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DxO Optics Pro 7.5.2 gains Olympus E-M5 and Panasonic GF5 support

By dpreview staff on Jul 11, 2012 at 13:00 GMT

DxO Labs has released DxO Optics Pro v7.5.2, with this latest update adding support for the Olympus OM-D E-M5 and Panasonic DMC-GF5. The addition means the software can now process files from all Panasonic's Micro Four Thirds cameras. In addition, v7.5.2 brings support for Panasonic's CMOS-based DMC-FZ150 superzoom. As usual, a 30-day free trial is available and the update is free for all Optics Pro 7 customers and anyone who bought Optics Pro 6 after September 1st 2011.


Press Release:

DxO Optics Pro v7.5.2 supports the Olympus OM-D EM-5 and includes more than 300 new DxO Optics Modules

11 July 2012 - DxO Labs announces the immediate availability of DxO Optics Pro v7.5.2 for Mac and Windows, its image processing software of reference for serious amateur and professional photographers. This update means that DxO Optics Pro 7 now supports the latest high-end micro 4/3 camera from Olympus, the OM-D EM-5. DxO Optics Pro v7.5.2 also supports the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 as well as the Lumix DMC-GF5, thus covering the entire range of Panasonic hybrid micro 4/3 cameras.

More than 300 new DxO Optics Modules

DxO Optics Pro v7.5.2 also benefits from the constant enrichment of its DxO Optics Module library, which now counts over 7,000 available modules.

Since the previous release, DxO laboratories have calibrated more than 300 new camera/lens combinations for DxO Optics Pro 7. These modules support additional Canon, Minolta, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina, and Zeiss lenses for numerous Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax, and Sony cameras.

Availability and prices

The Standard and Elite editions of DxO Optics Pro 7 for Mac and Windows are available for purchase in DxO Labs' online store (www.dxo.com) and at photo resellers, at the following prices:

USD:

  • DxO Optics Pro 7 Standard Edition: $ 169
  • DxO Optics Pro 7 Elite Edition: $ 299

EUR:

  • DxO Optics Pro 7 Standard Edition: 149 €
  • DxO Optics Pro 7 Elite Edition: 299 €
    (Suggested retail prices, including VAT)

BGP:

  • DxO Optics Pro 7 Standard Edition: £ 135
  • DxO Optics Pro 7 Elite Edition: £ 269
    (Suggested retail prices, including VAT)

This upgrade is free for all owners of DxO Optics Pro 7, as well as for photographers who purchased a license for DxO Optics Pro 6 after September 1, 2011.

A fully-functional trial version of DxO Optics Pro 7, good for one month, is available on the DxO Labs website (http://www.dxo.com/intl/photo/free_trial_version).

Comments

Total comments: 25
dkadc
By dkadc (Jul 12, 2012)

Detail Man, at some point companies will stop writing code that runs on obsolete operating systems. Windows XP is now an obsolete OS.

There's no excuse for companies to sell software that doesn't take advantage of 64 bit processors and 64 bit operating systems. Photo and video editing software are two of the best examples of software that show huge performance gains running in 64 bits.

Microsoft stopped offering full support for Windows XP over THREE years ago, except for once a month security updates. And even that low level of support ends in less than two years.

32 bit OS's were great in their day, but that era is over, just like the 16 bit era is over. Its time to update your hardware so you can run new software.

2 upvotes
Detail Man
By Detail Man (Jul 12, 2012)

An inspirational oration about how other people's resident 32-bit Operating Systems may no longer seem relevant to some (though MS supports WinXP SP3 into 2014, BTW), but you evidently have not noticed the fact that that (all) DxO Optics Pro Versions 7.x fully support WinXP.

Therefore, I think that your points might be said to be more relevant with reference to other subjects and discussions completely ...

BTW - If WinXP is so irrelevant, then I wonder why Adobe PS CS6 and CR 7.x (also) support it ?

"On the Windows side, minimum requirements are Windows XP with Service Pack 3, Vista Home Premium, Business, Ultimate, or Enterprise with Service Pack 2, Windows 7, or Windows 8."

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/2601746315/photoshop-cs6-beta-new-features-for-photographers/5#system

0 upvotes
Detail Man
By Detail Man (Jul 12, 2012)

What could possibly be a reasonable software development rationale for intentionally causing the newer (post-Version 7.5) DxO Optical Corrections Modules to not be viewable or download-able when using the (32-bit OS) Versions 7.x (thru Version 7.23). ???

