRL photography made easy with spots.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
6 upvotes
EssexAsh
By EssexAsh (Nov 22, 2012)

cool story bro

1 upvote
pcblade
By pcblade (Nov 22, 2012)

I think that this dust has a "film grain quality". Kudo Nikon !

7 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 23, 2012)

Love that kitty!

0 upvotes
Marc Rogoff
By Marc Rogoff (Nov 22, 2012)

This is not only a D600 problem but apparently the D800 has the same issue. In fact my D3X has terrible dust issues - very frustrating that Olympus seems to have solved the dust issue yet Nikon with all their R&D money cant sort this out...

7 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 22, 2012)

Could you show us some pictures of the dust on the D3x sensor ?
Is it oily too ?

2 upvotes
vagtanklan
By vagtanklan (Nov 22, 2012)

That Olympus have solved the dust issue is news to me, care to elaborate?

2 upvotes
petrocan
By petrocan (Nov 22, 2012)

I don't think Olympus have solved anything, but the fact that the sensor size is smaller it does help I think. I never get dust on my 4/3 camera. And also I rarely close down my lens at more than f8, so it kinda help too. I don't know but I never get dust on picture with 4/3 camera. I have a old 1ds, I get dust all the time :)

2 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (Nov 22, 2012)

Think about the air movement inside a 4/3 camera compared to FF when the mirror and shutter swings and closes.

1 upvote
deep7
By deep7 (Nov 22, 2012)

Olympus were first with a proper dust-removal system in the E1. I had several Olympus DSLR bodies and never once had a dust issue. You just don't think about it with an Olympus. Nothing to do with sensor size (except it is easier to shake a lighter sensor maybe), just good design.

3 upvotes
Boxbrownie
By Boxbrownie (Nov 23, 2012)

Well I consider my studio to be pretty dusty being within an engineering building and I change the lenses on my D3X several times a day and am using apertures smaller than f32 virtually all the time, I have never seen a dust issue on mine, I guess your just unlucky.

1 upvote
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (Nov 22, 2012)

Given that you knew from your own sample and all the other reports, why did you give this a Gold Star?

Surely the construction having been finished to a satisfactory standard ought to count towards the total points?

This has stopped me and at least one other photographer I know from buying one until it's sorted out. I don't pay two-grand to clean oil off the sensor for Gawds sake!

15 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Nov 29, 2012)

They don't give Gold to the best (by far) compact camera, yet give Gold to NOT THE BEST FF camera with serious issues (not only the spots, but also using APS-C AF sensor on a FF camera for cost savings). As they say, their "awards" are subjective, i.e. obviously worth nothing.

0 upvotes
Couscousdelight
By Couscousdelight (Nov 22, 2012)

What append if you don't remove those spots in one or two years ? the oil could dry and become some hard to remove stains ?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
compay
By compay (Nov 22, 2012)

I guess Dpreview has to change the GOLD award into......euhhh....
Wit all the complaints about dust already before the review....they shouldn't have given a gold award at all. All these pixel peeping tests etcetera and then give a gold award while knowing the problem of dust/oil spots.

it's like america having the triple A staus and the greatest debt off all countries.....??????

i guess it's a power...money thing!

17 upvotes
Alex Akai
By Alex Akai (Nov 22, 2012)

This is a quality control issue, not design. I am sure it will be solved in manufacturing process. So the Camera still merits whatever rating it's given to.

3 upvotes
Olibaer
By Olibaer (Nov 22, 2012)

Don't be so sure. Just tested a recently made D7000 which had strong backfocus issues with it's own 18-105mm kit lens. And that's after more than 2 years in production...

2 upvotes
digitalanalog
By digitalanalog (Nov 22, 2012)

''GOLD award has been given to Nikon D600* for outstanding achievements in the new area of DP (Dust Photography). Combine it with the Retina Macbook Pro IR screen issue and results will be astonishing!''

*D600 or Dust 600 = an average number of small particles and other imperfections collected on sensor during an average photo shooting.

