Previous news story    Next news story

Coming soon: Lens Reviews to return to dpreview.com

By dpreview staff on Oct 2, 2012 at 16:00 GMT

We're incredibly pleased to announce the imminent return of lens reviews to dpreview.com thanks to a joint venture with DXO Labs, involving the establishment of a dedicated DxO lens and camera testing facility in Seattle, and the incorporation of DxO test data into dpreview.com’s class-leading lens reviews. We're currently ironing out the last few bugs in the system, and hope to publish the first review later this week.

We launched lens reviews back in 2008 and they were an immediate hit, gaining praise for the unique user-friendly presentation of complex data via a patented test data widget, supported by numerous real-world sample images and expert commentary. Logistical issues put the lens reviews on an extended hiatus in late 2010, and the new venture with DxO Labs not only ensures the return of lens reviews to dpreview.com, but allows more of them to be produced, more quickly.

We're currently putting the finishing touches to a completely re-written version of our lens widget, which will use DXO data and present it in a familiar format.

The new lab is now fully operational, and we expect to publish the first review within the next week or so. The popular lens review data widget has been entirely re-written to allow dpreview.com’s visitors to visualize the test results from the new lab and compare lenses just as they could before. Dpreview.com’s highly respected lens expert, Andy Westlake, will once again produce the lens reviews.

As part of the joint venture agreement the test results obtained will also be made available on DxO Mark website (www.dxomark.com). DxO Labs and dpreview.com will also be collaborating on the testing of digital cameras with a view to adding even more valuable image quality information to dpreview.com’s legendary in-depth reviews.

'We are very happy to provide dpreview with our measurement technology for testing cameras and lenses' said DxO Labs CEO Jerome Meniere. 'Dpreview’s articulate and creative writing style makes difficult photography concepts accessible to even the most novices of photographers – they are a perfect complement to DxOMark’s scientific measures.'

Simon: Producing the data for lens reviews in an incredibly long-winded process requiring a large, dedicated studio and hundreds, sometimes thousands of high precision exposures and measurements. The establishment of a dedicated DxO Labs lens and camera testing facility on our doorstep allows us to entrust the measurement and studio testing of lenses to an established world leader in image quality analysis, and to work with its team to offer our readers the perfect combination of accurate, consistent measurements with real-world shooting experience and expert analysis.

Comments

Total comments: 275
123
cpvniii
By cpvniii (Apr 14, 2013)

Why are Canon shooter's so defensive?

0 upvotes
candleJack
By candleJack (Oct 22, 2012)

3 weeks after the announcement and that "later this week" review is yet to hit the stands.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 10, 2012)

DXO is absolutely useless as a decision making instrument.

nobody would buy the excellent EF 70-200mm f2,8 IS II when looking at the DXO results.

their testresults/conclusions are crap.....

0 upvotes
allkar
By allkar (Oct 8, 2012)

I think, cooperation with DXO is a step back for this page.
DXO's reviews of the optics, (above all ranking) are often misleading for the user and potential buyers.
There are better alternatives on the market.

1 upvote
Renzokuken
By Renzokuken (Oct 6, 2012)

just hope photozone don't follow suite on this one

the number of trusted and reliable lens/camera review sites are dwindling.

And just to quote:

"You need to grow a pair...of eyes if you think the D600 sensor is better than the 80 megapixel Phase One IQ180, but DXO says the D600 ranks higher so it must be true ;-)"

exactly roustabout66 !!!

0 upvotes
zapatista
By zapatista (Oct 6, 2012)

The DXO sensor tri-area scores do make some sense, but the lens "reviews" from them have been pretty much garbage.

3 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Oct 5, 2012)

EW...and with news, I stop paying any attention to DPR's lens reviews. Thanks for the heads up!

Btw, DX0's ratings exist purely to create buzz for their software. At one point, their licensing validation software amounted to a root kit. Remember that? It's not good software. Maybe they're changed their ways and gone more honest, but it would take a lot to convince me to take a risk after being bitten by a company like that.

