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Samsung's Android-powered Galaxy Camera: the most connected camera?

By dpreview staff on Aug 29, 2012 at 17:34 GMT

Samsung today launched the first true compact camera/smart device hybrid - the Galaxy Camera, with 3G/4G connectivity as well as Wi-Fi (which sets it apart from Wi-Fi-only competitors like the recently-announced Nikon Coolpix S800c).

Camera manufacturers have been seeing sales of their compact cameras fall for a long time now, challenged by a new generation of camera-equipped smartphones. As the photographic specification of phones get better, there's less need for most casual photographers to carry a dedicated camera, and if you're in the business of selling compact cameras, this is a serious problem. But Samsung believes it has a solution. Take a WB850F camera, and a Galaxy SIII smartphone, and... blend them. 

We've been talking to Samsung representatives for months about the concept of a camera running the Android OS, and the Korean manufacturer's early plans were the subject of more than one confidential briefing during a trip to Seoul earlier this year. Now that the wraps are off, the final specification is more or less in line with what we expected - a versatile, consumer-level camera running 'full strength' Android and equipped with both 3G/4G connectivity in addition to the now-standard (for Samsung) Wi-Fi. A 1.4GHz quad-core processor completes the picture and should provide enough 'grunt' to make everything run nice and smoothly. 

From the front, the Galaxy Camera's photographic lineage is obvious. An optically-stabilized 21X zoom lens (you have the option of controlling this via a conventional zoom rocker switch or via the touchscreen interface) and contoured handgrip denote a 'proper' camera.

The Galaxy Camera is a 16.3MP compact camera with a 4.8in LCD touchscreen running the Android operating system. It runs the latest iteration of Android (4.1 - known as 'Jelly Bean'), and will be available in two versions - a 3G + Wi-Fi model and a 4G + Wi-Fi variant (carrier and regional information TBC). This makes it the first 'connected camera' to offer more than just Wi-Fi connectivity.

Although we understand that the camera does not have cellular voice capabilities, it will be compatible with various VoiP apps, such as Skype, which will enable it to be used for making voice and video calls over 3G/4G or WiFi. Photographic features include a 21X zoom lens, spanning 23-481mm (equivalent) and a built-in 'Photo Wizard' for editing photographs in-camera. 

Months ago, in Seoul, we asked Samsung representatives how they envisaged smartphone/camera convergence: specifically, whether in the long-term the Korean manufacturer intended to expand the photographic capabilities of phones, or build smartphone features into cameras. At the time we received no clear answer. The fact that Samsung is calling this a 'Galaxy' product is interesting, but there's no mistaking that this is an enhanced camera, not the other way round.

Semantics aside, the Galaxy Camera is highly significant. It is the nearest thing we've seen to a true camera/phone hybrid, and as well as solid photographic specifications it contains a serious amount of DNA from Samsung's well-established line of smartphones. The key is the addition of a powerful processor, and 3G/4G connectivity. This means that just like a smartphone, the Galaxy Camera can connect to the web anywhere that there's mobile coverage, and should have enough power to run apps and browse the web without feeling sluggish. An 'Auto Cloud Backup' feature automatically saves images to Samsung's AllShare cloud storage service the moment they're taken - another benefit of 'always on' connectivity.

From the back, however, the Galaxy's massive display and three 'soft' buttons are classic Android OS. Gone are the usual buttons and dials that we'd expect on the rear of a Samsung compact camera.

Interestingly though, although the screen size is similar, the display on the back of the Galaxy Camera is an LCD unit, not the gorgeous AMOLED used in the Galaxy SIII. 

Likewise, the potential to send images captured with the Galaxy by email, or upload them directly to social network sites from pretty much anywhere is very appealing, and as Samsung knows very well, for a huge number of photographers working with mobile devices, this is already second nature. What these photographers aren't used to of course, is the sort of advanced photographic feature set that the Galaxy camera offers. In theory, this makes the Galaxy Camera an ideal first point-and-shoot for someone who's used to taking pictures on their phone, and wants to go further with photography. 

Of course, because the camera runs the open-source Android operating system this means that the camera's feature set can be expanded in the same way as any modern Android-based smartphone, via a huge number of third-party applications. We have some worries about battery life though - the Galaxy Camera's battery has roughly 50% greater capacity as the battery used in the WB850F, but around 25% less than the battery used in the Galaxy SIII, which isn't known for its stamina. Another big question mark - for now - is price. A significant amount of processing power is required to run a full smartphone OS - much more than would be necessary for a conventional compact camera - and it doesn't come cheap. At the time of writing, Samsung's pricing model, which may include carrier subsidies, is unknown. 