3 upvotes
Boxbrownie
By Boxbrownie (Nov 22, 2012)

Maybe somebody needs to do the exact same test but with the mirror locked up (I assume it can be locked?), at least the mirror mechanism could be eliminated as the cause if it still persists.

4 upvotes
nofumble
By nofumble (Nov 22, 2012)

Are they called breaking-in dust ?

0 upvotes
SDPharm
By SDPharm (Nov 22, 2012)

Wait, let me put on my old man hat. There. Remember the good old film days, dust, film scratches were all very common. Sometimes when Santa Ana was blowing and humidity dropped to single digit, you just could not avoid static cling.

But now, thanks to digital botox for photography, aka healing brush, that's a lot easier to deal with during post processing.

1 upvote
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 22, 2012)

It's about more than just the odd spot. A greasy film over the sensor will reduce overall resolution, contrast and clarity too.

2 upvotes
Denis of Whidbey Island
By Denis of Whidbey Island (Nov 22, 2012)

Yup. I can remember several rolls of 220 film shot in a RoundShot Super 220VR rotational camera with a dark streak where dust got caught in the slit aperture. I was not happy when I got home from Paris where this happened and saw the ruined film.

0 upvotes
Spectro
By Spectro (Nov 22, 2012)

The Nikon D600s needs to be out in the beginning of 2013. Funny I asked my local camera shop and they said they sold like 100s and only one guy came back about it, I think that is an understatement. This tolerance of dust is not acceptable, even thought it is more in the extreme case and high sharpening, by the demo; most people won't notice.

0 upvotes
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 22, 2012)

Well really, the D600 itself should've been released in the first quarter of 2013. It's apparent that a few more months of pre-release testing were in order here, that had it happened, would've avoided a lot of heartache for purchasers and Nikon alike.

2 upvotes
Olibaer
By Olibaer (Nov 22, 2012)

That would have been to late for Photokina. All the certainly expensive "shooting movies with the D600" presentations they showed there would have been for nothing...

0 upvotes
WayneDB
By WayneDB (Nov 22, 2012)

Voice your concerns directly to Nikon via:

http://www.change.org/petitions/nikon-nikon-d600-dust-on-sensor

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 22, 2012)

Two things need to happen to make this right.

1. Nikon needs to acknowledge the problem, and look after its existing customers. By all accounts this isn't happening (yet).

2. DP review - the worlds largest and arguably most reputable on-line camera review site, need to acknowledge the seriousness of the issue - at the very least adding a qualifying statement to their otherwise glowing review of this camera. The review as it stands would not deter anyone from buying one right now - and it needs to.

21 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 23, 2012)

I add my Yes to item 2.

0 upvotes
naththo
By naththo (Nov 22, 2012)

Troll (mbrobich) should get a kick in backside. Totally utterly useless comment. You should stick to on topic what is being discussed about. Those dust is very disturbing indeed! Its a major flaw in manufacture the camera of nikon D600. Come on Nikon answer the question to dpreview at once to explain whats going. Anyone who bought D600 deserved to get it return for refund or under warranty. Don't clean it off without any proper done by expert or it void warranty.

5 upvotes
mbrobich
By mbrobich (Nov 22, 2012)

So what, get a swab and clean the damn thing. I can't believe all the babies out there crying about dust or oil spots on all the new Nikon cams. It takes freakin 2 minutes, wipe wipe wipe and your done !!!!!!!!!!!! Wahh wahhh wahhh

7 upvotes
S Severs
By S Severs (Nov 22, 2012)

WARNING - You should be very careful about cleaning your camera sensor. Many companies will void your warranty (including Nikon) if they detect that you have touched the sensor. Follow all instructions provided by the company. Hopefully Nikon will address this problem satisfactorily.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
22 upvotes
naththo
By naththo (Nov 22, 2012)

S Severs totally correct! I agreed with you.

