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Watch time-lapse video of Shuttle Endeavour's voyage across L.A

By dpreview staff on Oct 17, 2012 at 17:30 GMT

The L.A. Times has posted a fascinating time-lapse video, showing the progress of retired space shuttle Endeavour across Los Angeles to its new home in the California Science Center, in Exposition Park. The video spans the entire length of the journey from Los Angeles International Airport, which started on Thursday night and due to delays caused by maintainance issues and obstacles along the route, finally ended 16 hours late, on Sunday afternoon. Click the image below to see the video at www.latimes.com (link opens in a new window)

Comments

Total comments: 36
peppino
By peppino (Oct 19, 2012)

Here is our timelapse video of the event, titled "Mission 26: The Big Endeavour" https://vimeo.com/51621640

enjoy!

0 upvotes
Funduro
By Funduro (Oct 19, 2012)

SUPER !

0 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Oct 18, 2012)

My Nikon can do without additional tools

0 upvotes
Biowizard
By Biowizard (Oct 18, 2012)

Lovely video - though I was briefly worried for one tree that appeared to be in the way!

Brian

1 upvote
MichaelK81
By MichaelK81 (Oct 18, 2012)

It looks like an army of ants bringing home a larger prey :-) Great video, thanks for the link.
--
http://www.michaelkormos.com

2 upvotes
Coyote_Cody
By Coyote_Cody (Oct 18, 2012)

The most wonderful thing about the USA is that ppl have opinions without any knowledge or facts to form that opinion, so saying the shuttle was inconsequential is a very uninformed immature, showing very little understanding of science, engineering or 'wonderment'.

To these here is their motto:

"I don't need no stinking science, facts or education of any sort, I have my opinions, founded upon nothing, pulled from my behind!"

Great time-lapse, likely its last trip! Sad!!

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
WT21
By WT21 (Oct 18, 2012)

Is this program dead because of some ignorance, or rather because it is actually economically infeasible? The data says it's economically infeasible. Do you have any contrary data, or again just opinions from your rear?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
SvobodaT
By SvobodaT (Oct 27, 2012)

Facts are that the U.S. Shuttle architecture was flawed technologically and economically from the initial design. Nevertheless it was the best mankind has ever had in operation.
The Russian shuttle concept was architected much better but never made it to a manned flight :-(
Too sad.

0 upvotes
Paul Farace
By Paul Farace (Oct 18, 2012)

Amazing time lapse, but sad in the bigger framework... I saw the first orbiter arrive at Kennedy in 1979 -- it was the beginning of a wonderful era... seeing this orbiter arrive at its tomb underscores the fact we have ended large-scale manned space flight, maybe forever. I hope not, but I don't see a groundswell of support for even the minimal support NASA had for shuttle ops. I thought for sure I heard "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" as they pulled the orbiter to its final resting place...

1 upvote
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Oct 18, 2012)

A lot of the problem is the total lack of historical perspective by the "omg, have we ended manned spaceflight forever?!" crowd.

Historically, decades could pass between the major voyages of discovery that made up the West's exploration of the world outside Europe. We have only experienced a short blip in American government-driven manned spaceflight. Within a few years, manned space flight could boom, and this time, driven by multiple private and probably American companies. And maybe driven by the desire to mine asteroids and other bodies for valuable resources, the same drive that brought Europe to the Americas and China to set up all over Africa.

I guess because I can remember the first shuttle launch, it seems old to me. Like a 1970s station wagon, even though we kept putting new engines, tires, transmissions, and stereos in it. Time to move on to a new era of space flight that is sustainably funded by private companies in a way that could ease resource crunches on Earth.

0 upvotes
Kevin Fitzsimons
By Kevin Fitzsimons (Oct 17, 2012)

"Pretty inconsequential"??? Are you joking? The upgrading of the Hubble telescope was probably worth the whole program. I'm shocked that a photo person would say such a thing. Go to hubblesite.org/gallery/ and see if you don't change your mind.
It is a very cool video. A lot of planning and time went into it.

