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Reader's concept prompts question: what would your ideal camera be?

By dpreview staff on Oct 19, 2012 at 23:22 GMT

What does your dream camera look like? One of our more enterprising readers has sketched-out what his would look like - creating an interesting contemporary rangefinder concept. Bristling with Nikon F4-inspired manual controls, each dial and switch also has a 'neutral' position to allow the on-screen interface settings to take precedence. Easycass acknowledges the concept may not be entirely possible - an 'ultra-fast' 24-105mm lens would dictate a fairly small sensor, and autofocus rangefinders have never exactly been commonplace - but it raises questions the question: 'What would your perfect camera be?'

With mirrorless and large-sensor compacts still going through a growth spurt, what would you like to see? What controls would you demand and what balance of size, price, sensor size and lens specs would you like to see. Let us know in the comments, below and try to be plausible (a realistic price is usually more than you want to pay for it).

If the comments section doesn't give you the space to express your ideas, consider doing what Easycass has done - create your own article.

Comments

Total comments: 710
12345
DanceOfLight
By DanceOfLight (Oct 23, 2012)

A digital equivalent of Pentax LX with all the beautiful manual controls and added digital bits. 24 mm × 36 mm sensor with no AA filter. Keep the mount, throw the mirror out, bring in the EVF and we are done.

- Tripod mount needs to be aligned in the exact center of the lens mount. optional -Add another tripod mount for vertical shooting without clumsy L brackets (645NII/645D come to mind)

- Give me clean pixels instead of Giga pixles any day

- Throw in a few F1.8 leaf shutter primes for silent operation and great flash sync

- Keep the weather sealing and the line of WR lens

- Bring a few decently priced TS lens

result - Happy puppy :)

2 upvotes
Foveonite
By Foveonite (Oct 23, 2012)

not bad :) you have some nice points!

2 upvotes
Foveonite
By Foveonite (Oct 23, 2012)

My DREAM camera will be

18-36 megapixel per layer, 36 x 24mm 3-layer Foveron Sensor, 51-point D800 autofocus technology, dual SD card, 600-800 raw shots battery life, 100% frame coverage, 1.0-1.25x magnification. (nikon ISO technology) ISO 50-25600(very usable at 6400), Shutterspeed 60sec to 1/8000 sec

body, similar to EOS 7D, 5Dmk3, D800 (any one also can). Canon EF-Mount for Lens, and Canon Flash mount.

Expanded body kit's battery can discharge to Flash Unit.

1 upvote
Foveonite
By Foveonite (Oct 23, 2012)

Raw file format which can be supported by Adobe Photoshop
Weather/Dust sealing + resistance (like Pentax K5, EOS 7D)
Burst at 6fps, limit 30shots, finish buffer <5sec
External Mic-able
First shot from startup <2sec

Good to haves:
3-layer Foveron Full HD RAW movie at 60fps (unlimited recording)
LCD screen that can swivel and rotate
screen technology same as HTC J Butterfly(non-pentile)

Price range about 4-5k USD

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
thewhitehawk
By thewhitehawk (Oct 23, 2012)

My dream camera would be... Fujifilm's X-Pro 1 sensor, with the Olympus' OM-D focusing speed, a hybrid version of Leica's M9 viewfinder, and Sony's NEX-7 one in the electronic view. In terms of controls, something similar to the OM-D or the NEX-7 would be great.

Software-wise, I think the NEX-7 is probably one of the best cameras in the market in that regard, but it would be great to have phone software that allowed for the installation of third-party software for in-camera photo editing capabilities, perhaps having Android as the operating system would be the easiest solution.

Basically I'd want a hybrid of the Leica M9, the NEX 7/OM-D and the X-Pro1. The best parts of all those cameras.

1 upvote
Benarm
By Benarm (Oct 23, 2012)

RX100

1 upvote
nflanders2
By nflanders2 (Oct 23, 2012)

I think the future camera will consist of two or three parts:
- a universal, head mounted display that is also used by your smart phone (smart device) in your pocket (which can take photos better than the iPhone 5 can do today).
- a camera body (containing a large sensor and at least a fixed lens - optionally a changeable lens).
- a lens (if changeable)

The camera will look like cameras of today, but without the viewfinder (which mans: totally different…). It might have a TFT screen to show photos to other persons, but that's just optional.
It will be big enough to be held comfortably by the big hands of professional photographs, but other models will be small enough to fit into the bag's of your jeans.