When we spoke to Sunhong Lim - VP Sales & Marketing in Samsung's Digital Imaging division back in March, he predicted that 'once the cloud computing era truly dawns, a non-connected device will be meaningless'. The Galaxy Camera is Samsung's surest step yet in this direction.

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Comments

Total comments: 290
123
vanessaelizebeth
By vanessaelizebeth (Feb 25, 2013)

The battery used in the Galaxy Camera is actually the same as the Galaxy S2.

http://www.mobilephonesreview.in/

0 upvotes
abi170845
By abi170845 (Sep 17, 2012)

My girlfriend would love this!

0 upvotes
Lexx81
By Lexx81 (Sep 5, 2012)

A month ago I was discussing with some friends on which will be the future improvements in digital cameras: I swear I told faster autofocus and in-camera editing like modern phones.... Than sony nex 5r and this one...

0 upvotes
paolopan83
By paolopan83 (Sep 4, 2012)

Cool. Maybe it is just a matter of time for camera and phones to become the same thing :)

The only doubt is the price... since it can't make phone calls I wouldn't spend more than 200euros on that, even if I guess many people will give higher value to this device.

0 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Sep 2, 2012)

Seems that Samsung is just 'testing waters' with this product. It may get my attention as soon as it really is a smartphone and not just a smartcamera. And I actually expect decent sensor size and lens quality, otherwise it does not make sense.

1 upvote
tim4321
By tim4321 (Sep 2, 2012)

While I am exciting at the creative possibilities of such integrated technology, I am pessimistically aware that the camera industry depends on stunting their technology in order to milk the consumer.

If the technology were faithfully integrated we would have a revolution in creative photography today - instead we have instagram.
Only now are we having perhaps in iOS 6 some possibility of controlling the iPhone's camera programmatically, as opposed to simple dumb post-processing and uploading.

It's depressing that this camera will probably not even allow this control to users or developers.

Manufacturers - we need cameras that are a faithful tool giving us utility according to the technology which is available now - not something to play the market, rationing features over the years to artificially differentiate products and feign innovation.

Today's photographers need today's technology to innovate and create new ways of seeing the world, and we are being held back by this :-(

0 upvotes
McCool69
By McCool69 (Sep 3, 2012)

>> It's depressing that this camera will probably not even allow this control to users or developers.

I think you have to look at the camera options on modern cell phones such as Samsung Galaxy S3 before you take a stand on these issues. The myriad of options it offers (which will no doubt be available on this camera as well) puts Apple to shame big time for their lacklustre implementation of camera-related tools in iPhone.

1 upvote
notareal
By notareal (Sep 2, 2012)

I guess someone had to do a hands on comparison with Nokia 808 Pureview
http://unleashthephones.com/2012/09/01/samsung-galaxy-camera-vs-nokia-808-pureview-camera-samples/

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
1 upvote
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Aug 31, 2012)

When are you going to stop innovating Samsung ?

Apple is left behind

2 upvotes
bikebum
By bikebum (Aug 31, 2012)

Why did they stop short of just making a phone? Just came back from a month long vacation and greece and didnt use my p&s once, just my galaxy s2 that was in my pocket anyhow with a local sim. The whole time i was asking myself why dont they just come out with a full blown phone-camera allready? Ide buy one... Guess ill have to keep on asking that question a little longer.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Aug 31, 2012)

Not surprised to see this. Don't think this actual model will change the world like the iPhone. But 2 things will happen. Apple will put a proper camera on the iPhone and camera brands will look at this Samsung concept. The next 10 years will be interesting for P&S cameras. Check out this parody film.

http://youtu.be/uIRBxRlsYR0

0 upvotes
billorg
By billorg (Aug 31, 2012)

Why is all of this connectivity starting with point and shoots only? Dslr cameras need it too, the eye-fi cards are really buggy, unreliable, Run HOT and are very yesterday. Bottom line is that we need to be able to instantly email a photo - sized as we choose on the fly as well as upload to our FTP and/or cloud space from anywhere. Not just upload to Facebook or other sharing and social sites - serious photographers need more than that. Some in-camera editing for the basics should be available also. Interfaces would obviously have to be modified to email easily. What is taking so long? The technology is very available and has been for a long time. I also think most people will not want to pay for a separate 3G acct - so it has to either be part of their existing 3G acct if they have one or just use wifi as a connection to not only the phone, but also directly to FTP space and email. The wifi NEX is ok but only let's you go through the phone to email which is clunky.