6 upvotes
WT21
By WT21 (Oct 18, 2012)

Yes, the use of "pretty inconsequential" is overstated, but relative to it's expense and length of it's run, did it achieve as much as you might have hoped? Yes, we all want this to be the precursor to Star Trek, but that is only because we assume we will actually be able to get off this rock. While fun science fiction, it is at this time mostly that - scifi. Even if we could, we would need breakthroughs from more affordable programs than this one.

IMO, the Shuttle soaked up a lot of money. I would rather have seen those funds put into more planetary exploration. This program was proved overly expensive quite some time ago, which is why it was never ratcheted up. I will not mourn that it is moth-balled, but rather look forward to what could be done next. To mourn an unworkable program is to be a hopeless romantic, which is what the music is conveying, and the point of my perhaps hastily-written post.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
1 upvote
WT21
By WT21 (Oct 18, 2012)

Also note I said "whose reign in space travel is pretty inconsequential" There was context to "pretty inconsequential".

0 upvotes
iamphil
By iamphil (Oct 17, 2012)

Did they really have to cut down hundreds of mature trees just to move this thing into place?

3 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (Oct 17, 2012)

I thought the point of it was that they "didn't" have to cut any trees down. The maker went out of his way to show how close they came to that one tree when turning the corner. If a significant number (more than 3 perhaps) trees were actually cut down to move then that greatly diminishes the wow factor for me.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Oct 17, 2012)

The absolute travesty of cutting down all those trees was the first thing I thought of when I saw this story. I'm not sure who decided that was necessary, but surely they could have come up with an alternate plan.

0 upvotes
Richard Shih
By Richard Shih (Oct 17, 2012)

The organizers had to cut down ~400 trees but promised to plant ~1,000 in place. http://io9.com/5944492/xspace-shuttle-endeavours-journey-to-museum-will-require-400-trees-to-be-cut-down

The space shuttle isn't something you can simply helicopter to its final destination nor chop up and reassemble.

1 upvote
CameraCarl
By CameraCarl (Oct 17, 2012)

Planting a thousand saplings is not equivalent to chopping down 400 mature trees. Considering that dozens of equally viable museums wanted to get the shuttle you would think that someone would have taken the problem of the trees into consideration before giving it to the California museum. Sometimes apparently smart people can be pretty stupid.

0 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Oct 18, 2012)

When the Concorde went to the Museum, nobody had to cut anything except Concorde itself, and a few lamp-posts maybe. And Concorde is a tad bigger than this bird... So, where's the will there's the way... :(

0 upvotes
iamphil
By iamphil (Oct 18, 2012)

Even if they did plant 1,000 trees to "replace" them, cutting down that many mature trees changes the face of entire neighborhoods. It sucks if you're a property owner there.

I don't see why they couldn't have chopped up the bird and re-assembled on site. It's not like it has to be flight worthy again.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
The Customer
By The Customer (Oct 18, 2012)

In many cases, they're going to be replacing cut trees with new ones that are already fairly large. Also: many of the trees removed were already slated for removal due to maintenance issues; the city was, in fact, planning to replace them with trees better suited to climate and place.

As for "chopping up the bird", that would have required a major disassembly which would have then required bringing MANY expert personnel to LA to rebuild the ship. Many of those people might not even be available, plus, the added expense would have been unrealistic.

Finally... Have you ever taken a long look at one of the space-going shuttles from the side or below? The wings are integrated into the overall design in a VERY intricate manner, with the heat shielding crating essentially a solid form, broken only by the landing gear doors. It's not a simple airplane.

2 upvotes
Todd Ka
By Todd Ka (Oct 18, 2012)

You guys are a bunch of idiots. How many trees were cut down so they could build the building you are living in now? Trees grow back people.

0 upvotes
pgb
By pgb (Oct 18, 2012)

400 trees or a shuttle ? I'd go for the trees every time.
Science can make a shuttle but can it make a tree?
We haven't found many trees on any planet we have visited.

0 upvotes
WT21
By WT21 (Oct 17, 2012)

The video shows the power of music. The space shuttle is a very large, very expensive piece of technology whose reign in space travel is pretty inconsequential. Very little happened, and the most memorable event about any of the shuttles, sadly, is the one that blew up.