1 upvote
Newbs
By Newbs (Nov 22, 2012)

mbrobich agree with you, but if it worse than normal compared with other DSLRs people have a right to concern. Having said that my D600 has been fine, the only dust I got after changing lens just was easly removed with a blower.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
photo perzon
By photo perzon (Nov 22, 2012)

Time for a quality control engineer to get fired. Revision A bummer.

3 upvotes
RStyga
By RStyga (Nov 22, 2012)

It reminds me a certain Panasonic-Leica lens model with debris around the back of the periphery of the front element... 2-3 copies with the same issue... Nikon will lose sales out of this issue, for sure. It's what Canon would hope to allow enough time for 6D to hit the market.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Nov 29, 2012)

Which PanaLeica?

0 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

I think this accumulation should be termed "schmutz" rather than "dust."

0 upvotes
maxnimo
By maxnimo (Nov 22, 2012)

If there's plastic in there, then you have potential problems. Plastic has a nasty tendency to outgas plastic molecules, and can also become unstable with time, either cracking into tiny pieces or turning to a sticky jell. If the manufacturing process is just a bit off, even a stable plastic can come out unstable, leading to degradation.

0 upvotes
CNY_AP
By CNY_AP (Nov 22, 2012)

Maybe the factory cheated and used cheap thin oil inside the camera that "flings".

2 upvotes
MikeFairbanks
By MikeFairbanks (Nov 22, 2012)

They'll get it fixed. But it is a bummer. On a related note, why would anyone argue for or against Nikon/Canon? They both make excellent gear. Neither can claim superiority in general. That's just silly.

1 upvote
Gasman66
By Gasman66 (Nov 22, 2012)

Actually I think they can. I've spent more time than is healthy over the last six months examining the relative merits of each brand, as I was upgrading and evaluating whether to switch. I opted for the manufacturer that produces solid, good "all round" bodies throughout the range and also has a lens lineup that isn't a shambles for the sake of maintaining compatability back to 1971.

0 upvotes
RobG67
By RobG67 (Nov 22, 2012)

Whinge, whinge, whine, whine.

If you really want something to complain about, try being blind, or homeless, or living in a refugee camp in Africa.

Accept that things ain't perfect, deal with it and move on.

Maybe the 'dust' ia actually stray pixels falling off that over-stuffed sensor...

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

No substantive gravamen here.

1 upvote
naththo
By naththo (Nov 22, 2012)

TROLL ALERT!

5 upvotes
pepelegal
By pepelegal (Nov 22, 2012)

I don't think this is a design issue, more a manufacturing one. Maybe they have opened a new factory in a dusty country somewhere to make the D600, and they all got assembled it in a less-than-clean room.

Would be interesting to see if the in-camera clean would do to all this dust or whatever it is. It would only take one second to find out .

But anyway, this is not the point. I like everyone else would expect the camera to show no dust build-up as long as the lenses are on. Obviously it has to do with all the physical movements inside the camera every time a shot is taken. It makes me think that these "mechanical" DSLR are more and more a thing of the past.

0 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

>Maybe they have opened a new factory in a dusty country somewhere

Might that be China?

0 upvotes
roombarobot
By roombarobot (Nov 22, 2012)

The in-camera clean did not remove my spots, not at all. The camera came with a couple of dust spots, which I eventually got off with several blower blasts. Now after just 200 pictures... More dust.

That isn't normal. People who are saying this is normal, do not own this camera and don't really know what they are talking about. Do you have to clean your sensor every 200 shots??

2 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Nov 22, 2012)

Fortunately, I drive by the Nikon service center everyday.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 22, 2012)

And now, for a limited time only, sign-up for a daily drive by sensor cleaning contract, full year service for less then the cost of the camera :-)

Of course you will have to sign an NDA.

1 upvote
Pixel Judge
By Pixel Judge (Nov 22, 2012)

Thank Kyle for investigate this issue.
I would've expected DPReview to do this instead.