Camera and HMD will be wirelessly connected.

0 upvotes
Andy Dufresne
By Andy Dufresne (Oct 23, 2012)

- Big body for my big hands,
- Variety of prime lenses from wide angle to tele range.
- Min. APS-C size senzor
- long shutter life (100K+)
- Low noise at high iso
- Fast Autofocus
- Internal focus motor in the body
- HD video with full manual controls

1 upvote
brujo74
By brujo74 (Oct 24, 2012)

Except for the first and last line you've described the Pentax K-5 :)

1 upvote
strmnzro
By strmnzro (Oct 23, 2012)

This is my concept. I know some of you will not like the combined viewfinder/flash solution. Next camera i do will be a rangefinder.
http://www.behance.net/gallery/SMAECK-Camera-concept/5604773

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Oct 23, 2012)

My dream camera would take pictures, make phone calls, send text messages, allow me to access the internet, and pleasure me in unspeakable ways *giggity*

0 upvotes
ajdelacruz
By ajdelacruz (Oct 23, 2012)

sony a900 with high iso performance like the d700

0 upvotes
cotty
By cotty (Oct 23, 2012)

My ideal point-and-shoot would have

24 mm wide lens
5x optical zoom, may be 7x, but not 30x
larger sensor is better, at least, 1/1.7
sensor shall be back-illuminated
panorama
HDR
fast start-up time - under 1 sec
Full HD video 30fps MPEG4
At least 10 FPS with mechanical shutter, or may be they figure out good in-sensor shutter.
new SD cards support
Easy control for flash and focusing (macro / auto / infinity)

I'm also dreaming of:
720p video at 120 fps
Manual zoom

It will NOT have:
MJPEG video format (it is too large)
Interlaced video
20 megapixels (6MP is more than any point-and-shoot lens can really provide, why waste space?)

The closest one is Casio ZR-300 and I love it, but 720p/120fps and bigger sensor would be ideal

1 upvote
JP Lee
By JP Lee (Oct 23, 2012)

Really? A box with a bunch of buttons? We can't dream any bigger than this?

0 upvotes
spencerberus
By spencerberus (Oct 22, 2012)

Full frame image quality & performance on a quarter-inch thick phone. This would require a very different type of optics, but I believe I read something about some super thin lenses designed at Harvard that could actually make this possible, I just hope I'm alive to see it happen. Until then, I'm pretty happy with the Olympus OM-D in terms of size and functionality, I'd like a camera where all the buttons and dials (except maybe the shutter) were COMPLETELY customizable - none of this 'you can select from these 3 things on this button and these 4 on this one...'.

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
1 upvote
rocklobster
By rocklobster (Oct 22, 2012)

M4/3 is the perfect size for me so give me and E-M5 without the SLR style hump and replace contrast AF with a phase detect system and finally do away with the steam age mechanical focal plane shutter and replace with fully electronic. I am not suggesting a CCD based global shutter but could LCD be utilised as a shutter like those used for 3D TV glasses? I imagine speed would be an issue as liquid crystal is slow in its operation but - just an idea.

Also, EVF is fine by me and I don't really care about a built in flash - clip on flash and hot-shoe are fine.

Cheers

0 upvotes
olla
By olla (Oct 22, 2012)

An affordable full frame digital Contax G3!

2 upvotes
morganb
By morganb (Oct 22, 2012)

Give me a Fuji X-trans sensor in full Frame
everything about the X-Pro1 but a super fast AF system
and all the software options that panasonic/olympus/sony throw into there cameras. (i.e. focus peaking, expanded auto bracketing in all ways....)

2 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Oct 22, 2012)

That except in a X-E1 body that's smaller.

Fuji really hit a home run with its external control rich designs.

1 upvote
JJSo
By JJSo (Oct 22, 2012)

All those switches - never thought of a touchscreen instead? Typical functionalist: throw in a button or knob for each possible (some useless, too) feature, can't go wrong.

Instead of thinking about a good concept in using before plastering buttons all over the place. Condensing it down to the essence is harder, but it looks android enough, I guess. In how many ways you need to turn this thing just to check which knob is set to which position? Not even a swivel-and-tilt screen? Poor concept, big limitations and no need for such an expensive, out-dated model.

1 upvote
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Oct 22, 2012)

The ideal cameras' are those where I work with.
The camera I like to see is based on modularity.