I am sure they were utilitarian, but the music makes you feel like you are viewing some poignant significant moment, when the the shuttle era has really been quite boring. The Benny Hill theme song could have fit in nicely to the time lapse, and given the viewer a MUCH different emotional response. You can find the BH theme music on youtube such as http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MK6TXMsvgQg. Try it out yourself, both ways. Mute the LA audio and turn up BH.

3 upvotes
JCB123
By JCB123 (Oct 17, 2012)

I thought that was the Benny Hill theme tune

0 upvotes
prrbill
By prrbill (Oct 17, 2012)

You fail to comprehend all that was accomplished during the shuttle's time in space and the experiments conducted. Give it a few years as scientists & researchers conduct their experiments. I read/heard the same thing from people in the '60's who said it was a waste of money for NASA to fulfill JFK's pledge to have a man on the moon by the end of the decade. Then in the '70's they said why continue the exploration since we got someone up there. The computer you're using is just one example of why. America need to wake up and fully fund NASA.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
WilliamJ
By WilliamJ (Oct 17, 2012)

To WT21: with the Benny Hill opening song, it's 100% perfect. It works with Jean-Jacques Perrey's "Baroque Hoedown" quite well too (cf: http://youtu.be/Ax00vnsZPKE ).

To prrbill: are you so arrogant to think computer science is a product of the USA to an extend it couldn't have existed without american engineers who worked on space projects ? Your knowledge of history seems too poor in my opinion to allow you to prescribe anything when it comes to the way of using citizen's hard-earned money.

2 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Oct 17, 2012)

Do you think the building of the ISS was inconsequential?

It's the first time anything that large was built in space. The shuttle was the only vehicle available to lift the components. We will need the large-scale zero-grav assembly experience and long-duration habitation data if we're to go any further into space.

You know what else was quite boring? Most of the other technical achievements involved in most of the technology you like to interact with daily.

In fact, being "quite boring" is a hallmark of a spectacularly successful technology, if it becomes so day-to-day that you take it for granted. We wanted shuttle missions to become routine, not missions where it was a major victory if an individual launch actually worked without killing anyone. Routine means we got it down.

4 upvotes
Richard Shih
By Richard Shih (Oct 17, 2012)

10 NASA inventions you might use everyday: http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity/topics/ten-nasa-inventions.htm

NASA spin-off technologies: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASAspin-offtechnologies

Modern computer science can attribute a significant portion to Americans and NASA (which promoted the ideas of maths and sciences and fostered a generation of thinkers), not discounting the contributions of Europeans and Asians. Intel, AMD, Microsoft, Google, Apple, a multitude of programming languages. Not to say that it couldn't have happened elsewhere in the world, but it did happen in the US.

Heaven forbid you spend a marginal amount of a country's budget on future technologies (many of which will fail and cost lots of money before succeeding). That's what science is about.

0 upvotes
The Customer
By The Customer (Oct 18, 2012)

"...the music makes you feel like you are viewing some poignant significant moment..."

Well, as someone who spent a fair amount of time over the past weekend following the shuttle around various parts of Los Angeles, I can tell you that, even without the music, it was a poignant , significant moment. :)

0 upvotes
Todd Ka
By Todd Ka (Oct 18, 2012)

Congratulations you have managed to post the dumbest least informed comment ever posted on the internet. It would be funner it it were not so sad.

0 upvotes
WT21
By WT21 (Oct 18, 2012)

International Space Station was mentioned, which is a good one. Also, I forgot the Hubble. I don't remember if that was launched by the shuttle, but it was certainly serviced by the shuttle.

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Oct 17, 2012)

I wish the space shuttle would have driven through my neighborhood.

5 upvotes
Franklin
By Franklin (Oct 17, 2012)

Cool

0 upvotes
Artichoke
By Artichoke (Oct 18, 2012)

it really should be in Houston
wouldn't have had to cut down any trees

2 upvotes
The Customer
By The Customer (Oct 18, 2012)

NASA Administrator Bolden said he wanted an orbiter in Houston, but the Space Center there came up far too short on the criteria used for allocation of the fleet. Those criteria were:

Commitment to funding

International access

Attendance

Regional population

Meet delivery schedule

Facility availability

Transportation effort/risk

AAM or Smithsonian affiliate

1 upvote
Total comments: 36