Regarding money - I paid the required cost in full for a DxO Optics Pro Versions 7.x license - and in this case I am clearly being barred from being able to utilize the functionality which I have already paid DxO Labs (in full) for.

If the explanation is something on the order of, "we had to make the new DxO Optical Corrections Modules compatible with 64-bit code only", that makes no sense - as Versions 7.5.x are said to (also) run on 32-bit OSs.

Further, the DxO Optical Corrections Modules created since the release of Version 7.0 and Version 7.23 run fine on Versions 7.5.x, do they not ?

I am unconvinced that this "32-bit lock-out" is anything but arbitrary and senseless.

Please give me an answer that makes rational sense. Thanks

0 upvotes
Detail Man
By Detail Man (Jul 11, 2012)

Axel,

Had a look at my DxO Optics Pro 7.23 installation. According to DxO Labs, I have full rights to obtain an activation-code for Version 7.5.x and later 7.x versions.

Because I have a 32-bit WinXP Pro OS, and 3 GB maximum amount of addressable RAM, I have no desire at all to install a likely more code-intensive and RAM-hungry (7.5.x) version that does me no good on a 32-bit OS. I see *nothing* substantial regarding the actual processing functionality added.

In the case of Versions 7.x, DxO Labs' motivation for denying Version 6.x users access to newer DxO Optical Corrections Modules was obvious - money. Forcing users to upgrade resulted in more sales. OK. So I paid DxO Labs for a Version 7.x license.

I see that my installed Version 7.23 is clearly "locked out" of access to all of the post-Version 7.5.x DxO Modules. This cannot be about money - it could be for *no other reason* than to irritate users.

This "32-bit lock-out" represents very poor planning in software development !

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Axel from DxO Labs
By Axel from DxO Labs (Jul 12, 2012)

Hi Detail Man,

I wanted to reassure you about the memory and processing power requirements of DxO Optics Pro v7.5.x 32 bits: it isn't more resource hungry than the previous version. We even see some performance improvments on some systems. So, there is no risk for you to upgrade to the latest version.
The only limitation of the 32 bits versions is that they can't handle the D800/D800E files: the RAW files are simply too large.

Enjoy DxO Optics Pro 7.5,

Axel

1 upvote
Detail Man
By Detail Man (Jul 12, 2012)

Hello Axel,

You have not answered any of my questions asked as to: by what possible reasonable rationale has DxO Labs deliberately chosen to lock Version 7.0 - 7.23 users out of access to DxO Optical Corrections Modules released after the release of Version 7.5 ?

This makes no sense at all. It cannot be about money - I already own a Versions 7.x license. Please explain why it would be that the newer Modules are completely inaccessible (and thus unusable) when using my Version 7.23 ?

Axel: "I wanted to reassure you about the memory and processing power requirements of DxO Optics Pro v7.5.x 32 bits: it isn't more resource hungry than the previous version. We even see some performance improvments on some systems. So, there is no risk for you to upgrade to the latest version."

If I were to activate a Version 7.5.x installation with required new Activation Code, and then discover that I would prefer instead to revert to a Version 7.23 installation, will the Pace Anti-Piracy allow that ?

0 upvotes
Axel from DxO Labs
By Axel from DxO Labs (Jul 13, 2012)

Hi,

Indeed I didn't address this question: the reason why some modules are only available for version 7.5.x is that they use some features added to this version. We are making backward-compatible modules (for v6.6 and v7.2.3) when possible, but it's not always possible.
Your question about rolling back to v7.2.3 after installing v7.5 is very valid, but not for copy protection reason, which will work.
If you have projects in you database or if you don't use the sidecars, make sure to back up your database before installing v7.5 because it will be converted in a format that isn't compatible with 7.2.3. Normally it is saved automatically but it will be easier to find if you back it up manually in a folder you choose (File>Database>Create a backup).

Hope this helps,

Axel

1 upvote
Detail Man
By Detail Man (Jul 16, 2012)

"... the reason why some modules are only available for version 7.5.x is that they use some features added to this version."

I do not know of a single example of the addition in Versions 7.5.x of any "feature" (in the sense of actual operational functionality as a RAW processor; separate from camera/lens compatibility). Please provide specific examples.

"We are making backward-compatible modules (for v6.6 and v7.2.3) when possible, but it's not always possible."

I do not know of any cases of a (post - Version 7.0 released) DxO Module provided for the use of DOP 6.6 users. Please provide specific examples. Please also provide specific examples for DOP 7.23 users.

Please explain (specifically) why providing such backwards-compatability would not be (technically) possible" ?