3 upvotes
McCool69
By McCool69 (Aug 31, 2012)

I totally agree. Unfortunately lots of DSLR-owners are a very conservative bunch of people that don't want change - even if it is a totally optional functionality that you don't have to use if you don't want to. Just look at all the hostile negativity towards something like being able to shoot live video with DSLRs when it appeared a few years ago.

Personally I would love to have functionallity like this Samsung camera has in my DSLR. I bet actual pros that take sports/press photography that needs to be delivered in smaller resolutions for web-use immediately would love it as well instead of stressing like they do today with uploading 'live' from their portable computers out in the field, causing them to potentially miss some action. Of course there are systems that more or less does this job today if you pay enough, but it adds a lot of bulk instead of having it embedded in the camera. And 3G/4G is a must - just wi-fi won't do.

3 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Aug 31, 2012)

more than that this may cost 100s of dollar per camera to implement.

0 upvotes
Reg Natarajan
By Reg Natarajan (Aug 31, 2012)

All the naysayers here are going to look foolish when this Samsung hits the market with this and sells a zillion cameras. I'll be one of the zillion.

3 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Aug 31, 2012)

Hopefully, the icons can be oriented in landscape or portrait mode.

0 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Aug 31, 2012)

The revolution here isn't about adding more features to the camera. It's not even about communication, as Wi-Fi and Eye-Fi already do that.

It's about giving up control, from the camera manufacturer to the community.

What this means is that the photographer can decide what's on the camera and how it should work. That is done via selecting apps and customizing the apps. There will be camera apps for every type of photography, and for every skill level. Plus, there will be apps to accomplish things that couldn't be done easily before, or things that were only available on certain brands.

The programmer community will be able to have freedom with the hardware, without hacking nor side-loading. Gone is the criticism of why a camera manufacturer didn't include a certain feature. If you want a feature, download it.

The revolution already happened in the phone world, separating "smart phones" from "feature phones". Now it's time for "smart cameras", rather than "feature camera".

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
14 upvotes
TacticDesigns
By TacticDesigns (Aug 31, 2012)

Very well put! :)

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Aug 31, 2012)

Im not at all certain that you will be able to create apps that allow different kinds of camera control

0 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (Aug 31, 2012)

Why not? Magic Lantern already does that on a Canon DSLR. How much easier to do something running Android. Isn't that the whole purpose of this camera anyway?

0 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Aug 31, 2012)

I already see thousands of camera apps for Android. Go to play.google.com, search for "camera" and you'll see things like: Pudding Camera, Camera Fun Pro, Retro Camera, Cartoon Camera, Camera Illusion, Camera ZOOM FX, Night Vision Camera, Silent Camera, Lomo Camera, Camera Magic, UCam Ultra Camera, etc.

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Aug 31, 2012)

yeah but they just use the standar camera and alter the image or give a different interface . i know of nothing in a mobile app that can control how the camera works

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Aug 30, 2012)

I find this a little odd. Android is an OS for doing everything and the camera is a piece of hardware for a specific task. they dont seem to go together. I dont need to be able to play angry birds on my camera. Now if it replaced a mobile phone I would kind of get it. similar to the pureview. I wonder if a camera with wifi and some software for social sharing wouldnt be more logical

2 upvotes
metalized
By metalized (Aug 31, 2012)

I agree. It is overkill to use android. as the os. However, when i read that samsung joins the digital camera industry I know that one day it will merge both products. The ability to control and customize the work of the camera by using userimplantable/installable softwares is the next logical step that i can think of.

1 upvote
McCool69
By McCool69 (Aug 31, 2012)

>> I wonder if a camera with wifi and some software for social sharing wouldnt be more logical

If you want to be stuck with how the camera manufacturers software is design and have no options then maybe.

The great thing about this is that you to a high degree can select exactly what apps you want to use for editing/sharing and so on, and not just be bound by what the manufacturer have included.

And surely a camera that can upload from everywhere that has a mobile connection (in addition to wi-fi) is superior in that respect to a wi-fi-only camera.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Aug 31, 2012)

actually know its not. the radio will bump the price significantly and i suspect that the amount of people who actually want a 3g/4g data plan for there camera are small. i actually thing the 3g 4g thing is a big miscalulation on samsungs part. I really thing that this issue is better addressed by a cell phone and camera interconnectivity

0 upvotes
metalized
By metalized (Aug 31, 2012)

yes. no need for 3g. and the os should allow an app to change how it works. e.g. changing white balance calculation, faster focusing algorithm, sharpening, resizing , compressing, dr enhancement, noise reduction algorithm, etc.