DPR, I appreciate that lens testing is hard work, but I would personally prefer to see you gather your own data, even if it is slow going. Or at least I'd prefer that to anything to do with DX0.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JohanCruyff
By JohanCruyff (Oct 4, 2012)

I tend to trust the reviews I read on Photozone, The Digital Picture and the ones from Amazon non professional users more than DXO's ones, at least with refernce to Lenses reviews.

Maybe the "merger" between DPReview and DXO will lead to something more useful for customers. We'll see.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
creeker
By creeker (Oct 4, 2012)

I always found that my lens performed very closely to what DXO reviews have shown. I'm certainly not going to give credibility to an Amazon user that wouldn't know a good image if it hit him in the head.

5 upvotes
Denis James Evans
By Denis James Evans (Oct 4, 2012)

Dxo is hopelessly pro Nikon. You cannot trust anything they review.

3 upvotes
creeker
By creeker (Oct 4, 2012)

Rubbish

6 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Oct 5, 2012)

DX0 is pro DX0. That is all. They are just selling software. Really janky, slow software. There "sensor reviews" and lens data are just a marketing ploy.

I guess I'm not against effective marketing per se, but DX0 is just not terribly good.

1 upvote
The A-Team
By The A-Team (Oct 4, 2012)

Great news! I was wondering what happened to the lens reviews. Canon 50mm 1.2L review please!

2 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 10, 2012)

it´s canon so its worse then a beer bottle.... at least in DXO tests.....

0 upvotes
ruicarv79
By ruicarv79 (Oct 4, 2012)

Good news!

2 upvotes
jeff_006
By jeff_006 (Oct 4, 2012)

I like very much the dpr user-friendly presentation of lens measurements and comparison tool with focal and aperture selection. This is really better than on dxo website...

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
emircruz
By emircruz (Oct 4, 2012)

yeah, the same dxo that cant release the e-m5 sensor results because... well your guess is as good as mine.

3 upvotes
tireur
By tireur (Oct 4, 2012)

Rubbish: look at their site first before posting: http://www.dxomark.com/

5 upvotes
novice7
By novice7 (Oct 4, 2012)

They'd been delaying the e-m5 results for a long long time:
"For the OM-D EM-5 review, the lab is working on it but noticed some surprising measures and is analyzing the root cause."

Then when it was all known that the e-m5 uses a Sony sensor, they published the results right after.

DxO is bought, and it's well known.

2 upvotes
creeker
By creeker (Oct 4, 2012)

As your user name implies, "novice". Bought?? well known by who you? Maybe you can post some real evidence to prove your slanderous claim they are bought. What did they do, give one of your loved lens a low rating.

3 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Oct 4, 2012)

A pretty novice statement :D

I guess if Olympus had not cheated on the ISO claims (iso 6000 being actually 3000 and so on), DxO wouldn't have had to lose time to get to the root of the "surprizing measures".

2 upvotes
Jinks81
By Jinks81 (Oct 6, 2012)

@goblin - You are totally right. I am sure DxO didn't find any "surprizing measures" when Nikon ISO 6400 is actually 4500 or Sony ISO 6400 is also not even 5000. Same with Canon too! Wow! Only Olympus "cheats!" This "cheat" was only brought up when E-M5 was released. How convenient.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Denis James Evans
By Denis James Evans (Oct 3, 2012)

Keep dxo's biases out of the camera reviews. If dxo has any influence in the camera reviews, I will never visit this site again. Dxo is a blight on the industry!

5 upvotes
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Oct 3, 2012)

It seems quite obvious from comments by Simon that DXO will be playing an ever increasing role at DPreview...unfortunately

3 upvotes
tireur
By tireur (Oct 4, 2012)

Rubbish, look at their site first before posting: http://www.dxomark.com

4 upvotes
MichaelEchos
By MichaelEchos (Oct 4, 2012)

lol. You're the one who's biased.