3 upvotes
sebastian huvenaars
By sebastian huvenaars (Nov 22, 2012)

But still,

credits to DPR for publishing this little investigation on their front page. I would have probably missed it otherwise, along with many others i guess.

3 upvotes
Retzius
By Retzius (Nov 22, 2012)

I noticed that my car gets dirty between washings. I made a time lapse video to document it. I called Toyota and told them about the issue but so far no reply. Ill continue to report on the issue as more information comes in.

3 upvotes
sebastian huvenaars
By sebastian huvenaars (Nov 22, 2012)

A better comparison would be when the cilinders in your new car kept collecting engine particles...

6 upvotes
pepelegal
By pepelegal (Nov 22, 2012)

With all respect, not the same thing

2 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

I noticed that my hide collects dust particles. I wash these off with drinking water.

1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Nov 22, 2012)

Its more like every time you start your car it sprays oil/particulates on to the windshield. This is not from normal use. Did you watch the video? He put one lens on the camera straight out of the box and left it on for the whole test. The stuff on the sensor is coming form INSIDE the camera. Not to mention the exterior of a car is designed to be a user cleanable part but a camera sensor is not. Doing so voids your warranty. So cleaning it your self is NOT part of the normal end user maintenance of the camera as far as Nikon is concerned.

So for this dust/oil/whatever accumulation to be normal it would mean Nikon intentionally made the camera so that you had to have the sensor cleaned by a service center every time you used it. Some people just don't have their thinking caps on about this issue.

1 upvote
Retzius
By Retzius (Nov 22, 2012)

welcome to the world of FX sensors. Yes they are bigger and get dusty. You clean it. Yay problem solved.

3 upvotes
WellyNZ
By WellyNZ (Nov 22, 2012)

What?! Would you expect the sensor to acquire dust when the lens is attached to the camera?! Sure, the sensors are bigger and get dusty but clearly there is a problem here, Tex!

5 upvotes
David0X
By David0X (Nov 22, 2012)

Come on - I've been changing lenses on my D700 for five yrs and no no dust. This D600 thing is different.

7 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (Nov 22, 2012)

Surely a smaller DX sensor would collect more dust as the area is smaller and whatever is coming in will be more concentrated.

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Nov 22, 2012)

Wow Retzius it is clear from your comments on this issue you have NO idea what you are talking about and are just blindly defending the camera.

0 upvotes
loe54
By loe54 (Nov 23, 2012)

Did anyone of you ever shoot with film? Now that was fun........

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Nov 29, 2012)

Now imagine this dust on a typical 1/2.33" P&S sensor. It would cover it all! :)

0 upvotes
GPW
By GPW (Nov 21, 2012)

The D600's front panel is made of plastic, It's plastic particles

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Nov 21, 2012)

Man, this D600 sounds like some old cars I've had.
Radiator leaked on one and I had to check and top it up between trips.
Difference is these cameras are new and from a manufacturer that has been making working mirror boxes for 40 years, yet they still deny fault.
Feel sorry for owners who have to keep cleaning their sensors.

12 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (Nov 21, 2012)

a quote from young Kyle's blog:

Kyle Clements said at 12:13 am on November 21st, 2012:

"I kind of set this up to be as unfair to the D600 as possible – to make any speck as visible as I possibly could.
In normal shooting conditions, these dust specks are more-or-less invisible. I don’t see a thing in my normal shots; it’s only when the lens is stopped down and I am shooting at a bright flat surface that the dust issue becomes apparent.
Don’t give up on the D600 because of this, just wait for Nikon to correct this minor design flaw in future runs, then you’ll have a great full frame camera. (at this point, the camera will be older and likely cheaper, too…)"

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
DWR0082
By DWR0082 (Nov 22, 2012)

But if they don't acknowledge the issue how can we know when it's been remedied?