0 upvotes
PocketTool
By PocketTool (Oct 22, 2012)

My ideal camera shoots film, thank you very much.

1 upvote
Bigbokeh
By Bigbokeh (Oct 23, 2012)

I bet you are still peeing outdoors -

1 upvote
lacro
By lacro (Oct 23, 2012)

Why is it that avergae film IQ still is better than average digital? Seriously!

1 upvote
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Oct 23, 2012)

Well,
Many people look at the sharpness and contrast of digital - and see that as the key if an image is good or not (digital is more sharper than processed/printed film) I don't see sharpness as THE major to decide if an image is good or not, I think DR is much more important.

Due to that most images now are shown digitally or printed digitally and not processed this kind of discussions get more and more irrelevant. Once in the so many year you will see a revival of film.

So and so the average iphone shooter thinks different about it, they take an image digitally and make it look like film (which is twice as bad) with an app and call it creativity.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Oct 22, 2012)

Putting all those switches on the front looks a bit awful

0 upvotes
CAFxX
By CAFxX (Oct 22, 2012)

What I'd love in a camera boils down to two things: 1) the ability to program/extend the functionalities of the camera and 2) a really good sensor, mostly w.r.t. dynamic range and noise levels.

1 upvote
aleware
By aleware (Oct 22, 2012)

Basically , an improved hibrid version of the Panasonic FZ50 / FZ200 models: the ergonomics and the Leica fixed manual zoom concept of the FZ50 with the range and the constant 2.8 aperture of the FZ200 with an improved sensor (not much more pixels needed...) who deals better with high ISO and with a good consistent IQ in all light situations. Weather prooof, shock resistant would be nice. The AF, IS and the general operating speed of the FZ200 are already very good... and a price between $400/$600.

3 upvotes
monseigneur
By monseigneur (Oct 22, 2012)

a new "pro" cam from olympus, from Loyd chambers:

"Micro Four Thirds makes the grade now. It will only get better and better, so the E-M5 is simply a best of breed in 2012 that will look dated in a year or two. I do hope to see sensor technology get to the ~24 megapixel level with improved noise behavior— think Sony sensor in Olympus body."

The SHG lenses are incredible, see his comparisons of the 14-35 and 35- 100 f2.0 with leica. The advantage of this format is that the lenses can be made this good, in part because they have to make no compromises in size, they're about as big as a DSLR zoom, but they give incredible image quality.

From digilloyd:

the Olympus SGH 14-35 is equivalent to, and as large and heavy as any 24-70 for a full-frame DSLR. Basically, to achieve its superlative world-beating performance, the lens had to be huge and heavy. Leica M lenses have always aimed for being very small, and this forces optical compromises.

2 upvotes
HariGeni
By HariGeni (Oct 22, 2012)

Compromise is inevitable. And -for a photo camera- some things are expected. Exposure, focus, white balance, etc. ... BUT with manual overrride in a "serious" compact. I accept "lesser" power or ability in a camera for my "simple souvernir" images. I agree with most of what you all say, and always say: "as far/big/cheap as small as possible" ...etc. Bigger sensor, faster lens (I would have enough with a zoom lens compact going from 28 to 135 equiv. For anything else, interchangeable lenses. A little built in flash for fill-in, and hot shoe. I never had problems with screen in sunlight, but prefer swivelling ones. I'm not sure viewfinders are still "evolved" enough... my film SLRs didn't offer alternative techonologies, so they were not a matter of discussion, beyond brightness and aparent size (important points, no doubt).

So, today I find things like Canon G15, Nikon P7700 like "plenty of camera / to little sensor". Do I make myself clear? Good luck to all, and happy shooting.

0 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Oct 22, 2012)

Flash lighting tends to diminish in necessity as the sensor and bright lenses capture more light. At the same time the artificial ambient light (some with sodium, some with mercury) trigger photonic frequencies in the sensor that do not necessarily agree with our eye's perception. (OVF can be a drawback here but that's another discussion.) What's needed, then, is a rapid white light balance adjustment ("wheel" or a lens ring) along with programmable and viewfinder-visible setpoints we used and marked in the past.

I no longer fiddle with focus or exposure (I use the point mode and adjust exposure with minute movement) and so the white balance comes to the forefront for me.