2 upvotes
do7slash
By do7slash (Oct 4, 2012)

just because Canon can't match Nikon's sensors means you think DxO is biased?

My god, grow a pair...

2 upvotes
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Oct 4, 2012)

You need to grow a pair...of eyes if you think the D600 sensor is better than the 80 megapixel Phase One IQ180, but DXO says the D600 ranks higher so it must be true ;-)

5 upvotes
creeker
By creeker (Oct 4, 2012)

Yep it is true

1 upvote
Simon Joinson
By Simon Joinson (Oct 4, 2012)

'It seems quite obvious from comments by Simon that DXO will be playing an ever increasing role at DPreview...unfortunately' - not true at all. We may use some of their raw data (emphatically not their scores) to add to areas we don't currently review (such as raw DR)

0 upvotes
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Oct 4, 2012)

That is great news! I was referring to a reply you gave to a request to incorporate DXO into camera tests and I guess I read more into your response than there was. I have been reading DPReview since about 2004 (although only recently as a registered member) and consider it one of my favorite photography sites. I would hate to see it diminished as an information source.

Thanks

1 upvote
MAubrey
By MAubrey (Oct 8, 2012)

@roustabout66

If you look at the actual measurements, rather than the total score you might realize that their rating is more complicated than "Oh, Nikon got 94 and Phase One only got 91 so everything is rubbish."

0 upvotes
06m1r3m86
By 06m1r3m86 (Oct 3, 2012)

I knew that no lens reviews had been posted in a while, but I never knew they were on indefinite hiatus. Good to see them back, there are quite a few lenses I'd like to see tested.
I did notice on the old testing regimen that you picked a mount for a lens like a Sigma and didn't test it on any other mounts. Personally I'd like to see some results for multiple mounts with third-party lenses. Also, I think that a standardized camera level should be chosen, and kept over a period of time, for instance Canon's 5Dmk 3 and Nikon's D600 (I chose those two because their pixel counts were similar and therefor should return more closely related results than the D800)or a 1Dx and D4, and then also given a shorter test on current consumer cameras as well so as to show the capabilities independent of a professional camera.

3 upvotes
Shelly Glaser
By Shelly Glaser (Oct 3, 2012)

About time...

It would be nice, though, if DPreview will publish extensive details on how lenses are tested and how the ratings are calculated.

Another nice-to-have feature will be to group tests, so at one time several lenses from different brands, but similar specs will be tested, and readers could make up their minds on which lens is the most suitable for them.

2 upvotes
ELOJR
By ELOJR (Oct 3, 2012)

Can't wait for the lens tests to start up again. Hopefully the new Sigma 18 - 250 macro (testing screen shot above) and the Nikon 18 - 300 are at the top of the review list!

3 upvotes
fdfgdfgdgf
By fdfgdfgdgf (Oct 3, 2012)

DXO is a juke

Nikon D600 was tested a few hours after arrive to amazon but other brands such as Olympus OM-D E-M5 or Canon 5D3 took 5 months

My D3200 got the highest score ever for APS-C. NOISY CAMERA

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
9 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Oct 3, 2012)

How about DXO sensor measurements as well.. e.g. instead of factory default jpgs for testing dynamic range.

1 upvote
Simon Joinson
By Simon Joinson (Oct 3, 2012)

We will be working with the new lab to add some sensor measurements to our camera reviews. Watch this space.

4 upvotes
Karl Gnter Wnsch
By Karl Gnter Wnsch (Oct 3, 2012)

@Simon, sorry to hear that you are selling out. DPreview previously was the benchmark for independent reviews. By tying in with the DxO lot I feel that the independence is lost - because DxO Tests are nothing more than a marketing vehicle for their software products. I have yet to see a single test by them that is not marred by extensive and exhaustive procedural mistakes and flaws that make them complete and utterly irrelevant for real life photography.

7 upvotes
hoggdoc
By hoggdoc (Oct 3, 2012)

@ Karl Gnter Wnsch - Wow that's a bit harsh don't you think? While you may be correct in your statement that DxO uses their test as a sales vehicle for their software, they are non-the-less the de-facto-standard are they not?