1 upvote
KitHB
By KitHB (Nov 21, 2012)

At least this is fixable. I can't say I miss having to retouch film and prints with a Cotman 0000 paintbrush. Although retouching Kate Moss was kinda fun, even if it was on the Mac.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Princess Leia
By Princess Leia (Nov 21, 2012)

Whoa, Canon has a lot of catching up to do designing a DSLR with vacuum cleaner. Does D600 camera comes with HEPA filter?

1 upvote
mauijohn
By mauijohn (Nov 22, 2012)

Nope it doesn't come with HEPA filter, but it comes with mini vac, free.

0 upvotes
KitHB
By KitHB (Nov 21, 2012)

Thanks for doing that, smart approach to investigating the problem.

Looking at 0:43 to 0:51. Is that more like a liquid condensing than a lump of something getting sputtered on the sensor? As it's a time lapse we can imagine a slow deposit forming in each blob between shots and some of them appear to get bigger over time.

Maybe there's a volatile oil or similar, so it's evaporating from a nearby part and re-condensing on the sensor, rather than being slung around by the shutter or mirror assemblies. We'd then expect to find other (non-sensor) surfaces where the offending liquid would condense inside the camera too. Then Nikon change it to something with a lower volatility which won't evaporate.

We could test this with DP readers. Do people who DON'T get this happen to use their cameras in cold places?
And can we expect a DP Challenge for artistic pics of "Sensor crud"

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
sebastian huvenaars
By sebastian huvenaars (Nov 21, 2012)

Well this will kick up some dust...

(tadumtsshhhh)

4 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 21, 2012)

The worldwide corporate culture of secrecy, coverup, arrogance and contempt for their customers is astounding. No wonder they swamp these boards with bullying shills if they don't even talk with us about such defects. It's obvious they prefer selling defective cameras and destroying their brand's image over serving happy customers.

Why would anyone write about "dust", seeing the spraying, liquid nature of the dots, if not to minimise the PR damage?

"they totally ignored my letter that asked them to clean the excess oil from the mirror box. I even called them 3 times while the camera was in the shop and instructed them to clean the excess oil out of the mirror box. It obviously fell on deaf ears. I will have to keep wet cleaning my sensor."
Nikon D7000 oil on sensor 2011
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/38678387

The only reason they get away with such repeated gross negligence over years is because customers are still too nice and not all sending their defective products back.

12 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

Great post!

1 upvote
Octane
By Octane (Nov 22, 2012)

They get away with it, because the majority of people doesn't shoot a plane white surface at f/22 and then increases the contrast to 600% on each photo.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 21, 2012)

What can I say.... DSLR shooters frequently get it from the short, nasty end of the stick, it seems. This time the all-time garbage-cam is a Nikon. Hard to believe they can just dump garbage like this on the hapless consumers, and this is actually from a so-called "name" manufacturer, wow.

This garbage-generating Nikon D600 is actually so full of garbage, it creates its own garbage internally!

Feeling so sorry for the ones who happened to have gotten this reverse dust vacuum turkey. Hopefully some lawyers are reading the link and are lining up a nice class action lawsuit against Nikon-san. Damned thing must have a miniaturized dust grinder inside it or something, huh?

6 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 21, 2012)

the dpreview troll enters the ring.. get the popcorn....

more trolling.... more fun.....

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

Give 'em heck, Francis. You're dead on target.

1 upvote
Nukunukoo
By Nukunukoo (Nov 22, 2012)

If the class action suit results in getting several free Nikon lenses of your choice, then I'm buying a D600...

1 upvote
WT21
By WT21 (Nov 21, 2012)

Anyone run a similar test on other FF DSLRs, just to compare?

2 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 21, 2012)

why would someone?

with the D600 it´s so obvious that everbody noticed it.
this test only shows how quick it happens

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 21, 2012)

as my niece would say: epic fail....

eat that dust you nikon fanboys.... haha

10 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Nov 22, 2012)

I would eat dust, but I'm too busy gluing my mirror back onto my 5D.

5 upvotes
pdnaia
By pdnaia (Nov 22, 2012)

Thanks LarryK, I paid 2k for it, i hardly find Henry's comment funny... but yours is ... lol

4 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

>busy gluing my mirror back

Have you tried black tape?