After paying DxO Labs in full for a Versions 7.x license, it appears to me that legitimate and obvious customer needs and concerns are of a very low priority at DxO Labs.

Prove me wrong with actions (not words).

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Detail Man
By Detail Man (Jul 26, 2012)

As I stated over two weeks ago, Axel, please (DxO Labs) prove me wrong with actual and tangible actions (not more mere words).

0 upvotes
Vasyl Tsvirkunov
By Vasyl Tsvirkunov (Jul 11, 2012)

Lens support for OM-D is still spotty, there are only 8 lenses in the first batch, from the looks of it. Even 12-50 did not make a cut and for this particular lens a good profile can make a big difference. At least, 20/1.7 and 45/1.8 are there, that should make a lot of people happy. Oly 14-150 and 40-150 also got into the first batch.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jul 11, 2012)

And still no Samsung NX cameras, does DXO open Leica M9 DNGs yet?

0 upvotes
Onur Otlu
By Onur Otlu (Jul 11, 2012)

The lenses list does not include Sony. Can DxO provide lens corrections for NEX bodies with E-mount lenses?

0 upvotes
Axel from DxO Labs
By Axel from DxO Labs (Jul 12, 2012)

Hi Onur,

DxO Optics Pro does support a lot of Sony NEXs cameras and lenses. And, most of the ones not yet supported should arrive in the near future. For more details about the specific models supported, you can check this page:
http://dxo.com/intl/photo/dxo_optics_pro/for_your_equipment

All the best,

Axel

0 upvotes
Onur Otlu
By Onur Otlu (Jul 23, 2012)

Hello Axel,

Thank you for the reply. I see that combinations of NEX bodies and Sony lenses are well supported, and I believe support for a few most popular 3rd party lenses will also arrive.

0 upvotes
federanghino
By federanghino (Jul 11, 2012)

Hallelujah!!! Maybe DXO have finally tested the OM-D EM-5?!

4 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Jul 11, 2012)

They should have. Otherwise they would release untested feature. The question is why DxOMark does not publish the results from DxO Labs?

0 upvotes
Starred
By Starred (Jul 11, 2012)

How does this software compare to Lightroom?

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jul 11, 2012)

In a nutshell, very favourably. I tried it at the same time I demo'ed Lr4. At first I found Lr to be superior, but with time I found myself going back to the retouches I had made with the pro 7 and trying to duplicate the results with Lr.
Don't get me wrong, Lr is a very powerful tool and will give you an extra degree of control, as opposed to the automation of DxO (which you can bypass anyway). It is also faster than DxO in everything except final processing and saving the new files. But you can get it free for a 31-day trial, so ultimately it's you who'll have to find the answer to your own question...

1 upvote
Nikonworks
By Nikonworks (Jul 11, 2012)

I use it daily. No memory slowdowns/crashes like LR.

Note: this article's statement that it can process 'all om-5, etc. images' is incorrect.

DXO can only process images for which it has included both a body and a specific lens combination.

And now at 64 bits, fantastic.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jul 11, 2012)

It's not true that Pro 7 can only process images taken by the cameras and lenses included in their modules; if there's no module, some corrections will not be automatically applied, but they can be made manually. As long as the software recognizes the body, all corrections are possible - albeit some of them, like distortion and chromatic aberrations, will have to be introduced manually. (I know it - I process photos taken with an Olympus E-P1 and old, MF lenses.)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Nikonworks
By Nikonworks (Jul 12, 2012)

It IS true.
You proved it.
For DXO to work you had to create your own lens preset.

This is not a criticism, just a fact that DPReview's statement is incorrect.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jul 12, 2012)

"DXO can only process images for which it has included both a body and a specific lens combination."
That's what you wrote, Nikonworks. What I replied is that Pro 7 WILL process images as long as the camera is on the database. If you want to take complication one step further, you can create your own presets, but the absence of automatic corrections doesn't mean the images can't be edited, as you seemed to imply. Actually, you can even process JPEGs with this thing - but of course you'll be missing some functionalities that are RAW only.

1 upvote
Nikonworks
By Nikonworks (Jul 12, 2012)

You are missing the 'Automatic' processing of DXO.

Seems they changed the wording in the article above.

0 upvotes
Axel from DxO Labs
By Axel from DxO Labs (Jul 12, 2012)

Hi,

I can confirm that as long as the body is supported by a DxO Optics Pro version, its pictures can be processed. A few corrections will not be automatically applied if the lens itself wasn't calibrated with this body.

Hope this help,

Axel

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jul 13, 2012)

It does, Axel. Thanks for the input.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 25