0 upvotes
Cheezr
By Cheezr (Aug 30, 2012)

the only thing that frightens me is the as yet unannounced price.
Galaxy SIII + compact is not going to be under $700, SIGH

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Aug 30, 2012)

Typical case of "the next big thing".

0 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Aug 30, 2012)

I wonder if one can "beam" images from the camera to a handset. No sense paying for another data plan if this capability exists and one is using an Android phone running 4.1.

The other option is to pay for a tethering plan for the handset (still cheaper than paying for an additional device), which will allow the camera to connect via wifi.

Because let's face it... very few people are going to use this in lieu of a phone. Those who do will be using Skype or GVoice or some other VoiP service app and a headset.

0 upvotes
David Zamora
By David Zamora (Aug 30, 2012)

If you purchase an Eye-fi SD card, you can do exactly that. Pair it to your phone, pop the card in any camera of your liking and let the magic happen. It creates an ad hoc WI FI connection directly to your phone and automatically transfers the images. I use one and it's pretty darn awesome. The best thing about it is that you're not limited to a specific camera. BTW, it only creates a WiFi connection once you've taken a new picture. It transfers the image/s to your phone, then disconnects the connection.

Certainly beats having to purchase a new camera...is on amazon for around $40 for the 4GB version.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
bryanhempstead
By bryanhempstead (Aug 30, 2012)

Quarter twenty mount?

0 upvotes
Essai
By Essai (Aug 30, 2012)

Well done Samsung (and Nikon). Cameras with a real OS and Wi Fi is the only way to go IMO.

0 upvotes
plasnu
By plasnu (Aug 30, 2012)

Compact camera market is dying. This is the sign of the end of low class camera brand like Samsung. Only high quality camera system will survive.

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
rmbackus
By rmbackus (Aug 30, 2012)

I'm waiting until a camera has a laser-pointer, a luggage weigher and a makeup mirror in it :-)
Oops, almost forgot a tire pressure gauger...

2 upvotes
thejohnnerparty
By thejohnnerparty (Aug 30, 2012)

LOL. :-)

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (Aug 30, 2012)

yeah that is my thought

0 upvotes
RUcrAZ
By RUcrAZ (Sep 3, 2012)

No pen-knife, or screwdriver, however - the airlines won't stand for it!

0 upvotes
paulkienitz
By paulkienitz (Aug 30, 2012)

Any bets on how long it'll be before samsung sells a "Galaxy" television set?

0 upvotes
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (Oct 5, 2012)

http://www.samsung.com/in/smarttv/#apps

0 upvotes
David Zamora
By David Zamora (Aug 30, 2012)

What I think will happen in the next couple years is that we will be seeing 3g/4g + wi-fi integrated cameras, but at no cost to the consumer. The camera companies know its silly ask consumers to pay for yet another data plan just for a camera. What I predict will happen is that camera companies will provide 3g/4g for free to the consumer, but the bandwidth will be throttled and the 'free' 3g/4g will most likely have ads on the screen when uploading to the phones 'social apps', eg. Face Book, Twitter, ETC. Similar to how Amazon offers free 3g on their ereaders (with ads).

I think this method will be common place within several years...and will make make way for some great photo sharing on social media sites as well. I'm pretty stoked as to where this is all going!

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Gkpm
By Gkpm (Aug 30, 2012)

Amazon doesn't do the 3G with ads. They take "download fees" from the money that authors get.

Amazon also recently restricted the 3G browsing. There's a 50MB limit now.

It's not a sustainable offer, just like even to this day you don't get free phone calls with your phone - ads or no ads.

1 upvote
David Zamora
By David Zamora (Aug 30, 2012)

Good to know. But, either way, this method is going to happen one way or another. Just a matter of when the ball gets rolling.

0 upvotes
Suave
By Suave (Aug 30, 2012)

You don't need 3g/4g connection. All you need is an app which will turn your camera into a virtual microSD card. Then the phone can take the data from the camera over wi-fi and feed it into 4g. Sort of like WAP on rooted android phones but the other way around. I am sure that if say Samsung and AT@#$%#%T work together they can make it happen.