1 upvote
Entropius
By Entropius (Oct 22, 2012)

Flash is more useful to fix "bad" lighting (i.e. by bouncing flash off the ceiling to get a smooth illumination) than to just plain add more light. But you're absolutely right about better lenses and sensors solving some of our low-light woes; I shot a bunch of natural light portraits with an EM-5 and 45/1.8 this weekend in light I'd never have dared to shoot in before.

0 upvotes
arie lodder
By arie lodder (Oct 22, 2012)

My dream camera would be like the Sony RX1 but then just a bit bigger. So containing a 24 Mp full-frame sensor.

1) Smaller, but rotating LCD
2) At least 2 Mp EVF with ample functionality for manual focussing. Please not an old-fashioned rangefinder.
3) Sensor-shift IS
4) Extra control dial for the shutter speed
5) Interchangeable bayonet-systeem (you may choose from at least Minolta alfa bayonet, Contax-Yashica bayonet, Rolleiflex SL bayonet) plus adapters for M39, M42, Leica M-mount. Not all adapters for all bayonets, but combinations based on the simplest solution for the required technical functions.
6) Built-in flash not necessary. In this class you are better off with a real flash unit.

With such a camera you could finally use lenses like the 12mm Voigtlander without an annoying crop factor. Plus you could make use of all the beautiful old glass that is still out there somewhere.

1 upvote
sonictooth
By sonictooth (Oct 22, 2012)

As a primarily fine art photographer I have ZERO interest in anything automatic, so my ideal camera would be something along the lines of a fm-2 body with a d800 or d600 sensor. Get rid of all the BS and just give me a sturdy weather sealed FULLY MANUAL dslr WITH A REAL FOCUSING SCREEN! It would be an instant classic. Getting rid of all the BS the manufacturer could make this camera very affordable. Every enthusiast would own one and it wouldn't cut into the sales of the auto cameras much because there is a true need for the beasts. I just don't have one and I'm sick of paying more than I think I need to for features that are utterly useless to me. I know your saying just shoot film you moron, and maybe I should but I have come to really like digital and not having to build darkrooms wherever I move. It also just seems a bit more environmentally friendly, digital that is.

6 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Oct 22, 2012)

I always laugh at comments like yours where people don't want the 'bells and whistles' and just want to shoot full manual. You know what, every decent DSLr ever made has a full manual mode, if that's what you want then go right ahead...no one is forcing you to shoot in Auto.

Much the same with those whining about video on DSLR's, don't use the feature if you don't want it.

3 upvotes
piratejabez
By piratejabez (Oct 22, 2012)

I would love to see focusing screens come back.

2 upvotes
gfoulk
By gfoulk (Oct 22, 2012)

Do you really think that having another camera without auto focusing would result in a cheaper camera? Sure, the auto focusing hardware costs *something* - but relative to the rest, it's not a whole lot. The bigger factor is that it will be a niche product that will have much less economy of scale. It's likely to be more expensive, not less.

The same goes for people complaining about the inclusion of video (even more so, since video is essentially pure firmware.)

2 upvotes
trekkeruss
By trekkeruss (Oct 22, 2012)

I seriously doubt automatic controls on cameras add much if anything to the cost of cameras.

A manual-only camera would not be cheaper, but merely a lousy seller.

1 upvote
sonictooth
By sonictooth (Oct 24, 2012)

Well I think a few of you missed the point of this article. This is my personal ideal camera. Clint, laugh away that's ok, I do use my brick of a camera in manual mode and use zeiss lenses on it. My point is that I am forced to carry around a camera that is much bigger(and expensive?) than I need it to be. I simply don't ever use any of the auto features, although I must admit I do love the "on board' spot meter.
Gfoulk, I was referring to all auto features not just focus, but including the shutter, the lcd, all the "modes" well, everything. Just a d800 sensor in a fm2 body. You probably are right about the cost being more, I just get excited about the thought of shooting with this camera (sorry), because I would love this thing I naturally think everyone would. lol Although, in my defense, I do believe there are a great number of photographers who would love a body like this; landscape, street, architectural and folks doing static studio work. Maybe maybe not.

1 upvote
wkay
By wkay (Oct 22, 2012)

tail fins

1 upvote
Ian Leach
By Ian Leach (Oct 22, 2012)

No, they’d poke you in the eyes. How about a hood (lens) ornament like the spirit of ecstasy on a Rolls, the ‘my cameras better than yours’ types would love it.