It seems to me that if someones' reviews/tests are to have meaning they need to be conducted in accordance with an established standard, or there would be no real means of comparison.

As for your comment :"I have yet to see a single test by them that is not marred by extensive and exhaustive procedural mistakes and flaws that make them complete and utterly irrelevant for real life photography." How did you come to this conclusion, what standards did you apply to whatever tests you ran to ascertain theirs was faulty.

Maybe a "IMHO" at the end of your rant would be nice.

9 upvotes
MichaelEchos
By MichaelEchos (Oct 4, 2012)

@Karl - You just need to understand what they mean for each factors. They are not biased or irrelevant, just a bit sophisticated for your simple mind. These are not computer benchmark and is very relevant for real life situations.

2 upvotes
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Oct 4, 2012)

So you need to be "sophisticated" to understand how the D600 sensor is better than the 80 megapixel Phase One IQ180 since DXO rates it higher. I can think of several words other than sophisticated to describe people who believe that :-)

0 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Oct 5, 2012)

@Karl, thank you for hitting the nail on the head! DPR has only one bias: they want to drive camera sales via Amazon. I don't think they care which cameras, just so long as people are happy.

DX0 is peddling software. They want their test numbers to stir a buzz to attract attention to their software. Their incredibly mediocre software.

0 upvotes
grayowl
By grayowl (Oct 3, 2012)

JKP already addressed it: We read the test reports in order to know more about the particular lens and to decide for or against it when we consider to buy it. However, what we get to read is the test result measured on a lens copy which we'll not buy. Lenses are industrial products and their quality varies from sample to sample. This is absolutely normal and unavoidable, no manufacturing runs without tolerances and lens production is no exception. The question is, how strong does the quality fluctuate in the lens type of our interest.
We need the information, if - when we buy this lens - there is a rather high probability that our copy will be as good as the tested one, or if there is a high risk that we'll don't get what the tested sample promised.

It would be really great if dpReview & DxO would expand the test procedure in this direction. I guess that e.g. a fast assessment of the centering variation on at least 5 (better 10) lens samples would be appreciated by a lot of us.

4 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Oct 3, 2012)

Yes, after missing them for two years, what I need is to start giving them instructions on how to do the stuff...

I'd say - let's make it at least 50 units, from different batches. Nothing less. Otherwise, it will still be worse than what we have now - NOTHING :D

For what it's worth - all their reviews on the lenses I own have been spot on, or dead on balls accurate, to quote a cult movie. Don't know how many units they tested.

2 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (Oct 3, 2012)

FIFTY?!???

0 upvotes
grayowl
By grayowl (Oct 4, 2012)

50 isn't practicable. 5 is exactly five times more (i.e. better) than one, 10 would be still better and - I hope it - feasible.

Another important criterion is the AF accuracy and repeatability. The best results (resolution) measured in the lab using one lens sample after meticulous manual focusing is useless in the real life if the AF doesn't work perfect. A repeatability assessment is a question of a statistical analysis. I know a german magazine publishing its test results concerning AF repeatability. This is a nearly unique service among the lens testing labs but they only list the best and the worst result of ten measurements and measure the AF accuracy in percent. Nobody knows
a) what means 'percent' in the assessment of the AF accuracy
b) if the worst result (e.g. 20%) is an outlier or the rule, whereas the best result (e.g. 100%) is the outlier

Please, dpr, give us meaningful test result presentation, statistically well-funded!

2 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (Oct 3, 2012)

Yes ! Yess !!! YEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESSSS !!!

FINALLY !!!

I'M YELLLIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINGGG :D :D :D

Thank you dpr. It was about time.

1 upvote
Twoeyes
By Twoeyes (Oct 3, 2012)

Excellent. With the sudden influx of large sensor cameras on the market or being announced, the choosing of the lenses to get the best out of these sensors is going to become more important. So this move by DPR to restart lens reviews is really good news for the consumers.
'If' this is done to the same standard as existing DPR reviews, the site should become an even more valuable resource.