1 upvote
paulkienitz
By paulkienitz (Aug 30, 2012)

More workable would be to set up some means of sharing your phone's account with your camera.

0 upvotes
David Zamora
By David Zamora (Aug 30, 2012)

@ Suave Actually, this already exists and I use it now. It's called the Eye-Fi card, with built in Wi Fi. After pairing it to your phone, any time you take a shot from your DSLR or point and shoot, it will immediately pair camera-to-phone via a private wifi connection and transfer the images. I use it all the time. I actually think it's great, and although it takes about a minute, it's still very convenient. But, if you could remove this bridge altogether between the camera and phone, and just put it ALL on the camera without having to rely on the phone, I think this would truly make photography a thing of the future. This takes one more step of workflow out of the picture > the phone. No waiting for the transfer, just immediately edit the photo on the camera (if needed), bring up the camera app for Facebook and upload. THAT is what will bring the consumers and photography to the next level of picture taking AND sharing.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Aug 30, 2012)

Almost all the new Kindles are wi-fi only. The phone connection idea was a good way to get people to buy books, but isn't really needed now that most people who have gadgets have wi-fi at home. For cameras, a data plan is more attractive because they are often used away from home.

But it won't be long before these have phones, too. It may be a clumsy phone, but not as clumsy as carrying both a phone and a camera. The Samsung Note is doing great and it is a huge phone/tiny tablet. I will probably get one (or similar) eventually. If I can have a decent camera in my chunky device, even better. Preferably somewhere between this Samsung and Nokia's high-res sensor.

0 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Aug 30, 2012)

Why pay a separate data plan for a camera? Since most people will have their phones, they can turn that into a hotspot and connect the camera via wi-fi. Most carriers have such an option, though pricier than a single phone plan with no hotspot option (yet cheaper than paying data for two separate devices).

0 upvotes
McCool69
By McCool69 (Aug 31, 2012)

>> Why pay a separate data plan for a camera?

You guys really need to shake up the carriers in the US. Some of the limitations they have (in order to make money) is mind-boggling for us that live in other countries.

Where I live (Norway) I can tether any device to my cell phone via wi-fi to get access to the internet and don't have to pay a cent for making that connection in itself.

And if I have a second or third device (typically a tablet - or maybe a camera like this) I pay USD 5 extra a month for an extra simcard and it all runs on my main phone account without any extra charges than that small monthly fee.

Of course any data traffic generated by the tethered devices or devices that use a second or third sim card is paid in the same way as if the phone itself generated the traffic.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
svegress
By svegress (Aug 30, 2012)

I have been using a Galaxy SII for about six months now as my main camera. The best feature is that because it looks like a phone, no one takes much notice of you even if you have your camera pointing directly at them. For candid photos it has worked a treat. And I have found the software apps excellent and evolving. I do three shot HDR, timelase, all kinds off effects and even cropping. As I come within range of a wifi, it starts automatically uploading my photos to Google+ ready for me to send.
Where it fails is in the mechanics of the camera itself. Although better than an iPhone, it still has a large pink tinge at the centre of the each shot--you only notice it against a strong white background. When you are taking photos for publication this is a serious matter. Any camera/phone combo is going to be flawed at the current level of technology but what we have in this seems to be the best available at present.
Question: how much and what is the battery life?.

1 upvote
hladacik
By hladacik (Aug 30, 2012)

Canon 1D X with Android??? :-)
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151010435060995&set=a.383999600994.168661.106593340994&type=1&theater

0 upvotes
Kiefmo
By Kiefmo (Aug 30, 2012)

Oh wow... my Instagram photos are going to look SO good now [joking]!

Anyway, this is the next logical step from wi-fi cameras, right? Instead of bieng limited to available, open wi-fi networks, you're connected [potentially] anywhere.

This is how camera manufacturers take amateur photography back from cell phones -- by offering the ability to instantly share in a manner with which they are already familiar?

Downsides? Effing data plan costs to take advantage of the camera's capabilities -- although, if I had this thing, I'd go back to a cheap just-a-phone and make this my only "smart" device. I wonder if it will be available with radios for all carriers.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
camillako
By camillako (Aug 30, 2012)

gentlemen, this is the future.

all cameras will have to be "connected" in the very same manner as they all now have video mode.

4 upvotes
Greg Gebhardt
By Greg Gebhardt (Aug 30, 2012)

Is there a phone built in? LOL!