0 upvotes
superphotog
By superphotog (Oct 22, 2012)

I have owned dozens of cameras and current SLR is Nikon digital. But my perfect (or close to it) camera my Mamiya 7II manual focus rangefinder. Yes, it's film. Scanning in those big negatives beats anything digital, and it's compact enough to feel close to an SLR.

0 upvotes
piratejabez
By piratejabez (Oct 22, 2012)

Lens -
- Zoom starting at ≤24mm
- ≥f/2 at 24mm; ≥f/4 at tele
- Fixed works for me
- I'm loving the manual zoom on Fuji's X10 and XF1
- Retractable / automatic lens cap

Sensor -
- ≥1" or sensor w/ ≥10 million pixels (Foveon would be nice...)
- Multi-aspect 16:9 to 1:1 (all 24mm)
- A conventional-enough sensor that third-part RAW converters can handle without batting an eye

Other -
- Responsive "shutter"/ responsive handling, even with RAW files
- RAW: DNG-native would be a plus, and I would love an sRAW option
- ≥920k-dot LCD
- Pop-up flash (a good distance from the lens)
- Programmable / intelligent ISO based on metering, camera shake, and focal length
- The more external controls the better, with at least one Fn button and Fn ring. The more rings (lens, top, back, I don't care) the better.
- A quick, fathomable menu system
- More-or-less pocketable (pocket can be large)

If most/all these are met, I will not be able to throw my money at them fast enough.

Cheers

2 upvotes
piratejabez
By piratejabez (Oct 22, 2012)

While we're at it... why are we making rectangular sensors, anyway? Lenses product circular images... why not a square or circular sensor? This goes one-step beyond Panasonic's "multi-aspect" feature, and would allow photographers to shoot without even having to think about rotation or H/V orientation. Shooting in RAW could enable the shooter to decide later what s/he prefers the rectangular crop to be.

1 upvote
gfoulk
By gfoulk (Oct 22, 2012)

Sensors are rectangular because sensors are expensive, and making them larger only to crop away a significant portion of it is rather wasteful. That said, as sensor tech gets cheaper and and it gets harder to differentiate cameras, I bet we'll see large square sensors eventually.

0 upvotes
straitouttahell
By straitouttahell (Oct 22, 2012)

D600 sensor in a D700 body

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 22, 2012)

better D800 sensor, AF, and AE.

0 upvotes
straitouttahell
By straitouttahell (Oct 22, 2012)

I'm not a big fan of the D800 sensor, being limited by diffraction at f8 leaves me cold. Great sensor, but not everybody's cup of tea IMO

0 upvotes
joeybaking
By joeybaking (Oct 22, 2012)

Can you put in one mic in and one headphone out?

0 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Oct 22, 2012)

A true replacement for the Nikonos underwater cameras, with full-frame sensor, inductive charging and wireless data transfer, so that the ONLY time they would need to be taken apart, is when selecting and changing the lens.

Brian

0 upvotes
johnghh
By johnghh (Oct 22, 2012)

A rugged compact made from parts found in a Sony RX1, Fuji X100 and Fuji XE1 would tick all my boxes. Full frame, black bodied, fixed pancake f2.8 lens 28mm lens (after all, f2 is only one stop brighter, but so much bigger and heavier for the light gained unless it’s only the out of focus bits of images that turn you on?), leaf shutter for fast flash synch speed, 100% accurate hi res EVF, aperture, shutter and exposure compensation as per X100, and ideally a mechanical manual focus option as well as a quick auto system. Finally it should be sufficiently weatherised and dust resistant so it could be slung over my shoulder or stuffed in a pocket to be my constant companion. I reckon I would happily part with £1200-£1500 for such a camera, safe in the knowledge that there are already many excellent SLR's out there for folk that want to change focal lengths?

1 upvote
7enderbender
By 7enderbender (Oct 22, 2012)

Quite simple actually: any affordable M9-style camera, or a digital version of a Canon F1n with no frills, full-time manual focus with a no-compromise LARGE andbright viewfinder. So basically today's sensor technology in a classic camera design that is centered around quality mechanical parts.

And in addition to that I'd like to have a full-frame point&shoot with manual aperture priority mode and a fast fixed 35 or 55 mm lens. It was possible with 35mm film so it should be possible now.