Comment edited 53 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
JKP
By JKP (Oct 3, 2012)

Hopefully you'll have a change to test multiple copies of the same lens (ideally from multiple manuf lots) to find out the variation between the units.

For example, my copy of EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM is clearly less sharp than my EF 85mm f/1.8 USM. I believe it should be vice versa. Not happy.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
sxhortx
By sxhortx (Oct 3, 2012)

The 85mm 1.8 is one of Canons sharpest lenses (as shown over at DXO), your lenses are behaving as expected.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Lenses/Camera-Lens-Ratings/Optical-Metric-Scores

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Shelly Glaser
By Shelly Glaser (Oct 3, 2012)

Hello sxhortx - I looked at your link for DxO lens test result, and I wonder... how can they compare resolution of various lenses when the term "resolution" is an ill defined measure (MTF at several spatial frequencies and field positions must be used to get objective results) and they test each lens on a camera with different pixel count?

2 upvotes
JKP
By JKP (Oct 7, 2012)

sxhortx: Thank you for the link! I'm surprised 85mm is really that sharp when compared to any other lens.

0 upvotes
David Rosser
By David Rosser (Oct 3, 2012)

I really think that the only satisfactory way of testing lenses is independent of camera using equipment such as this
http://lenses.zeiss.com/camera-lenses/carl-zeiss-camera-lenses/industrial_lenses/products/lens-measuring-technologies.html#inpagetabs_41a6-0
I am sure that with the backing of Amazon DPReview could afford to purchase such equipment. The Zeiss lens testing equipment also has one important attribute that your methodology does not - it test the lens at infinity focus, your tests cover near focus only.

7 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Oct 3, 2012)

You do realize that you're advocating equipment that hasn't been updated in 15 years, can't measure past 6 microns (a 24mp APS camera is 4 microns) and, if memory serves, can't accommodate the short backfocus of EVIL lenses.

6 upvotes
Lee Jay
By Lee Jay (Oct 3, 2012)

Yes...let's see some lens tests for once, instead of these limited-usefulness system tests. Given the number of lenses, bodies and cross-platform adapters, systems tests are getting more and more useless by the minute.

Either use a lens projector, or use the same camera - with AA filter removed - for every lens test, using adapters to mount the lenses from other manufacturers. And uses a method like Imatest that oversamples so pixel size doesn't matter much.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HBowman
By HBowman (Oct 3, 2012)

@ Joseph :

So they need to ask SIGMA to build them a new Foveon MTF machine ;)

1 upvote
Izu
By Izu (Oct 3, 2012)

C'mon Joseph, he wrote "such as": K8 is famous even among amateurs, it doesn't mean he really suggest them to buy a K8... :)

BTW, K8 can reach 160 p/mm, for today's cameras with AA filters it's more than enough I think. Moreover we are actually using an even older Ealing and we have (almost) no problem with CSC cameras since we can test Sony E, Samsung NX, Fujifilm X and so on... tricky but not impossible ;)

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Shelly Glaser
By Shelly Glaser (Oct 3, 2012)

The Zeiss system you recommend is nice to have convinience, but is not a necessity. With proper knowledge and a calibrated target like http://www.aig-imaging.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=AIIPI&Product_Code=M-6&Category_Code=Sinusoidal-Precision-Sine-Test-Array

You can get equaly precise results.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
cordellwillis
By cordellwillis (Oct 3, 2012)

Good news. Now let's just hope IPhone lenses are not part of the testing.

6 upvotes
sxhortx
By sxhortx (Oct 3, 2012)

The iPhone, the most popular camera on the planet should be the first tested, if anything just to prove to people that there phone is NOT as good as a dedicated point n shoot!

4 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Oct 3, 2012)

@cordellwillis - you need to get over this. The iPhone is a camera. We test cameras. We're not going to suddenly change overnight and only test cameras on phones, but we are going to respond to the very real demand for coverage of that segment of the market.