5 upvotes
Sam_Oslo
By Sam_Oslo (Nov 21, 2012)

WOW, that was a big mess.
Why does he call it "dust"? This term is usually associates with dirt coming from outside when you change lens. That mess is some kind of internal particles flowing around inside the camera. Maybe we should call it "mess"?

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 21, 2012)

Better check the specs on that miniaturized coffee grinder that Nikon cleverly incorporated into the D600's body. Talk about "stealth technology," ayyayay!

3 upvotes
QuarterToDoom
By QuarterToDoom (Nov 21, 2012)

Wow usually you see Olympus get the lynch mob treatment but seems this story has turned the Canon lynch mob onto Nikon.

1 upvote
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Nov 21, 2012)

well you have to give something back..... after the light-leak- nikon-mob i feel obligated.

8 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 21, 2012)

Don't own a Canon or a Nikon, plus Oly has got nothing to do with this whatsoever. I am sympathizing with the ones who have gotten themselves one of these totally faulty D600s, however. You probably call that 'lynching' or whatever.

3 upvotes
Apewithacamera
By Apewithacamera (Nov 21, 2012)

LOL

2 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Nov 21, 2012)

i think it is fair to say.... the only good in nikon cameras these days is the sony sensor.

30 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 21, 2012)

+1

2 upvotes
Abraxx
By Abraxx (Nov 22, 2012)

+1

1 upvote
Lift Off
By Lift Off (Nov 21, 2012)

I actually mentioned doing this about a week ago.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3335920

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Nov 21, 2012)

you either get a swiffer with a new D600.. or 400 euro for cleaning the camera in the warranty periode.

after that you have to pay....

LOL

2 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Nov 22, 2012)

Wikipedia --

Swiffer is a line of cleaning products by Procter and Gamble and Michael Rand. Introduced in 1999, the brand uses the "razor-and-blades business model"; in this case, the consumer purchases the handle assembly at a low price, but must continue to purchase replacement refills and pads over the life of the product.

[I recently parachuted in from a distant planet.]

1 upvote
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Nov 21, 2012)

Dusty 600... im a vacuum cleaner

3 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Nov 21, 2012)

In the time of the D100 and D70 I really cleaned my camera's once in a while with a vacuum cleaner, holding the camera upside down and the hose close in front of the lens mount. It does work well.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Nov 22, 2012)

Watch out, vacuum cleaners can create electric discharges.

0 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Nov 21, 2012)

In the video example you see that dust is gathering at one part of the sensor. It's also dust/tiny particles and no oil spots.

And if it's building itself up after usage it has a relation with the camera operation itself (dust is somewhere stuck behind (falls on at the right side), and who knows where it is coming from. Camera/mirror shake gets it loose/from somewhere behind.

This not happening with my D800, I do use the D800 now for 9 months and of course there is dust on the sensor so now and then but in no way comparable as the D600 user shows in his video.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 21, 2012)

Nikon seems to generate the dust internally. With many other brands of cameras, most of the dust comes inside the body from the outside environment. That is a bigger difference to me than your D600 vs. D800 example.

1 upvote
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Nov 21, 2012)

@Francis.

What I meant to say, it's not internally generated, it's internally already there. Due to operation it comes loose.

What I also hope with this, is that it is a problem which will disappear after a certain time of using.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Nov 21, 2012)

I'm not a nikon user, but wouldn't a FF 24Mp Nikon D600 simply highlight dust due to its higher resolving power, where a meager DX 6Mp Nikon D70 wouldn't ever resolve, even if the dust were just as proliferous (same as before, but impossible to detect due to dust spots being smaller than the sensor can highlight)? had to point this out, as it may play a partial role in making folks notice 'resolved' dust where it wouldn't be before unless it was 'giant' dust intruding into the system from outside.