0 upvotes
Jim222
By Jim222 (Oct 22, 2012)

Five steps to the perfect landscape DSLR

1. A full frame sensor with only 18 megapixels and optimized for dynamic range.
2. A large bright viewfinder
3. Manual focus only - with the kind of beautifully silky focusing ring lenses we used to have in the SLR days.
4. Enough weight to the camera to make it less shake prone.
5. A real mechanical shutter release - you guessed it, like the old SLRs used to have so that you can trip it without shaking the camera. These electronic button releases bite in comparison.

of course if you have no experience with a quality older SLR you won't get what I am talking about.

4 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Oct 22, 2012)

A just perfect requirements list. Thank you!

0 upvotes
jhumkey
By jhumkey (Oct 22, 2012)

Far more interested in the "Ultimate Lens", 12mm-1000mm 1.4f w/ no spherical or chromatic aberrations. Weighs a few oz's and is 1" deep. (But I'm afraid we'll have to conquer "gravity" to produce such a lens. Glass alone will never cut the mustard.) For the camera: 60fps shutter burst, 2 days on a battery, Full Frame (primarily for anti noise) 6 "user config presets". Configurable HDR (2-11 shots, with 1/3stop step rate). Excellent low light performance. All for $500 or less. You know . . . "just the basics". Right now, my 7D is "acceptably close". A 7D speed with Full Frame Sensor and a tad better HDR options . . . would be "very" close. (And NO!!!!! Software for HDR means options for ME to do HDR, NOT doing HDR processing "in" the camera.)

0 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Oct 22, 2012)

Nothing gives the dream of all technologists: The all in one beast. In order to fight the never ending wishes, I have acquired so many cameras from analog to digital. Each fetches special needs, and I really use and enjoy them.

Costly "hobby" - but I run - what one of my photographers' friend describes - the "shutter therapy". Healing today's boring business encounters by expressing yourself as liberated as possible in picture taking.

This demands flexibility in equipment. Cheers

0 upvotes
Tom Zimmer
By Tom Zimmer (Oct 22, 2012)

I only want one thing. Really really good low light performance.

3 upvotes
husky92
By husky92 (Oct 22, 2012)

Start with the new Canon 6D, add a popup flash and the 650D's touch screen. For me, that would be perfect.

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Oct 22, 2012)

Actually Sony RX1 is very close to ideal camera for me. But it is still far from becoming "perfect". And the price is an important factor.

2 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Oct 22, 2012)

I would need 2

Slim P&S Android cameraphone w/a 6-10x optical zoom lens that could fit in my pocket. Not sure about sensor size; whatever tricks necessary to get it to a respectable level of speed and video quality.

Full frame Sony Nex w/a rangefinder lens, fast walkaround prime and if possible some kind of zoom. I would be OK with 5-10x, as long as it was still light + compact. Wouldn't need to be super fast- its a damn full frame.

Personally I am kind of done with DSLRs, they are so damn clunky. NEX has changed my whole outlook. If my dreams don't come to be though I will probably supplement my NEX-C3 with an old full frame Alpha.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Oct 22, 2012)

clunky? Lol... if anything is clunky - it's the tiny crippled mirrorless.

0 upvotes
easyliving
By easyliving (Oct 22, 2012)

At first glance, a beautiful camera, expecially in that breaks the same tired designs in favor of a more rugged and pro apparence. Also beautiful are the many direct manual controls all over the camera. The three rotary controls on the front are clearly wrong.

0 upvotes
mischivo
By mischivo (Oct 22, 2012)

That is one brute of a camera! I'm also curious to know why the metering and drive settings are on the front of the camera. That seems stupid. I'm tempted to ask why the focus controls are also there, but many manufacturers have gone with that route, Nikon included. The jury is still out on why Macro (doesn't Nikon call it Micro?) needs to be there. And where is the manual focus ring?

0 upvotes
arrow180
By arrow180 (Oct 22, 2012)

All I am waiting for is an advanced compact (e.g. Canon G15, Fuji X10) with a built in EVF.

1 upvote
Tom Zimmer
By Tom Zimmer (Oct 22, 2012)

Nikon V1?