6 upvotes
cordellwillis
By cordellwillis (Oct 3, 2012)

What's your problem BARRRRRRRNNNNNEEEEEEYYYYYYY?

Please test another iPhone, errrr oops. iCamera so we can read about the DXO results. The iPhone is a great phone. Darn, I did it again. The iCamera is a great camera that just so happens to have a phone!

Kind of like my in-dash radio with MP3 player that has a nice car.

Where is the finger button?

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
1 upvote
hoggdoc
By hoggdoc (Oct 3, 2012)

Yep!

0 upvotes
MichaelEchos
By MichaelEchos (Oct 4, 2012)

iPhone won't seem to be tested until there is support for RAW images.

0 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Oct 3, 2012)

Great news, thanks for the announcement! Very useful part of overall informative aspect of DPR site.
Speaking of optics, I wonder whatever happened with Origami Optics? Long time ago it has been announced as soon-to-come, but I still haven't seen this excellent idea in everyday use.
Maybe someone among your data gatherers could be bothered to get us an up-to-date info about it?
For those who want to know more, use http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=617

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
readingaloud
By readingaloud (Oct 3, 2012)

One additional test that would be of immense interest to an (admittedly small, but growing) number of protographers would be to test lenses for infrared usability. It wouldn't have to be anything elaborate, but there are a bunch of us who would reallly like to know whether a lens has an IR hotspot before we spend good money for it, and currently there's no way to tell about a new lens until other IR folks start complaining about it.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Oct 3, 2012)

There's two problems.

First is the "Sony lesson". High profile entities come under a lot of fire for offering any sort of support for infrared. It's one thing for some guys in a basement like Lifepixel or Max Max to do it, but dpreview would have the same problems that Sony had, religious groups and rabid mothers screaming about perverts taking "x-ray pictures" of their precious children.

Second is that IR hotspots are highly dependent on the wavelength of IR used, and the characteristics of a particular sensor, and that of the filter used for the IR mod. So there's no one test. That's also why you see so many "independent" tests disagreeing about particular lenses.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Karl Gnter Wnsch
By Karl Gnter Wnsch (Oct 3, 2012)

For what it's worth - I wouldn't bother with DxO results, their testing procedures are so far off any reality that these values serve no one - as often as they contradict reality they should really refrain from publishing anything. Anyone trusting their data is IMHO up a creek without a paddle...

7 upvotes
MichaelEchos
By MichaelEchos (Oct 4, 2012)

You're just not understanding what they are trying to show you. They are pretty much right. Maybe you're just a Canon fan. Who knows?

1 upvote
CFynn
By CFynn (Oct 3, 2012)

It's great that lens tests are coming back.

Perhaps DPReview should get a cat as a mascot and to photograph "real world" sample images when testing lenses and cameras. The eyes, fine hair and whiskers of a cat provide a wealth of detail and texture. It would also be much more fun for users to compare sample images of a cat than those boring test shots, and you could keep us up to date on his/her exploits.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
l_d_allan
By l_d_allan (Oct 3, 2012)

Sounds good, although I'm not all that familiar with DxO lens testing.

Even better would be somehow incorporating collaboration with Roger Cicala at LensRentals. He makes what I believe are valid points about sample variations between lenses. There are "good copies" and "bad copies". They have several to dozens of duplicates of the same lens, and perhaps 50+ of the most popular lenses.

However, those lenses are sent back and forth as rentals, and not necessarily treated all that well. Another type of useful information would be their repair frequency statistics.

Also, I suppose DxO/DPR will micro-focus-adjust the lens to body? But I suppose that doesn't matter if you use LiveView at 10x magnification for critical focus?

1 upvote
Red Boar
By Red Boar (Oct 3, 2012)

Yeah! Thanks! Lenses are far too expensive to find out how they perform after the purchase.

3 upvotes
Alphoid
By Alphoid (Oct 3, 2012)

Wonderful! Desperately needed.