0 upvotes
Thomas Hnig
By Thomas Hnig (Aug 30, 2012)

Simply add a motion detector as trigger and it gets a game camera with dircet upload. And because images could be saved immediately out of reach of the triggering subject it seems perfect for burglar alarm and capture.

0 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Aug 30, 2012)

Cant understand what Nikon and Samsung want to do with this, if they are serious then why don't they put a phone in it............

1 upvote
walkerr
By walkerr (Aug 30, 2012)

You're joking right?

.... a 3G + Wi-Fi model and a 4G + Wi-Fi variant (carrier and regional information TBC) ....

0 upvotes
PJInTheUSA
By PJInTheUSA (Aug 30, 2012)

Yes but no phone. i.e. no voice capability only data. That is strange.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Essai
By Essai (Aug 30, 2012)

strange ??? Its a camera, not a phone ! You want your camera to be ON all the time ? Not me. I barely make 2 days on a charge with my S3

0 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Aug 30, 2012)

The camera part wouldn't be on all the time. There would be no significant effect on battery life when you weren't taking pictures, and not much more then than using it for apps.

Displays still use the great majority of the power. Even with an efficient OLED display, over 80% of the juice of my phone goes to the display. I like the rgbw display idea Sony uses. It can give both increased brightness outdoors and improved efficiency. The idea is old, but was never widely used. Probably because it only applies to LCD displays and the companies all figured we'd have migrated to OLED by now. Too bad they aren't bright enough for direct sunlight.

0 upvotes
walkerr
By walkerr (Aug 31, 2012)

Maybe not a phone in conventional sense - but if it has 3g/4g and Android you have Skype, numerous VoIP solutions (which actually I find better than Skype), plus WhatsApp (which I also prefer to SMS).

Conventional phone - no - phone of the future, maybe IMO

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
OutdoorArt
By OutdoorArt (Aug 31, 2012)

Has no one heard of VOIP? That's all I use on my gs2.

0 upvotes
JohnnyWashngo
By JohnnyWashngo (Aug 30, 2012)

This is the future of photography and I am looking forward to giving it a go.

Bravo to Samsung for seeing that Cameras need to be Internet connected in order to move forward. They are not the first to do so, but I reckon they will be the first to actually pull it off with any real success.

The Android OS is proving to a real jack of all trades and I think OEM manufacturers are really benefiting from the cost savings made by not having to develop their own OSes as well as the developer ecosystem that Android provides. As an Android developer myself, I can't wait to start writing code for a camera :)

As much as I love my 5DM3, and I do love it very much, I would love to have a decent, pocketable camera that I can snaps shots with and upload to my GDrive or SkyDrive or whatever. How long until Android OS makes its way into more professional cameras?

6 upvotes
EasyClick
By EasyClick (Aug 30, 2012)

I agree. This is the future of cameras but not entirely convinced about using Android as operating system. For me, it would just be wifi/3G connectivity to upload to an account. I think innovations will have to come from connectivity and integration.

2 upvotes
GMart
By GMart (Aug 30, 2012)

Nikon will be raging.....lol

0 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Aug 30, 2012)

So you aim for a nice shot, have the subject in focus, and someone calls you at that very moment and your reminder goes off too — the camera darkens the screen, starts ringing and vibrating, pops out a few dialogues:
-Answer
-Cancel
-OK
-Reschedule appointment
-Focus again
-Cancel the shot
-Text the model
And the answering machine in camera activates: "You have reached the camera of Mr Joe Photographer. He is currently experiencing some difficulties, so leave your aperture number and bu**er off by the fastest shutter speed possible".

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
twadger
By twadger (Aug 30, 2012)

Might as well stick a phone in it and have done, with Apple's permission of course......

4 upvotes
Justin Francis
By Justin Francis (Aug 30, 2012)

Nikon can't seem to do anything right lately.

0 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Aug 30, 2012)

Their DSLRs are top class
Their P&S are POS

1 upvote
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Aug 30, 2012)

O and Samsung makes world class P&S ?...LOL

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
kff
By kff (Aug 30, 2012)

apparently the first step before it dares to give more professional machines, I applaud JB, Nikon obviously does not understand that it depends on OS ... API allows to control if really all camera parameters and lens external programs, we can not wait to see huge steps in the development and user features of sw ... otherwise the sensor is small, not only in this Nokia is on, but let's take it just as a first step, if it starts an interest in the development of new software and designing new features outside of the manufacturer, eg in a stacked macro from multiple exposures are certain possibilities etc.