0 upvotes
taktak91
By taktak91 (Oct 22, 2012)

One man's dream is another man's nightmare. That goes for dream cameras as well.(^-^)

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Oct 22, 2012)

I must say, I need good film scanner. Because I have found ideal camera among film cameras (Xpan and panoramic 617).
Hasselblad X5 is a good scanner, but too expensive :(

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
mischivo
By mischivo (Oct 22, 2012)

I've got the Nikon LS 5000 and love it. It gives me great 20-21 megapixel scans, which pretty much out-resolves any of the films I've shot with. Nikon no longer sells or supports it.
But you're still in luck. Plustek recently announced a new scanner, and from what I've read, it's comparable if not better than the Nikons. http://plustek.com/usa/products/opticfilm-series/opticfilm-120/
It'll be expensive, but nowhere near as pricey as the Hasselblads.

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Oct 22, 2012)

Mischivo , I know Nikon 5000 scans are great, many of my films were scanned at Nikon 5000. Tnanks for plustek link, but I doubt it will be good as Nikon 8000/9000. Plustek never was perfect.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Don Douglas
By Don Douglas (Oct 22, 2012)

The Reflecta MF 5000 seems like a reasonable alternative. It scans 35mm through 6x12 at 3200 dpi. I haven't used it but am interested in is as it is currently available and supported. Street prices are around 1300 euro.

reflecta.de

0 upvotes
Michael Knox
By Michael Knox (Oct 22, 2012)

Like a Sony RX1, better grip, built-in viewfinder. They almost had it, but without a viewfinder it's useless to the target audience.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Colin Dutton
By Colin Dutton (Oct 22, 2012)

Someone should design a cartridge sensor that can can slot into any 35mm film camera.

5 upvotes
Miguel Osorio
By Miguel Osorio (Oct 22, 2012)

Colin,
I have been trying to spread this idea and I think it is possible:

-> re35.net/, or
-> http://seoulcolors.com/2011/05/digital-camera-back-for-35mm-film-by-hyun-jin-park/

4 upvotes
steelneck
By steelneck (Oct 22, 2012)

A company called Silicon Film tried to make exactly that for about 10 years ago. They was of course a bit too early and did not manage to produce a real product, though they did make some working experimental examples of it. Unfortunately they also patented it. When the companies money ran out it died and the patents was bought up by bigger players, who obviously do not want to see such a product on the market. Patents lasts for 10 years, so we have to wait at least another 10 years until the patents expire. This is the main use of patents, to stifle compentition and block innovation.

Here is the patent:
http://www.google.com/patents?id=x8ELAAAAEBAJ&zoom=4&dq=Silicon%20%20film%20cartridge&hl=sv&pg=PA1#v=onepage&q=Silicon%20%20film%20cartridge&f=false

1 upvote
Miguel Osorio
By Miguel Osorio (Oct 22, 2012)

Thank you for the patent information. This idea is very simple and it is the most obvious. I can't undestand why it is patented. It is the "same" as a normal photographic film, but with an electronic sensor. The rest is only electronics. The FPGA world can solve this. That's why I am an opensource adept.

1 upvote
Danlo
By Danlo (Oct 23, 2012)

Dream come true.. wow.. it would be so amazing.. imagine putting one of these in any old compact, slr, rangefinder or lomo camera !? So freaking fun!

1 upvote
Miguel Osorio
By Miguel Osorio (Oct 24, 2012)

Yes, it would be fantastic. There are plenty of analog cameras worldwide. I think companies (eg Fujifilm) still producing photographic film, could embark on this solution. With all the experience that these companies have both in digital and analog photography that certainly would make an excellent product and it would be a commercial success.

0 upvotes
sirkhann
By sirkhann (Oct 22, 2012)

I want a digital FM3a :)

6 upvotes
jure1
By jure1 (Oct 22, 2012)

RX1 (as only Sony can make such a small body) with interchangeable lenses and one fast normal pancake.

3 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Oct 22, 2012)

Yeah, you meant to say Panasonic GF1 w/20mm pancake wannabe. Except then you have to go to a bigger sensor because Sony cannot keep up with the optics.

Know something about RX1 flare, jure? It can spoil the whole day, not to mention the ideal camera.

0 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Oct 22, 2012)

Do you really want one that small? I used an EM-5 this weekend and I don't think I'd want anything any smaller than that.

0 upvotes
jure1
By jure1 (Oct 30, 2012)

I have learned to work with small bodies, and love to have a small camera always around with me.

0 upvotes
jure1
By jure1 (Oct 30, 2012)

I have not know about RX1 flare, OneGuy!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Total comments: 710
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