A very useful test bench would involve a compact sensor positioned behind a universal lens mount with MF so you could compare Canon vs. Nikon vs. Sony. u4/3 or NEX would work in abstract, but smaller, higher-resolution sensor would be able to tell you a lot more.

1 upvote
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Oct 3, 2012)

"I pity the fool who needs measurements to tell them which lens to buy." - Mr. T.

7 upvotes
creeker
By creeker (Oct 4, 2012)

A person would be a fool NOT knowing how a lens performs before buying. If you don't see reviews how would you know it's quality until you try it. I can tell in the first images if a lens is a dog, but I'm certainly not going to buy a lens that all the reviews show not to be good. When a new lens come on the market and you bought it. Would you be a fool if it wasn't good and you didn't look at any of the "measurement". I'd say that's being a fool.

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
1 upvote
HarrieD7000
By HarrieD7000 (Oct 3, 2012)

Great. I hoop we soon have lots of tests, so we can see what to expect of a new lens.

2 upvotes
creeker
By creeker (Oct 4, 2012)

I agree 100%. It will give us just one more way to judge a lens before buying.

0 upvotes
qba1212
By qba1212 (Oct 3, 2012)

This sounds very good!!
On a side note, does this text have to be so... marketing'y ?
It would sound so much more natural and real if the following words were removed:
-Popular
-Highly respected
-legendary
-world leader

15 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Oct 3, 2012)

I agree with you, superlatives are too lightly used nowadays.

0 upvotes
qba1212
By qba1212 (Oct 3, 2012)

I failed to add "class-leading" to my list :)

1 upvote
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Oct 3, 2012)

Superlatives are overused, I agree, but Andy Westlake is a highly respected legend in my house! Looking forward to seeing him in action again.

2 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Oct 4, 2012)

Absolutely - such a mind-numbingly vast number of astonishingly excessive superlatives crammed into such a tiny space literally caused my head to explode into a billion pieces.

2 upvotes
shahid11235
By shahid11235 (Oct 3, 2012)

This is a very welcome decision. Thanks DPreview!

2 upvotes
creeker
By creeker (Oct 4, 2012)

I agree 100%

0 upvotes
Valterj
By Valterj (Oct 3, 2012)

Great joint venture! I wish you all the success.

1 upvote
attomole
By attomole (Oct 3, 2012)

Great to hear of your new resolve to give this prime topic a shift in focus, That DXO is hand holding should also lead you to some sharper content. The frequency of your output needs to be in contrast to the past which was at best, Shaky.

I have looked far and wide for somthing along these lines, I hope this new venture put's a cap on it.

2 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Oct 5, 2012)

This is HORRIBLE! Exactly my type of humor. ;D

0 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (Oct 3, 2012)

Great news! Congratulations.

0 upvotes
Cani
By Cani (Oct 3, 2012)

DxO reviews are the most comprehensive ones available, that's great news.

Just a comment.

In about every test methodology lenses are tested at (an unknown) close focusing distance only, which is frustrating since lense performance might vary significantly across the range of focusing distances from the closest up to infinity.

More and more we see lenses that test successfully but disappoint in the real world due to poor performance at infinity.
So, imo if you had plans to include an appreciation of lens performance at infinity (other than sample shots) that would be another great improvement.

13 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Oct 3, 2012)

We need an ISO 12233 chart the size of a football field ;)

0 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Oct 3, 2012)

This is a real good news..........8-))

0 upvotes
Leichhardt
By Leichhardt (Oct 3, 2012)

It's good to see that Dpreview is refocusing its efforts on lense reviews.

1 upvote
perry rhodan
By perry rhodan (Oct 3, 2012)

The experience of using DXO Optics Pro for years and closely following DPR growing to excellence for many years made me jump! The combined expertise will no doubt bring joy to enthousiasts. Nice move DPR, congrats!

3 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (Oct 3, 2012)

Please don't make any use of the DxOMark 'Scores'. They are so misleading as to give higher 'scores' to lenses that are clearly worse, optically.