otherwise, on the whole, yes, the D600 probably is mfr'd under new compromised conditions, or compromised designed components, so, that's not good, as new mfr processes should improve over time rather than get worse (higher sensor resolution notwithstanding).

my 20Mp FF 5DMkII never experienced any dust whatsoever, and i was testing long term 'no lens changes' keeping my favorite 24mm prime on it, thus sealed from day-one, just to see how it fared over time.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
QuarterToDoom
By QuarterToDoom (Nov 21, 2012)

My D30 not 30D highlighted dust spots just fine with 3.1 MP. My E-1 in 8 years never had a spot of dust ever and I never paid attention when changing lenses. Go Olympus go... I expect the same from my E-5 for the next 8 years.

2 upvotes
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (Nov 21, 2012)

I am a Nikon user and to give you very short answer to your "resolving theory"....
And answer is NO, you can see dust on any sensor no matter how many Mpix it has.

6 upvotes
topstuff
By topstuff (Nov 21, 2012)

Holding the Canon 5D2 up as a shining example is not very clever - there is quite well documented evidence that early adopters of the 5D2 had problems with dusty and dirty cameras out of the box.

That's not to excuse Nikon, who seem to have a problem on their hands, but it would be disingenuous of Canon users to hit Canon too hard.

After all, Canon have had their moments too. 1D3 AF recalls, remember them?

2 upvotes
Cartagena Photo
By Cartagena Photo (Nov 21, 2012)

Amazing. Here are more dust than I have ever had in my SONY alpha 900 in the last 4 years.

There must be a problem with the camera. Maybe Nikon cut too deep in the engineering and manufacturing budget for this camera.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
intensity studios
By intensity studios (Nov 21, 2012)

UNLEASH THE CANON TROLLS...

5 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Nov 21, 2012)

Oh i think it's the Nikon users who are bothered by this more than anyone, and trolling about it plenty themselves. Nevertheless the D600 is still on my wishlist, guess i'll have to be patient a bit more.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 21, 2012)

Spoken like a true studio troll.

0 upvotes
Tom Goodman
By Tom Goodman (Nov 21, 2012)

We can always count on users of rival manufacturers to weigh in on something they know absolutely nothing about nor can contribute to understanding. Then, there are the speculators, who would rather spend time postulating about the sources of dust than on the images they make. Finally, there is the contingent that condemns review conclusions and ratings that noted the problem, promised more investigation and is making good on that promise.

Oh, and then there are the people who say to themselves: Nikon is a fairly well-established company that would probably be interested in getting to the bottom of a problem accompanying the launch of a new, touted system as quickly and professionally as possible without prompting from the peanut gallery.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 21, 2012)

Tom, for how long have you been employed by the Mighty Nikon-san, if we may be as bold as to ask?

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Nov 21, 2012)

Tom Goodman wrote - 'users of rival manufacturers...something they know absolutely nothing about'
Are you implying that an SLR user of another brand would not be somewhat experienced with the notion mirror slaps and sensor dust?

'who would rather spend time postulating about the sources of dust than on the images they make'
Please tell me you would happily pay $2000+ for this camera considering what you know now. Imagine shooting a whole bunch of time lapse stuff and then realizing you have to clean every frame in post.

'Nikon is a fairly well-established company that would probably be interested in getting to the bottom of a problem'
They have denied it being a fault so far, right?

'quickly and professionally as possible without prompting from the peanut gallery'
The 'peanut gallery' has chimed in purely because Nikon has done nothing quickly and professionally about this.

In summary:
Do you even know what you are talking about?

3 upvotes
Tom Goodman
By Tom Goodman (Nov 22, 2012)

Oh, gee, you've outed me. I have worked for Nikon for three weeks now

1 upvote
Tom Goodman
By Tom Goodman (Nov 22, 2012)

Fmian: Thanks for your unsubstantiated rant. The D600 has been out a short time and it's quite clear to you Nikon has already said "screw you" to anyone who has purchased or is considering purchasing the camera. Maybe YOU work for a camera company!

1 upvote
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