0 upvotes
TacticDesigns
By TacticDesigns (Aug 30, 2012)

This looks like one really fun camera. A super compact. Take a picture and be able to play around with it right away. [With better IQ than your smartphone] Whether you're waiting at a bus stop. Or when you're bored at some lecture. No waiting until you get back to your computer. And . . . once you're done playing with the picture, why not upload it right away. What's not to like? It's a camera that can keep up with you.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Nic Walmsley
By Nic Walmsley (Aug 30, 2012)

Sorry for the sexual metaphor, but it is the easiest way to explain

I want the love child of an iPhone, an XZ-1, and an Olympus Tough. Don't care if it is chunky.

Apple or Olympus, please make one.

4 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Aug 30, 2012)

Now see. Samsung manages to make the latest Android version run on their newest product. Nikon couldn't. (Nikon Coolpix S800c = Android 2.3)

But ... while the idea of a modern strongly internet connected camera is nice in some way it competes with all the smartphones out there. I'm afraid it will loose that competition.

0 upvotes
Suave
By Suave (Aug 30, 2012)

It might, but I think - let's have them a go at it.

0 upvotes
MichaelEchos
By MichaelEchos (Aug 30, 2012)

If the next generation allows call just like smart phones, while making it thinner, it could appeal to many people. Having a control ring and an extra function button works well too. If they could extend the grip to the thickness of the lens (which increases the size of the battery too), then it would be much more usable. There doesn't seem to be a way to insert a neck/hand strap either. Increase the aperture/sensor size, decrease the zoom range.

But there's nothing much we could complain. It is currently the best phone+camera hybrid in the market.

0 upvotes
J R R S
By J R R S (Aug 30, 2012)

Yes but this is just the start...

get android behind a big sensor and some good glass - and you will even be able to see the future!

0 upvotes
yudhir
By yudhir (Aug 30, 2012)

I like this: http://www.dpreview.com/news/2009/09/29/samsungamoled12m
Camera More

0 upvotes
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Aug 30, 2012)

This is proof that we live in a era of smart phones and stupid people

4 upvotes
swhs
By swhs (Aug 30, 2012)

And yet another infantile meaningless comment. I have not seen anything useful from you ever. In one of your comments below you whine about the USSR, you whine again about 'Samsuck'. Moderators: Please ban this troll!

9 upvotes
Nic Walmsley
By Nic Walmsley (Aug 30, 2012)

stupid people can't use smart phones, maybe

1 upvote
Boerseuntjie
By Boerseuntjie (Aug 30, 2012)

I have been banned and 75% of the comment here are infantile and meaningless just like this camera/phone, likewise I have never seen anything remotely intelligent come out of your mouth swhs

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
plasnu
By plasnu (Aug 30, 2012)

Smart phone means the phone is smarter than its user.

0 upvotes
swhs
By swhs (Aug 30, 2012)

> likewise I have never seen anything remotely intelligent come out of your mouth swhs

Mods, please ban this moron.

And FYI Boerseuntjie, your view about my writings is of no value whatsoever.

Comment edited 53 seconds after posting
1 upvote
robjons
By robjons (Aug 30, 2012)

Every Samsung product I have ever used has had stupidly illogical UI. That plus mediocre quality and their blatant rip off of other companies (Apple of course) is enough to never come near one of their products. Have some integrity, look elsewhere.

5 upvotes
kevin camera
By kevin camera (Aug 30, 2012)

i guess this camera phone was a straight rip-off from apple, just like the galaxy note :D

7 upvotes
normansun123
By normansun123 (Aug 30, 2012)

Robjons,
You are seriously pathetic.

5 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

The Apple Freakshow is about to be started, folks.

0 upvotes
robjons
By robjons (Aug 30, 2012)

Pathetic because I have an opinion about a company’s poorly thought-out products? I ‘m no apologist for Apple (except I do appreciate Job’s product integrity attitude as opposed to most U.S. CEOs who can’t see past next year’s P&L statement). But regardless of what you think of Apple, Samsung still has all the creativity of a herd of sheep.

1 upvote
Suave
By Suave (Aug 30, 2012)

You do know that with minimal technical knowledge you can put pretty much whatever UI you might want on any Samsung android device?

1 upvote
Caleido
By Caleido (Aug 30, 2012)

I guess very very few people share your opinion. This camera is equipped with the latest version of the most popular and most sold smartphone OS on the planet.
And don't get us started on your claim that Samsung copies everything. How you can shout about Samsung not being creative in a comment about a product that is the first of its kind, is completely ridiculous.