If the presentation is similar to your old system, then OK.

Although, I will never understand the reluctance to determine and publish the lens resolution on a scale that is independent of camera sensors. Buyers are better served to know what is the lens' absolute limit, not what it achieves on this sensor or that sensor.

7 upvotes
bargello
By bargello (Oct 3, 2012)

You are right

0 upvotes
mrahmo
By mrahmo (Oct 3, 2012)

Great news, i just hope that the real life experiance is finally mixed with the strange DXO data to get something better out

and yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay for the lens review

1 upvote
troy1
By troy1 (Oct 3, 2012)

Checking DXO's test results for some time I wasn't convinced they did a good job as there are some unplausibilities (i.e. 70-200 2.8 IS II was rated not as good as every other review I read).

So I'm unsure if integration of DXO in DPR is a good move.

Do you get the raw data from DXO and draw your own conclusion? And what if your conclusion differs much from the one drawn by DXO?

I rate DPReview one of the best and - most important - independent und reliable reviewer and hope this doesn't change.

Absolutely great job so long!

6 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Oct 3, 2012)

Truely, I respect DPR on the same grounds and am not very confident on DXO. I hope DPR will carry out its more realistic testing without being too scientific but misleading DXO.

I would raither get both results from these two companies independently and keep the competition as it is!

1 upvote
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (Oct 3, 2012)

Nice to hear about lens tests coming back (with or without DXO).
Am looking forward to a nice blend of technical data and real life shooting tests.

3 upvotes
EmmanuelStarchild
By EmmanuelStarchild (Oct 3, 2012)

I'm a little confused here. Dxo pretty much slammed the Canon 70-200 2.8 IS II, while you guys gave it your 'gold' award. How exactly is the merging of your reviews going to rectify such a huge difference of opinion?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
7 upvotes
Simon Joinson
By Simon Joinson (Oct 3, 2012)

we're not merging reviews. We're using test data which we will be carefully checking and managing. If that data doesn't agree with our findings we won't just publish (in fact this process will undoubtedly improve DXO's lens tests by more readily identifying sample variation outliers).

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
akiskev
By akiskev (Oct 3, 2012)

DXO's data are very good. Their testing methodology is great. What they(dxo) do with that data is the problem. Their metrics are COMPLETELY USELESS.

So it is great that DPreview will combine their photographic common sense and the perfect dxo testing in their reviews! Thumbs up from me to DPreview!

10 upvotes
walnist
By walnist (Oct 3, 2012)

Why choosing DxO labs over Imatest?
In the field of industrial cameras Imatest has been the standard for years, and i never found odd results coming out of it.

While sometimes I see scores published by DxO labs which do seem rather inconsistent, and the 70-200 2.8 IS II is just one example.

8 upvotes
Absolutic
By Absolutic (Oct 3, 2012)

I for one disagree with DXO results very often. By the way I agree with Dpreview on 70-200 F/2.8 IS II that it is THE BEST 70-200 lens across all manufacturers. Andrew was right and DXO as their conclusions often are, was dead wrong.

By the way, photozone slammed the new 24-70 F/2.8L II while Roger Cicala said it was incredible.

2 upvotes
Nightwings
By Nightwings (Oct 3, 2012)

Excellent News! I really hope I don't insult DPR by what I'm about to say or suggest ... it's meant as a suggestion only.

SLRGear has been my go-to place for lens reviews because of the blur Index method they use and how its brilliantly illustrated in the UI slider controls. It shows where the lens is at its strongest and where its weaknesses lie in a very easy to understand graphic visual. I'm hoping DPR will adopt a similar way of presenting the review results.... in addition to what they have in mind already.

7 upvotes
riknash
By riknash (Oct 3, 2012)

Excellent decision dpreview! The challenge will be to provide meaningful analysis to the data that even the technically challenged can find useful. Really looking forward to this! Its all about the glass!

2 upvotes
Total comments: 275
123