I guess companies suing others for having smartphones with round corners - even if everyone else already produced smartphones with round corners before that - has more integrity in your view?

2 upvotes
OutdoorArt
By OutdoorArt (Aug 31, 2012)

It is rectangular with rounded corners.

0 upvotes
Koulang
By Koulang (Aug 30, 2012)

Extremely interesting!

I wish to see a higher class camera from Samsung with equivalent sensor to the mirroless camera.

0 upvotes
57even
By 57even (Aug 30, 2012)

Funny, we use the word "phone" now to mean a small tablet computer that makes calls. The "phone" part is just one of many features (which ironically this camera doesn't have).

Someone really needs to redefine the category because "phone" doesn't really cut it and Galaxy Phone/Camera/Tablet is really a brand name. We need a generic name for devices which are cloud connected.

I'm all for convergence myself, but I can also see the need and advantage in specialised tools as well. I don't really agree with Sunhong Lim. You only need one "cloud hub" which could be a tablet or a smartphone, and connect to it via USB or wifi or bluetooth.

However it seems that the P&S is not going to be replaced by smart phones after all. Rather the two will converge into a single device. This is going to really challenge those companies with no imaging patents....let me see....who may they be?

2 upvotes
Johannes Zander
By Johannes Zander (Aug 30, 2012)

Phocata
Tacafo
Catafo
???

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
historianx
By historianx (Aug 30, 2012)

ruh roh it's white lawyers on the ready...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
NeilBart
By NeilBart (Aug 30, 2012)

Good device for business use. This full specification camera combined with image, text and data capture using Mobile Data Studio will be excellent for home inspections, safety audits, graffiti logging, environmental surveys, person ID and similar mobile data requirements where smartphone cameras are often weak. Well done Samsung.

2 upvotes
McCool69
By McCool69 (Aug 31, 2012)

Indeed - it can even be set up to automatically upload the photos to cloud-based services like DropBox.

I think this is the first step of a natural progression; even pro photographers that does press work would surely prefer to do a quick crop and rough adjustments out in the field - and then send it to the editor 30 secs after taking the shot - without doing the extra step of having to transfer the photo(s) to their portable PC first.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Ocean View
By Ocean View (Aug 30, 2012)

This is innovating on top of existing ideas and technology.
Screw you Apple!
I'm definitely gonna get this camera to replace my P&S camera.

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
10 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (Aug 30, 2012)

The backside looks remarkably similar to iphone. Sue Samsung again, Apple please. haha.

0 upvotes
Rooru S
By Rooru S (Aug 30, 2012)

Yeah, right, because any apple product has 3 touch buttons under the display. Yeah... (a lot of crap comments over here just because Samsung lost a battle in US soil...)

5 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Aug 30, 2012)

What, Apple? Are they still in business?

0 upvotes
Wye Photography
By Wye Photography (Aug 30, 2012)

Where have you been Francis - in Prison? Apple rule the planet. Welcome to Apple World.

At least the Samsung/Apple battle is the only battle the Americans can win nowadays (not including Alien invasions (and I don't mean Mexicans there either)).

Jesting aside, no doubt the Solicitors are revving up again! Something innovative and original from Samsung! I wonder how badly it will bomb. I mean if you are a smart phone photographer why buy another piece of tech? I suppose, smart phone in one pocket this camera in the other. Two pockets - makes sense!

0 upvotes
Greynerd
By Greynerd (Aug 30, 2012)

I think this must be America's tactic to pay off its huge debt. Patent the mundane and obvious and sue foreign companies in its home courts with local juries with predictable outcomes.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Charlie Jin
By Charlie Jin (Aug 30, 2012)

Good for Android users.
But I am sort of tied to Apple. I already bought so many
picture editing/filter Apps, and have more than 60 such apps
in my collection for my iPad and iPhone. Now, I rarely need to
use PhotoShop, since apps in iOS are so diverse. I only need to
know which apps can do which better.

I wish Apple also come up with iCamera or something like that.
The only thing I can do now is I use Sony RX100 with Eye-Fi and
transfer the images to my iPhone and iPad.
Too bad that most apps in iOS don't support the high resolution
images yet :-(

2 upvotes
McCool69
By McCool69 (Aug 31, 2012)

Good points - and you are pointing out the exact reason why it makes a lot of sense to base a 'real' camera on a mobile OS. It gives you access to a wealth of options and apps connected to photography and movie recording instead of having to work with just the camera makers often limited software.

0 upvotes
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